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Viewing 121 to 150 of 43870
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0124
Michael Maurer, Peter Holler, Stefan Zarl, Thomas Fortner, Helmut Eichlseder
To fulfil the new European real driving emissions (RDE) legislation, the LNT operation strategy – especially for DeNOx events – has to be optimized to minimize NOx as well as CO and HC emissions. On one hand the DeNOx purges should be long enough to fully regenerate the lean NOx trap, on the other hand the purges should be as short as possible to reduce the fuel consumption penalty from rich mode. Fundamental experiments have been conducted on a synthetic-gas-test-bench, purposely designed to test LNT catalysts. This methodology allowed to remove NOx from the gasfeed after the lean storage phase. The actually reduced amount of NOx could be easily calculated from the NOx storage before a regeneration minus the NOx that was desorbed during the DeNOx event and afterwards thermally desorbed NOx. To show the effect of aging method on the regeneration characteristics, tests have been performed with a in a car endurance run aged LNT and a synthetic hydrothermally aged LNT.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0128
Lauretta Rubino, Jan Piotr Oles, Antonino La Rocca
Environmental authorities such as EPA, VCA have enforced stringent emissions legislation governing air pollutants released into the atmosphere. Of particular interest is the challenges introduced by the limit on particulate number (PN) counting (#/km) and real driving emissions (RDE) testing; with the Euro 6c emissions legislation being shortly introduced for the gasoline direct injection engines. Gasoline particulate filters (GPF) are considered to be the most immediate solution. While engine calibration and testing over the NEDC allows the limits to be met, real driving emission and cold start represent a challenge. The present work focuses on an experimental durability study on road under real word driving conditions. Two set of experiments were carried out. The first study analyzed a Gasoline Particulate Filter (GPF) (2,4 liter, diameter 5,2” round) installed in underfloor (UF) position driven for up to 200.000 km.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0129
Vladimir Merzlikin, Svetlana Parshina, Victoria Garnova, Andrey Bystrov, Alexander Makarov, Sergey Khudyakov
The core of this paper is reduction of exhaust emission and increase of diesel efficiency due to application of microstructure ceramic semitransparent heat-insulating coatings (SHIC). The authors conducted experimental study of thermal state of internal-combustion engine piston head with a heat-insulating layer formed by plasma coating method. The paper presents physical and mathematical simulation of improved optical (transmittance, reflectance, absorption, scattering) and thermo radiative (emittance) characteristics determining optimal temperature profiles inside SHIC. The paper considers the effect of subsurface volumetric heating up and analyzes temperature maximum position inside subsurface of this coating. Decrease of SHIC surface temperature of the coated piston in comparison with temperature of traditional opaque heat-insulating coatings causes NOx emission reduction.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0132
Martin Großbichler, Zhen Zhang, Philipp Polterauer, Harald Waschl
To meet current legislation limits, modern diesel engines already achieve very low raw emission levels and utilize additional components for aftertreatment. However, during fast transients still undesired emission peaks can occur for both soot and NOx. These are caused by differences in the in-cylinder conditions between the quasi steady state engine calibration and the transient engine operation, e.g. during tip-ins. These effects become more and more important in view of future RDE emission test cycles. In this work a case study is performed to analyze the potential reduction of transient soot emissions during a specified engine maneuver. An additional target is to investigate potential benefits of a novel in-situ soot sensor based on the Laser Induced Incandescence (LII) principle which offers a high temporal resolution.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0135
Shuxia Miao, Lin Luo, Yan Liu, Zhangsong Zhan
New emissions regulations of light-duty vehicles (China 6) will be implemented in China from July 1, 2020. This standard includes two stages, China 6a and China 6b, in which the PM limits of 4.5 mg/km and 3.0 mg/km are introduced respectively, the PN limit is set to be 6×10e11 #/km for both stages. The WLTC testing cycle will be implemented in China 6 regulation as well. In this study a light-duty vehicle satisfying China 6(b) emission standards was developed by improving the engine raw emissions, optimizing the calibration and adding a coated GPF to the after-treatment system. The impacts of ash content and consumption of engine oil and the fast ash accumulation to vehicle emissions and backpressure were analyzed through dynamometer testing. The vehicle after-treatment system was then designed and developed to meet China 6(b) emission standards. The characteristics of soot accumulated through mimicking routine driving under cold environments were tested.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0137
Zhen Zhang, Luigi del Re, Richard Fuerhapter
During transients, engines tend to produce substantially higher peak emissions which are the longer the more important as the steady state emissions are better controller. To this end, they must be measurable in an adequate time scale. While for most emissions there are commercially available sensors of sufficient speed and performance, the same is not true for soot, especially for production engines. Against this background, in the last years we have investigated together with a supplier of measurement systems the possible use of a 50Hz sensor based on LII and of the same size of a standard oxygen probe, and the results were very positive, showing that the sensor could recognize transient changes undetected by conventional measurement systems (like AVL Opacimenter or Microsoot) but confirmed e.g. by incylinder 2 color spectroscopy. The higher speed is also due to the position, as the sensor can be mounted above or below the turbine in a turbocharged CI engine.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0141
Riccardo Amirante, Elia Distaso, Silvana Di Iorio, Davide Pettinicchio, Paolo Sementa, Paolo Tamburrano, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
It is common knowledge that of all the regulated automotive emissions, particulate emissions are most difficult to quantify as they comprise a complex mixture of particles of varying size and composition, each of which may be influenced by many external factors including engine technology, fuel composition, air-to-fuel ratio, lubricant oil, after-treatment and the act of measurement itself. The aim of the present work is to provide further guidance into better understanding the production mechanisms of such emissions in spark-ignition engines fueled with compressed natural gas. In particular, extensive experimental investigations were designed with the aim to isolate the contribution of the fuel from that of lubricant oil to particle emissions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0002
Adrian Irimescu, Silvana Di Iorio, Simona Merola, Paolo Sementa, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
Quasi-dimensional modeling is used on a wide scale in engine development, given its potential for saving time and resources compared to experimental investigations. Often it is preferred to more complex CFD codes that are much more computationally intensive. Accuracy is one major issue of quasi-dimensional simulations and for this reason sub-models are continuously developed in order to improve predictive capabilities. This study looks into the use of equivalent fluid velocity and characteristic length scales for simulating the processes of fresh charge entrainment and oxidation behind the flame front. Rather than dividing combustion into three different phases (i.e. laminar kernel, turbulent flame propagation and oxidation near the walls), the concept of turbulent heat and mass transfer is imposed throughout the entire process.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0013
Nicolas Perrot, Pascal Chesse, Rémi Dubouil, Guillaume Goumy
Today turbochargers are used by car manufacturers on Diesel engines and on an increasing number of gasoline engines, especially in the scope of downsizing. This component has to be well understood and modeled as simulation is widely used at every step of the development. Indeed development cost and time have to be reduced to fulfill both customers’ wishes and more stringent emissions standards. Current turbocharger simulation codes are mostly based on look-up tables (air mass flow and efficiency) given by manufacturers. This raises two points. Firstly, the characteristics are known only in the same conditions as manufacturers ‘tests. Secondly, the current efficiency given by turbochargers manufacturer is the product of the isentropic efficiency by the turbocharger mechanical efficiency. This global efficiency is suitable for the calculation of the power transferred to the compressor.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0078
R. vallinayagam, S vedharaj, Yanzhao An, Alaaeldin Dawood PhD, Mohammad Izadi Najafabadi, Bart Somers, Junseok Chang, Mani Sarathy, Bengt Johansson
Light naphtha is a low boiling point fraction of crude oil, and is ideal for partially premixed combustion (PPC). Sufficient premixing can be realized due to its low boiling point and octane rating (RON = 64.5). This study investigates the combustion characteristics of light naphtha and a multicomponent surrogate under various start of injection (SOI) conditions. In this study, LN and a five component surrogate for LN comprising 43% n-pentane, 12% n-heptane, 10% 2-methylhexane, 25% iso-pentane and 10% cyclo-pentane is tested in a single cylinder optical diesel engine. The transition in combustion homogeneity from CI combustion to homogenized charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion is compared between LN and its surrogate. The engine experimental results show a good agreement in terms of combustion phasing, ignition delay, start of combustion, in-cylinder pressure and rate of heat release between LN and its surrogate.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0117
Fabio Scala, Enzo Galloni, Gustavo Fontana
In this paper, the behavior of a downsized spark-ignition engine firing with alcohol/gasoline blends has been analyzed. In particular, different butanol-gasoline and ethanol-gasoline blends have been examined. All the alcohol fuels here considered are derived from biomasses. In the paper, a numerical approach has been followed. A one dimensional model has been tuned in order to simulate the engine operation when it is fueled by alcohol/gasoline mixtures. Numerous operating points, characterized by two different engine speeds and several low-medium load values, have been analyzed. The objective of the numerical analysis is determining the optimum spark advance for different alcohol percentages in the mixtures at the different engine operating points. Once the best spark timing has been selected, the differences, in terms of both indicated torque and efficiency, arising in the different kinds of fueling have been evaluated.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0127
Lauretta Rubino, Dominic Thier, Torsten Schumann, Stefan Guettler, Gerald Russ
With the increasing number of engines utilizing direct fuel injection and the upcoming more stringent emission legislation, regulating not only particulate mass (PM) but particulate number (PN), emissions of Direct Injection Spark Ignition Engines (DISI) are becoming of increasing concern. Gasoline Particle Filters (GPF) represent a novel potential measure to reduce particle number emissions from DISI engines and are particularly effective in view of the tight particle number limits requirements at cold start and over RDE. Even if some learning from the development and application of particulate filters to diesel engines can be transferred to gasoline engines, the particulate consistence, the mass to number ratio and the temperature as well as the gas composition of gasoline engines are significant different to diesel engines. Therefore, there is the need to study the application of particulate filters to gasoline engines carefully.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0130
Antonio Paolo Carlucci, Marco Benegiamo, Sergio Camporeale, Daniela Ingrosso
Nowadays, In-Cylinder Pressure Sensors (ICPS) have become a mainstream technology that promises to change the way the engine control is performed. Among all the possible applications, the prediction of raw (engine-out) NOx emissions would allow to eliminate the NOx sensor currently used to manage the after-treatment systems. In the current study, a semi-physical model already existing in literature for the prediction of engine-out nitric ox-ide emissions based on in-cylinder pressure measurement has been improved; in particular, the main focus has been to improve nitric oxide prediction accuracy when injection timing is varied. The main modification introduced in the model lies in taking into account the turbu-lence induced by fuel spray and enhanced by in-cylinder bulk motion.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0139
Francesco Barba, Alberto Vassallo, Vincenzo Greco
The aim of the present study is to improve the effectiveness of the engine and aftertreatment calibration process through the critical evaluation of several methodologies available to estimate the soot mass flow produced by diesel engines and filtered by Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF). In particular, the focus of the present study has been the development of a reliable simulation method for the accurate prediction of the engine-out soot mass flow starting from Filter Smoke Number (FSN) measurements executed in steady state conditions, in order to predict the DPF loading considering different engine working conditions corresponding to NEDC and WLTP cycles. In order to achieve this goal, the study was split into two parts: - Correlation between ‘wet soot’ (measured by soot filter weighing) and the ‘dry soot’ (measured by the Micro Soot Sensor MSS).
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0144
Carlo Beatrice, Maria Antonietta Costagliola, Chiara Guido, Pierpaolo Napolitano, Maria Vittoria Prati
Diesel particulate filter (DPF) is the most effective emission control device for reducing particle emissions (both in mass, PM, and number, PN) from diesel engines, however many studies have reported elevated emissions of nanoparticles (<50 nm) during its regeneration. In this paper the results of an extensive literature search are presented (about 150 reports and scientific papers). During DPF active regeneration most of the literature studies show an increase in the number of the emitted nanoparticles of about 2-3 orders of magnitude compared to the normal operating conditions. Many factors can influence their amount, size distribution, chemical-physical nature (volatiles, semi-volatiles, solid) and the duration of the regenerative event: i.e. DPF load and thermodynamic conditions, lube and fuel sulfur content, engine operative conditions, PN sampling and measurement methodologies.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0162
Harald Stoffels, Jens Dunstheimer, Christian Hofmann
The application of a turbocharger, having an electric motor/generator on the rotor was studied focusing on the electric energy recuperation on a downsized gasoline internal combustion engine, using 1D-calculation approaches. Using state-of-the art optimization techniques, the settings of the valve timing was optimized to cater for a targeted pre-turbine pressure and certain level of residual gases in the combustion chamber to avoid abnormal combustion events. Subsequently, a steady-state map of the potential of electric energy recuperation was performed while considering in parallel different efficiency maps of the potential generator and a certain wastegate actuation strategy. Moreover, the results were taken as input to a WLTP cycle simulation in order to identify any synergies with regard to fuel economy.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0168
James W.G. Turner, James P. Lewis Monsma
Modern automotive engines almost exclusively operate on the 4-stroke Otto cycle and utilize poppet valves for gas exchange. This state of affairs has not always been the case, however, and one unusual and relatively successful technology that was once in mass production (albeit in piston aero engines) was the Burt-McCollum single sleeve valve. This paper investigates the timing and angle-area of a Bristol Centaurus engine cylinder, which utilized such a single sleeve valve for gas exchange, using some modern tools. A comparison with poppet valve angle-areas is made. Finally, the results are also used to study the potential of variable valve timing and the interaction with compression ratio of a single sleeve mechanism.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0167
Enrico Mattarelli, Carlo Rinaldini, Tommaso Savioli, Giuseppe Cantore, Alok Warey, Michael Potter, Venkatesh Gopalakrishnan, Sandro Balestrino
A CFD study on a 2-stroke (2-S) opposed piston high speed direct injection (HSDI) Diesel engine is reported in this work. The engine main features (bore, stroke, port timings, et cetera) were defined in a previous stage of the project, with the support of CFD-1D engine simulations and empirical hypotheses. The current analysis is focused on the assembly made up of scavenge ports, manifold and cylinder. The first step of the study consisted in the construction of a parametric mesh on a simplified geometry. Two geometric parameters and 3 different operating conditions were considered. A CFD-3D simulation by using a customized version of the KIVA-4 code was performed on a set of 243 different cases, sweeping all the most interesting combinations of geometric parameters and operating conditions. The post-processing of this huge amount of data allowed us to define the most effective geometric configuration, named baseline.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0123
Christopher Eck, Futoshi Nakano
Small commercial vehicles (SCV) with Diesel engines require efficient exhaust aftertreatment systems to reduce the emissions while keeping the fuel consumption and total operating cost as low as possible. To meet current emission legislations in all cases, a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particulate filter (DPF) and some NOx treatment device (e.g. a lean NOx trap or selective catalytic reduction, SCR) are required. Creating a cost-effective SCV also requires to keep the cost for the aftertreatment system as low as possible because the contribution to total vehicle cost is high. By using more sophisticated and more robust operating strategies and control algorithms, the hardware cost can be reduced. To keep the calibration effort at a low level, it is necessary to apply only algorithms which have a time-efficient calibration procedure. This paper will focus on the active regeneration of the DPF.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0131
Sergio Mario Camporeale, Patrizia D. Ciliberti, Antonio Carlucci, Daniela Ingrosso
The incoming PostEuro6 regulation and the on-board diagnostics -OBD- pushes the research activity towards the set-up of even more efficient after treatment systems. Nowadays, the most common after treatment system for NOx reduction is the selective catalytic reactor –SCR- . This system requires as an input the value of engine out NOx emission –raw- in order to control the Urea dosing strategy. In this work, a grey box NOx raw emission model based on in-cylinder pressure signal (ICPS) is validated on two standard cycles: MNEDC and WLTC using an EU6 engine at the test bench. The overall results show a maximum relative error of the integrated cumulate value integral of 12.8% and 17.4% for MNEDC and WLTC respectively. In particular, the instantaneous value of relative error is included in the range of ± 10% in the steady state conditions while during transient conditions is less than 20% mainly.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0032
Gilles Decan, Stijn Broekaert, Tommaso Lucchini, Gianluca D'Errico, Jan Vierendeels, Sebastian Verhelst
The present work details a study of the heat flux through the walls of an internal combustion engine. The determination of this heat flux is an important aspect in engine optimization, as it influences the power, efficiency and the emissions of the engine. Therefore, a set of simulation tools in the OpenFOAM® software has been developed, that allows the calculation of the heat transfer through engine walls for ICEs. Normal practice in these types of engine simulations is to apply a wall function model to calculate the heat flux, rather than resolving the complete thermo-viscous boundary layer, and perform simulations of the closed engine cycle. When dealing with a complex engine, this methodology will reduce the overall computational cost. It however increases the need to rely on assumptions on both the initial flow field and the behavior in the near-wall region.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0017
Emanuele Servetto, Andrea Bianco, Gennaro Caputo, Giuseppe Lo Iacono
Large pressure pulsations and a non-uniform distribution of charge air temperature along the intake manifold were detected on a large-bore marine Dual-Fuel engine. These two phenomena were found to impact negatively on the knock resistance of individual cylinders, when the engine is operated in gas-mode. As it happens with marine gas engines, the cylinder most prone to knocking drives the engine tuning for all the others, thus reducing the overall fuel conversion efficiency. In order to effectively tackle this issue, a comprehensive study was carried out, which included both experimental testing and fluid-dynamics simulation. A detailed GT-POWER 1D engine model was built, representing the laboratory 8L (i.e. inline eight-cylinder) engine configuration. The model was extensively correlated against measurements at different speeds and loads and it proved capable of closely reproducing both the pressure fluctuations and the temperature gradient along the intake manifold.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0159
Davide Di Battista, Marco Di Bartolomeo, Carlo Villante, Roberto Cipollone
Internal combustion engines is actually one of the most important source of pollutants and greenhouse gases emissions. In particular, on-the-road transportation sector has taken this environmental challenge and worldwide governments set up regulations in order to limit the emissions and fuel consumption from vehicles. Among the several technologies under development, an ORC unit bottomed exhaust gas seems to be very promising, but it still has several complications when it is applied on board of a vehicle (weight, encumbrances, backpressure effect on the engine, safety, reliability). In this paper, a comprehensive mathematical model of an ORC unit bottomed a heavy duty engine, used for commercial vehicle, has been developed. The model is completed with the sizing of the two exchangers involved in the ORC plant: the heat recovery vapor generator (HRVG) and the condenser.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0158
Teresa Castiglione, Giuseppe Franzè, Angelo Algieri, Pietropaolo Morrone, Sergio Bova
The paper shows how specific requirements of the cooling system of an ICE can be met by actuating the coolant flow rate independently of engine speed, by means of an electric pump and of an ad-hoc developed control system. Given that the proposed methodology is valid for each condition, in the present paper the focus is on the engine operating under fully warmed conditions, with the aim to keep the wall temperature into the prescribed limits, with the lowest possible coolant flow rates. This goal is achieved by properly defining the controller parameters. The developed controller is based on the Robust Model Predictive Control approach, which makes use of a lumped parameter model of the engine cooling system. The model also includes the radiator-thermostatic valve-fan block and incorporates the nucleate boiling heat transfer regime.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0118
Marius Zubel, Stefan Pischinger, Benedikt Heuser
Within the cluster of excellence “Tailor-Made Fuels from Biomass” at the RWTH Aachen University, two novel biogenic fuels, namely 1-octanol and its isomer dibutyl ether (DBE), were identified and extensively analyzed in respect of their suitability for Diesel engine combustion. Both biofuels feature very different properties, especially regarding their ignitability. In previous works of the research cluster, promising synthesis routes with excellent yields for both fuels were found, using lignocellulosic biomass as source material. Both fuels were investigated as pure components in optical and thermodynamic single cylinder engines. For 1-octanol at lower part load, almost no soot emission could be measured, while with DBE the soot emissions were only about a quarter of that with conventional Diesel fuel. At high part load, the soot reduction of 1-octanol was more than 50% and for DBE more than 80 % respectively.
2017-08-29
Journal Article
2017-01-9000
Teresa Donateo, Antonio Ficarella
Abstract The design of a hybrid electric powertrain requires a complex optimization procedure because its performance will strongly depend on both the size of the components and the energy management strategy. The problem is particular critical in the aircraft field because of the strong constraints to be fulfilled (in particular in terms of weight and volume). The problem was addressed in the present investigation by linking an in-house simulation code for hybrid electric aircraft with a commercial many-objective optimization software. The design variables include the size of engine and electric motor, the specification of the battery (typology, nominal capacity, bus voltage), the cooling method of the motor and the battery management strategy. Several key performance indexes were suggested by the industrial partner. The four most important indexes were used as fitness functions: electric endurance, fuel consumption, take-off distance and powertrain volume.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1938
Shyam Sunder Manivannan, Gopkumar Kuttikrishnan, Rajesh Siva, Janarthanan C, G A Ramadass
Abstract The hybrid robot will be a battery operated four wheel drive vehicle with a rigid chassis for all terrain operation. The vehicle will be suited for various payloads based on applications with geological, atmospheric sensors and buried object identification at a depth of 8 to 100 m., etc. The vehicle will be remotely controlled through a RF signal, allows it to maneuver up to 5 km. The novelty of the design, is its capability for all terrain and ease of trafficability based on skid steering, self-alignment of sensors and vehicle traction in spite of possible inverted conditions and the vehicle can travel from land, snow, water and vice versa. The vehicle could be deployed for surveying coastline of water bodies, borderlines and also be extensively used in polar region for studying glacier aging and as advance vehicle for the convoys and polar mapping.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1950
J Suresh Kumar, Sakthivel B, Srinivasan B, Ramalingam Sivanantham
The automotive industry in world is facing the problem of reduction of emissions coming out of the engine. Also, the stringent emission norms imposed by the regulating body for transition from BS IV to BS VI urges the auto makers to concentrate on new technologies to reduce the emissions. One of the major emissions coming out of the diesel engine is oxides of nitrogen (NOx) which is detrimental to human health. This NOx emission is formed when the combustion temperature of engine exceeds the threshold limit. There are several methods available to reduce these NOx emissions formed in-cylinder. Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) is one such system, which reduces the NOx emission formed inside the engine by supplying a portion of the exhaust gases. By re-circulating exhaust gases, the air admitted to the engine is diluted. Further, due to the high latent heat of vaporization of water, water vapor tends to absorb more amount of heat that is generated during combustion.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1951
K Nantha Gopal, B. Ashok, Rishabh Bahuguna, Tanmay Prasad
Abstract Thermal management is one of the most challenging and innovative aspects of the automotive industry. The efficiency of the vehicle cooling framework unequivocally relies upon the air stream through the radiator core. Significant advances in thermal management are being embraced in the field of radiator material and coolant. The radiator shouldn't be exclusively credited for the reliable cooling of the engine. There are other auto parts that play an essential role in keeping engine temperature at a manageable level. The fan-shroud assembly is an important component of the cooling system. While the fan is responsible for drawing in air, the fan shroud's job is to ensure uniform air distribution to the radiator core. By assisting airflow in the engine compartment the fan shroud helps in dismissing excess heat from the engine. This assembly also prevents the recirculation of heated air through the cooling fan.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1953
Tushar Narendra Puri lng, Lalitkumar Ramujagir Soni lng, Sourabh Deshpande
Abstract The infliction of rigorous emission norms across the world has made the automobile industry to focus and dwell upon researches to reduce the emissions from internal combustion engines, namely diesel engines. Variation in fuel injection timing has better influence on reduction of engine exhaust emissions. This papers deals with the variation of fuel injection timing along with fuel injection pressure numerically on a 4 stroke, single cylinder, and direct injection diesel engine running at full load condition using CONVERGE CFD tool. As the piston and bowl geometry considered in this work is symmetric, only 60 degree sector of the piston cylinder assembly is considered for numerical simulation over complete 360 degree model.
Viewing 121 to 150 of 43870