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Viewing 271 to 300 of 43870
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0706
Gen Shibata, Hideyuki Ogawa, Yuki Okamoto, Yasumasa Amanuma, Yoshimitsu Kobashi
Abstract Premixed diesel combustion is effective for high thermal efficiency and reductions of NOx and PM emissions, but a reduction of combustion noise is necessary for medium-high load engine operation. The control of the fuel injection has become more accurate because of the technical progress of the common rail fuel injection system, and the target heat release shape, calculated by computation, can be achieved by control of EGR, boosting, fuel injection timing, and injection quantity of multiple fuel injections. In this paper, the reduction of premixed diesel combustion noise maintaining high thermal efficiency has been investigated by the control of injection timings and heating values of multiple fuel injections. There are two aspects of the combustion noise reduction by multiple fuel injections. One is the reduction of the maximum rate of pressure rise in each combustion cycle, and the other is noise reduction effects by the noise cancelling spike (NCS) combustion.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0704
Noriyuki Takada, Takeshi Hashizume, Terutoshi Tomoda, Kazuhisa Inagaki, Kiyomi Kawamura
Abstract Generally, soot emissions increase in diesel engines with smaller bore sizes due to larger spray impingement on the cavity wall at a constant specific output power. The objective of this study is to clarify the constraints for engine/nozzle specifications and injection conditions to achieve the same combustion characteristics (such as heat release rate and emissions) in diesel engines with different bore sizes. The first report applied the geometrical similarity concept to two engines with different bore sizes and similar piston cavity shapes. The smaller engine emitted more smoke because air entrainment decreases due to the narrower spray angle. A new spray design method called spray characteristics similarity was proposed to suppress soot emissions. However, a smaller nozzle diameter and a larger number of nozzle holes are required to maintain the same spray characteristics (such as specific air-entrainment and penetration) when the bore size decreases.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0676
Naoto Hayashi, Akimitsu Sugiura, Yuya Abe, Kotaro Suzuki
Abstract In recent years, from a viewpoint of global warming and energy issues, the need to improve vehicle fuel economy to reduce CO2 emission has become apparent. One of the ways to improve this is to enhance engine thermal efficiency, and for that, automakers have been developing the technologies of high compression ratio and dilute combustion such as exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), and lean combustion. Since excessive dilute combustion causes the failure of flame propagation, combustion promotion by intensifying in-cylinder turbulence has been indispensable. However, instability of flame kernel formation by gas flow fluctuation between combustion cycles is becoming an issue. Therefore, achieving stable flame kernel formation and propagation under a high dilute condition is important technology.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0675
Kenichiro Ogata
Low pressure cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to suppress engine knocking is increasingly being used to downsize engines and increase the compression ratio to improve thermal efficiency. This study aims to develop an ignition system to extend the EGR limit and EGR operation area. The ignition system must be improved to enhance ignitability of a mixture of fuel and air. In this paper, we focus on ignition energy of the ignition coil and summarize experimental results on a test dyno obtained by using reinforced conventional ignition coil on the basis of ignition energy and engine speed. As engine speed (mixture flow velocity between ignition plug electrode-gap) and EGR ratio were increased, the secondary energy requirement of the ignition coil was increased. This increase was considered to be caused by an increase of mixture flow velocity at the plug gap and a decrease of laminar flame velocity as EGR ratio increased.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0678
Xiao Yu, Shui Yu, Zhenyi Yang, Qingyuan Tan, Mark Ives, Liguang Li, Mengzhu Liu, Ming Zheng
Abstract Future clean combustion engines tend to increase the cylinder charge to achieve better fuel economy and lower exhaust emissions. The increase of the cylinder charge is often associated with either excessive air admission or exhaust gas recirculation, which leads to unfavorable ignition conditions at the ignition point. Advanced ignition methods and systems have progressed rapidly in recent years in order to suffice the current and future engine development, and a simple increase of energy of the inductive ignition system does not often provide the desired results from a cost-benefit point of view. Proper design of the ignition system circuit is required to achieve certain spark performances.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0677
Dongwon Jung, Kosaku Sasaki, Kenji Sugata, Masayoshi Matsuda, Takeshi Yokomori, Norimasa Iida
Abstract Improving the thermal efficiency of spark ignition (SI) engine is strongly required due to its widespread use but considerably less efficiency than that of compression ignition (CI) engine. Although lean SI engine operation can offer substantial improvements of the thermal efficiency relative to that of traditional stoichiometric SI operation, the cycle-to-cycle variations of combustion increases with the level of air dilution, and becomes unacceptable. To improve the stability of lean operation, this study examines the effects of spark discharge pattern and tumble level on cycle-to-cycle variations of combustion at lean limits. The spark discharge pattern was altered by a custom inductive ignition system using ten spark coils and the tumble level was increased by a custom adapter installed in the intake port (tumble adapter).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0672
Yanyu Wang, Jiongxun Zhang, Paul Dice, Xin Wang, Mahdi Shahbakhti, Jeffrey Naber, Michael Czekala, Qiuping Qu, Garlan Huberts
Abstract The effect of flow direction towards the spark plug electrodes on ignition parameters is analyzed using an innovative spark aerodynamics fixture that enables adjustment of the spark plug gap orientation and plug axis tilt angle with respect to the incoming flow. The ignition was supplied by a long discharge high energy 110 mJ coil. The flow was supplied by compressed air and the spark was discharged into the flow at varying positions relative to the flow. The secondary ignition voltage and current were measured using a high speed (10MHz) data acquisition system, and the ignition-related metrics were calculated accordingly. Six different electrode designs were tested. These designs feature different positions of the electrode gap with respect to the flow and different shapes of the ground electrodes. The resulting ignition metrics were compared with respect to the spark plug ground strap orientation and plug axis tilt angle about the flow direction.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0674
Benjamin Matthew Wolk, Isaac Ekoto
Abstract Pulsed nanosecond discharges (PND) can achieve ignition in internal combustion engines through enhanced reaction kinetics as a result of elevated electron energies without the associated increases in translational gas temperature that cause electrode erosion. Atomic oxygen (O), including its electronically excited states, is thought to be a key species in promoting low-temperature ignition. In this paper, high-voltage (17-24 kV peak) PND are examined in oxygen/nitrogen/carbon dioxide/water mixtures at engine-relevant densities (up to 9.1 kg/m3) through pressure-rise calorimetry and direct imaging of excited-state O-atom and molecular nitrogen (N2) in an optically accessible spark calorimeter, with the anode/cathode gap distance set to 5 mm or with an anode-only configuration (DC corona). The conversion efficiency of pulse electrical energy into thermal energy was measured for PND with secondary streamer breakdown (SSB) and similar low-temperature plasmas (LTP) without.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0673
Alessandro Cimarello, Carlo N. Grimaldi, Francesco Mariani, Michele Battistoni, Massimo Dal Re
Abstract Radio Frequency Corona ignition systems represent an interesting solution among innovative ignition strategies for their ability to stabilize the combustion and to extend the engine operating range. The corona discharge, generated by a strong electric field at a frequency of about 1 MHz, produces the ignition of the air-fuel mixture in multiple spots, characterized by a large volume when compared to a conventional spark, increasing the early flame growth speed. The transient plasma generated by the discharge, by means of thermal, kinetic and transport effects, allows a robust initialization of the combustion even in critical conditions, such as using diluted or lean mixtures. In this work the effects of Corona ignition have been analyzed on a single cylinder optical engine fueled with gasoline, comparing the results with those of a traditional single spark ignition.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0748
Zhenkan Wang, Sara Lonn, Alexios Matamis, Oivind Andersson, Martin Tuner, Marcus Alden, Mattias Richter
Abstract In a previous study, in order to investigate the effect of charge stratification on combustion behavior such as combustion efficiency and combustion phasing which also largely affects the emissions, an experiment was conducted in a heavy-duty compression ignition (CI) metal engine. The engine behavior and emission characteristics were studied in the transition from HCCI mode to PPC mode by varying the start of injection (SOI) timing. To gain more detailed information of the mixing process, in-cylinder laser diagnostic measurements, namely fuel-tracer planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging, were conducted in an optical version of the heavy-duty CI engine mentioned above. To the authors’ best knowledge, this is the first time to perform fuel-tracer PLIF measurements in an optical engine with a close to production bowl in piston combustion chamber, under transition conditions from HCCI to PPC mode.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0749
Suya Gao, Mianzhi Wang, Chia-Fon Lee
Abstract A new approach of NOx reduction in the compression-ignition engine is introduced in this work. The previous research has shown that during the combustion stage, the high temperature ignition tends to occur early at the near-stoichiometric region where the combustion temperature is high and majority of NOx is formed; Therefore, it is desirable to burn the leaner region first and then the near-stoichiometric region, which inhibits the temperature rise of the near-stoichiometric region and consequently suppresses the formation of NOx. Such inverted ignition sequence requires mixture with inverted phi-sensitivity. Fuel selection is performed based on the criteria of strong ignition T-sensitivity, negligible negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior, and large heat of vaporization (HoV).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0746
Pietro Matteo Pinazzi, Fabrice Foucher
Abstract Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) engines based on Gasoline Partially Premixed Combustion (GPPC) showed potential for high efficiency and reduced emissions of NOx and Soot. However, because of the high octane number of gasoline, misfire and unstable combustion dramatically limit low load operating conditions. In previous work, seeding the intake of the engine with ozone showed potential for increasing the fuel reactivity of gasoline. The objective of this work was to evaluate the potential of ozone to overcome the low load limitations of a GCI engine. Experiments were performed in a single-cylinder light-duty CI engine fueled with 95 RON gasoline. Engine speed was set to 1500 rpm and intake pressure was set to 1 bar in order to investigate typical low load operating conditions. In the first part of the work, the effect of ozone on gasoline autoignition was investigate while the start of the fuel injection varied between 60 CAD and 24 CAD before TDC.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0752
Sara Lonn, Alexios Matamis, Martin Tuner, Mattias Richter, Oivind Andersson
Abstract Low temperature combustion modes, such as Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) and Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC), have been researched over recent decades since the concepts show promise for high efficiency and low emissions compared to conventional diesel combustion. PPC is an intermediate combustion type ranging from HCCI-like combustion to diesel-like combustion. The purpose of this paper is to study optically how the combustion and ignition are affected by different start of injection (SOI) timings. The study is carried out in an optically accessible heavy-duty single-cylinder engine with swirl. The intake pressure was kept constant while the intake temperature was varied to keep the combustion phasing (CA50) constant at ∼3 CAD atdc during an SOI sweep. The fuel used is a mix of primary reference fuels with octane number 81. To determine where the combustion starts, high-speed combustion imaging is used to detect the natural luminosity.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0747
John Storey, Samuel Lewis, Melanie Moses-DeBusk, Raynella Connatser, Jong Lee, Tom Tzanetakis, Kukwon Cho, Matthew Lorey, Mark Sellnau
Abstract Low temperature combustion engine technologies are being investigated for high efficiency and low emissions. However, such engine technologies often produce higher engine-out hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, and their operating range is limited by the fuel properties. In this study, two different fuels, a US market gasoline containing 10% ethanol (RON 92 E10) and a higher reactivity gasoline (RON 80 E0), were compared on Delphi’s second generation Gasoline Direct-Injection Compression Ignition (Gen 2.0 GDCI) multi-cylinder engine. The engine was evaluated at three operating points ranging from a light load condition (800 rpm/2 bar IMEPg) to medium load conditions (1500 rpm/6 bar and 2000 rpm/10 bar IMEPg). The engine was equipped with two oxidation catalysts, between which was located the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) inlet. Samples were taken at engine-out, between the catalysts, and at tailpipe locations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0753
Marcus Olof Lundgren, Zhenkan Wang, Alexios Matamis, Oivind Andersson, Mattias Richter, Martin Tuner, Marcus Alden, Andersson Arne
Abstract Gasoline partially premixed combustion (PPC) has shown potential in terms of high efficiency with low emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and soot. Despite these benefits, emissions of unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) are the main shortcomings of the concept. These are caused, among other things, by overlean zones near the injector tip and injector dribble. Previous diesel low temperature combustion (LTC) research has demonstrated post injections to be an effective strategy to mitigate these emissions. The main objective of this work is to investigate the impact of post injections on CO and UHC emissions in a quiescent (non-swirling) combustion system. A blend of primary reference fuels, PRF87, having properties similar to US pump gasoline was used at PPC conditions in a heavy duty optical engine. The start of the main injection was maintained constant. Dwell and mass repartition between the main and post injections were varied to evaluate their effect.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0750
Shuli Wang, Kyle van der Waart, Bart Somers, Philip de Goey
Abstract The optimal fuel for partially premixed combustion (PPC) is considered to be a gasoline boiling range fuel with an octane number around 70. Higher octane number fuels are considered problematic with low load and idle conditions. In previous studies mostly the intake air temperature did not exceed 30 °C. Possibly increasing intake air temperatures could extend the load range. In this study primary reference fuels (PRFs), blends of iso-octane and n-heptane, with octane numbers of 70, 80, and 90 are tested in an adapted commercial diesel engine under partially premixed combustion mode to investigate the potential of these higher octane number fuels in low load and idle conditions. During testing combustion phasing and intake air temperature are varied to investigate the combustion and emission characteristics under low load and idle conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0751
Praveen Kumar, Yu Zhang, Michael Traver, David Cleary
Abstract In this study a detailed 1-D engine system model coupled with 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was used to investigate the air system design requirements for a heavy duty diesel engine operating with low reactivity gasoline-like fuel (RON70) under partially premixed combustion (PPC) conditions. The production engine used as the baseline has a geometric compression ratio (CR) of 17.3 and the air system hardware consists of a 1-stage variable geometry turbine (VGT) with a high pressure exhaust gas recirculation (HP-EGR) loop. The analysis was conducted at six engine operating points selected from the heavy-duty supplemental emissions test (SET) cycle, i.e., A75, A100, B25, B50, B75, and C100.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0756
Zhenkuo Wu, Christopher Rutland, Zhiyu Han
Abstract Natural gas is a promising alternative fuel for internal combustion engines due to its rich reserves and low price, as well as good physical and chemical properties. Its low carbon structure and high octane number are beneficial for CO2 reduction and knock mitigation, respectively. Diesel and natural gas dual fuel combustion is a viable pathway to utilize natural gas in diesel engines. To achieve high efficiency and low emission combustion in a practical diesel engine over a wide range of operating conditions, understanding the performance responses to engine system parameter variations is needed. The controllability of two combustion strategies, diesel pilot ignition (DPI) and single injection reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI), were evaluated using the multi-dimension CFD simulation in this paper.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0754
Hu Wang, Laihui Tong, Zunqing Zheng, Mingfa Yao
Abstract The dual-fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) combustion could achieve high efficiency and low emissions over a wide range of operating conditions. However, further high load extension is limited by the excessive pressure rise rate and soot emission. Polyoxymethylene dimethyl ethers (PODE), a novel diesel alternative fuel, has the capability to achieve stoichiometric smoke-free RCCI combustion due to its high oxygen content and unique molecule structure. In this study, experimental investigations on high load extension of gasoline/PODE RCCI operation were conducted using late intake valve closing (LIVC) strategy and intake boosting in a single-cylinder, heavy-duty diesel engine. The experimental results show that the upper load can be effectively extended through boosting and LIVC with gasoline/PODE stoichiometric operation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0757
Jeffrey Hwang, Xuesong Li, William Northrop
Abstract Many dual fuel technologies have been proposed for diesel engines. Implementing dual fuel modes can lead to emissions reductions or increased efficiency through using partially premixed combustion and fuel reactivity control. All dual fuel systems have the practical disadvantage that a secondary fuel storage and delivery system must be included. Reforming the primary diesel to a less reactive vaporized fuel on-board has potential to overcome this key disadvantage. Most previous research regarding on-board fuel reforming has been focused on producing significant quantities of hydrogen. However, only partially reforming the primary fuel is sufficient to vaporize and create a less volatile fuel that can be fumigated into an engine intake. At lower conversion efficiency and higher equivalence ratio, reforming reactors retain higher percentage of the inlet fuel’s heating value thus allowing for greater overall engine system efficiency.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0755
Karthik Nithyanandan, Yongli Gao, Han Wu, Chia-Fon Lee, Fushui Liu, Junhao Yan
Abstract Dual-fuel combustion combining a premixed charge of compressed natural gas (CNG) and a pilot injection of diesel fuel offer the potential to reduce diesel fuel consumption and drastically reduce soot emissions. In this study, dual-fuel combustion using methane ignited with a pilot injection of No. 2 diesel fuel, was studied in a single cylinder diesel engine with optical access. Experiments were performed at a CNG substitution rate of 70% CNG (based on energy) over a wide range of equivalence ratios of the premixed charge, as well as different diesel injection strategies (single and double injection). A color high-speed camera was used in order to identify and distinguish between lean-premixed methane combustion and diffusion combustion in dual-fuel combustion. The effect of multiple diesel injections is also investigated optically as a means to enhance flame propagation towards the center of the combustion chamber.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0760
Menghan Li, Xiangyu Meng, Jie HOU, Suya Gao, Chia-Fon Lee, Guoxiang Li
Abstract Butanol, which is a renewable biofuel, has been regarded as a promising alternative fuel for internal combustion engines. When blended with diesel and applied to pilot ignited natural gas engines, butanol has the capability to achieve lower emissions without sacrifice on thermal efficiency. However, high blend ratio of butanol is limited by its longer ignition delay caused by the higher latent heat and higher octane number, which restricts the improvement of emission characteristics. In this paper, the potential of increasing butanol blend ratio by adding hot exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is investigated. 3D CFD model based on a detailed kinetic mechanism was built and validated by experimental results of natural gas engine ignited by diesel/butanol blends. The effects of hot EGR is then revealed by the simulation results of the combustion process, heat release traces and also the emissions under different diesel/butanol blend ratios.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0758
Yaopeng Li, Ming Jia, Yachao Chang, Guangfu Xu
Abstract Multi-dimensional models coupled with a reduced chemical mechanism were used to investigate the effect of fuel on exergy destruction fraction and sources in a reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) engine. The exergy destruction due to chemical reaction (Deschem) makes the largest contribution to the total exergy destruction. Different from the obvious low temperature heat release (LTHR) behavior in gasoline/diesel RCCI, methanol has a negative effect on the LTHR of diesel, so the exergy destruction accumulation from LTHR to high temperature heat release (HTHR) can be avoided in methanol/diesel RCCI, contributing to the reduction of Deschem. Moreover, the combustion temperature in methanol/diesel RCCI is higher compared to gasoline/diesel RCCI, which is also beneficial to the lower exergy destruction fraction. Therefore, the exergy destruction of methanol/diesel RCCI is lower than that of gasoline/diesel RCCI at the same combustion phasing.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0761
Christopher W. Gross, Rolf Reitz
Abstract In an attempt to increase efficiency and lower critical and highly regulated emissions (i.e., NOx, PM and CO2) many advanced combustion strategies have been investigated. Most of the current strategies fall into the category of low temperature combustion (LTC), which allow emissions mandates to be met in-cylinder along with anticipated reduction in cost and complexity. These strategies, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI), partially premixed combustion (PPC) and reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI), use early injection timings, resulting in a highly lean charge with increased specific heat ratios to improve thermal efficiency and reduce PM emissions. Lower combustion temperatures also avoid the activation of NOx formation reactions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0765
Shuojin Ren, Boyuan Wang, Jianhua Xiao, Haoye Liu, Zhi Wang, Jianxin Wang, Chuandong Li, Qingpeng Zhang
Abstract This research focuses on the potential of Homogeneous Charge Induced Ignition (HCII) combustion meeting the Euro V emission standard on a heavy-duty multi-cylinder engine using a simple after-treatment system. However, in our previous studies, it was found that the gasoline ratio was limited in HCII by the over-high compression ratio (CR). In this paper, the effects of reducing CR on the performances of HCII at medium and high loads were explored by experimental methods. It was found that by reducing CR from 18:1 to 16:1 the peak in-cylinder pressure and the peak pressure rise rate were effectively reduced and the gasoline ratio range could be obviously extended. Thus, the combustion and emission characteristics of HCII at medium and high loads were noticeably improved. Soot emissions can be significantly reduced because of the increase of premixed combustion ratio. The reduction could be over 50% especially at high load and high speed conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0759
Rasmus Pettinen, Ossi Kaario, Martti Larmi
Abstract Dual-fuel technology is suggested as a solution for effectively utilizing alternative fuel types in the near future. Charge air mixed methane combined with a compression ignition engine utilizing a small diesel pilot injection seems to form a worthwhile compromise between good engine efficiency and low emission outcome. Problems concerning dual-fuel technology profitableness seems to be related to fully control the combustion in relation to lean conditions. Lean operating conditions solves the problems concerning pumping losses, but brings challenges in controlling the slow heat release of the premixed methane-air mixture. In the present work, a single cylinder ‘free parameter’ diesel engine was adapted for dual-fuel (diesel-methane) usage. A parameter study related to lambda window widening possibilities was carried out.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0763
Ethan Faghani, Pooyan Kheirkhah, Christopher W.J. Mabson, Gordon McTaggart-Cowan, Patrick Kirchen, Steve Rogak
Abstract High-pressure direct-injection (HPDI) in heavy duty engines allows a natural gas (NG) engine to maintain diesel-like performance while deriving most of its power from NG. A small diesel pilot injection (5-10% of the fuel energy) is used to ignite the direct injected gas jet. The NG burns in a predominantly mixing-controlled combustion mode which can produce particulate matter (PM). Here we study the effect of injection strategies on emissions from a HPDI engine in two parts. Part-I investigated the effect of late post injection (LPI); the current paper (Part-II) reports on the effects of slightly premixed combustion (SPC) on emission and engine performance. In SPC operation, the diesel injection is delayed, allowing more premixing of the natural gas prior to ignition. PM reductions and tradeoffs involved with gas slightly premixed combustion was investigated in a single-cylinder version of a 6-cylinder, 15 liter HPDI engine.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0764
Gabriele Di Blasio, Giacomo Belgiorno, Carlo Beatrice
Abstract The paper reports the results of an experimental campaign aimed to assess the impact of the compression ratio (CR) variation on the performance and pollutant emissions, including the particle size spectrum, of a single cylinder research engine (SCE), representatives of the engine architectures for automotive application, operated in dual-fuel methane-diesel mode. Three pistons with different bowl volumes corresponding to CR values of 16.5, 15.5 and 14.5 were adopted for the whole test campaign. The injection strategy was based on two injection pulses per cycle, as conventionally employed for diesel engines. The test methodology per each CR included the optimization of both 1st injection pulse quantity and intake air mass flow rate in order to lower as much as possible the unburned methane emissions (MHC).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0769
Pierpaolo Napolitano, Chiara Guido, Carlo Beatrice, Nicola Del Giacomo
Abstract An increasing interest in the use of natural gas in CI engines is currently taking place, due to several reasons: it is cheaper than conventional Diesel fuel, permits a significant reduction of carbon dioxide and is intrinsically clean, being much less prone to soot formation. In this respect, the Dual Fuel concept has already proven to be a viable solution, industrially implemented for several applications in the heavy duty engines category. An experimental research activity was devoted to the analysis of the potentiality offered by the application of a Dual Fuel Diesel-CNG configuration on a light duty 2L Euro 5 automotive diesel engine, equipped with an advanced control system of the combustion. The experimental campaign foresaw to test the engine in dynamic and steady state conditions, comparing engine performance and emissions in conventional Diesel and Dual Fuel combustion modes.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0762
Xiaoye Han, Prasad Divekar, Meiping Wang, Ming Zheng, Jimi Tjong, William De Ojeda
Abstract In this work, an innovative piston bowl design that physically divides the combustion chamber into a central zone and a peripheral zone is employed to assist the control of the ethanol-diesel combustion process via heat release shaping. The spatial combustion zone partition divides the premixed ethanol-air mixture into two portions, and the combustion event (timing and extent) of each portion can be controlled by the temporal diesel injection scheduling. As a result, the heat release profile of ethanol-diesel dual-fuel combustion is properly shaped to avoid excessive pressure rise rates and thus to improve the engine performance. The investigation is carried out through theoretical simulation study and empirical engine tests. Parametric simulation is first performed to evaluate the effects of heat release shaping on combustion noise and engine efficiency and to provide boundary conditions for subsequent engine tests.
Viewing 271 to 300 of 43870