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Viewing 1 to 16 of 16
2017-09-25
Book
Ravi Rajamani
The environmental impact of hydrocarbon-burning aircraft is one of the main motivations for the move to electric propulsion in aerospace. Also, cars, buses, and trucks are incorporating electric or hybrid-electric propulsion systems, reducing the pressure on hydrocarbons and lowering the costs of electrical components. The economies of scale necessitated by the automotive industry will help contain costs in the aviation sector as well. The use of electric propulsion in airplanes is not a new phenomenon. However, it is only recently that it has taken off in a concrete manner with a viable commercial future. The Electric Flight Technology: Unfolding of a New Future reviews the history of this field, discusses the key underlying technologies, and describes how the future for these technologies will likely unfold, distinguishing between all-electric (AE) and hybrid-electric (HE) architectures. Written by Dr.
2017-05-18
Book
Jean Broge
Aviation propulsion development continues to rely upon fossil fuels for the vast majority of commercial and military applications. Until these fuels are depleted or abandoned, burning them will continue to jeopardize air quality and provoke increased regulation. With those challenges in mind, research and development of more efficient and electric propulsion systems will expand. Fuel-cell technology is but one example that addresses such emission and resource challenges, and others, including negligible acoustic emissions and the potential to leverage current infrastructure models. For now, these technologies are consigned to smaller aircraft applications, but are expected to mature toward use in larger aircraft. Additionally, measures such as electric/conventional hybrid configurations will ultimately increase efficiencies and knowledge of electric systems while minimizing industrial costs.
2014-11-01
Book
Jon Harrop, Peter Harrop
The electric vehicle business will approach a massive $500 billion in 2025 with the traction motors segment capturing over $25 billion. Traction motors propelling land, water and air vehicles along can consist of one inboard motor or - an increasing trend - more than one near the wheels, in the wheels, in the transmission or ganged to get extra power. Complex trends in this industry are explained with this updated report, and future winning suppliers are identified alongside market forecasts. The information is especially important as hybrid vehicles may have the electric motor near the conventional engine or its exhaust, and this may mean they need to tolerate temperatures never before encountered in pure electric vehicles. Motors for highly price-sensitive markets such as electric bikes, scooters, e-rickshaws and micro EVs avoid the price hikes of neodymium and other rare earths in the magnets.
2012-11-01
Book
Edouard Freund, Paul Lucchese
Hydrogen, energy vector for the future? Or, on the contrary, limited to its current applications in the field of chemistry and refining for decades to come, possibly even until the end of the century? There is much controversy over this issue and two sides to the argument. Advocates of the hydrogen civilization consider that, following a technological revolution hydrogen will play a universal role alongside electricity as a substitute for fossil fuels, especially (but not only) in transport, leading to radical elimination of CO2 emissions. For the skeptics, and even outspoken opponents, hydrogen will remain restricted to its current applications due to the insoluble problems inherent to its generalized use, especially in transport. This book highlights the increasing and inevitable role of "energy" hydrogen – as opposed to chemical hydrogen – in the key sectors of transport and "clean" electricity production.
2010-04-30
Book
This set includes: SAE International Journal of Aerospace March 2010 - Volume 2 Issue 1 SAE International Journal of Commercial Vehicles October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 March 2010 - Volume 2, Issue 2 SAE International Journal of Engines October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 March 2010 - Volume 2, Issue 2 SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 March 2010 - Volume 2, Issue 2 SAE International Journal of Materials and Manufacturing October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 March 2010 - Volume 2, Issue 2 SAE International Journal of Passenger Cars - Electronic and Electrical Systems October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 SAE International Journal of Passenger Cars - Mechanical Systems October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 March 2010 - Volume 2, Issue 2
2010-01-01
Book
Jack Connors
This book describes the evolution from piston engines to gas turbines by the engineers who created those engines. Included are hundreds of archival photographs, as well as over a dozen tables listing specifications and applications. The story starts with the founding of the company in the 1920's to provide reliable air-cooled piston engines to the military and to help create coast-to-coast commercial flight service. Pratt & Whitney quickly dominated commercial and military flight in the 1930's - ultimately providing half the horsepower of American engines during WWII. Jack Connors explains how Pratt & Whitney came from behind the competition on developing gas turbines after the war with the debut of the J57, which powered the B-52 in 1952 and later the Air Force Century Series fighters (F-100, F-101, F-102) and the Navy A3D, F4D, and F-8 airplanes.
2009-10-08
Book
Jean-Pierre Pirault, Martin L.S. Flint
This book explores the opposed piston (OP) engine, a model of power and simplicity, and provides the first comprehensive description of most opposed piston (OP) engines from 1887 to 2006. Design and performance details of the major types of OP engines in stationary, ground, marine, and aviation applications are explored and their evolution traced. The OP engine has set enviable and leading-edge standards for power/weight refinement, fuel tolerance, fuel efficiency, package space, and manufacturing simplicity. For these reasons, the OP concept still remains of interest for outstanding power and package density, simplicity, and reliability; e.g., aviation and certain military transport requirements. Using material from historic and unpublished internal research reports, the authors present the rationale for OP engines, their diverse architecture, detailed design aspects, performance data, manufacturing details, and leading engineers and applications.
2009-01-01
Book
Jack D. Mattingly, Link C. Jaw
This book covers the design of engine control and monitoring systems for both turbofan and turboshaft engines, focusing on four key topics: • Modeling of engine dynamics • Application of specific control design methods to gas turbine engines • Advanced control concepts • Engine condition monitoring Although principally concerned with aircraft engines, this book is applicable to all air, land, and sea-based gas turbines, since most of the issues in designing other gas turbine control systems will be subsumed within the substantial challenges inherent in designing aviation gas turbine control systems. This book is not only a comprehensive resource for understanding the design of modern turbine engine control and monitoring systems, it can also be used as a reference for engineers and researchers designing control and monitoring systems for other industrial equipment and systems. The book is based on a course on gas turbine engine controls developed and taught by Dr. Jaw and Dr.
2001-08-15
Book
Graham White
This book chronicles the development, production, and application of what was arguably the finest aircraft piston engine ever produced - the Pratt & Whitney R-2800. It powered many of the significant fighters and medium bombers of the conflict, and went on to power many other military and commercial aircraft.
2001-02-16
Book
Dick Mulready
Advanced Engine Development at Pratt & Whitney offers a behind-the-scenes look at the almost unbelievable projects at Pratt & Whitney, including the RL10 hydrogen rocket engine, which has been used to launch most large satellites over the past half-century, and the development of the technology for the high-pressure staged combustion rocket engine used in the Space Shuttle.
1995-09-01
Book
Graham White
While it took the demands of two World Wars to bring aviation into acceptance by the general public, it was a relative handful of engineers, entrepreneurs, and pilots who positioned the technology and resources necessary to make aviation one of the deciding factors in ending World War II. This book attempts to illuminate some of the historically significant technical developments that were incorporated into World War II aircraft engines that directly contributed to the execution and tactics of the war. Engines detailed in the book include those from these manufacturers: Rolls-Royce Bristol, Napier General Electric Pratt and Whitney Allison Wright Aeronautical Corporation
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