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Viewing 15061 to 15090 of 15634
1962-07-01
Magazine
1962-06-01
Standard
J478A_196206
Included herein are complete general and dimensional data for the types of slotted and recessed head machine, tapping, and wood screws, and slotted capscrews recognized as SAE Standard. Also included are performance data for tapping screws and appendixes which provide instructions for protrusion gaging flat heads, penetration gaging of recessed heads, across corners gaging of hexagon heads, recommended hole sizes for tapping screws, and a cross reference of tapping screw type designations. The inclusion of dimensional data in this standard is not intended to imply that all of the products described are stock production sizes. Consumer interests are requested to consult with manufacturers concerning lists of stock production sizes.
1962-06-01
Magazine
1962-05-01
Magazine
1962-04-01
Standard
J823_196204
This SAE Standard specifies the test procedure, test circuitry, and instruments required for measuring the performance of flashers used in motor vehicles.
1962-03-01
Standard
AS446
This Aerospace Standard covers three basic types of cargo compartment fire detector instruments. Basic Types - Definition of: Type I: Carbon Monoxide, an instrument which will actuate an alarm siganl when the concentration of carbon monoxide in air exceeds a specified value. Type II: Smoke Detector, Electronic, an instrument operating on the principle of smoke particles modifying the relationsihp between a light beam and electronic light sensor which will actuate an alarm signal when the concentration of smoke in air exceeds a specified value. Type III: Smoke Detector, Visual, an instrument whcih by visual means will show in a positive manner the presence of smoke when the concentration of smoke in air exceeds a specified value.
1962-03-01
Standard
AS420B
This Aerospace Standard establishes essential minimum safe performance standards for Flight Director instruments primarily for use with reciprocating engine powered transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.3. This Aerospace Standard covers Flight Directors for use on aircraft to indicate to the pilot, by visual means, the correct control application for the operation of an aircraft in accordance with a pre-selected flight plan.
1962-03-01
Standard
J587A_196203
This SAE Standard provides test procedures, requirements, and guidelines for vehicular license plate illumination devices.
1962-02-15
Standard
AS400A
This Aerospace Standard covers three basic types of cargo compartment fire detector instruments. Basic Types - Definition of: Type I: Carbon Monoxide, an instrument which will actuate an alarm signal when the concentration of carbon monoxide in air exceeds a specified value. Type II: Smoke Detector, Electronic, an instrument operating on the principle of smoke particles modifying the relationship between a light beam and electronic light sensor which will actuate an alarm signal when the concentration of smoke in air exceeds a specified value. Type III: Smoke Detector, Visual, an instrument which, by visual means, will show in a positive manner the presence of smoke when the concentration of smoke in air exceeds a specified value.
1962-02-01
Magazine
1962-02-01
Standard
J684A_196202
This SAE Standard includes couplings, hitches, and safety chains used in conjunction with all types of trailers or towed vehicles whose Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) does not exceed 4540 kg (10 000 lb). This includes such types as utility, boat, camping, travel, and special purpose trailers which are normally towed by conventional passenger cars, light-duty commercial vehicles, light trucks, and multipurpose passenger vehicles. This document is intended primarily for ball-and-socket type of couplings and hitches. It should not be construed as a limitation to this type alone but should apply where appropriate to ring-and-pintle, clevis-and-pin, or any other draft means designed to serve this purpose.
1962-01-15
Standard
AS269C
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) provides material identification codes for aluminum alloys, copper alloys, carbon steels, alloy steels, titanium alloys, corrosion resistant materials, and heat resistant materials that are used to make AN, MS, and AS engine and propeller standard utility parts. This document also provides similar material codes for company parts (such as nuts, bolts, etc.) having design configuration similar to other company parts or the engine and propeller standard utility parts (AN, MS, and AS) that are not of the same material.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620417
J. C. Lachman
Development of coaxial type high temperature thermocouples was initiated by manufacturing tungsten-26% rhenium alloy seamless tubing, which has excellent room temperature bend ductility in addition to inherent advantages of high strength and very high melting point. Tungsten/tungsten-28% rhenium coaxial thermocouples were directly fabricated from large billets. Tungsten-rhenium alloy tubes were reduced by hot fabrication to coaxial thermocouple wire. Coaxial tungsten/tungsten-26% rhenium thermocouples were calibrated in hydrogen atmosphere. The thermal emf of coaxial units above 2700 F was lower than the calibration for conventional, wire type thermocouples, but the departure might be attributed to variations in alloy composition or calibration techniques.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620424
L. S. Bialkowski, W. J. Le Blanc
A new all-metallic seal has been tested and produced by The B.F. Goodrich Co. This seal, which is adapted for rod or piston service, dynamic or static applications, has been operated successfully at temperatures from -65 to 560 F. The temperature range was limited only by the fluids used. The pressure test range extends to 35,000 psi, which is not a design limit. Break-out force can be adjusted with very low or no leakage of the fluids or gases. The concept is that of a blunt knife edge that forms the radial or axial edge of a flexible diaphragm.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620421
J. W. Noonan
The effect that some of the more significant environmental parameters can have on the physical and mechanical properties of seal materials is discussed. Extreme operating conditions of space are generally unfavourable to seal materials but in a few cases the effect can be favourable. The view is expressed that further exploration of behaviour of existing materials can lead to extension of performance capabilities of a number of materials.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620422
John Lee
This paper concerns the design, development and evaluation of metallic seals to meet the extreme conditions of temperature and pressure experienced in fluid power systems of advanced aerospace vehicles. The basic principles and design problems that characterize the use of metallic seals are discussed. Single and two-stage rod seals for 4000 psi, -65 F to +1000 F, hydraulic system applications using mineral oil and polyphenyl ether fluids are described. The performance evaluation of metallic and graphite piston rings are included. The selection of rod-gland material combinations and surface coatings are discussed. Static seal configurations for use at 4000 psi and temperatures up to 1000 F are also described.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620260
F. R. Holliday
Typical solutions for automotive strength problems are complicated by such variables as driver habits and road conditions, but the inclusion of a safety factor when designing for fatigue loading modifies these intangibles to some extent. Two different loading systems are discussed in this article to demonstrate the application of formulas for measuring magnitudes of loads and for estimating frequencies of fatigue failure in road test experience, service mileage, information, and strength comparisons. The author emphasizes that such statistical calculations, used in place of former rule-of-thumb methods, produce more realistic safety factor values and also provide a faster and more economical approach toward achieving long life and reliability of parts.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620231
George A. Peters, Robert L. Anderson, Norman A. Hunstad
A brief review of the testing of automatic transmission fluid for compatibility with seals is presented. The total immersion test used in fluid qualification, while apparently effective in predicting the compatibility of fluids and seals in service, does not correlate well with transmission tests with respect to hardness change of piston seals. The Dip-Cycle Test, developed to overcome this limitation, is a procedure for alternately immersing seal specimens in the test fluid and suspending them in the hot air-fluid vapor atmosphere above the fluid. Correlation of the Dip-Cycle Test with transmission piston seal results is much improved over that with the total immersion test. It is the purpose of this paper to review these developments and to present an improved test procedure (dip cycle test) for evaluating the effect of fluids on transmission piston seal materials.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620042
John O. Almen
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620109
E. S. Bower, B. C. Vandermar
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620111
E. C. Beck, W. VanDam, C. N. DeBruin
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620112
Charles S. Chapman
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620098
V. L. Peickii
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS7278A
This specification has been declared "SUPERSEDED" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of 10/17/90. Use AMS 7276 or 7280
1962-01-01
Standard
ARP260B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides the definition for a control lever connection with 60° "V" serrations for aircraft power or control levers.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS7454D
1. SCOPE: 1.1 Type: This specification covers high quality holts and screws made of a low-alloy, heat resistant steel. 1. 2 Application: Primarily for joining parts where high strength up to 900'F (480'C) is reqnired.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS7279A
This specification has been declared "SUPERSEDED" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of 10/17/90.
1961-11-30
Standard
ARP727
The following design features are provided by this recommended practice: 1. Prevention of installation of gyro in wrong position vector-wise. 2. Prevention of wrong gyro from being installed by use of a coded keying system. 3. Center of gravity mount. 4. Use of plug and socket type connectors rather than soldered terminals. 5. Self test feature. 6. Standard to be flexible enough to allow for expansion of types as the need arises. 7. A policed and controlled recommended practice. 8. Plug-in rate gyro. 9. Elimination of wrong harness connection by use of MS33683-1 standard which has 3 keyway positions. This could by expanding to 5 positions.
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