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Viewing 1 to 30 of 43696
2017-06-17
Journal Article
2017-01-9550
David Neihguk, M. L. Munjal, Arvind Ram, Abhinav Prasad
Abstract A production muffler of a 2.2 liter compression ignition engine is analyzed using plane wave (Transfer Matrix) method. The objective is to show the usefulness of plane wave models to analyze the acoustic performance (Transmission Loss, TL) of a compact hybrid muffler (made up of reactive and dissipative elements). The muffler consists of three chambers, two of which are acoustically short in the axial direction. The chambers are separated by an impervious baffle on the upstream side and a perforated plate on the downstream side. The first chamber is a Concentric Tube Resonator (CTR). The second chamber consists of an extended inlet and a flow reversal 180-degree curved outlet duct. The acoustic cavity in the third chamber is coupled with the second chamber through the acoustic impedances of the end plate and the perforated plate.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1773
Jing Yuan
The dual phase twin synchronous drive has been developed for belt noise reduction. Two identical synchronous belts are arranged parallel side by side with one tooth staggered against other by the half pitch. The noise cancellation effect is achieved as one belt tooth engagement coincides with the other belt tooth dis-engagement. A center flange is used as a divider to prevent the belts contacting each other along the axial direction during their entrance and exit of the sprocket. An overall 20 [dBA] noise reduction has been achieved with the dual phase twin belt system compared to an equal width single belt counterpart. The vibration amplitude of the hub load is also reduced which is directly correlated to the structural borne noise. Comparing to the related dual phase helical tooth belt, also known as the eagle belt trade marked by Goodyear, the dual phase twin belt is superior in torque carrying capability; and is on par with noise mitigation.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1769
Onkar Gangvekar, Santosh Deshmane
In today's automobile market, most of OEM's uses manual transmission for Cars. Gear Shifting is a crucial customer touch point. Any issue or inconvenience caused while shifting gear can result into customer dissatisfaction and will affect the brand image. Synchronizer is a vital subsystem for precise gear shifting mechanism. Based on vehicle application selection of synchronizer for given inertia and speed difference is the key factor which decides overall shift quality of gearbox. For more demanding driver abuse conditions like skip shifting, conventional brass synchronizers have proved inadequate for required speed difference and gear inertia and which eventually results into synchronizer crashing and affects driving performance. To increase synchronizer performance of multi-cone compact brass synchronizer, a grit blasting process has been added. These components are tested with Accelerated test plan successfully.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1820
Martin Sopouch, Josip Hozmec, Alessandro Cadario
This paper presents a simulation environment and methodology for noise and vibration analyses of a driven rear axle in a bus application, with particular focus on medium to high frequency range (400 Hz to 3 kHz). The workflow demonstrates structure borne noise and sound radiation analyses. The fully flexible Multi–Body Dynamics (MBD) model - serving to cover the actual mechanical excitation mechanisms and the structural domain – includes geometrical contacts of hypoid gear in the central gear and planetary gear integrated at hubs, considering non-linear meshing stiffness. Contribution of aforementioned gear stages, as well as the propeller shaft universal joint at the pinion axle, on overall axle noise levels is investigated by means of sensitivity analysis. Based on the surface velocities computed at the vibrating axle-housing structure the Wave Based Technique (WBT) is employed to solve the airborne noise problem and predict the radiated sound.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1800
Robert White
Several analytical tools exist for estimating a driveshaft’s critical speed, from simple elementary beam theory to sophisticated FEA models. Ultimately, nothing is better than a test, because no one will argue with the outcome from a well-designed measurement. Impact response measurements are easy, but they tend to over predict the critical speed. A test which sweeps the shaft speed up until failure is telling, but the speed causing failure is strongly dependent on even small amounts of variation in rotor unbalance. Waterfall plots of shaft displacement measurements offer the best indication of critical speed, however sometimes the resonance isn’t clearly seen or multiple resonances exist, making the critical speed unclear. A method less susceptible to system variation is offered here, fitting shaft orbit measurements to the theoretical single degree of freedom equation.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1808
Francis Nardella
In a previous report, it was shown that power transmission through the camshaft reduced the first mode natural frequency of the powertrain and translated its convergence with dominant engine excitatory harmonics to a lower engine speed resulting in a marked reduction in torsional vibration for geared 6 cylinder compression ignition engines for aviation. This report describes a sweep though 2 and 4 stroke engines with differing numbers of cylinders configured as standard gear reduction (SGRE) and with power transmission through the camshaft (CDSE). Four and 6 cylinder engines were modeled as opposed boxer engines and 8, 10 and 12 cylinder engines were modeled as 180-degree V-engines. Mass-elastic models of the different engine power train configurations were modeled using the torsional vibration module in Shaft Designer obtained from SKF (Svenska Kullagerfabriken). Crankshaft, camshaft, gearing, pistons, piston pins and connecting rods with bolts were modeled in Solidworks.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1826
Sagar Deshmukh, Sandip Hazra
Engine mounting system maintains the position of power train in the vehicle with respect to chassis and other accessories during inertia, torque reaction loads and roadway disturbances. The mounting system also plays a role in terms of isolation of the rest of the vehicle and its occupants from power train and helps in maintaining vehicle ride and handling condition. This paper investigates the performance comparison between a conventional mount, hydromount and switchable hydromount during idle condition and ride performance. The optimization scheme aims to improve the performance of the mounting system in order to achieve overall power train performance and NVH attribute balancing through semi active technology. Keywords: Engine Mount, NVH,Switchable Hydromount
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1892
Yosuke Tanabe, Masanori Watanabe, Takafumi Hara, Katsuhiro Hoshino, Akira Inoue, Masaru Yamasaki
Predicting vibration of motor gearbox assembly driven by a PWM inverter in an early development stage is demanding, because the assembly is one of the dominant noise sources of electric vehicle (EV). In this paper, we propose a simulation model that can predict the transient vibration excited by gear meshing, reaction force from mount and electromagnetic forces including carrier frequency component of inverter up to 10 kHz. By employing the techniques of structural model reduction and state space modeling, the proposed model enables to predict the vibration of assembly in operating condition to simulate with a system level EV simulator. A verification test was conducted to compare the simulation result with running test result of EV. Although the absolute value of simulation is 10 dB different from test at most, we conclude that the model can well predict the trend of the dominant order vibration caused by the electromagnetic force of motor including the carrier frequency of inverter.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1780
Yong Xu
Research Objective: For MT vehicles, gearbox rattle is a common NVH problem which influences the comfort level of vehicle. In order to prevent rattle in the design phase of vehicle, this work aimed to study the excitation mechanism and influence factors of gearbox rattle, and then to propose effective measures. Methodology: First, the root cause of gearbox rattle problem was studied with the aid of classical dynamical theories. And then the simulation model of vehicle powertrain system was built via Matlab-Simulink. Then some critical parameters of the model and some experiential optimum proposals were selected to perform a sensitivity analysis on the torsional vibration, which is the root cause of rattle. Referring the simulation results, the dual-mass flywheel was selected as the most effective solution to gearbox rattle. Results: The simulation results indicated the critical parameters for optimization to prevent gearbox rattle problem in the design phase of the vehicle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1768
Yong Xu
Purpose: For rear-wheel-drive (or all-wheel-drive) vehicles, the vibration and noise that caused by driveshaft often become the main factors that influence the comfort level of vehicle. In order to control and improve the NVH problems related to driveshaft, this work aimed to study the excitation mechanism and transfer path of driveshaft vibration, and then to propose effective measures. The purpose of this work was to propose an effective way to improve the NVH performance by controlling the additional excitation force of U-joints in the early phase of project. Methodology: First, the rotation order characteristics of driveshaft were studied with the aid of classical dynamics. Then a rigid-elastic coupling model of vehicle powertrain was modelled with the theory of multi-body dynamics. By inputting the actual vehicle parameters into the model, the acceleration operation of vehicle could be simulated.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1870
Saeed Siavoshani, Prasad Balkrishna Vesikar, Daniel Pentis, Rajani Ippili
The objective of this paper is to develop a robust methodology to study the internal combustion (IC) engine block vibrations and to quantify the contribution of combustion pressure loads and inertial loads (mechanical loads) to the engine block vibrations. This study is not extended to the sound pressure generated by the engine and contribution analysis for that response. In an IC engine, the combustion and mechanical/inertial loads are the main sources of engine block vibrations. They both contain not only strong harmonic content due to their repetitive nature but also transient broadband impact loads. Therefore, it is difficult to identify/separate the contribution of combustion and inertial loads in the vibration response due to their correlated frequency excitations. One of the tools utilized in the industry to separate the combustion and mechanical noise is the Wiener filter.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1802
Dong chul Lee, Insoo Jung, Jaemin Jin, Stephan Brandl, Mehdi Mehrgou
Classical approaches to development require a lot of time and cost to make samples involved the major design factors, which is why there have been recent researches to improve the efficiency of the development through a variety of simulation techniques. NVH simulation is of importance in this advanced phase, the design of all the parts should be satisfactory from the NVH point of view during the first phase of the project. This paper presents such an approach of simulation for the prediction radiated noise from a diesel engine with integrated powertrain model with changing combustion excitation. For changing combustion excitation, the cylinder pressure is measured and used as an input for simulation. The simulation model is validated with comparing the result of experiment in specified frequency ranges that the level of the noise is made louder than the development target.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1809
Dhanesh Purekar
Engine noise is considered significant aspect of product quality for light and medium duty diesel engine market applications. Gear whine is one of those noise issues which is considered objectionable and impacts the customer perception. Gear whine could results due to defects in the gear manufacturing process and/or due to inaccurate design of the gear macro and micro-geometry. The focus of this technical paper is to discuss gear whine considerations from the production plant perspective. A gear whine case study is presented on the data collected on one of the Cummins diesel engines in the production environment. This paper also includes quick overview of measurement process, test cell environment, noise acceptance criteria considerations. This paper highlights the benefits of using production facility for developing next generation of product development from whine perspective.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1782
Jobin Puthuparampil, Henry Pong, Pierre Sullivan
Large-scale emergency or off-grid power generation is typically achieved through diesel or natural gas generators. To meet governmental emission requirements, emission control systems (ECS) are required. In operation, effective control over the generator’s acoustic emission is also necessary, and can be accomplished within the ECS system. Plug flow mufflers are commonly used, as they provide a sufficient level of noise attenuation in a compact structure. The key design parameter is the transmission loss of the muffler, as this dictates the level of attenuation at a given frequency. This work implements an analytically decoupled solution, using multiple perforate impedance models, through the transfer matrix method (TMM) to predict the transmission loss based on the muffler geometry. An equivalent finite element model is implemented for numerical simulation. The analytical results and numerical results are then evaluated against experimental data from literature.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1827
Michael J. Santora, Cyril Gbenga Ige, Jeff Otto, David Egolf
A muffler attached to an engine attenuates sound over a dedicated frequency range. This research involves the development of an active muffler that is keyed to the revolutions per minute (rpm) of the engine and suppresses the fundamental frequency being exhausted through the tailpipe. The active muffler consists of a tracking side-branch resonator terminated with a composite piezoelectric transducer. The use of an exponential horn as a resonating cavity and terminated with a composite piezoelectric transducer is presented. This would create Electromechanical Active Helmholtz Resonator (EMAHR) with a notch that can be moved between 100-1000 Hz. The use of acoustical-to-mechanical, mechanical-to-electrical, and analog-to-digital transformations to develop a system model for the active muffler are presented. These transforms will be presented as two-port network parameters. The use of two-port networks to model the electroacoustic system are a defining factor in the analysis.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1787
Jan Biermann, Adrien Mann, Barbara Neuhierl, Min-Suk Kim
Over the past decades, noise sources such as wind noise or engine noise have been significantly reduced leveraging improvements of both the overall vehicle designs and of sound packages. Consequently, noise sources originating from HVAC systems (Heat Ventilation and Air Conditioning), fans or exhaust systems are now becoming Tier-1 problems affecting quality and passenger comfort. Furthermore, existing experimental techniques are not adapted to internal flows and fail at identifying the location of noise sources, as well as corresponding design changes to reduce noise. This study focuses on HVAC systems and discusses a Flow-Induced Noise Detection Contributions (FIND Contributions) numerical method enabling the identification of the flow-induced noise sources inside HVAC systems. Moreover, this method provides the contribution of each source at the passenger’s ear locations considering the propagation of the noise through the system.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1791
David Neihguk, Shreyas Fulkar
Parametric model of a production hybrid (made up of reactive and dissipative elements) muffler for tractor engine is developed to compute the acoustic Transmission Loss (TL). The objective is to simplify complex muffler acoustic simulations without any loss of accuracy, robustness and usability so that it is accessible to all product development engineers and designers. The parametric model is a 3D Finite Element Method (FEM) based built in COMSOL model builder which is then converted into a user-friendly application (App) using COMSOL App builder. The uniqueness of the App lies in its ability to handle not only wide range of parametric variations but also variations in the physics and boundary conditions. This enables designers to explore various design options in the early design phase without the need to have deep expertise in a specific simulation tool nor in numerical acoustic modeling.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1778
Enrico Galvagno, Antonio Tota, Mauro Velardocchia, Alessandro Vigliani
This paper explores the potentiality of reducing noise and vibration of a vehicle transmission thanks to powertrain control integration with active braking system. The torsional backlashes between transmission rotating components (gears, synchronizers, splines, CV joints), in the presence of external disturbances, coming from the driver, e.g. during tip-in / tip-out maneuvers, or from the road, e.g. crossing a speed bump or driving on a rough road, may lead to NVH issues known as clonk. In this study, first of all the positive effect of a brake torque application at the driving wheels during such maneuvers on transmission NVH performance is shown. After that, a powertrain/brake integrated control strategy is proposed. The braking system is activated in advance with respect to the perturbation and it is deactivated immediately after to minimize the energy loss.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1823
Dennis J. Kinchen
Powertrain mounting systems design and development involves creating and optimizing a solution using specific mount rates and multiple operating conditions. These mount rates become the recommended “nominal” rates in the specifications. As is typical of natural materials, the properties have variation resulting in a tolerance around the nominal specification which leads to differences in noise and vibration performance. A system that is robust to this variation is desired. The design and development process requires evaluation of these mounts to ensure that the noise and vibration performance is consistently met. During the hardware development of the powertrain mounting system a library of mounts that include the range of production variation is studied however this is time consuming. In this paper, a methodology is described to reduce the hardware evaluation time and provide a recommended optimal solution that is robust in the presence of production mount property variation.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1753
Jack Hall Riddle, Ya-Juan Bemman, Tom Frei, Sihui Wu, Ishang Padalkar
Demands for low-RPM operation are increasing in the automotive market. This requirement is largely driven by consumer and regulatory demand for vehicles which are more efficient in the use of fuel. As a result, modern engine and transmission technologies have been developed which permit engine operation at increasingly low RPM’s. The resulting low frequency exhaust noise is more difficult to attenuate than in vehicles in years past. At the same time, vehicles often have less packaging space for mufflers, when larger volume would otherwise be needed to attenuate the lower frequency firing order content. A further challenge is the demand for increasingly refined performance sounds from the exhaust systems of premium cars despite the technical obstacles involved in even maintaining sound quality. Finally, legally permissible sound levels are decreasing in some markets. These market and regulatory demands require new solutions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1755
Frank C. Valeri, James T. Lagodzinski, Scott M. Reilly, John P. Miller
Hybrid powertrain vehicles inherently create discontinuous sounds during operation. The discontinuous noise created from the electrical motors during transition states are undesirable since they can create tones that do not correlate with the dynamics of the vehicle. The audible level of these motor whines and discontinuous tones can be reduced via common noise abatement techniques or reducing the amount of regeneration braking. One electronic solution which does not affect mass or fuel economy is Masking Sound Enhancement (MSE). MSE is an algorithm that uses the infotainment system to mask the naturally occurring discontinuous hybrid drive unit and driveline tones. MSE enables a variety of benefits, such as more aggressive regenerative braking strategies which yield higher levels of fuel economy and an overall more pleasing interior vehicle powertrain sound. This paper will discuss the techniques and signals used to implement MSE in a hybrid powertrain equipped vehicle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1824
Reza Kashani, Karthik S. Jayakumar, Neville Bugli, Jeff Lapp
Passive, tuned acoustic absorbers, such as Helmholtz resonators (HR) or quarter-wave tubes, are commonly used solutions for abating the low-frequency tonal noise in air induction systems. Since absorption at multiple frequencies is required, multiple absorbers tuned to different frequencies are commonly used. Typically, the large size and multiple numbers of these devices under the hood is a packaging challenge. Also, the lack of acoustic damping narrows their effective bandwidth and creates undesirable side lobes. Active noise control could address all of the above-mentioned issues. Most active noise control systems use feed-forward adaptive algorithms as their controllers. These complex algorithms need fast, powerful digital signal processors to run. To ensure the convergence of the adaptation algorithm, the rate of adaptation should be made slow.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1834
Dirk von Werne, Prasanna Chaduvula, Patrick Stahl, Michael Jordan, Jamison Huber, Korcan Kucukcoskun, Mircea Niculescu
Fan noise can form a significant part of the vehicle noise signature and needs hence to be optimized in view of exterior noise and operator exposure. Putting together unsteady CFD simulation with acoustic FEM modeling, tonal and broadband fan noise can be accurately predicted, accounting for the sound propagation through engine compartment and vehicle frame structure. This paper focuses on method development and validation in view of the practical vehicle design process. In a step by-step approach, the model has been validated against a dedicated test-set-up, so that good accuracy of operational fan noise prediction could be achieved. Main focus was on the acoustic transfer through the engine compartment. The equivalent acoustic transfer through radiators/heat exchangers is modeled based on separate detailed acoustic models. The updating process revealed the sensitivity of various components in the engine compartment.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1829
Guillaume Loussert
The new fuel efficiency and emission standards have forced OEMs to put emphasis on different strategies such as engine downsizing, cylinder deactivation... Unfortunately these new technologies may lead to increased powertrain vibrations generated by the engine and transmitted to the chassis and the car cabin, such that their reduction or elimination has become a key topic for the automotive industry. The use of active engine mounts, acting directly on the fluid of an hydromount, or active vibration dampers, acting as an inertial mass-spring system, are very effective solutions, particularly when using electromagnetic based actuators. Nevertheless, all electromagnetic actuators technologies are not equals and the choice of such actuators must be considered carefully by taking into account the full performances and the overall cost of the solutions. This paper presents an electromagnetic actuator technology, that can be considered as the best tradeoff between performances and cost.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1844
Jiawei Liu, Yangfan Liu, J. Stuart Bolton
In modern engine design, downsizing and reducing weight while still providing an increased amount of power has been a general trend in the past decades. Traditionally, an engine design with superior NVH performance usually comes with a heavier, thus sturdier structure. Therefore, modern engine design requires that NVH be considered in the very early design stage to avoid modifications of engine structure at the last minute, when very few changes can be made. NVH design optimization of engine components has become more practical due to the development of computer software and hardware. However, there is still a need for smarter algorithms to draw a direct relationship between the design and the radiated sound power. At the moment, techniques based on modal acoustic transfer vectors (MATVs) have gained popularity in design optimization for its performance in sound pressure prediction.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1837
Paul R. Donavan, Carrie Janello
Acoustic beamforming was used to localize noise sources on heavy trucks operating on highways in California and North Carolina at a total of 20 sites. Over 1,200 trucks were measured under a variety of operating conditions including cruise on level highways, on upgrades, down degrades, low speed acceleration, and for various speeds and pavements. The contours produced by the beamforming measurements were used to identify specific source contributions under these conditions and for a variety of heavy trucks. Consistently, the highest noise levels were seen the tire-pavement interface with lessor additional noise radiated from the engine compartment. Noise from elevated exhaust stacks was only documented for less than 5% of the trucks measured. The results were further reduced to produce vertical profiles of noise levels versus height above the roadway. The profiles were normalized to the highest noise level at ground level.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1840
Thierry Bourdon, Rainer Weber, Johann Massinger
Nowadays, the automotive industry is increasingly facing of reducing vibration & noise in the vehicle. More particularly on the engine area, the development of fuel components based on high pressure pumps, rails, any pipes and injectors are a subject of a particular NVH attention. The use of modern digital techniques such as 3D finite element vibroacoustic, leads to use virtual prototyping as complementary to traditional real hardware prototypes development. Among interest, number of iterative loops to reach a best design brings an important value to new product development with an optimized cost. Basically the core part of virtual prototyping is about 3D finite element models for each component. It is quite challenging to establish these models, as they must mimic the entire physical phenomenon of real structure borne hardwares sound in the whole audible frequency range.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1850
Samaneh Arabi, Glen Steyer, Zhaohui Sun, Jeffrey Nyquist
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirement for 54.5mpg by 2025 to reduce greenhouse gases has pushed the industry to look for alternative fuels to run vehicles. Electricity is of those green energies that can help auto industry to achieve those strict requirements. However, the electric or hybrid-electric vehicles brought new challenges into science and engineering world including the Noise and Vibration issues which are usually tied up with both airborne and structural noises. The electromagnetic force plays a significant role in acoustic noise radiation in the electric motor which is an air-gap radial Maxwell force. This paper describes an innovative approach to model the physics of noise radiated by the electric motor.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1846
Fabio Bianciardi, Karl Janssens, Konstantinos Gryllias, Simone Delvecchio, Claudio Manna
The noise radiated by an ICE engine results from a mixture of various complex sources such as combustion, injection, piston slap, turbocharger, etc. Some of these have been categorized as combustion related noise and others as mechanical noise. Of great concern is the assessment of combustion noise which, under some operating conditions, is likely to predominate over the other sources of noise. The residual noise, produced by various other sources, is commonly referred to as mechanical noise. Being able to extract combustion and mechanical noise is of prime interest in the development phase of the engine and also for diagnostic purposes. This paper presents the application of combustion mechanical noise separation techniques on a V8 engine. Two techniques, namely the classical Wiener filter and cyclostationary Wiener filter, have been investigated. The techniques have been applied to microphone recordings measured at one meter distance from the engine running on a test bench.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1845
Jon Furlich, Jason Blough, Darrell Robinette
When subjected to high speeds and high torques, a vehicle driveshaft and other powertrain components experience an increase in stored potential energy. When the engine and driveshaft are decoupled during an up or down shift, the potential energy is released causing clutch clatter during the shift event. A smooth shift is desired by the customer thus reduction of the clutch clatter will improve customer experience and satisfaction. In this study, a six speed MT, RWD passenger car was used to experimentally capture acoustic and vibration data during the clutch clatter event. To successfully replicate the in-situ results additional data was collected and analyzed for powertrain component roll, and pitch from the test vehicle. These boundary conditions were applied to a reduced car model in a lab environment to successfully replicate the clutch clatter event on a stationary test stand.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 43696