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Viewing 31 to 60 of 43701
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1800
Robert White
Abstract Several analytical tools exist for estimating a driveshaft’s critical speed, from simple elementary beam theory to sophisticated FEA models. Ultimately, nothing is better than a test, because no one will argue with the outcome from a well-designed measurement. Impact response measurements are easy, but they tend to over predict the critical speed. A test which sweeps the shaft speed up until failure is telling, but the speed causing failure is strongly dependent on even small amounts of variation in rotor unbalance. Waterfall plots of shaft displacement measurements offer the best indication of critical speed, however sometimes the resonance isn’t unmistakable or multiple resonances exist, making the critical speed unclear. A method less susceptible to system variation is offered here, fitting shaft orbit measurements to the theoretical single degree of freedom equation.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1799
Nagasuresh Inavolu, Jaganmohan Rao Medisetti, S. Nanda Kumar, J Lingeshkumar, Akshay Loya, Mvgprasad MV
Abstract Engine noise reduction is one of the highest priorities in vehicle development from the viewpoint of meeting stringent noise regulations. Engine noise reduction involves identification of noise sources and suppression of noise by changing the response of sources to input excitations. Noise can originate from several mechanical sources in engine. The present work focuses on systematic study of the behavior or response of engine structure and its ancillaries to engine excitation and thereby assess their contribution to overall engine noise. The approach includes engine noise and vibration measurement and component ranking using engine noise and vibration measurement in a non-anechoic environment, structural analysis of engine including experimental modal testing of engine and its components, etc. Correlation of the above obtained results is performed to identify the noise sources. Later, ranking of critical components was performed based on results of cladding exercise.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1798
Jiri Navratil, Warren Seeley, Peng Wang, Shriram Siravara
Abstract The ability to accurately predict exhaust system acoustics, including transmission loss (TL) and tailpipe noise, based on CAD geometry has long been a requirement of most OEM’s and Tier 1 exhaust suppliers. Correlation to measurement data has been problematic under various operating conditions, including flow. This study was undertaken to develop robust modelling technique, ensuring sensible correlation between the 1-D models and test data. Ford use Ricardo WAVE as one of their 1-D NVH tools, which was chosen for the purpose of this benchmark study. The most commonly used metrics for evaluating the acoustical performance of mufflers are insertion loss (IL), TL, and noise reduction (NR). TL is often the first step of analysis, since it represents the inherent capability of the muffler to attenuate sound if both the source and termination are assumed to be anechoic. It can also be reliably measured and numerically simulated without having to connect to an engine.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1797
Adrien Mann, Raj Nair, Jaspreet Singh Gill, Brett Birschbach, Patrick Crowley
Abstract Exhaust systems including mufflers are commonly mounted on engines to reduce the firing cycle noise originating from the combustion process. However, mufflers also produce flow-induced self-noise, originating from the complex flow path throughout the muffler. As an engine prototype is not available in the early stages of a development program, it is challenging to assess the acoustic performance of the full system when only experiment is available. It is also difficult to pinpoint the design features of a muffler generating noise, as a portion of the noise is generated internally. Numerical approaches are a possible alternative. However, capturing non-linear dissipation mechanisms and thermal fluctuations of exhaust flows is challenging, while necessary to accurately predict flow noise.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1802
Dong chul Lee, Insoo Jung, Jaemin Jin, Stephan Brandl, Mehdi Mehrgou
Abstract In the automotive industry, various simulation-based analysis methods have been suggested and applied to reduce the time and cost required to develop the engine structure to improve the NVH performance of powertrain. This simulation is helpful to set the engine design concept in the initial phase of the powertrain development schedules. However, when using the conventional simulation method with a uniformed force, the simulation results sometimes show different results than the test results. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method for predicting the radiated noise level of a diesel engine using actual combustion excitation force. Based on the analytical radiated noise development target, we identify the major components of the engine that are beyond this development target by in the frequency range. The components of the problem found in this way are reflected in the engine design of the early development stage to shorten the development time.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1801
Sivasankaran Sadasivam, Aditya Palsule, Ekambaram Loganathan, Nagasuresh Inavolu, Jaganmohan Rao Medisetti
Abstract Powertrain is the major source of noise and vibration in commercial vehicles and has significant contribution on both interior and exterior noise levels. It is vital to reduce the radiated noise from powertrain to meet customer expectations of vehicle comfort and to abide by the legislative noise requirements. Sound intensity mapping technique can identify the critical components of noise radiation from the powertrain. Sound intensity mapping has revealed that oil sump as one of the major contributors for radiated noise from powertrain. Accounting the effect of dynamic coupling of oil on the sump is crucial in predicting its noise radiation performance. Through numerical methods, some amount of work done in predicting the dynamic characteristics of structures filled with fluid.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1808
Francis Nardella
Abstract In a previous report, it was shown that power transmission through the camshaft reduced the first mode natural frequency of the power train and translated its convergence with dominant engine excitatory harmonics to a lower engine speed resulting in a marked reduction in torsional vibration while achieving 2/1 gear reduction for a 4-stroke 6-cylinder compression ignition (CI) engine for aviation. This report describes a sweep though 2 and 4-stroke engines with differing numbers of cylinders configured as standard gear reduction (SGRE) and with power transmission through the camshaft (CDSE) or an equivalent dedicated internal driveshaft (DISE). Four and 6-cylinder 4-stroke engines were modeled as opposed boxer engines. Four and 6-cylinder 2-stroke engines and 8, 10 and 12-cylinder 2-stroke and 4-stroke engines were modeled as 180° V-engines. All 2-stroke engines were considered to be piston ported and configured as SGRE or DISE.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1811
Jouji Kimura, Tatsuya Tanaka, Kenjiro Hakomoto, Kousuke Kawase, Shinichiro Kobayashi
Abstract Since the sizes of the flywheel and clutch have been enlarged due to downsizing of diesel engines, the mass and moment of inertia at the crankshaft rear end have increased. Consequently, the serious bending stresses have appeared in the crankshaft rear. This paper describes the characteristics of those serious bending stresses, based on the mechanism for whirl resonance. The whirl resonance is largely impacted by the mass of the flywheel and clutch and by the distance from the crank-journal center of the rear end to the center of gravity of the flywheel and clutch.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1810
Shinichiro Kobayashi, Kenjiro Hakomoto, Kousuke Kawase, Makoto Kidokoro, Jouji Kimura
Abstract As the issue of global warming has become more serious, needs for downsizing or weight saving of an engine has been getting stronger, and forces exerted on engine parts, especially force on a crankshaft, have been getting larger and larger. In addition, since a crankshaft is a heavy engine part, needs for saving weight have been getting stronger and stronger. Therefore, determining the mechanism of high stress generation in a crankshaft system is urgently needed. This paper describes the characteristics and mechanism of a severe bending stress caused by the whirl of crankshaft rear end of an inline 6-cylinder medium-duty diesel engine. The authors measured bending stress on the fillets of the crankshaft, and found severe levels of sharp peaks in the stress curves for the crankshaft rear. To figure out why the severe levels of sharp peaks appear, they analyzed and studied the measured data.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1809
Dhanesh Purekar
Abstract Engine noise is one of the significant aspects of product quality for light and medium duty diesel engine market applications. Gear whine is one of those noise issues, which is considered objectionable and impacts the customer’s perception of the product quality. Gear whine could result due to defects in the gear manufacturing process and/or due to inaccurate design of the gear macro and micro geometry. The focus of this technical paper is to discuss gear whine considerations from the production plant perspective. This includes quick overview of the measurement process, test cell environment, noise acceptance criteria considerations. A gear whine case study is presented based on the data collected in the test cell at the engine plant. Gear whine data acquired on current product and next generation of prototype engines is analyzed and presented. This paper concludes by highlighting the lessons learned from the case study.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1818
Ramya Teja, T. R. Milind, Rodney C. Glover, Sunil Sonawane
Abstract Helical gears are commonly used instead of spur gears due to their potential higher load carrying capacity, efficiency and lower noise. Transmission Error (TE) is defined as deviation from perfect motion transfer by a gear pair. TE is dominant source of gear whine noise and hence gears pairs are generally analyzed and designed for low TE. In the process of designing helical gears for lower TE, the shuttling moment can become a significant excitation source. Shuttling moment is caused due to shifting of the centroid of tooth normal force back and forth across the lead. The amount of shuttling force or moment is produced by combination of design parameters, misalignment and manufacturing errors. Limited details are available on this excitation and its effect on overall noise radiated from gear box or transmission at its gear mesh frequency and harmonics.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1819
Cyril Nerubenko, George Nerubenko
Abstract The problem of crankshaft torsional vibrations for heavy car engines is important for the V8 engines. The paper describes the results of the dynamical study of the new patented Torsional Vibration Dampers mounted on a crankshaft in V8 engines. Design and structure of Torsional Vibration Damper is based on author’s US Patent 7,438,165 having the control system with instantaneous frequencies tuner for all frequencies of running engine. Analysis and disadvantages of conventional rubber and viscous Crank Dampers are shown. The focus of the study is on Torsional Vibration Damper having the mechanical self-tuning structure applicable for V8 engines. Mathematical model based on the system of ordinary differential equations describing the rotation and vibration of mechanical components has been used for the analysis of the dynamic behavior of V8 engine crankshaft system having proposed Torsional Vibration Damper.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1820
Martin Sopouch, Josip Hozmec, Alessandro Cadario
Abstract This paper presents a simulation environment and methodology for noise and vibration analyses of a driven rear axle in a bus application, with particular focus on medium to high frequency range (400 Hz to 3 kHz). The workflow demonstrates structure borne noise and sound radiation analyses. The fully flexible Multi-Body Dynamics (MBD) model - serving to cover the actual mechanical excitation mechanisms and the structural domain - includes geometrical contacts of hypoid gear in the central gear and planetary gear integrated at hubs, considering non-linear meshing stiffness. Contribution of aforementioned gear stages, as well as the propeller shaft universal joint at the pinion axle, on overall axle noise levels is investigated by means of sensitivity analysis. Based on the surface velocities computed at the vibrating axle-housing structure the Wave Based Technique (WBT) is employed to solve the airborne noise problem and predict the radiated sound.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1826
Sagar Deshmukh, Sandip Hazra
Abstract Engine mounting system maintains the position of powertrain in the vehicle with respect to chassis and other accessories during inertia, torque reaction loads and roadway disturbances. The mounting system also plays a role in terms of isolation of the rest of the vehicle and its occupants from powertrain and helps in maintaining vehicle ride and handling condition. This paper investigates the performance comparison between hydromount and switchable hydromount during idle and ride performance. The optimization scheme aims to improve the performance of the mounting system in order to achieve overall powertrain performance and NVH attribute balancing through switchable mount technology.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1827
Michael J. Santora, Cyril Gbenga Ige, Jeff Otto, David Egolf
Abstract A muffler attached to an engine attenuates sound over a dedicated frequency range. This research involves the development of an active muffler that is keyed to the revolutions per minute (rpm) of the engine and suppresses the fundamental frequency being exhausted through the tailpipe. The active muffler consists of a tracking side-branch resonator terminated with a composite piezoelectric transducer. The use of an exponential horn as a resonating cavity and terminated with a composite piezoelectric transducer is presented. This would create Electromechanical Active Helmholtz Resonator (EMAHR) creates a notch that can be moved between 200-1000 Hz. The use of acoustical-to-mechanical, mechanical-to-electrical, and analog-to-digital transformations to develop a system model for the active muffler are presented. These transforms will be presented as two-port network parameters. The use of two-port networks to model the electroacoustic system are a defining factor in the analysis.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1829
Guillaume Loussert
Abstract The new fuel efficiency and emission standards have forced OEMs to put emphasis on different strategies such as engine downsizing, cylinder deactivation… Unfortunately these new technologies may lead to increased powertrain vibrations generated by the engine and transmitted to the chassis and the car cabin, such that their reduction or elimination has become a key topic for the automotive industry. The use of active engine mounts, acting directly on the fluid of an hydromount, or active vibration dampers, acting as an inertial mass-spring system, are very effective solutions, particularly when using electromagnetic based actuators. Nevertheless, all electromagnetic actuators technologies are not equals and the choice of such actuators must be considered carefully by taking into account the full performances and the overall cost of the solutions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1822
Kopal Agarwal, Sandip Hazra
Abstract In this study we will be discussing two issues related to vibrations which effect car owners. The first one, called lateral shake, can be described as a lateral vibration felt by customer in low speed of around 1200rpm, when vehicle shakes severely in Y-direction. The vibration is significantly felt at the thighs of passengers. A 16DOF rigid body model is established to simulate the power train & body system. The second vibration issue, called drive away shudder (also known as clutch judder/chatter/shudder) is a vibration felt by customers at the time of marching off. The vibration is significantly felt at the time of clutch engagement as a shiver in vehicle. While the common solution of shudder is to optimize clutch friction & engagement, in this study solution has been provided by optimizing the power train mounting system. Clutch shudder is observed on a medium sized car when driven in the range of 10-20 Km/h.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1823
Dennis J. Kinchen
Abstract Powertrain mounting systems design and development involves creating and optimizing a solution using specific mount rates and evaluation over multiple operating conditions. These mount rates become the recommended “nominal” rates in the specifications. The powertrain mounts typically contain natural materials. These properties have variation, resulting in a tolerance around the nominal specification and lead to differences in noise and vibration performance. A powertrain mounting system that is robust to this variation is desired. The design and development process requires evaluation of these mounts, within tolerance, to ensure that the noise and vibration performance is consistently met. During the hardware development of the powertrain mounting system, a library of mounts that include the range of production variation is studied. However, this is time consuming.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1824
Reza Kashani, Karthik S. Jayakumar, Neville Bugli, Jeff Lapp
Abstract Passive, tuned acoustic absorbers, such as Helmholtz resonators (HR) and quarter-wave tubes, are commonly used solutions for abating the low-frequency tonal noise in air induction systems. Since absorption at multiple frequencies is required, multiple absorbers tuned to different frequencies are commonly used. Typically, the large size and multiple numbers of these devices under the hood is a packaging challenge. Also, the lack of acoustic damping narrows their effective bandwidth and creates undesirable side lobes. Active noise control could address all of the above-mentioned issues. Most active noise control systems use feedforward adaptive algorithms as their controllers. These complex algorithms need fast, powerful digital signal processors to run. To ensure the convergence of the adaptation algorithm, the rate of adaptation should be made slow.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1835
Nader Dolatabadi, Ramin Rahmani, Stephanos Theodossiades, Homer Rahnejat, Guy Blundell, Guillaume Bernard
Abstract Clutches are commonly utilised in passenger type and off-road heavy-duty vehicles to disconnect the engine from the driveline and other parasitic loads. In off-road heavy-duty vehicles, along with fuel efficiency start-up functionality at extended ambient conditions, such as low temperature and intake absolute pressure are crucial. Off-road vehicle manufacturers can overcome the parasitic loads in these conditions by oversizing the engine. Caterpillar Inc. as the pioneer in off-road technology has developed a novel clutch design to allow for engine downsizing while vehicle’s performance is not affected. The tribological behaviour of the clutch will be crucial to start engagement promptly and reach the maximum clutch capacity in the shortest possible time and smoothest way in terms of dynamics. A multi-body dynamics model of the clutch system is developed in MSC ADAMS.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1834
Dirk von Werne, Prasanna Chaduvula, Patrick Stahl, Michael Jordan, Jamison Huber, Korcan Kucukcoskun, Mircea Niculescu
Abstract Fan noise can form a significant part of the vehicle noise signature and needs hence to be optimized in view of exterior noise and operator exposure. Putting together unsteady CFD simulation with acoustic FEM modeling, tonal and broadband fan noise can be accurately predicted, accounting for the sound propagation through engine compartment and vehicle frame structure. This paper focuses on method development and validation in view of the practical vehicle design process. In a step by-step approach, the model has been validated against a dedicated test-set-up, so that good accuracy of operational fan noise prediction could be achieved. Main focus was on the acoustic transfer through the engine compartment. The equivalent acoustic transfer through radiators/heat exchangers is modeled based on separate detailed acoustic models. The updating process revealed the sensitivity of various components in the engine compartment.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1837
Paul R. Donavan, Carrie Janello
Abstract Acoustic beamforming was used to localize noise sources on heavy trucks operating on highways in California and North Carolina at a total of 20 sites. Over 1,200 trucks were measured under a variety of operating conditions, including cruise on level highways, on upgrades, down degrades, low speed acceleration, and for various speeds and pavements. The contours produced by the beamforming measurements were used to identify specific source contributions under these conditions and for a variety of heavy trucks. Consistently, the highest noise levels were seen at the tire-pavement interface, with lesser additional noise radiated from the engine compartment. Noise from elevated exhaust stacks was only documented for less than 5% of the trucks measured. The results were further reduced to produce vertical profiles of noise levels versus height above the roadway. The profiles were normalized to the highest noise level at ground level.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1845
Jon Furlich, Jason Blough, Darrell Robinette
Abstract When a manual transmission (MT) powertrain is subjected to high speeds and high torques, the vehicle driveshaft, and other components experience an increase in stored potential energy. When the engine and driveshaft are decoupled during an up or down shift, the potential energy is released causing clunk during the shift event. The customer desires a smooth shift thus reduction of clunk will improve experience and satisfaction. In this study, a six-speed MT, rear-wheel-drive (RWD) passenger vehicle was used to experimentally capture acoustic and vibration data during the clunk event. To replicate the in-situ results, additional data was collected and analyzed for powertrain component roll and pitch. A lumped parameter model of key powertrain components was created to replicate the clunk event and correlate with test data. The lumped parameter model was used to modify clutch tip-out parameters, which resulted in reduced prop shaft oscillations.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1844
Jiawei Liu, Yangfan Liu, J. Stuart Bolton
Abstract In modern engine design, downsizing and reducing weight while still providing an increased amount of power has been a general trend in recent decades. Traditionally, an engine design with superior NVH performance usually comes with a heavier, thus sturdier structure. Therefore, modern engine design requires that NVH be considered in the very early design stage to avoid modifications of engine structure at the last minute, when very few changes can be made. NVH design optimization of engine components has become more practical due to the development of computer software and hardware. However, there is still a need for smarter algorithms to draw a direct relationship between the design and the radiated sound power. At the moment, techniques based on modal acoustic transfer vectors (MATVs) have gained popularity in design optimization for their good performance in sound pressure prediction.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1846
Fabio Bianciardi, Karl Janssens, Konstantinos Gryllias, Simone Delvecchio, Claudio Manna
Abstract The noise radiated by an ICE engine results from a mixture of various complex sources such as combustion, injection, piston slap, turbocharger, etc. Some of these have been categorized as combustion related noise and others as mechanical noise. Of great concern is the assessment of combustion noise which, under some operating conditions, is likely to predominate over the other sources of noise. The residual noise, produced by various other sources, is commonly referred to as mechanical noise. Being able to extract combustion and mechanical noise is of prime interest in the development phase of the engine and also for diagnostic purposes. This paper presents the application of combustion mechanical noise separation techniques on a V8 engine. Three techniques, namely the multi regression analysis, the classical Wiener filter and the cyclostationary (synchronous) Wiener filter, have been investigated.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1840
Thierry Bourdon, Rainer Weber, Johann Massinger
Abstract Virtual NVH Engineering is going to be reviewed in this paper for the development of FIE (fuel injection equipment) components. Some examples based on high pressure pumps and SCR air cooling injectors will illustrate the explanation. The use of a 3D FEM vibro-acoustic model is essential to support virtual NVH Engineering. Therefore, a review of techniques to study components is done first. Model correlation is also an important topic which will be discussed and which makes any NVH engineer confident in using a model instead of real HW. It is quite challenging to establish these models, as they must mimic the entire physical phenomenon of real structure borne hardware sound in the whole audible frequency range. Limitations of models are also identified and allow answering one true question: Should we stay considering only each component separately or as an assembly of parts of a larger system in the development process?
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1843
Taejin Shin, Jaemin Jin, Sang Kwon Lee, Insoo Jung
Abstract This paper presents the influence of radiated noise from engine surface according to assembly condition between the engine block and oil pan. At the first, the force exciting the main bearing of cylinder block is calculated by using a multi-body dynamics model of the engine crankshaft. Secondly, the modal analysis is processed to obtain the mode contribution and modal participation factors for the FEM of a virtual cylinder block. Thirdly, the radiated noise from a structure is calculated by acoustic-FEM analysis. This structure is assembled by the virtual oil pan with a rigid connection method and a soft connection method. The sandwich panel connection model is used for the soft connection method. The sound radiated from this assemble structure is calculated according to two different connection properties respectively. The sound matrices for two results are compared using an objective method.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1850
Samaneh Arabi, Glen Steyer, Zhaohui Sun, Jeffrey Nyquist
Abstract The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirement for 54.5mpg by 2025 to reduce greenhouse gases has pushed the industry to look for alternative fuels to run vehicles. Electricity is of those green energies that can help auto industry to achieve those strict requirements. However, the electric or hybrid-electric vehicles brought new challenges into science and engineering world including the Noise and Vibration issues which are usually tied up with both airborne and structural noises. The electromagnetic force plays a significant role in acoustic noise radiation in the electric motor which is an air-gap radial Maxwell force. This paper describes an innovative approach to model the physics of noise radiated by the electric motor.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1874
Tongyang Shi, Yangfan Liu, J Stuart Bolton, Frank Eberhardt, Warner Frazer
Abstract Wideband Acoustical Holography (WBH), which is a monopole-based, equivalent source procedure (J. Hald, “Wideband Acoustical Holography,” INTER-NOISE 2014), has proven to offer accurate noise source visualization results in experiments with a simple noise source: e.g., a loudspeaker (T. Shi, Y. Liu, J.S. Bolton, “The Use of Wideband Holography for Noise Source Visualization”, NOISE-CON 2016). From a previous study, it was found that the advantage of this procedure is the ability to optimize the solution in the case of an under-determined system: i.e., when the number of measurements is much smaller than the number of parameters that must be estimated in the model. In the present work, a diesel engine noise source was measured by using one set of measurements from a thirty-five channel combo-array placed in front of the engine.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1871
Nobutaka Tsujiuchi, Masahiro Akei, Akihito Ito, Daisuke Kubota, Koichi Osamura
Abstract This paper describes new method for selecting optimal field points in Inverse-Numerical Acoustic analysis (INA), and its application to construction of a sound source model for diesel engines. INA identifies the surface vibration of a sound source by using acoustic transfer functions and actual sound pressures measured at field points located near the sound source. When measuring sound pressures with INA, it is necessary to determine the field point arrangement. Increased field points leads to longer test and analysis time. Therefore, guidelines for selecting the field point arrangement are needed to conduct INA efficiently. The authors focused on the standard deviations of distance between sound source elements and field points and proposed a new guideline for optimal field point selection in our past study. In that study, we verified the effectiveness of this guideline using a simple plate model.
Viewing 31 to 60 of 43701