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Viewing 121 to 150 of 43696
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0860
PengBo Dong, Jun Yamauchi, Keiya Nishida, Youichi Ogata
Abstract With the aim of improving engine performance, recent trend of fuel injection nozzle design followed by engineers and researchers is focusing on more efficient fuel break up, atomization, and fuel evaporation. Therefore, it is crucial to characterize the effect of nozzle geometric design on fuel internal flow dynamics and the consequent fuel-air mixture properties. In this study, the internal flow and spray characteristics generated by the practical multi-hole (10 holes) nozzles with different nozzle hole length and hole diameter were investigated in conjunction with a series of computational and experimental methods. Specifically, the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) commercial code was used to predict the internal flow variation inside different nozzle configurations, and the high-speed video observation method was applied to visualize the spray evolution processes under non-evaporating conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0873
Senthilkumar Masimalai, Jai Kumar Mayakrishnan, Natraj Ganesan
Abstract This paper presents a comprehensive study on using MO (Mahua oil) as fuel effectively in a diesel engine by adopting emulsification and TBC (Thermal Barrier Coating) techniques. A mono cylinder diesel engine was used for the study. Initially trials were made on the engine using neat diesel (ND), Neat Mahua oil (NMO) as fuels. In the second phase, NMO was converted into its stable emulsion (called as MOE) and tested in the engine. Finally thermal barrier coating of 0.2 mm was made on the piston, valves and cylinder head of the engine using the ceramic power of Al2O3 and the engine was tested using NMO and MOE as fuels in the TBC engine. Results indicated improvement in BTE (brake thermal efficiency) with MOE as compared to NMO mainly at high power outputs in the unmodified engine. The maximum BTE was found as 31.5% with ND, 27.2% with NMO and 30.4% with MOE at the peak power output.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0872
Sunil Kumar Pathak, Vineet sood, Yograj Singh, Shubham Gupta, Salim Abbasbhai Channiwala
Abstract In this study, A Gasoline Passenger car (Euro IV) was experimentally investigated for performance and emissions on three different fuels i.e. Gasoline, LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) and DME (Di-methyl ether) blend with a concentration of 20% by mass in LPG (DME20). In particular, emission characteristics (including Hydrocarbon, CO, NOx, and CO2) over the Modified Indian Driving Cycle (MIDC) and fuel economy were investigated at the Vehicle Emission Laboratory (VEL) at the CSIR- Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun, India. The experimental results showed that Vehicle complies with Euro IV legislation on gasoline and LPG fuel, however, showed higher NOx Emissions on DME 20 fuel. LPG kit was reconfigured for DME and LPG blend to bring down the emissions within the specified emission limits. The Emission values observed for DME20 were 0.635 g/km (CO), 0.044 g/km (THC), and 0.014 g/km (NOx) against the Euro IV limits of 1.0 g/km, 0.1 g/km and 0.08 g/km, respectively.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0875
Valentin Soloiu, Jose Moncada, Martin Muinos, Aliyah Knowles, Remi Gaubert, Thomas Beyerl, Gustavo Molina
Abstract This paper investigates the performance of an indirect injection (IDI) diesel engine fueled with Bu25, 75% ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD#2) blended with 25% n-butanol by mass. N-butanol, derivable from biomass feedstock, was used given its availability as an alternative fuel that can supplement the existing limited fossil fuel supply. Combustion and emissions were investigated at 2000 rpm across loads of 4.3-7.2 bar indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP). Cylinder pressure was collected using Kistler piezoelectric transducers in the precombustion (PC) and main combustion (MC) chambers. Ignition delays ranged from 0.74 - 1.02 ms for both operated fuels. Even though n-butanol has a lower cetane number, the high swirl in the separate combustion chamber would help advance its premixed combustion. The heat release rate of Bu25 became initially 3 J/crank-angle-degree (CAD) higher than that of ULSD#2 as load increased to 7.2 bar IMEP.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0869
Job Immanuel Encarnacion, Edwin Quiros
Abstract The Philippine Biofuels Act of 2006 (RA 9367) requires commercial diesel fuel to be mixed with Coconut Methyl Ester (CME) in accordance with the Philippine Clean Air Act of 1999 (RA 8749). As of 2015, the blend percentage is at 2% CME v/v, contrary to the scheduled 5% as stipulated in the biofuels act. Researches done locally showing the performance and emissions of CME-fueled engines are few and thus the basis for the CME percentage increase is still questionable and hampers the drive for the further implementation of the policy. The study investigates the influence of varying percentages of CME blends (2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% v/v) to the performance and emissions of a heavy-duty turbocharged common rail direct injection (CRDI) engine. The engine is run at steady state at partial load (50Nm and 250 Nm) and at near full load (500Nm). Each run is set at three pedal positions, α (25%, 50% and 60%), controlled directly from the engine control unit.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0870
Yuanxu Li, Xiangyu Meng, Karthik Nithyanandan, Chia-Fon Lee, Zhi Ning
Abstract Due to the increasing consumption of fossil fuels, alternative fuels in internal combustion engines have attracted a lot of attention in recent years. Ethanol is the most common alternative fuel used in spark ignition (SI) engines due to its advantages of biodegradability, positively impacting emissions reduction as well as octane number improvement. Meanwhile, acetone is well-known as one of the industrial waste solvents for synthetic fibers and most plastic materials. In comparison to ethanol, acetone has a number of more desirable properties for being a viable alternative fuel such as its higher energy density, heating value and volatility.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0957
Ian Smith, Thomas Briggs, Christopher Sharp, Cynthia Webb
Abstract It is projected that even when the entire on-road fleet of heavy-duty vehicles operating in California is compliant with 2010 emission standards of 0.20 g/bhp-hr, the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) requirements for ambient ozone will not be met. It is expected that further reductions in NOX emissions from the heavy-duty fleet will be required to achieve compliance with the ambient ozone requirement. To study the feasibility of further reductions, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) funded a research program to demonstrate the potential to reach 0.02 g/bhp-hr NOX emissions. This paper details the work executed to achieve this goal on the heavy-duty Federal Test Procedure (FTP) with a heavy-duty natural gas engine equipped with a three-way catalyst. A Cummins ISX-12G natural gas engine was modified and coupled with an advanced catalyst system.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0573
Mohammed Jaasim Mubarak ali, Francisco Hernandez Perez, R Vallinayagam, S Vedharaj, Bengt Johansson, Hong Im
Abstract Full cycle simulations of KAUST optical diesel engine were conducted in order to provide insights into the details of fuel spray, mixing, and combustion characteristics at different start of injection (SOI) conditions. Although optical diagnostics provide valuable information, the high fidelity simulations with matched parametric conditions improve fundamental understanding of relevant physical and chemical processes by accessing additional observables such as the local mixture distribution, intermediate species concentrations, and detailed chemical reaction rates. Commercial software, CONVERGE™, was used as the main simulation tool, with the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence model and the multi-zone (SAGE) combustion model to compute the chemical reaction terms. SOI is varied from late compression ignition (CI) to early partially premixed combustion (PPC) conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0580
Zainal Abidin, Kevin Hoag, Nicholas Badain
Abstract The promising D-EGR gasoline engine results achieved in the test cell, and then in a vehicle demonstration have led to exploration of further possible applications. A study has been conducted to explore the use of D-EGR gasoline engines as a lower cost replacement for medium duty diesel engines in trucks and construction equipment. However, medium duty diesel engines have larger displacement, and tend to require high torque at lower engine speeds than their automobile counterparts. Transmission and final drive gearing can be utilized to operate the engine at higher speeds, but this penalizes life-to-overhaul. It is therefore important to ensure that D-EGR combustion system performance can be maintained with a larger cylinder bore, and with high specific output at relatively low engine speeds.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0579
Stephane Chevillard, Olivier Colin, Julien Bohbot, Mingjie Wang, Eric Pomraning, P. K. Senecal
Abstract Nowadays Spark Ignition (SI) engine developments focus on downsizing, in order to increase the engine load level and consequently its efficiency. As a side effect, knock occurrence is strongly increased. The current strategy to avoid knock is to reduce the spark advance which limits the potential of downsizing in terms of consumption reduction. Reducing the engine propensity to knock is therefore a first order subject for car manufacturers. Engineers need competitive tools to tackle such a complex phenomenon. In this paper the 3D RANS simulations ability to satisfactorily represent knock tendencies is demonstrated. ECFM (Extended Coherent Flame Model) has been recently implemented by IFPEN in CONVERGE and coupled with TKI (Tabulated Kinetics Ignition) to represent Auto-Ignition in SI engine. These models have been applied on a single cylinder engine configuration dedicated to abnormal combustion study.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0627
Bo Yang, Peter Woyciesjes, Aleksei Gershun
Abstract In this paper, new test results in the use of electrochemical techniques to measure corrosion in extended life engine coolants are presented. Corrosion protection performance of the engine coolants (including both fresh coolants and simulated used coolants) for typical cooling system metals under heat rejecting and heat accepting surface corrosion conditions for both general corrosion and localized corrosion are measured under conditions similar to the ones encountered in vehicle engine cooling systems as a function of immersion time. Fleet tests of the coolants were also conducted. They are used to provide support on the electrochemical test methodologies adopted. The effective use of electrochemical techniques to aid the development of the next generation of extended life coolant technologies with improved corrosion protection performance and a longer service life will be demonstrated and discussed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0629
John Kuo, George Garfinkel
Abstract Thermal modeling of liquid-cooled vehicle traction battery assemblies using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) usually involves large models to accurately resolve small cooling channel details, and intensive computation to simulate drive-cycle transient solutions. This paper proposes a segregated method to divide the system into three parts: the cells, the cold plate and the interface between them. Each of the three parts can be separated and thermally characterized and then combined to predict the overall system thermal behavior for both steady-state and transient operating conditions. The method largely simplifies battery thermal analysis to overcome the limitations of using large 3D CFD models especially for pack level dynamic drive cycle simulations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0633
Kurt Stuart, Terry Yan, James Mathias
Abstract In this paper, the air-standard cycle analysis is performed for a 5-stroke engine to obtain the indicated thermal efficiency and power output over a range of operating points and design characteristics, including engine RPM, compression ratio, overall expansion ratio, expansion cylinder clearance volume, and transfer port volume. The results are compared with those of a baseline 4-stroke engine. This analysis is accomplished by an air-standard thermodynamic model for both engines with heat release function with heat transfer and mass loss for both the combustion cylinder and the expansion cylinder. The results indicate increased thermal efficiency and power output over the baseline 4-stroke engine, depending on the engine RPM and overall expansion ratios.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0636
Vijai Shankar Bhavani Shankar, Nhut Lam, Arne Andersson, Bengt Johansson
Abstract The concept of double compression, and double expansion engine (DCEE) for improving the efficiency of piston reciprocating engines was introduced in SAE Paper 2015-01-1260. This engine configuration has separate high, and low pressure units thereby effectively reducing friction losses for high effective compression ratios. The presence of an additional expander stage also theoretically allows an extra degree of freedom to manipulate the combustion heat release rate so as to achieve better optimum between heat transfer, and friction losses. This paper presents a 1-D modeling study of the engine concept in GT-Power for assessing the sensitivity of engine losses to heat release rate. The simulations were constrained by limiting the maximum pressure to 300 bar.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0638
Neerav Abani, Nishit Nagar, Rodrigo Zermeno, Michael chiang, Isaac Thomas
Abstract Heavy-duty vehicles, currently the second largest source of fuel consumption and carbon emissions are projected to be fastest growing mode in transportation sector in future. There is a clear need to increase fuel efficiency and lower emissions for these engines. The Opposed-Piston Engine (OP Engine) has the potential to address this growing need. In this paper, results are presented for a 9.8L three-cylinder two-stroke OP Engine that shows the potential of achieving 55% brake thermal efficiency (BTE), while simultaneously satisfying emission targets for tail pipe emissions. The two-stroke OP Engines are inherently more cost effective due to less engine parts. The OP Engine architecture presented in this paper can meet this performance without the use of waste heat recovery systems or turbo-compounding and hence is the most cost effective technology to deliver this level of fuel efficiency.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0637
Yan Zhang, Ziyu Wang, Honglin Bai, Chao Guo, Jinlong liu, Yufeng Li
Abstract Mechanical load and thermal load are the two main barriers limiting the engine power output of heavy duty (HD) diesel engines. Usually, the peak cylinder pressure could be reduced by retarding combustion phasing while introducing the drawback of higher thermal load and exhaust temperature. In this paper, Miller cycle with late intake valve closing was investigated at high speed high load condition (77 kW/L) on a single cylinder HD diesel engine. The results showed the simultaneous reduction of mechanical and thermal loads. In the meanwhile, higher boosting pressure was required to compensate the Miller loss of the intake charge during intake and compression process. The combustion temperature, cylinder pressure, exhaust temperature and NOx emission were reduced significantly with Miller cycle at the operating condition. Furthermore, the combustion process, smoke number and fuel consumption were analysed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0442
Harchetan Singh Aneja, Manas Tripathi, Harmeet Singh, Aashish Parmar
Abstract With the increasing expectation of customer for a quiet and comfortable ride, automobile manufacturers need to continuously work upon to improve automobile powertrain NVH. Today’s customer has become so aware of vehicle related noises that in-tank fuel pump noise is no exception to the checklist of evaluating cabin NVH. In-tank fuel pump, that is responsible for delivering the fuel from fuel storage tank to delivery rail, uses an electric driven motor. The rotating parts such as rotor, etc. produce vibrations that may traverse to tank body & subsequently vehicle body. Since noise is essentially an audible vibration at its root, these structure borne vibrations may be perceived as noise inside passenger cabin. Additionally, the noise may also be produced by fuel flow pulsations if transferred through piping to vehicle body. This paper focuses on various approaches to reduce the fuel pump generated noise heard inside passenger cabin.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0516
Tim Franken, Arnd Sommerhoff, Werner Willems, Andrea Matrisciano, Harry Lehtiniemi, Anders Borg, Corinna Netzer, Fabian Mauss
Today numerical models are a major part of the diesel engine development. They are applied during several stages of the development process to perform extensive parameter studies and to investigate flow and combustion phenomena in detail. The models are divided by complexity and computational costs since one has to decide what the best choice for the task is. 0D models are suitable for problems with large parameter spaces and multiple operating points, e.g. engine map simulation and parameter sweeps. Therefore, it is necessary to incorporate physical models to improve the predictive capability of these models. This work focuses on turbulence and mixing modeling within a 0D direct injection stochastic reactor model. The model is based on a probability density function approach and incorporates submodels for direct fuel injection, vaporization, heat transfer, turbulent mixing and detailed chemistry.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0513
Jose Serrano, Luis Miguel García-Cuevas lng, Andres Tiseira, Tatiana Rodriguez Usaquen, Guillaume Mijotte
Abstract The growing concerns about emissions in internal combustion engines, makes necessary a good prediction of the after-treatment inlet temperature in fast one-dimensional engine simulation codes. Different simple models have been developed during the last years which improve the prediction of the turbocharger heat transfer phenomena. Although these models produce good results when computing the turbine outlet temperature, those models focus on the axial heat transfer paths and lack the capability of producing detailed results about the internal thermal behavior of the turbocharger. In this work, a new version of heat transfer model for automotive turbochargers is presented. This model discretizes the turbocharger in both the radial and axial directions, and computes the heat transfer and temperature at different parts of the machine.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0512
Andrea Matrisciano, Tim Franken, Cathleen Perlman, Anders Borg, Harry Lehtiniemi, Fabian Mauss
Abstract A novel 0-D Probability Density Function (PDF) based approach for the modelling of Diesel combustion using tabulated chemistry is presented. The Direct Injection Stochastic Reactor Model (DI-SRM) by Pasternak et al. has been extended with a progress variable based framework allowing the use of a pre-calculated auto-ignition table. Auto-ignition is tabulated through adiabatic constant pressure reactor calculations. The tabulated chemistry based implementation has been assessed against the previously presented DI-SRM version by Pasternak et al. where chemical reactions are solved online. The chemical mechanism used in this work for both, online chemistry run and table generation, is an extended version of the scheme presented by Nawdial et al. The main fuel species are n-decane, α-methylnaphthalene and methyl-decanoate giving a size of 463 species and 7600 reactions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0509
Jyotishman Ghosh, Andrea Tonoli, Nicola Amati
Abstract This paper presents a novel strategy for the control of the motor torques of a rear wheel drive electric vehicle with the objective of improving the lap time of the vehicle around a racetrack. The control strategy is based upon increasing the size of the friction circle by implementing torque vectoring and tire slip control. A two-level nested control strategy is used for the motor torque control. While the outer level is responsible for computing the desired corrective torque vectoring yaw moment, the inner level controls the motor torques to realize the desired corrective torque vectoring yaw moment while simultaneously controlling the wheel longitudinal slip. The performance of the developed controller is analyzed by simulating laps around a racetrack with a non-linear multi-body vehicle model and a professional human racing driver controller setting.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0136
Apostolos Karvountzis-Kontakiotis, Apostolos Pesiridis, Hua Zhao, Fuhaid Alshammari, Benjamin Franchetti, Ioannis Pesmazoglou, Lorenzo Tocci
Abstract Modern heavy duty diesel engines can well extend the goal of 50% brake thermal efficiency by utilizing waste heat recovery (WHR) technologies. The effect of an ORC WHR system on engine brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) is a compromise between the fuel penalty due to the higher exhaust backpressure and the additional power from the WHR system that is not attributed to fuel consumption. This work focuses on the fuel efficiency benefits of installing an ORC WHR system on a heavy duty diesel engine. A six cylinder, 7.25ℓ heavy duty diesel engine is employed to experimentally explore the effect of backpressure on fuel consumption. A zero-dimensional, detailed physical ORC model is utilized to predict ORC performance under design and off-design conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0123
Saiful Bari
Abstract In general, diesel engines have an efficiency of about 35% and hence, a considerable amount of energy is expelled to the ambient air. In water-cooled engines, about 25%, 33% and 7% of the input energy are wasted in the coolant, exhaust gas, and friction, respectively. The heat from the exhaust gas of diesel engines can be an important heat source to provide additional power and improve overall engine efficiency. Studies related to the application of recoverable heat to produce additional power in medium capacity diesel engines (< 100 kW) using separate Rankine cycle are scarce. To recover heat from the exhaust of the engine, an efficient heat exchanger is necessary. For this type of application, the heat exchangers are needed to be designed in such a way that it can handle the heat load with reasonable size, weight and pressure drop. This paper describes the study of a diesel generator-set attached with an exhaust heat recovery system.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0124
V N Bhasker, Abhinav Agarwal, Abhishek Sharma, Avisek Das, Nirajkumar Mishra
Abstract Vehicle heat management has become a serious concern due to escalating under-hood and exhaust temperatures. Compact vehicle packaging caused by downsizing has further magnified this concern. In an automobile, fuel is stored in a metallic or plastic fuel tank. In addition to fuel storage, temperature inside fuel tank has to be maintained at a certain limit in order to control high fuel evaporation rate and prevent deterioration of parts. The fuel tank surface temperature is governed by heat rejection from the engine, exhaust system and heat radiated from the road. Generally, mechanical shielding has been found to be an efficient defense to the heat management problem. However ‘what to shield’, ‘where to place the shield’ and ‘how to shield’ are the major challenges. This paper describes a methodology followed to reduce temperature on fuel tank surface by varying material, geometry and layout of heat shields.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0155
Yongbing Xu, Gangfeng Tan, Xuexun Guo, Xianyao Ping
Abstract The closed cabin temperature is anticipated to be cooled down when it is a bit hot inside the driving car. The traditional air-condition lowers the cabin temperature by frequently switching the status of the compressor, which increases the engine’s parasitic power and shortens the compressor’s service-life. The semiconductor auxiliary cooling system with the properties of no moving parts, high control precision and quick response has the potential to assist the on-board air-condition in modulating the cabin temperature with relative small ranges. Little temperature differences between the cabin and the outside environment means that the system energy consumption to ensure the occupant comfort is relatively low and the inefficiency could be made up by the renewable energy source.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0139
Fei Dong, Liuwendi Hou, Zhenlong Xu, TaoTao Cao
Abstract The objective of this present research is to investigate the influence of bubble waiting time coefficient on subcooled flow boiling heat transfer in internal combustion engines and propose an approach to predict its value. The three-dimension simulated cooling jacket structure of valve bridges for forced water-cooling system was developed respectively. The numerical model for subcooled flow boiling based on two-fluid approach was established and calculated. Numerical results suggest that the bubble departure diameter increases with the increasing wall superheat or decreasing inlet subcooling. And the proportion of the quenching heat flux gradually rises and its peak value is delayed along the direction of the higher wall superheat when the subcooling degree increases. The bubble waiting time coefficient has been found to have a significant impact upon the boiling heat transfer.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0148
Majid Arab, Majid Majidi
Abstract The approaching the ideal efficiency assumption is possible in Stirling engine. Regenerator is the main component in improving the efficiency of the engine. Besides the Geometry and materials of the regenerator, amount and quality of porosity have significant impacts on the regenerator performance which is focused on this research. The main idea of this study is to evaluate the effect of porosity, or unsymmetrical porosity gradient in pressure drop and the thermodynamic performance of regenerator, so three models of regenerator are developed and analyzed: First, a model in which the porosity is constant and do not change (Common mode). In the Second model, the length of regenerator porosity is changed from high to low and in the third model, the length of regenerator porosity is changed from low to high. All versions of models have the same global porosity.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0159
Peng Liu, Ge-Qun Shu, Hua Tian, Xuan Wang, Dongzhan Jing
Abstract The environmental issues combined with the rising of crude oil price have attracted more interest in waste heat recovery of marine engine. Currently, the thermal efficiency of marine diesels only reaches 48~51%, and the rest energy is rejected to the environment. Meanwhile, energy is required when generating electricity and cooling that are necessary for vessels. Hence, the cogeneration system is treated as the promising technology to conform the strict environment regulation while offering a high energy utilization ratio. In this paper, an electricity and cooling cogeneration system combined of Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) and Absorption Refrigeration Cycle (ARC) is proposed to recover waste heat from marine engine. ORC is applied to recover exhaust waste heat to provide electricity while ARC is used to utilize condensation heat of ORC to produce additional cooling.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0260
Yuanying Wang, Heath Hofmann, Denise Rizzo, Scott Shurin
Abstract This paper presents a computationally-efficient model of heat convection due to air circulation produced by rotor motion in the air gap of an electric machine. The model calculates heat flux at the boundaries of the rotor and stator as a function of the rotor and stator temperatures and rotor speed. It is shown that, under certain assumptions, this mapping has the homogeneity property. This property, among others, is used to pose a structure for the proposed model. The coefficients of the model are then determined by fitting the model to the results of a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation program. The accuracy of the new model is compared to the CFD results, shown an error of less than 0.3% over the studied operating range.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0263
Krishnaraj Udayachalam, Manan Trivedi, Ziliang Zheng, Amit Shrestha, Naeim Henein
Abstract SASOL IPK is a low cetane number synthetic fuel formed from coal by the Fischer-Tropsch process which can be used as an extender to JP8, currently used in military ground vehicles. This paper presents two surrogates developed considering the following criteria: (a) availability of kinetic combustion models for each component, (b) smallest number of components to reduce computation time and cost, (c) matching the following properties of target fuel DCN, distillation curve, density, LHV, MW and H/C ratio. The autoignition and combustion characteristics of the surrogates were validated in IQT according to ASTM D6890-10a. Surrogate formulation strategy involves an equation to calculate DCN of the surrogate mixture from the DCN of each component. The linear equation commonly used for such calculations was modified to include a multiplier, based on regression analysis, for each component to produces DCN values that agree well with the measured DCN in the IQT.
Viewing 121 to 150 of 43696