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Technical Paper
1952-01-01
W. E. KAVASCH
Technical Paper
1952-01-01
T.H. Peirce, J.B. Robinson
THIS paper has been divided into two sections; the first, by Mr. Peirce, deals with the problems of engine mounting, and the second, by Mr. Robinson, deals with torsional vibration dampers. The object of the paper has been to present: (1) the problems of engine mounting to obtain optimum performance with respect to smoothness, quietness, and the function of accessories and controls, (2) illustrations of the various types of engine mountings and their locations on truck and bus engines, (3) results of torsional tests on various types of engines and the torsional performance characteristics of commercially used vibration dampers on such engines, and (4) illustrations of typical torsional vibration damper designs applicable to commercial engines. The authors hope that a discussion of the practical problems of both engine mountings and torsional vibration damper designs will contribute to a better understanding of the many problems that must be solved to maintain in the future the requisite standards of engine mounting and torsional vibration damper performance.
Technical Paper
1952-01-01
D.T. Sicklesteel
THREE phases of the torque-converter problem are discussed here: 1. Cooling systems - vehicle driving conditions that should be considered in their design, temperature rise tests. 2. Fluids - their functions and characteristics. 3. Seals - types, materials used in their construction.
Magazine
1951-11-01
Standard
1951-10-01
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of mechanical tubing. This tubing has been used typically for parts, 0.75 inch (19 mm) and under in section thickness at time of heat treatment, requiring a through-hardening steel capable of developing hardness as high as 40 HRC when properly hardened and tempered and for parts of greater thickness but requiring proportionately lower hardness, but usage is not limited to such applications.
Standard
1951-10-01
INTRODUCT ION Conventional internal conbustion a i r c r a f t engines require the same basic conditions for starting in cold weather as they do in warn weather. These are: (1) The engine must be cranked a t a reasonable speed. ( 2 ) A combustible mixture must be delivered t o the cylinders. (3) An ignition spark must be supplied which is capable of igniting t'ne charge a t the proper t i m e . (4) The fits and olearanoes of mating parts in the engine m u s t be such that normal Sunctions occur a t a l l temperatures. (5) The engine must receive a usable lubricant. (6) The engine must develop s u f f i c i e n t power t o overcome its own f r i c t i o n and accelerate itself t o the desired operating speed.
Standard
1951-08-01
No scope available
Standard
1951-08-01
No scope available
Standard
1951-06-01
This specification covers leather tanned with chromium salts and retanned with vegetable tanning material.
Standard
1951-06-01
This specification covers bearings of leaded copper cast on one or both faces of a steel backing.
Standard
1951-06-01
This specification covers bearings of low-carbon steel plated on one or both faces with silver.
Standard
1951-06-01
This specification covers bearings of a leaded bronze cast on one or both faces of a steel backing.
Standard
1951-06-01
This specification covers bearings of a leaded bronze cast on one or both faces of a steel backing.
Standard
1951-06-01
This specification covers bearings of a tin alloy cast on one or both faces of a steel or bronze backing.
Standard
1951-06-01
This specification has been declared "CANCELLED " by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of January 2009. By this action, this document will remain listed in the Numerical Section of the Index of Aerospace Material Specifications indicating that it has been "CANCELLED ".
Standard
1951-06-01
This specification covers bearings of a leaded bronze cast on one or both faces of a steel backing with a layer of babbitt metal cast on the leaded bronze.
Magazine
1951-05-01
Standard
1951-03-01
To specify the minimum requirements for gyroscopically stabilized Bank and Pitch Indicators for use in aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instrument to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.4.
Standard
1951-03-01
This specification covers a low-carbon steel in the form of wire supplied as coils of wire or, when specified, as straight lengths.
Technical Paper
1951-01-01
G.L. McCain
THE SAE standard for involute splines, which has also been approved by several other societies, has been nine years in the making. This paper gives data and methods to supplement the standard, including intermediate tables for experimental enginering and a few new convenient formulas. A complete discussion of all the data used for the development of the involute spline standard is given here. In the standard, all dimensions given are based on production needs, but in this discussion there are tables with data and dimensions that may be applied directly to experimental or custom-built parts where gages and production checking means are not available.
Technical Paper
1951-01-01
Robert Schilling
THIS paper describes the line of reasoning on which automotive stress analysis is based. It concerns itself primarily with operational stresses in the chassis proper and only in a limited way with aspects of engine and transmission design. The author tries to show that the automotive method does not rely on trial and error alone, and is tailored to the product and its service.
Standard
1950-12-01
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of mechanical tubing. This tubing has been used typically for parts, 0.75 inch (19 mm) and under in section thickness at time of heat treatment, requiring a through-hardening steel capable of developing hardness as high as 40 HRC when properly hardened and tempered and for parts of greater thickness but requiring proportionately lower hardness, but usage is not limited to such applications.
Standard
1950-10-01
This specification covers an aircraft quality, low alloy steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate. These products have been used typically for heat treated parts and structures that may require welding during fabrication, but usage is not limited to such applications. It may be through-hardened to a minimum tensile strength of 180 ksi (1241 MPa) in sections 0.125 inch (3.18 mm) and under in nominal thickness and proportionately lower strength in heavier section thicknesses.
Standard
1950-10-01
This specification has been 'CANCELLED' by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of June, 1996.

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