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Viewing 181 to 210 of 43870
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1800
Robert White
Abstract Several analytical tools exist for estimating a driveshaft’s critical speed, from simple elementary beam theory to sophisticated FEA models. Ultimately, nothing is better than a test, because no one will argue with the outcome from a well-designed measurement. Impact response measurements are easy, but they tend to over predict the critical speed. A test which sweeps the shaft speed up until failure is telling, but the speed causing failure is strongly dependent on even small amounts of variation in rotor unbalance. Waterfall plots of shaft displacement measurements offer the best indication of critical speed, however sometimes the resonance isn’t unmistakable or multiple resonances exist, making the critical speed unclear. A method less susceptible to system variation is offered here, fitting shaft orbit measurements to the theoretical single degree of freedom equation.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1801
Sivasankaran Sadasivam, Aditya Palsule, Ekambaram Loganathan, Nagasuresh Inavolu, Jaganmohan Rao Medisetti
Abstract Powertrain is the major source of noise and vibration in commercial vehicles and has significant contribution on both interior and exterior noise levels. It is vital to reduce the radiated noise from powertrain to meet customer expectations of vehicle comfort and to abide by the legislative noise requirements. Sound intensity mapping technique can identify the critical components of noise radiation from the powertrain. Sound intensity mapping has revealed that oil sump as one of the major contributors for radiated noise from powertrain. Accounting the effect of dynamic coupling of oil on the sump is crucial in predicting its noise radiation performance. Through numerical methods, some amount of work done in predicting the dynamic characteristics of structures filled with fluid.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1810
Shinichiro Kobayashi, Kenjiro Hakomoto, Kousuke Kawase, Makoto Kidokoro, Jouji Kimura
Abstract As the issue of global warming has become more serious, needs for downsizing or weight saving of an engine has been getting stronger, and forces exerted on engine parts, especially force on a crankshaft, have been getting larger and larger. In addition, since a crankshaft is a heavy engine part, needs for saving weight have been getting stronger and stronger. Therefore, determining the mechanism of high stress generation in a crankshaft system is urgently needed. This paper describes the characteristics and mechanism of a severe bending stress caused by the whirl of crankshaft rear end of an inline 6-cylinder medium-duty diesel engine. The authors measured bending stress on the fillets of the crankshaft, and found severe levels of sharp peaks in the stress curves for the crankshaft rear. To figure out why the severe levels of sharp peaks appear, they analyzed and studied the measured data.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1811
Jouji Kimura, Tatsuya Tanaka, Kenjiro Hakomoto, Kousuke Kawase, Shinichiro Kobayashi
Abstract Since the sizes of the flywheel and clutch have been enlarged due to downsizing of diesel engines, the mass and moment of inertia at the crankshaft rear end have increased. Consequently, the serious bending stresses have appeared in the crankshaft rear. This paper describes the characteristics of those serious bending stresses, based on the mechanism for whirl resonance. The whirl resonance is largely impacted by the mass of the flywheel and clutch and by the distance from the crank-journal center of the rear end to the center of gravity of the flywheel and clutch.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1808
Francis Nardella
Abstract In a previous report, it was shown that power transmission through the camshaft reduced the first mode natural frequency of the power train and translated its convergence with dominant engine excitatory harmonics to a lower engine speed resulting in a marked reduction in torsional vibration while achieving 2/1 gear reduction for a 4-stroke 6-cylinder compression ignition (CI) engine for aviation. This report describes a sweep though 2 and 4-stroke engines with differing numbers of cylinders configured as standard gear reduction (SGRE) and with power transmission through the camshaft (CDSE) or an equivalent dedicated internal driveshaft (DISE). Four and 6-cylinder 4-stroke engines were modeled as opposed boxer engines. Four and 6-cylinder 2-stroke engines and 8, 10 and 12-cylinder 2-stroke and 4-stroke engines were modeled as 180° V-engines. All 2-stroke engines were considered to be piston ported and configured as SGRE or DISE.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1809
Dhanesh Purekar
Abstract Engine noise is one of the significant aspects of product quality for light and medium duty diesel engine market applications. Gear whine is one of those noise issues, which is considered objectionable and impacts the customer’s perception of the product quality. Gear whine could result due to defects in the gear manufacturing process and/or due to inaccurate design of the gear macro and micro geometry. The focus of this technical paper is to discuss gear whine considerations from the production plant perspective. This includes quick overview of the measurement process, test cell environment, noise acceptance criteria considerations. A gear whine case study is presented based on the data collected in the test cell at the engine plant. Gear whine data acquired on current product and next generation of prototype engines is analyzed and presented. This paper concludes by highlighting the lessons learned from the case study.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1752
Kapil Gupta, Arun Choudhary, Rakesh Bidre
Abstract At present, a Dual Mass Flywheel (DMF) system is widely known to provide benefits on driveline induced noise, vibration and drivability over a Single Mass Flywheel (SMF). A well-tuned DMF provides nice isolation of torsional vibrations generated in periodic combustion process of automobile IC engines. Similarly, a torsional vibration damper mounted on driveline component reduces the torsional excitation and results a lower torsional vibration at driveline components. Noise and vibration issues like boom noise and high vibrations at low engine RPM range drive are often resulted due to high engine firing order torsional excitation input to the driveline. More often, this becomes one of the most objectionable noise and vibration issues in vehicle and should be eliminated or reduced for better NVH performance. A 4 cylinder, 4 stroke small diesel engine equipped with SMF is found to have high engine firing order torsional excitation.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1753
Jack Hall Riddle, Ya-Juan Bemman, Tom Frei, Sihui Wu, Ishang Padalkar
Abstract Demands for engines to operate at low-frequency firing order are increasing in the automotive market. This requirement is driven by consumer and regulatory demand for vehicles which are more efficient in the use of fuel. As a result, engine and transmission technologies have been developed which permit operation of engines with fewer cylinders at increasingly low RPM’s. The resulting low frequency exhaust noise is more difficult to attenuate than in vehicles in years past. At the same time, vehicles often have less packaging space for mufflers, when larger volume would otherwise be needed to attenuate at lower frequencies. A further challenge is the demand for increasingly refined performance sounds from the exhaust systems of premium cars despite the technical obstacles involved in even maintaining sound quality. Finally, legally permissible sound levels are decreasing in some markets. These market and regulatory demands require new solutions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1755
Frank C. Valeri, James T. Lagodzinski, Scott M. Reilly, John P. Miller
Abstract Hybrid powertrain vehicles inherently create discontinuous sounds during operation. The discontinuous noise created from the electrical motors during transition states are undesirable since they can create tones that do not correlate with the dynamics of the vehicle. The audible level of these motor whines and discontinuous tones can be reduced via common noise abatement techniques or reducing the amount of regeneration braking. One electronic solution which does not affect mass or fuel economy is Masking Sound Enhancement (MSE). MSE is an algorithm that uses the infotainment system to mask the naturally occurring discontinuous hybrid drive unit and driveline tones. MSE enables a variety of benefits, such as more aggressive regenerative braking strategies which yield higher levels of fuel economy and results in a more pleasing interior vehicle powertrain sound. This paper will discuss the techniques and signals used to implement MSE in a hybrid powertrain equipped vehicle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1769
Onkar Gangvekar, Santosh Deshmane
Abstract In today’s automobile market, most OEMs use manual transmission for cars. Gear Shifting is a crucial customer touch point. Any issue or inconvenience caused while shifting gears can result into customer dissatisfaction and will affect the brand image. Synchronizer is a vital subsystem for precise gear shifting mechanism. Based on vehicle application selection of synchronizer for given inertia and speed difference is a key factor which decides overall shift quality of gearbox. For more demanding driver abuse conditions like skip shifting, conventional brass synchronizers have proved inadequate for required speed difference and gear inertia, which eventually results into synchronizer crashing and affects driving performance. To increase synchronizer performance of multi-cone compact brass synchronizer, a ‘Grit blasting process’ has been added. These components tested with an accelerated test plan successfully.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1768
Yong Xu
Abstract The NVH performance is one of the most important concerns in vehicle development. For all-wheel drive (AWD) vehicles and rear-wheel (RWD) drive vehicles, prop shaft is a major transmission component which may cause various NVH problems. This paper focuses on the vehicle NVH problems caused by the second order excitation force of prop shaft. In order to control the NVH performance of the prop shaft efficiently and fundamentally, this work first studied the rotation kinematical characteristics of prop shaft. Then a rigid-elastic coupling model of vehicle driveline was built with the theory of multi-body dynamics. With this model, the sensitive factors that may affect the second order excitation force were investigated. This paper also describes a case study to verify the conclusions which are revealed from the theoretical calculation and the simulation.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1770
Wallace Hill, Dennis Kinchen, Mark A. Gehringer
Abstract This paper describes the development of an analytical method to assess and optimize halfshaft joint angles to avoid excessive 3rd halfshaft order vibrations during wide-open-throttle (WOT) and light drive-away events. The objective was to develop a test-correlated analytical model to assess and optimize driveline working angles during the virtual design phase of a vehicle program when packaging tradeoffs are decided. A twelve degree-of-freedom (12DOF) system model was constructed that comprehends halfshaft dynamic angle change, axle torque, powertrain (P/T) mount rate progression and axial forces generated by tripot type constant velocity (CV) joints. Note: “tripot” and “tripod” are alternate nomenclatures for the same type of joint. Simple lumped parameter models have historically been used for P/T mount optimization; however, this paper describes a method for using a lumped parameter model to also optimize driveline working angles.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1773
Jing Yuan
Abstract The dual phase twin synchronous drive has been developed for belt noise reduction. Two identical synchronous belts are arranged parallel side by side with one tooth staggered against other by the half pitch offset. The noise cancellation effect is achieved as one belt tooth engagement coincides with the other belt tooth dis-engagement. A center flange is used as a divider to prevent the belts contacting each other along the axial direction during their entrance and exit of the sprocket. An overall 20 [dBA] noise reduction has been achieved with the dual phase twin belt drive compared to an equal width single belt counterpart. The vibration amplitude of the hub load is also reduced which is directly correlated to the structural borne noise. Comparing to the related dual phase helical tooth belt, the dual phase twin belt is superior in torque carrying capability; and is on par with noise mitigation.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1772
Yawen Wang, Xuan Li, Guan Qiao, Teik Lim
Abstract The prediction and control of gear vibration and noise has become very important in the design of a quiet, high-quality gearbox systems. The vibratory energy of the gear pair caused by transmission error excitation is transmitted structurally through shaft-bearing-housing assembly and radiates off from exterior housing surface. Most of the previous studies ignore the contribution of components flexibility to the transmission error (TE) and system dynamic responses. In this study, a system level model of axle system with hypoid gear pair is developed, aiming at investigating the effect of the elasticity of the shafts, bearings and housing on TE as well as the contribution of flexible bearings on the dynamic responses. The load distribution results and gear transmission errors are calculated and compared between different assumptions on the boundary conditions.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1774
Fabio Luis Marques dos Santos, Tristan Enault, Jan Deleener, Tom Van Houcke
Abstract The increasing pressure on fuel economy has brought car manufacturers to implement solutions that improve vehicle efficiency, such as downsized engines, cylinder deactivation and advanced torque lock-up strategies. However, these solutions have a major drawback in terms of noise and vibration comfort. Downsized engines and lock-up strategies lead to the use of the engine at lower RPMs, and the reduced number of cylinders generates higher torque irregularities. Since the torque generated by the engine is transferred through flexible elements (clutch, torsional damper, gearbox, transmission, tire), these also impact the energy that is transferred to the vehicle body and perceived by the driver. This phenomenon leads to low frequency behavior, for instance booming noise and vibration. This paper presents a combined test and CAE modelling approach (1D/3D) to reverse engineer a vehicle equipped with a CPVA (centrifugal pendulum vibration absorber).
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1777
Thomas Wellmann, Kiran Govindswamy, Dean Tomazic
Abstract The automotive industry continues to develop new technologies aimed at reducing overall vehicle level fuel consumption. Powertrain and driveline related technologies will play a key role in helping OEM’s meet fleet CO2 reduction targets for 2025 and beyond. Specifically, use of technologies such as downsized engines, idle start-stop systems, aggressive torque converter lock-up schedules, wide-ratio spread transmissions, and electrified propulsion systems are vital towards meeting aggressive fuel economy targets. Judicious combinations of such powertrain and driveline technology packages in conjunction with measures such as the use of low rolling resistance tires and vehicle lightweighting will be required to meet future OEM fleet CO2 targets. Many of the technologies needed for meeting the fuel economy and CO2 targets come with unique NVH challenges. In order to ensure customer acceptance of new vehicles, it is imperative that these NVH challenges be understood and solved.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1778
Enrico Galvagno, Antonio Tota, Mauro Velardocchia, Alessandro Vigliani
Abstract This paper explores the potentiality of reducing noise and vibration of a vehicle transmission thanks to powertrain control integration with active braking. Due to external disturbances, coming from the driver, e.g. during tip-in / tip-out maneuvers, or from the road, e.g. crossing a speed bump or driving on a rough road, the torsional backlashes between transmission rotating components (gears, synchronizers, splines, CV joints), may lead to NVH issues known as clonk. This study initially focuses on the positive effect on transmission NVH performance of a concurrent application of a braking torque at the driving wheels and of an engine torque increase during these maneuvers; then a powertrain/brake integrated control strategy is proposed. The braking system is activated in advance with respect to the perturbation and it is deactivated immediately after to minimize losses.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1779
Xianwu Yang, Jian Pang, Lanjun Wang, Xiong Tian, Yu Tang
Abstract With drastically reduction of engine noise, the gear rattle noise generated by the impact between neutral gears inside transmission can be much easily perceived. It is well known that the torsional mode has a direct relationship with the transmission gear rattle noise. This paper establishes a torsional model of a front wheel drive automotive drivetrain, including clutch system, transmission box and equivalent load of a full vehicle, in AMESim software. The experimental engine speed fluctuations at different gears are used to excite the torsional model. The influences of several parameters, including flywheel inertia, clutch stiffness, clutch hysteresis and drive shaft stiffness, on the 2nd order (major engine firing order for a 4-cylinder-4-stroke engine) torsional resonant frequency and the 2nd order torsional resonant peak of the transmission input shaft are analyzed by changing them alternatively.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1780
Yong Xu
Abstract In the design or match process of vehicle powertrain system, gearbox rattle is a common NVH problem which directly affects passengers’ judgment on the quality and performance of vehicle. During the development process of a passenger car, prototype vehicles have serious gear rattle problem. In order to efficiently and fundamentally control this problem, this work first studied the characteristics and mechanisms of the gearbox rattle. The study results revealed that the torsional vibration of powertrain system was the root cause of gearbox rattle. Then a simulation model of the full vehicle was built with the aid of Simulink® toolbox, which is a graphical extension to MATLAB® for modeling and simulation of variety of systems. With this model, the sensitivity analysis and parametrical optimization were performed, and the simulation results indicated that the dual-mass flywheel (DMF) was the best measure to control the rattle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1782
Jobin Puthuparampil, Henry Pong, Pierre Sullivan
Abstract Large-scale emergency or off-grid power generation is typically achieved through diesel or natural gas generators. To meet governmental emission requirements, emission control systems (ECS) are required. In operation, effective control over the generator’s acoustic emission is also necessary, and can be accomplished within the ECS system. Plug flow mufflers are commonly used, as they provide a sufficient level of noise attenuation in a compact structure. The key design parameter is the transmission loss of the muffler, as this dictates the level of attenuation at a given frequency. This work implements an analytically decoupled solution, using multiple perforate impedance models, through the transfer matrix method (TMM) to predict the transmission loss based on the muffler geometry. An equivalent finite element model is implemented for numerical simulation. The analytical results and numerical results are then evaluated against experimental data from literature.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1892
Yosuke Tanabe, Masanori Watanabe, Takafumi Hara, Katsuhiro Hoshino, Akira Inoue, Masaru Yamasaki
Abstract Predicting the vibration of a motor gearbox assembly driven by a PWM inverter in the early stages of development is demanding because the assembly is one of the dominant noise sources of electric vehicles (EVs). In this paper, we propose a simulation model that can predict the transient vibration excited by gear meshing, reaction force from the mount, and electromagnetic forces including the carrier frequency component of the inverter up to 10 kHz. By utilizing the techniques of structural model reduction and state space modeling, the proposed model can predict the vibration of assembly in the operating condition with a system level EV simulator. A verification test was conducted to compare the simulation results with the running test results of the EV.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1907
Yang Wang, Yong Xu, Xiao Tan
Abstract The vibration isolation performance of vehicle powertrain mounting system is mostly determined by the three-directional stiffness of each mount block. Because of the manufacturing tolerance and the coupling effect, the stiffness of mounts cannot be maintained stable. The purpose of this study was to find out the way to optimize the stiffness of mounts via the design of experiments (DOE). According to the DOE process, a full factorial design was implemented. The z-direction stiffness of three mount blocks in the mounting system was selected as the three analysis factors. The maximum and the minimum stiffness of each mount block within the manufacturing tolerance were selected as the two levels. The measured vibration of vehicle body under certain loading case was selected as the response factor. After eight times of experiment, the DOE parameters were analyzed with statistical methods.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1867
Mustafa Tosun, Mehdi Yildiz, Aytekin Ozkan
Abstract Structure borne noises can be transmitted to interior cabin via physical connections by gearbox as well as other active components. Experimental Transfer Path Analysis (TPA) Methods are utilized to investigate main paths of vibrations which are eventually perceived as noise components inside the cabin. For identifying the structure and air borne noise transfer paths in a system, Matrix Inversion (MI), Mount Stiffness (MS), Operational Transfer Path Analysis (OTPA) and Operational Path Analysis with Exogenous Inputs (OPAX) Methods exist. In this study, contribution ranking of transmission paths from active system components through the physical connections into the interior cabin are investigated by MI and OPAX Methods and finally a comparison of them is presented based on the accuracy of obtained results. The modifications are applied on dominant transfer paths which are determined by the mentioned methods above, respectively.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1865
Peter Van der Linden, Frank Daenen, Masashi Komada, Hideto Ogawa
Abstract The tendency for car engines to reduce the cylinder number and increase the specific torque at low rpm has led to significantly higher levels of low frequency pulsation from the exhaust tailpipe. This is a challenge for exhaust system design, and equally for body design and vehicle integration. The low frequency panel noise contributions were identified using pressure transmissibility and operational sound pressure on the exterior. For this the body was divided into patches. For all patches the pressure transmissibility across the body panels into the interior was measured as well as the sound field over the entire surface of the vehicle body. The panel contributions, the pressure distribution and transmissibility distribution information were combined with acoustic modal analysis in the cabin, providing a better understanding of the airborne transfer.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1875
Martino Pigozzi, Flavio Faccioli, Carlo Ubertino, Davide Allegro, Daniel Zeni
Abstract Within recent years, passenger comfort has become a main focus of the automotive industry. The topic is directly connected with acoustics, since sounds and noises have a major impact on the well-being of vehicle occupants. So-called “noise control” focuses on directly optimizing acoustic comfort by implementing innovative materials or geometries for automotive components and systems. One possibility to optimize the acoustics within a vehicle is connected to the phenomenon of sloshing in Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) tanks. Sloshing is a noise which is generated during normal driving situations by the motion of the Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) in the tank. Until now, no procedure for measuring sloshing noise in SCR tanks has been defined, and neither a specific acoustic target which the SCR tanks need to fulfil.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1874
Tongyang Shi, Yangfan Liu, J Stuart Bolton, Frank Eberhardt, Warner Frazer
Abstract Wideband Acoustical Holography (WBH), which is a monopole-based, equivalent source procedure (J. Hald, “Wideband Acoustical Holography,” INTER-NOISE 2014), has proven to offer accurate noise source visualization results in experiments with a simple noise source: e.g., a loudspeaker (T. Shi, Y. Liu, J.S. Bolton, “The Use of Wideband Holography for Noise Source Visualization”, NOISE-CON 2016). From a previous study, it was found that the advantage of this procedure is the ability to optimize the solution in the case of an under-determined system: i.e., when the number of measurements is much smaller than the number of parameters that must be estimated in the model. In the present work, a diesel engine noise source was measured by using one set of measurements from a thirty-five channel combo-array placed in front of the engine.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1871
Nobutaka Tsujiuchi, Masahiro Akei, Akihito Ito, Daisuke Kubota, Koichi Osamura
Abstract This paper describes new method for selecting optimal field points in Inverse-Numerical Acoustic analysis (INA), and its application to construction of a sound source model for diesel engines. INA identifies the surface vibration of a sound source by using acoustic transfer functions and actual sound pressures measured at field points located near the sound source. When measuring sound pressures with INA, it is necessary to determine the field point arrangement. Increased field points leads to longer test and analysis time. Therefore, guidelines for selecting the field point arrangement are needed to conduct INA efficiently. The authors focused on the standard deviations of distance between sound source elements and field points and proposed a new guideline for optimal field point selection in our past study. In that study, we verified the effectiveness of this guideline using a simple plate model.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1870
Saeed Siavoshani, Prasad Balkrishna Vesikar, Daniel Pentis, Rajani Ippili
Abstract The objective of this paper is to develop a robust methodology to study internal combustion (IC) engine block vibrations and to quantify the contribution of combustion pressure loads and inertial loads (mechanical loads) in overall vibration levels. An established technique for noise separation that, until recently, has not been applied to engine noise is Wiener filtering. In this paper, the harmonic part of the overall vibration response of the IC engine block is removed, resulting in a residual broadband response which is uncorrelated to the source signal. This residue of the response signal and the similarly calculated residue of the combustion pressure represent the dynamic portion of their respective raw signals for that specific operating condition (engine speed and load). The dynamic portion of the combustion pressure is assumed to be correlated only to the combustion event.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1829
Guillaume Loussert
Abstract The new fuel efficiency and emission standards have forced OEMs to put emphasis on different strategies such as engine downsizing, cylinder deactivation… Unfortunately these new technologies may lead to increased powertrain vibrations generated by the engine and transmitted to the chassis and the car cabin, such that their reduction or elimination has become a key topic for the automotive industry. The use of active engine mounts, acting directly on the fluid of an hydromount, or active vibration dampers, acting as an inertial mass-spring system, are very effective solutions, particularly when using electromagnetic based actuators. Nevertheless, all electromagnetic actuators technologies are not equals and the choice of such actuators must be considered carefully by taking into account the full performances and the overall cost of the solutions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1826
Sagar Deshmukh, Sandip Hazra
Abstract Engine mounting system maintains the position of powertrain in the vehicle with respect to chassis and other accessories during inertia, torque reaction loads and roadway disturbances. The mounting system also plays a role in terms of isolation of the rest of the vehicle and its occupants from powertrain and helps in maintaining vehicle ride and handling condition. This paper investigates the performance comparison between hydromount and switchable hydromount during idle and ride performance. The optimization scheme aims to improve the performance of the mounting system in order to achieve overall powertrain performance and NVH attribute balancing through switchable mount technology.
Viewing 181 to 210 of 43870