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Viewing 15061 to 15090 of 15347
Standard
1951-06-01
This specification has been declared "CANCELLED " by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of January 2009. By this action, this document will remain listed in the Numerical Section of the Index of Aerospace Material Specifications indicating that it has been "CANCELLED ".
Magazine
1951-05-01
Standard
1951-03-01
To specify the minimum requirements for gyroscopically stabilized Bank and Pitch Indicators for use in aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instrument to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.4.
Standard
1951-03-01
This specification covers a low-carbon steel in the form of wire supplied as coils of wire or, when specified, as straight lengths.
Technical Paper
1951-01-01
G.L. McCain
THE SAE standard for involute splines, which has also been approved by several other societies, has been nine years in the making. This paper gives data and methods to supplement the standard, including intermediate tables for experimental enginering and a few new convenient formulas. A complete discussion of all the data used for the development of the involute spline standard is given here. In the standard, all dimensions given are based on production needs, but in this discussion there are tables with data and dimensions that may be applied directly to experimental or custom-built parts where gages and production checking means are not available.
Technical Paper
1951-01-01
Robert Schilling
THIS paper describes the line of reasoning on which automotive stress analysis is based. It concerns itself primarily with operational stresses in the chassis proper and only in a limited way with aspects of engine and transmission design. The author tries to show that the automotive method does not rely on trial and error alone, and is tailored to the product and its service.
Standard
1950-12-01
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of mechanical tubing. This tubing has been used typically for parts, 0.75 inch (19 mm) and under in section thickness at time of heat treatment, requiring a through-hardening steel capable of developing hardness as high as 40 HRC when properly hardened and tempered and for parts of greater thickness but requiring proportionately lower hardness, but usage is not limited to such applications.
Standard
1950-10-01
This specification covers an aircraft quality, low alloy steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate. These products have been used typically for heat treated parts and structures that may require welding during fabrication, but usage is not limited to such applications. It may be through-hardened to a minimum tensile strength of 180 ksi (1241 MPa) in sections 0.125 inch (3.18 mm) and under in nominal thickness and proportionately lower strength in heavier section thicknesses.
Standard
1950-10-01
This specification has been 'CANCELLED' by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of June, 1996.
Magazine
1950-08-01
Magazine
1950-06-01
Standard
1950-05-01
No scope available.
Standard
1950-04-15
No scope available.
Standard
1950-04-01
No scope available.
Standard
1950-04-01
No scope available.
Standard
1950-04-01
No scope available.
Magazine
1950-02-01
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
J. P. WILSON
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
F.C. Mock, D.R. Ganger
ACHIEVEMENT of a high degree of atomization and evenness of distribution - particularly at low fuel rates-are major needs in the field of gas turbine powerplant fuel spray nozzles. Since the swirl type of nozzle is inadequate to meet these needs, according to the authors, it is being abandoned in favor of duplex nozzles, which have the advantage of holding up the energy of atomization at low deliveries. The duplex nozzle is also easy to manufacture and has a wide available range of fuel flows, compared with the simplex nozzle.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
ELLWOOD F. RIESING
THIS paper discusses the application of resilient mountings to passenger-car powerplants. Resilient mountings have a threefold purpose: 1. They isolate engine vibration and torque impulses from the rest of the vehicle. 2. They insulate the engine mass from incoming excitations due to road irregularities. 3. Nos. 1 and 2 must be accomplished without allowing the powerplant mass to get into synchronous vibration with any component of the vehicle.
Magazine
1950-01-01
Magazine
1949-12-01
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