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Viewing 181 to 210 of 43696
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0539
Duc-Khanh Nguyen, Sebastian Verhelst
Abstract Methanol fueled spark ignition (SI) engines have the potential for very high efficiency using an advanced heat recovery system for fuel reforming. In order to allow simulation of such an engine system, several sub-models are needed. This paper reports the development of two laminar burning velocity correlations, corresponding to two reforming concepts, one in which the reformer uses water from an extra tank to produce hydrogen rich gas (syngas) and another that employs the water vapor in the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) stream to produce reformed-EGR (R-EGR). This work uses a one-dimensional (1D) flame simulation tool with a comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanism to predict the laminar burning velocities of methanol/syngas blends and correlate it. The syngas is a mixture of H2/CO/CO2 with a CO selectivity of 6.5% to simulate the methanol steam reforming products over a Cu-Mn/Al catalyst.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0534
Bojan S. Jander, Roland Baar
Abstract The knowledge of thermal behavior of combustion engines is extremely important e.g. to predict engine warm up or to calculate engine friction and finally to optimize fuel consumption. Typically, thermal engine behavior is modeled using look-up tables or semi-physical models to calculate the temperatures of structure, coolant and oil. Using look-up tables can result in inaccurate results due to interpolation and extrapolation; semi-physical modeling leads to high computation time. This work introduces a new kind of model to calculate thermal behavior of combustion engines using an artificial neural network (ANN) which is highly accurate and extremely fast. The neural network is a multi-layered feed-forward network; it is trained by data generated with a validated semi-physical model. Output data of the ANN-based model are calculated with nonlinear transformation of input data and weighting of these transformations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0529
Seamus Kane, Xuesong Li, Benjamin Wolk, Isaac Ekoto, William F. Northrop
Abstract Fuel reforming during a Negative Valve Overlap (NVO) period is an effective approach to control Low Temperature Gasoline Combustion (LTGC) ignition. Previous work has shown through experiments that primary reference fuels reform easily and produce several species that drastically affect ignition characteristics. However, our previous research has been unable to accurately predict measured reformate composition at the end of the NVO period using simple single-zone models. In this work, we use a stochastic reactor model (SRM) closed cycle engine simulation to predict reformate composition accounting for in-cylinder temperature and mixture stratification. The SRM model is less computationally intensive than CFD simulations while still allowing the use of large chemical mechanisms to predict intermediate species formation rates.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0528
Eric Miller, Arnaud Konan, Adam Duran
Accurate vehicle parameters are valuable for design, modeling, and reporting. Estimating vehicle parameters can be a very time-consuming process requiring tightly-controlled experimentation. This work describes a method to estimate vehicle parameters such as mass, coefficient of drag/frontal area, and rolling resistance using data logged during standard vehicle operation. The method uses a Monte Carlo method to generate parameter sets that are fed to a variant of the road load equation. The modeled road load is then compared to the measured load to evaluate the probability of the parameter set. Acceptance of a proposed parameter set is determined using the probability ratio to the current state, so that the chain history will give a distribution of parameter sets. Compared to a single value, a distribution of possible values provides information on the quality of estimates and the range of possible parameter values. The method is demonstrated by estimating dynamometer parameters.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0530
Ted Holmberg, Andreas Cronhjort, Ola Stenlaas
Abstract In one dimensional engine simulation software, flow losses over complex geometries such as valves and ports are described using flow coefficients. It is generally assumed that the pressure ratio over the valve has a negligible influence on the flow coefficient. However during the exhaust valve opening the pressure difference between cylinder and port is large which questions the accuracy of this assumption. In this work the influence of pressure ratio on the exhaust valve flow coefficient has been investigated experimentally in a steady-flow test bench. Two cylinder heads, designated A and B, from a Heavy-Duty engine with different valve shapes and valve seat angles have been investigated. The tests were performed with both exhaust valves open and with only one of the two exhaust valves open. The pressure ratio over the exhaust port was varied from 1.1:1 to 5:1. For case A1 with a single exhaust valve open, the flow coefficient decreased significantly with pressure ratio.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0525
Namho Kim, Joohan Kim, Insuk Ko, Hoimyung Choi, Kyoungdoug Min
Abstract The role of 1D simulation tool is growing as the engine system is becoming more complex with the adoption of a variety of new technologies. For the reliability of the 1D simulation results, it is necessary to improve the accuracy and applicability of the combustion model implemented in the 1D simulation tool. Since the combustion process in SI engine is mainly determined by the turbulence, many models have been concentrating on the prediction of the evolution of in-cylinder turbulence intensity. In this study, two turbulence models which can resemble the turbulence intensity close to that of 3D CFD tool were utilized. The first model is dedicated to predicting the evolution of turbulence intensity during intake and compression strokes so that the turbulence intensity at the spark timing can be estimated properly. The second model is responsible for predicting the turbulence intensity of burned and unburned zone during the combustion process.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0524
Lei Liang, Huaqi Ge, Haiwen Ge, Peng Zhao
Abstract The thermal efficiency of spark-ignition engines can be enhanced by increasing the rate of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) such that the low temperature combustion regime could be achieved. However, there is an upper limit on the amount of EGR rate, beyond which flame speed becomes slow and unstable, and local quenching starts to hurt the combustion stability, efficiency, and emission. To resolve this issue, the concept of dedicated EGR has been proposed previously to be an effective way to enhance flame propagation under lean burn condition with even higher levels of EGR with reformate hydrogen and carbon monoxide. In this study, the effects of thermochemical fuel reforming on the reformate composition under rich conditions (1.0 < ϕ < 2.0) have been studied using detailed chemistry for iso-octane, as the representative component for gasoline.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0527
Arya Yazdani, Jeffrey Naber, Mahdi Shahbakhti, Paul Dice, Chris Glugla, Stephen Cooper, Douglas McEwan, Garlan Huberts
An accurate estimation of cycle-by-cycle in-cylinder mass and the composition of the cylinder charge is required for spark-ignition engine transient control strategies to obtain required torque, Air-Fuel-Ratio (AFR) and meet engine pollution regulations. Mass Air Flow (MAF) and Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensors have been utilized in different control strategies to achieve these targets; however, these sensors have response delay in transients. As an alternative to air flow metering, in-cylinder pressure sensors can be utilized to directly measure cylinder pressure, based on which, the amount of air charge can be estimated without the requirement to model the dynamics of the manifold.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0526
Oldrich Vitek, Jan Macek
Abstract The proposed paper deals with thermodynamic optimization of highly flexible ICE (variable compression ratio, intake/exhaust VVA) while comparing e-turbocharging concept with classical one. The e-turbocharging approach is based on idea that compressor/turbine has its own electric machine (motor/generator) and that additional electric energy can be supplied/attached from/to engine crank train. Hence it allows independent control of compressor/turbine. On the other hand, classical approach is based on a standard mechanical connection between turbine and compressor. The whole system (flexible engine + boost device) is optimized under steady operation – low load (BMEP of 4 bar), medium load (BMEP of 13 bar), high load (BMEP of 30, 25 and 18 bar) and maximum load are considered. Moreover, 3 combustion concepts are considered – classical SI and CI, and ideal RCCI.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0521
Richard Merrett, John Murray, Doug Kolak
Abstract The development of experimental ORC systems is an extremely complex, time consuming and costly task. Running a range of experiments on a number of different component configurations may be prohibitively expensive and subject to equipment issues and failures. Yet ORC systems offer significant potential for automotive manufacturers to improve vehicle efficiency, reduce fuel consumption and vehicle emissions; the technology is particularly relevant for those involved in the design and/or manufacture of heavy duty trucks. This paper is focused on the validation of a computational ORC system simulation tool against a number of SAE published test results based on the European Stationary Cycle. Such studies on industry standard systems are essential in order to help promote confidence in a virtual prototype approach.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0520
Gianluca Montenegro, Augusto Della Torre, Tarcisio Cerri, Angelo Onorati, Lorenzo Nocivelli, Marco Fiocco
Abstract In this work an integration between a 1D code (Gasdyn) with a CFD code (OpenFOAM®) has been applied to improve the performance of a Moto3 engine. The four-stroke, single cylinder S.I. engine was modeled, in order to predict the wave motion in the intake and exhaust systems and to study how it affects the cylinder gas exchange process. The engine considered was characterized by having an air induction system with integrated filter cartridge, air-box and intake runner, including two fuel injectors, resulting in a complex air-path from the intake mouth to the intake valves, which presents critical aspects when a 1D modeling is addressed. The exhaust and intake systems have been optimized form the point of view of the wave action. However, due to the high revolution speed reached by this type of engine, the interaction between the gas stream and the fuel spray becomes a key aspect to be addressed in order to achieve the best performance at the desired operating condition.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0522
Jianning Zhao, Antonio Sciarretta
Abstract Fuel consumption is an essential factor that requires to be minimized in the design of a vehicle powertrain. Simple energy models can be of great help - by clarifying the role of powertrain dimensioning parameters and reducing the computation time of complex routines aiming at optimizing these parameters. In this paper, a Fully Analytical fuel Consumption Estimation (FACE) is developed based on a novel GRaphical-Analysis-Based fuel Energy Consumption Optimization (GRAB-ECO), both of which predict the fuel consumption of light- and heavy-duty series hybrid-electric powertrains that is minimized by an optimal control technique. When a drive cycle and dimensioning parameters (e.g. vehicle road load, as well as rated power, torque, volume of engine, motor/generators, and battery) are considered as inputs, FACE predicts the minimal fuel consumption in closed form, whereas GRAB-ECO minimizes fuel consumption via a graphical analysis of vehicle optimal operating modes.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0847
Ming Ge, Xingyu Liang, Hanzhengnan Yu, Yuesen Wang, Hongsheng Zhang
Abstract Spray impacting on a lube oil film with a finite thickness is a common phenomenon in IC engines and plays a critical role in the fuel-air mixture process and combustion. With the use of early injection strategy to achieve HCCI combustion mode in diesel engines, this phenomenon becomes more and more prominent. In addition, oxygenated fuels such as methanol and ethanol are regarded as alternative fuel and additives to improve the overall performance of HCCI engine. Therefore, a better understanding about the role of lube oil film thickness in methanol-diesel and ethanol-diesel blended fuels spray/wall impingement is helpful for accumulating experimental data to establish a more accurate spray/wall impingement model and optimize the combustion in HCCI engines. In this paper, the effect of lube oil film thickness on the characteristics of spray/wall impingement of different fuels are investigated in a constant volume bomb test system.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0846
Raul Payri, Gabriela Bracho, Pedro Marti-Aldaravi, Alberto Viera
In the present work a constant-pressure flow facility able to reach 15 MPa ambient pressure and 1000 K ambient temperature has been employed to carry out experimental studies of the combustion process at Diesel engine like conditions. The objective is to study the effect of orifice diameter on combustion parameters as lift-off length, ignition delay and flame penetration, assessing if the processing methodologies used for a reference nozzle are suitable in heavy duty applications. Accordingly, three orifice diameter were studied: a spray B nozzle, with a nominal diameter of 90 μm, and two heavy duty application nozzles (diameter of 194 μm and 228 μm respectively). Results showed that nozzle size has a substantial impact on the ignition event, affecting the premixed phase of the combustion and the ignition location.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0845
Kazufumi Serizawa, Daiji Ueda, Naoki Mikami, Yasufumi Tomida, Jost Weber
Abstract The Diesel engine performance was drastically improved since the introduction of the Common Rail system in 1996. Over the years, the Common Rail technology was continuously improved to reduce the fuel consumption, engine-out emissions and enhance the drivability. However further technical improvement steps for a precise control of combustion are required to satisfy the increasing stringent worldwide emissions limits and to contribute to attractively performing Diesel powered vehicles. Common Rail injectors significantly contribute to improve the combustion. This improvement can be achieved by precisely controlling the injected fuel quantity and increasing the injection pressure. In addition to those features, a more rectangular injection rate, the capability of stable multiple injections at shorter intervals and the control of the spray shape, are required to achieve an optimized fuel mixture.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0843
Jose Pastor, Jose M Garcia-Oliver, Antonio Garcia, Varun Reddy Nareddy
Abstract Recent studies have shown that the use of highly premixed dual fuel combustion reduces pollutant emissions and fuel consumption in CI engines. The most common strategy for dual fueling is to use two injection systems. Port fuel injection for low reactivity fuel and direct injection for high reactivity fuel. This strategy implies some severe shortcomings for its real implementation in passenger cars such as the use of two fuel tanks. In this sense, the use of a single injection system for dual fueling could solve this drawback trying to maintain pollutant and efficiency benefits. Nonetheless, when single injection system is used, the spray characteristics become an essential issue. In this work the fundamental characteristics of dual-fuel sprays with a single injection system under non-evaporating engine-like conditions are presented.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0842
Luis Bravo, Scott Ripplinger, Omid Samimi
Abstract Numerical simulations of diesel reacting jets in a simulated engine environment were carried out to study the effect of oxygen concentration on the ignition delay time and lift-off length dynamics. A recently developed mechanism, direct integration of chemistry, and well established Lagrangian-Eulerian spray model were utilized for 3-D turbulent spray combustion simulation under engine like conditions. The simulations are able to provide a time-history of chemical species including formaldehyde CH2O intermediates and hydroxide OH radicals to facilitate development of auto-ignition and lift off length numerical diagnostics. A range of important operating points including variations in the oxygen concentration, rail pressure, and injection duration were examined. The purpose of conducting the parametric studies is to investigate the consistency of the results and provide a more comprehensive analysis than a single point condition.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0856
Yanzhi Zhang, Ming Jia, Huiquan Duan, Pengfei Wang, Jianxiang Wang, Hong Liu, MaoZhao Xie
Abstract The phenomenon of a thin liquid film separation and atomization at expanding corners during the spray/wall interaction is usually encountered in premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) engines. However, detailed information about the film separation is very limited, especially under high injection pressure conditions. In this study, experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of injection pressure and impingement distance on the evolutions of the impinging spray and the adhered film at simplified geometries with an expanding corner by employing a high-speed camera. In addition, an improved hybrid film separation and atomization model was developed, which includes the sub-models of film separation criterion, film separation mass ratio, and the film atomization model based on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability theory.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0855
Rakesh Kale, R. Banerjee
Abstract Use of bio fuels in a regular spark ignition engine is becoming common in several countries to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels and overall generation of green house emissions. Alcohols such as methanol and ethanol are blended with gasoline when SI engines are considered. Advanced direct injection stratified charge engine technology has gained lot of interest due to its merits over conventional port fuel injection engine. Since the technology is significantly spray controlled, fuel injection and spray behavior under different thermodynamic conditions plays a very important role in successful engine operation. Present work was carried out to understand the spray behavior of isooctane and three alcohols under engine-like pressure and temperature conditions. Selected alcohols were ethanol, isobutanol and n-butanol. A six holes solenoid injector was used for this study.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0853
Roberto Torelli, Sibendu Som, Yuanjiang Pei, Yu Zhang, Alexander Voice, Michael Traver, David Cleary
Abstract It is well known that in-nozzle flow behavior can significantly influence the near-nozzle spray formation and mixing that in turn affect engine performance and emissions. This in-nozzle flow behavior can, in turn, be significantly influenced by fuel properties. The goal of this study is to characterize the behavior of two different fuels, namely, a straight-run naphtha that has an anti-knock index of 58 (denoted as “Full-Range Naphtha”) and n-dodecane, in a simulated multi-hole common-rail diesel fuel injector. Simulations were carried out using a fully compressible multi-phase flow representation based on the mixture model assumption with the Volume of Fluid method. Our previous studies have shown that the characteristics of internal and near-nozzle flow are strongly related to needle motion in both the along- and off-axis directions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0849
Chao Gong, Roland Baar
Abstract The present work involves the technical background of the field of Diesel injection systems of combustion engines and compares the effects of two kinds of remedies (Re-meshing Technique and Linear Interpolation Technique) on mesh deformation. Mathematical formulation of moving grids has been proposed to guide the change of cell volume before. In this study, CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis was conducted to study the behaviors of the internal nozzle flow and the characteristics of the spray. An external library concept was introduced to couple the internal nozzle injection process with the spray formation. In addition, all dynamic simulations were performed under a double-axis system. A comparison between simulation and experimental results shows that the integration of the traditional mesh deformation technique with the re-meshing or the linear interpolation technique can repair mesh deformation and further contribute to better simulation results.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0832
Jacob Temme, Vincent Coburn, Chol-Bum Kweon
Abstract The objective of the study was to investigate the spray and combustion characteristics of Jet Propellant-8 (JP-8) using a high-pressure fuel injector which is capable of up to 250-MPa fuel injection pressure. Experiments were performed in a constant-pressure flow-through combustion chamber at the ambient conditions of 825 K and 6 MPa for the oxygen concentration of 0 and 21%. JP-8 was injected over a range of fuel injection pressures from 50 to 250 MPa for single injection events to establish a baseline operation. Pilot and post injections were used to study the effect of multiple injections on spray and combustion of the high-pressure fuel injector. Both pilot and post injection separation times and quantities were systematically varied. JP-8 spray and combustion events were imaged at 75 kHz using a combination of Mie scattering and OH* chemiluminescence imaging.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0828
Dongwei Wu, Baigang Sun, Dan Xu, Xiaodong An, Yunshan Ge
Abstract The pressure fluctuation characteristics of a constant pressure fuel system has great influence on its fuel injection characteristics. It is, therefore important to understand the impacts of these fluctuations in order to better study and optimize the fuel injection characteristics. In this study, the pressure fluctuation characteristics of the high pressure common rail system have been investigated experimentally. The transient pressure at different positions in the high pressure common rail system have been measured. The phase of pressure fluctuation during the injection process has been analyzed and the corresponding fluctuating characteristic parameters have been characterized for each phase. The changes in pressure wave propagation velocity, fuel injection pressure drop amplitude, wave amplitude, period and decay time are obtained by studying the fluctuation characteristic parameters caused by fuel pressure and temperature change.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0829
Gina M. Magnotti, Caroline L. Genzale
Abstract The atomization and initial spray formation processes in direct injection engines are not well understood due to the experimental and computational challenges associated with resolving these processes. Although different physical mechanisms, such as aerodynamic-induced instabilities and nozzle-generated turbulence and cavitation, have been proposed in the literature to describe these processes, direct validation of the theoretical basis of these models under engine-relevant conditions has not been possible to date. Recent developments in droplet sizing measurement techniques offer a new opportunity to evaluate droplet size distributions formed in the central and peripheral regions of the spray. There is therefore a need to understand how these measurements might be utilized to validate unobservable physics in the near nozzle-region.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0826
Russell P. Fitzgerald, Christopher Gehrke, Kenth Svensson, Glen Martin
Abstract The performance of five positive k-factor injector tips has been assessed in this work by analyzing a comprehensive set of injected mass, momentum, and spray measurements. Using high speed shadowgraphs of the injected diesel plumes, the sensitivities of measured vapor penetration and dispersion to injection pressure (100-250MPa) and ambient density (20-52 kg/m3) have been compared with the Naber-Siebers empirical spray model to gain understanding of second order effects of orifice diameter. Varying in size from 137 to 353μm, the orifice diameters and corresponding injector tips are appropriate for a relatively wide range of engine cylinder sizes (from 0.5 to 5L). In this regime, decreasing the orifice exit diameter was found to reduce spray penetration sensitivity to differential injection pressure. The cone angle and k-factored orifice exit diameter were found to be uncorrelated.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0822
Jim Elkjær Bebe, Kasper Steen Andersen
Abstract The purpose of this work is to determine essential spray parameters for a specific nozzle to be integrated in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of selective catalytic reduction systems (SCR) based on the injection of urea water solution (UWS). As Dinex does not develop nozzles, but rather integrate nozzles from a variety of manufacturers, the spray data made available is of an inhomogeneous quality. This paper presents the results of a simple, partial validation and calibration of a CFD simulation performed with the commercial CFD code AVL FIRE 2014.2 using the Lagrangian discrete droplet method. The validation is based on a novel and low cost experimental setup, where the experimental method utilizes high-speed imaging to provide spray cone angle, axial spray penetration length and spray plume droplet density.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0823
Alessandro Mariani, Andrea Cavicchi, Lucio Postrioti, Carmine Ungaro
Abstract In the present paper, a new methodology for the estimation of the mass delivered by a single hole of a GDI injector is presented and discussed. The GDI injector used for the activity featured a five-hole nozzle characterized by three holes with the same diameter and two holes with a larger diameter. The different holes size guarantees a significant difference in terms of mass flow. This new methodology is based on global momentum flux measurement of each single plume and on its combination with the global mass measurement made with the gravimetric principle. The momentum flux is measured by means of a dedicated test bench that detects the impact force of the single spray plume at different distances. The sensing device is moved in different positions and, in each point, the force trace averaged over several injection events is acquired.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0839
Luigi Allocca, Alessandro Montanaro, Amedeo Amoresano, Giuseppe Langella, Vincenzo Niola, Giuseppe Quaremba
Abstract The paper reports an innovative method of analysis based on an advanced statistical techniques applied to images captured by a high-speed camera that allows highlighting phenomena and anomalies hardly detectable by conventional optical diagnostic techniques. The images, previously elaborated by neural network tools in order for clearly identifying the contours, have been analyzed in their time evolution as pseudo-chaotic variables that may have internal periodic components. In addition to the Fourier analysis, tools as Lyapunov and Hurst exponents and average Kω permitted to detect the chaos level of the signals. The use of this technique has permitted to distinguish periodic oscillations from chaotic variations and to detect those parameters that actually determine the spray behavior.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0838
Sayop Kim, Dorrin Jarrahbashi, Caroline Genzale
Abstract This study investigates the role of turbulent-chemistry interaction in simulations of diesel spray combustion phenomena after end-of-injection (EOI), using the commercially-available CFD code CONVERGE. Recent experimental and computational studies have shown that the spray flame dynamics and mixture formation after EOI are governed by turbulent entrainment, coupled with rapid evolution of the thermo-chemical state of the mixture field. A few studies have shown that after EOI, mixtures between the injector nozzle and the lifted diffusion flame can ignite and appear to propagate back towards the injector nozzle via an auto-ignition reaction sequence; referred to as “combustion recession”.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0836
Hongjiang Li, Christopher Rutland
Abstract In this paper, large eddy simulation (LES) coupled with two uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods, namely latin-hypercube sampling (LHS) and polynomial chaos expansion (PCE), have been used to quantify the effects of model parameters and spray boundary conditions on diesel and gasoline spray simulations. Evaporating, non-reacting spray data was used to compare penetration, mixture fraction and spray probability contour. Two different sets of four uncertain variables were used for diesel and gasoline sprays, respectively. UQ results showed good agreement between experiments and predictions. UQ statistics indicated that discharge coefficient has stronger impact on gasoline than diesel sprays, and spray cone angle is important for vapor penetration of both types of sprays.
Viewing 181 to 210 of 43696