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Viewing 271 to 300 of 44126
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0046
Richard Stone, Ben Williams, Paul Ewart
Abstract The increased efficiency and specific output with Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) engines are well known, but so too are the higher levels of Particulate Matter emissions compared with Port Fuel Injection (PFI) engines. To minimise Particulate Matter emissions, then it is necessary to understand and control the mixture preparation process, and important insights into GDI engine mixture preparation and combustion can be obtained from optical access engines. Such data is also crucial for validating models that predict flows, sprays and air fuel ratio distributions. The purpose of this paper is to review a number of optical techniques; the interpretation of the results is engine specific so will not be covered here. Mie scattering can be used for semi-quantitative measurements of the fuel spray and this can be followed with Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) for determining the air fuel ratio and temperature distributions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0048
Jose V. Pastor, Jose M. Garcia-Oliver, Antonio Garcia, Mattia Pinotti
Abstract In the past few years’ various studies have shown how the application of a highly premixed dual fuel combustion for CI engines leads a strong reduction for both pollutant emissions and fuel consumption. In particular a drastic soot and NOx reduction were achieved. In spite of the most common strategy for dual fueling has been represented by using two different injection systems, various authors are considering the advantages of using a single injection system to directly inject blends in the chamber. In this scenario, a characterization of the behavior of such dual-fuel blend spray became necessary, both in terms of inert and reactive ambient conditions. In this work, a light extinction imaging (LEI) has been performed in order to obtain two-dimensional soot distribution information within a spray flame of different diesel/gasoline commercial fuel blends. All the measurements were conducted in an optically accessible two-stroke engine equipped with a single-hole injector.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0053
Silvio A. Pinamonti, Domenico Brancale, Gerhard Meister, Pablo Mendoza
Abstract The use of state of the art simulation tools for effective front-loading of the calibration process is essential to support the additional efforts required by the new Real Driving Emission (RDE) legislation. The process needs a critical model validation where the correlation in dynamic conditions is used as a preliminary insight into the bounds of the representation domain of engine mean values. This paper focuses on the methodologies for correlating dynamic simulations with emissions data measured during dynamic vehicle operation (fundamental engine parameters and gaseous emissions) obtained using dedicated instrumentation on a diesel vehicle, with a particular attention for oxides of nitrogen NOx specie. This correlation is performed using simulated tests run within AVL’s mean value engine and engine aftertreatment (EAS) model MoBEO (Model Based Engine Optimization).
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0054
Francesco de Nola, Giovanni Giardiello, Alfredo Gimelli, Andrea Molteni, Massimiliano Muccillo, Roberto Picariello
Abstract In the last few years, the automotive industry had to face three main challenges: compliance with more severe pollutant emission limits, better engine performance in terms of torque and drivability and simultaneous demand for a significant reduction in fuel consumption. These conflicting goals have driven the evolution of automotive engines. In particular, the achievement of these mandatory aims, together with the increasingly stringent requirements for carbon dioxide reduction, led to the development of highly complex engine architectures needed to perform advanced operating strategies. Therefore, Variable Valve Actuation (VVA), Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR), Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI), turbocharging, powertrain hybridization and other solutions have gradually and widely been introduced into modern internal combustion engines, enhancing the possibilities of achieving the required goals.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0040
Insuk Ko, Kyoungdoug Min, Federico Rulli, Alessandro D'Adamo, Fabio Berni, Stefano Fontanesi
Abstract The increasing interest in the application of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to Internal Combustion Engines (hereafter ICEs) flows is motivated by its capability to capture spatial and temporal evolution of turbulent flow structures. Furthermore, LES is universally recognized as capable of simulating highly unsteady and random phenomena driving cycle-to-cycle variability (CCV) and cycle-resolved events such as knock and misfire. Several quality criteria were proposed in the recent past to estimate LES uncertainty: however, definitive conclusions on LES quality criteria for ICEs are still far to be found. This paper describes the application of LES quality criteria to the TCC-III single-cylinder optical engine from University of Michigan and GM Global R&D; the analyses are carried out under motored condition.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0039
Daniele Piazzullo, Michela Costa, Youngchul Ra, Vittorio ROCCO, Ankith Ullal
Abstract Bio-derived fuels are drawing more and more attention in the internal combustion engine (ICE) research field in recent years. Those interests in use of renewable biofuels in ICE applications derive from energy security issues and, more importantly, from environment pollutant emissions concerns. High fidelity numerical study of engine combustion requires advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to be coupled with detailed chemical kinetic models. This task becomes extremely challenging if real fuels are taken into account, as they include a mixture of hundreds of different hydrocarbons, which prohibitively increases computational cost. Therefore, along with employing surrogate fuel models, reduction of detailed kinetic models for multidimensional engine applications is preferred. In the present work, a reduced mechanism was developed for primary reference fuel (PRF) using the directed relation graph (DRG) approach.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0038
Golnoush Ghiasi, Irufan Ahmed, Yuri M. Wright, Jann Koch, Nedunchezhian Swaminathan
Abstract Engines with reduced emissions and improved efficiency are of high interest for road transport. However, achieving these two goals is challenging and various concepts such as PFI/DI/HCCI/PCCI are explored by engine manufacturers. The computational fluid dynamics is becoming an integral part of modern engine development programme because this method provides access to in-cylinder flow and thermo-chemical processes to develop a closer understanding to tailor tumble and swirling motions to construct green engines. The combustion modelling, its accuracy and robustness play a vital role in this. Out of many modelling methods proposed in the past flamelet based methods are quite attractive for SI engine application. In this study, FlaRe (Flamelets revised for physical consistencies) approach is used to simulate premixed combustion inside a gasoline PFI single-cylinder, four-stroke SI engine.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0042
Ali Jannoun, Xavier Tauzia, Pascal Chesse, Alain Maiboom
Abstract Residual gas plays a crucial role in the combustion process of SI engines. It acts as a diluent and has a huge impact on pollutant emissions (NOx and CO emissions), engine efficiency and tendency to knock. Therefore, characterizing the residual gas fraction is an essential task for engine modelling and calibration purposes. Thus, an in-cylinder sampling technique has been developed on a spark ignition VVT engine to measure residual gas fraction. Two gas sampling valves were flush mounted to the combustion chamber walls; they are located between the 2 intake valves and between intake and exhaust valves respectively. In-cylinder gas was sampled during the compression stroke and stored in a sampling bag using a vacuum pump. The process was repeated during a large number of engine cycles in order to get a sufficient volume of gas which was then characterized with a standard gas analyzer.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0065
Helmut Ruhland, Thomas Lorenz, Jens Dunstheimer, Albert Breuer, Maziar Khosravi
Abstract An integral part of combustion system development for previous NA gasoline engines was the optimization of charge motion towards the best compromise in terms of full load performance, part load stability, emissions and, last but not least, fuel economy. This optimum balance may potentially be different in GTDI engines. While it is generally accepted that an increased charge motion level improves the mixture preparation in direct injection gasoline engines, the tradeoff in terms of performance seems to become less dominant as the boosting systems of modern engines are typically capable enough to compensate the flow losses generated by the more restrictive ports. Nevertheless, the increased boost level does not come free; increased charge motion generates higher pumping- and wall heat losses. Hence it is questionable and engine dependent, whether more charge motion is always better.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0064
En-Zhe Song, Shi-Chao Chu, Li-Ping Yang, Zhen-Ting Liu
Abstract A CFD model of natural gas engine was established, and working process from intake stroke to combustion stroke was simulated in this paper. Based on the validation of CFD model through experimental method, the combustion characteristics of lean-burn natural gas engine are studied under different ignition timings and different ignition energies. Results indicate that, the in-cylinder indicated mean effective pressure increases with the ignition timing advancing from 22°CA BTDC to 32°CA BTDC at the same load level. Meanwhile, the heat release rate is increased by 23.18J/°CA and its peak phase is advanced by 9°CA. The peak pressure is also increased by 45.95% and its phase is advanced by 4.5°CA. On the other hand, when the ignition energy decreases from 91.97mJ to 33.1mJ at the same load level, the in-cylinder indicated mean effective pressure decreases.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0063
Sebastiano Breda, Alessandro D'Adamo, Stefano Fontanesi, Marco Del Pecchia, Simona Merola, Adrian Irimescu
Abstract The recent interest in alternative non-fossil fuels has led researchers to evaluate several alcohol-based formulations. However, one of the main requirements for innovative fuels is to be compatible with existing units’ hardware, so that full replacement or smart flexible-fuel strategies can be smoothly adopted. n-Butanol is considered as a promising candidate to replace commercial gasoline, given its ease of production from bio-mass and its main physical and chemical properties similar to those of Gasoline. The compared behavior of n-butanol and gasoline was analyzed in an optically-accessible DISI engine in a previous paper [1]. CFD simulations explained the main outcomes of the experimental campaign in terms of combustion behavior for two operating conditions. In particular, the first-order role of the slower evaporation rate of n-butanol compared to gasoline was highlighted when the two fuels were operated under the same injection phasing.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0069
Hyunwook Park, Jugon Shin, Choongsik Bae
Abstract The spray and combustion of diesel fuel were investigated to provide a better understanding of the evaporation and combustion process under the simulated cold-start condition of a diesel engine. The experiment was conducted in a constant volume combustion chamber and the engine cranking period was selected as the target ambient condition. Mie scattering and shadowgraph techniques were used to visualize the liquid- and vapor-phase of the fuel under evaporating non-combustion conditions (oxygen concentration=0%). In-chamber pressure and direct flame visualization were acquired for spray combustion conditions (oxygen concentration=21%). The fuel was injected at an injection pressure of 30 MPa, which is the typical pressure during the cranking period.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0071
Fadila Maroteaux, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
Abstract Ignition delay time is key to any hydrocarbon combustion process. In that sense, this parameter has to be known accurately, and especially for internal combustion engine applications. Combustion timing is one of the most important factors influencing overall engine performances like power output, combustion efficiency, emissions, in-cylinder peak pressure, etc. In the case of low temperature combustion (LTC) mode (e.g. HCCI mode), this parameter is controlled by chemical kinetics. In this paper, an ignition delay time model including 7 direct reactions and 13 species coupled with a temperature criterion is described. This mechanism has been obtained from the previous 26-step n-heptane reduced mechanism, focusing on the low temperature region which is the most important phase during the two stage combustion process. The complete model works with 7 reactions until the critical temperature is reached, leading to the detection of the ignition delay time value.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0068
Roberto Finesso, Ezio Spessa, Yixin Yang, Giuseppe Conte, Gennaro Merlino
Abstract A real-time approach has been developed and assessed to control BMEP (brake mean effective pressure) and MFB50 (crank angle at which 50% of fuel mass has burnt) in a Euro 6 1.6L GM diesel engine. The approach is based on the use of feed-forward ANNs (artificial neural networks), which have been trained using virtual tests simulated by a previously developed low-throughput physical engine model. The latter is capable of predicting the heat release and the in-cylinder pressure, as well as the related metrics (MFB50, IMEP - indicated mean effective pressure) on the basis of an improved version of the accumulated fuel mass approach. BMEP is obtained from IMEP taking into account friction losses. The low-throughput physical model does not require high calibration effort and is also suitable for control-oriented applications.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0066
Maria Cristina Cameretti, Roberta De Robbio, Raffaele Tuccillo
Abstract The present study deals with the simulation of a Diesel engine fuelled by natural gas/diesel in dual fuel mode to optimize the engine behaviour in terms of performance and emissions. In dual fuel mode, the natural gas is introduced into the engine’s intake system. Near the end of the compression stroke, diesel fuel is injected and ignites, causing the natural gas to burn. The engine itself is virtually unaltered, but for the addition of a gas injection system. The CO2 emissions are considerably reduced because of the lower carbon content of the fuel. Furthermore, potential advantages of dual-fuel engines include diesel-like efficiency and brake mean effective pressure with much lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen and particulate matter. In previous papers, the authors have presented some CFD results obtained by two 3D codes by varying the diesel/NG ratio and the diesel pilot injection timing at different loads.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0087
Maxime Pochet, Ida Truedsson, Fabrice Foucher, Hervé Jeanmart, Francesco Contino
Abstract Ammonia and hydrogen can be produced from water, air and excess renewable electricity (Power-to-fuel) and are therefore a promising alternative in the transition from fossil fuel energy to cleaner energy sources. An Homogeneous-Charge Compression-Ignition (HCCI) engine is therefore being studied to use both fuels under a variable blending ratio for Combined Heat and Power (CHP) production. Due to the high auto-ignition resistance of ammonia, hydrogen is required to promote and stabilize the HCCI combustion. Therefore the research objective is to investigate the HCCI combustion of varying hydrogen-ammonia blending ratios in a 16:1 compression ratio engine. A specific focus is put on maximizing the ammonia proportion as well as minimizing the NOx emissions that could arise from the nitrogen contained in the ammonia.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0089
S. Vedharaj, R. Vallinayagam, Yanzhao An, Alaaeldin Dawood, Mohammad Izadi Najafabadi, Bart Somers, Junseok Chang, Bengt Johansson
Abstract The literature study on PPC in optical engine reveals investigations on OH chemiluminescence and combustion stratification. So far, mostly PRF fuel is studied and it is worthwhile to examine the effect of fuel properties on PPC. Therefore, in this work, fuel having different octane rating and physical properties are selected and PPC is studied in an optical engine. The fuels considered in this study are diesel, heavy naphtha, light naphtha and their corresponding surrogates such as heptane, PRF50 and PRF65 respectively. Without EGR (Intake O2 = 21%), these fuels are tested at an engine speed of 1200 rpm, fuel injection pressure of 800 bar and pressure at TDC = 35 bar. SOI is changed from late to early fuel injection timings to study PPC and the shift in combustion regime from CI to PPC is explored for all fuels. An increased understanding on the effect of fuel octane number, physical properties and chemical composition on combustion and emission formation is obtained.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0090
Robert E. Morgan, Morgan Heikal, Emily Pike-Wilson
Abstract Traffic related NOx and particle emission remain a significant concern particularly in the urban environment. Electrification offers a medium to long term solution, but there remains a need to significantly reduce internal combustion engine emissions in the short and medium term, and potentially in the long term for long range inter city transportation. Late injection low temperature combustion (LTC) has the potential to achieve ultra-low emissions levels in a compression ignition engine by increasing the lean pre-mixed burn fraction. However, significant quantities of diluent are normally required to achieve the required delay in ignition and pre-mixing to achieve LTC. This results in high boost requirements, increased pumping work and the complexity of the air handling system and potentially adversely impacting fuel economy.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0083
Hassan Khatamnejad, Shahram Khalilarya, Samad Jafarmadar, Mostafa Mirsalim, Mufaddel Dahodwala
Abstract RCCI strategy gained popularity in automotive applications due to lower fuel consumption, less emissions formation and higher engine performance in compared with other diesel combustion strategies. This study presents results of an experimental and numerical investigation on RCCI combustion using natural gas as a low reactivity premixed fuel with advanced injection of diesel fuel as a high reactivity fuel in a CI engine. An advanced three dimensional CFD simulation coupled with chemical kinetic developed to examine the effects of diesel injection timing, diesel/natural gas ratio and diesel fuel included spray angle on combustion and emissions formation in various engine loads and speeds, in a heavy duty diesel engine.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0084
Giacomo Belgiorno, Nikolaos Dimitrakopoulos, Gabriele Di Blasio, Carlo Beatrice, Martin Tuner, Per Tunestal
Abstract In this paper, a parametric analysis on the main engine calibration parameters applied on gasoline Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) is performed. Theoretically, the PPC concept permits to improve both the engine efficiencies and the NOx-soot trade-off simultaneously compared to the conventional diesel combustion. This work is based on the design of experiments (DoE), statistical approach, and investigates on the engine calibration parameters that might affect the efficiencies and the emissions of a gasoline PPC. The full factorial DoE analysis based on three levels and three factors (33 factorial design) is performed at three engine operating conditions of the Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Cycles (WLTC). The pilot quantity (Qpil), the crank angle position when 50% of the total heat is released (CA50), and the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) factors are considered. The goal is to identify an engine calibration with high efficiency and low emissions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0086
Yanzhao An, S. Vedharaj, R. Vallinayagam, Alaaeldin Dawood, Jean-Baptiste MASURIER, Mohammad Izadi Najafabadi, Bart Somers, Junseok Chang, Bengt Johansson
Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatic on combustion stratification and particulate emissions for PRF60. Experiments were performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for TPRF0 (100% v/v PRF60), TPRF20 (20% v/v toluene + 80% PRF60) and TPRF40 (40% v/v toluene + 60% PRF60). TPRF mixtures were prepared in such a way that the RON of all test blends was same (RON = 60). Single injection strategy with a fuel injection pressure of 800 bar was adopted for all test fuels. Start of injection (SOI) was changed from early to late fuel injection timings, representing various modes of combustion viz HCCI, PPC and CDC. High-speed video of the in-cylinder combustion process was captured and one-dimensional stratification analysis was performed from the intensity of images. Particle size, distribution and concentration were measured and linked with the in-cylinder combustion images.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0080
Ross Ryskamp, Gregory Thompson, Daniel Carder, John Nuszkowski
Abstract Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) is a form of dual-fuel combustion that exploits the reactivity difference between two fuels to control combustion phasing. This combustion approach limits the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and soot while retaining high thermal efficiency. The research presented herein was performed to determine the influences that high reactivity (diesel) fuel properties have on RCCI combustion characteristics, exhaust emissions, fuel efficiency, and the operable load range. A 4-cylinder, 1.9 liter, light-duty compression-ignition (CI) engine was converted to run on diesel fuel (high reactivity fuel) and compressed natural gas (CNG) (low reactivity fuel). The engine was operated at 2100 revolutions per minute (RPM), and at two different loads, 3.6 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) and 6 bar BMEP.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0081
Luigi De Simio, Michele Gambino, Sabato Iannaccone
Abstract In recent years the use of alternative fuels for internal combustion engines has had a strong push coming from both technical and economic-environmental aspects. Among these, gaseous fuels such as liquefied petroleum gas and natural gas have occupied a segment no longer negligible in the automotive industry, thanks to their adaptability, anti-knock capacity, lower toxicity of pollutants, reduced CO2 emissions and cost effectiveness. On the other hand, diesel engines still represent the reference category among the internal combustion engines in terms of fuel consumptions. The possibility offered by the dual fuel systems, to combine the efficiency and performance of a diesel engine with the environmental advantages of gaseous fuels, has been long investigated. However the simple replacement of diesel fuel with natural gas does not allow to optimize the performance of the engine due to the high THC emissions particularly at lower loads.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0082
Muhammad Umer Waqas, Nour Atef, Eshan Singh, Jean-Baptiste MASURIER, Mani Sarathy, Bengt Johansson
Abstract The blending of ethanol with PRF (Primary reference fuel) 84 was investigated and compared with FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) A gasoline surrogate which has a RON of 83.9. Previously, experiments were performed at four HCCI conditions but the chemical effect responsible for the non-linear blending behavior of ethanol with PRF 84 and FACE A was not understood. Hence, in this study the experimental measurements were simulated using zero-dimensional HCCI engine model with detailed chemistry in CHEMKIN PRO. Ethanol was used as an octane booster for the above two base fuels in volume concentration of 0%, 2%, 5% and 10%. The geometrical data and the intake valve closure conditions were used to match the simulated combustion phasing with the experiments. Low temperature heat release (LTHR) was detected by performing heat release analysis.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0073
Carlo Beatrice, Giacomo Belgiorno, Gabriele Di Blasio, Ezio Mancaruso, Luigi Sequino, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
Abstract Technologies for direct injection of fuel in compression ignition engines are in continuous development. One of the most investigated components of this system is the injector; in particular, main attention is given to the nozzle characteristics as hole diameter, number, internal shape, and opening angle. The reduction of nozzle hole diameter seems the simplest way to increase the average fuel velocity and to promote the atomization process. On the other hand, the number of holes must increase to keep the desired mass flow rate. On this basis, a new logic has been applied for the development of the next generation of injectors. The tendency to increase the nozzle number and to reduce the diameter has led to the replacement of the nozzle with a circular plate that moves vertically. The plate motion allows to obtain an annulus area for the delivery of the fuel on 360 degrees; while the plate lift permits to vary the atomization level of the spray.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0075
Felix Leach, Riyaz Ismail, Martin Davy, Adam Weall, Brian Cooper
Abstract Modern diesel cars, fitted with state-of-the-art aftertreatment systems, have the capability to emit extremely low levels of pollutant species at the tailpipe. However, diesel aftertreatment systems can represent a significant cost, packaging and maintenance requirement. Reducing engine-out emissions in order to reduce the scale of the aftertreatment system is therefore a high priority research topic. Engine-out emissions from diesel engines are, to a significant degree, dependent on the detail of fuel/air interactions that occur in-cylinder, both during the injection and combustion events and also due to the induced air motion in and around the bowl prior to injection. In this paper the effect of two different piston bowl shapes are investigated.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0078
R. Vallinayagam, S. Vedharaj, Yanzhao An, Alaaeldin Dawood, Mohammad Izadi Najafabadi, Bart Somers, Junseok Chang, Mani Sarathy, Bengt Johansson
Abstract Light naphtha is the light distillate from crude oil and can be used in compression ignition (CI) engines; its low boiling point and octane rating (RON = 64.5) enable adequate premixing. This study investigates the combustion characteristics of light naphtha (LN) and its multicomponent surrogate under various start of injection (SOI) conditions. LN and a five-component surrogate for LN, comprised of 43% n-pentane, 12% n-heptane, 10% 2-methylhexane, 25% iso-pentane and 10% cyclo-pentane, has been tested in a single cylinder optical diesel engine. The transition in combustion homogeneity from CI combustion to homogenized charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion was then compared between LN and its surrogate. The engine experimental results showed good agreement in combustion phasing, ignition delay, start of combustion, in-cylinder pressure and rate of heat release between LN and its surrogate.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0106
Alessandro Montanaro, Luigi Allocca, Amedeo Amoresano, Giuseppe Langella
Abstract The analysis of a spray behavior is confined to study the fluid dynamic parameters such as axial and radial velocity of the droplets, size distribution of the droplets, and geometrical aspect as the penetration length. In this paper, the spray is considered like a dynamic system and consequently it can be described by a number of parameters that characterize its dynamic behavior. The parameter chosen to describe the dynamic behavior is the external cone angle. This parameter has been detected by using an experimental injection chamber, a multi-hole (8 holes) injector for GDI applications and recorded by a high-speed C-Mos camera. The images have been elaborated by a fuzzy logic and neural network algorithm and are processed by using a chaos deterministic theory. This procedure carries out a map distribution of the working point of the spray and determines the stable (signature of the spray) and instable behavior.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0105
Stefania Falfari, Gian Marco Bianchi, Giulio Cazzoli, Claudio Forte PhD, Sergio Negro
Abstract The primary target of the internal combustion engines design is to lower the fuel consumption and to enhance the combustion process quality, in order to reduce the raw emission levels without performances penalty. In this scenario the direct injection system plays a key role for both diesel and gasoline engines. The spray dynamic behaviour is crucial in defining the global and the local air index of the mixture, which in turns affects the combustion process development. At the same time it is widely recognized that the spray formation is influenced by numerous parameters, among which also the cavitation process inside every single hole of the injector nozzle. The proper prediction of the cavitation development inside the injector nozzle holes is crucial in predicting the liquid jet emerging from them.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0103
Marlene Wentsch, Marco Chiodi, Michael Bargende
Abstract Main limiting factor in the application of 3D-CFD simulations within an engine development is the very high time demand, which is predominantly influenced by the number of cells within the computational mesh. Arbitrary cell coarsening, however, results in a distinct distortion of the simulation outcome. It is rather necessary to adapt the calculation models to the new mesh structure in order to ensure reliability and predictability of the 3D-CFD engine simulation. In the last decade, a fast response 3D-CFD tool was developed at FKFS in Stuttgart. It aims for a harmonized interaction between computational mesh, implemented calculation models and defined boundary conditions in order to enable fast running simulations for engine development tasks. Their susceptibility to errors is significantly minimized by various measures, e.g. extension of the simulation domain (full engine) and multi-cycle simulations.
Viewing 271 to 300 of 44126