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Viewing 15061 to 15090 of 19878
CURRENT
1984-12-01
Standard
AS41094-5
No scope available.
HISTORICAL
1984-12-01
Standard
J232_198412
This SAE Standard establishes performance criteria for towed, semi-mounted, or mounted and arm type rotary mowers with one or more blade assemblies of 77.5 cm blade tip circle diameter or over, mounted on a propelling tractor or machine of at least 15 kW, intended for marketing as industrial mowing equipment and designed for cutting grass and other growth in public use areas such as parks, cemeteries, and along roadways and highways. The use of the word "industrial" is not to be confused with "in-plant industrial equipment." This document does not apply to: a. Turf care equipment primarily designed for personal use, consumption, or enjoyment of a consumer in or around a permanent or temporary household or residence. b. Equipment designed primarily for agricultural purposes but which may be used for industrial use. c. Self-powered or self-propelled mowers or mowing machines.
HISTORICAL
1984-12-01
Standard
AS1852
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the maximum allowable free opening dimensions for airframe fueling ports on civil aircraft that require the exclusive use of gasoline as an engine fuel, and the minimum free opening dimensions for airframe fueling ports on civil aircraft that operate with turbine fuels as the primary fuel type and with gasoline as the emergency fuel type. This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) also defines the features and dimensions for airframe refueling ports on civil aircraft that require the exclusive use of turbine fuel as an engine fuel. In addition, this document defines the minimum fuel nozzle spout dimensions for turbine fuel ground service equipment, and the maximum fuel nozzle spout diameter for gasoline ground service equipment.
CURRENT
1984-11-14
Standard
AS44800-3
No scope available.
1984-11-01
Technical Paper
841713
David E. Johnston, Robert Bond
In the course of studying the market requirements for seals in large axles and relating this to conventional sealing technology, it became apparent that a fresh approach to sealing was desirable. This paper describes such a development in detail. Centrifugal action is the principle sealing action of the seal. Although this is in itself not new, the method by which it is harnessed makes the design radically different from normal “slinger” seals. Both practical and analytical work are covered in the text.
HISTORICAL
1984-11-01
Standard
AIR1590
This Standard present a recommended part numbering scheme for fluid system component parts which may require complex standard numbers. Standardizing on certain numbering systems provides for numbering simplicity, ease of interchangeability and supersession (when required) and standardization and limitation of usable codes within a fifteen-character limitation.
HISTORICAL
1984-11-01
Standard
AS1738
No scope available.
HISTORICAL
1984-10-01
Standard
AMS7234D
ABSTRACT
CURRENT
1984-10-01
Standard
AMS3663
ABSTRACT
1984-10-01
Technical Paper
841387
R. S. Johnson
Laboratory engine low temperature pumpability test programs have been completed with two four cylinder gasoline engines. Both of these engines are reported to have been involved in low temperature field failures in recent years. Hardware and oil formulation effects have been studied and shown to have a significant impact on low temperature operability. Three commercially available viscosity modifiers are ranked for relative pumpability performance in each engine. In addition, evidence is given to explain the reasons for the field failures that occurred in these two engines.
1984-10-01
Technical Paper
841585
T. K. Hasselman, Jon D. Chrostowski
This paper addresses the problem of experimentally verifying an analytical model of a dynamic system, using data from both component and system-level vibration tests. Statistical parameter estimation is used as a tool for validating the structure of a model, as well as estimating its parameter values. Important aspects of model verification strategy and planning are discussed on the basis of recent experience, and a practical example is given.
1984-10-01
Technical Paper
841619
Michael E. Hampson
Significant improvements in engine readiness with reductions in maintenance costs and turnaround times can be achieved with an engine condition monitoring systems (CMS). The CMS provides health status of critical engine components, without disassembly, through monitoring with advanced sensors. Engine failure reports over 35 years were categorized into 20 different modes of failure. Rotor bearings and turbine blades were determined to be the most critical in limiting turbopump life. Measurement technologies were matched to each of the failure modes identified. Three were selected to monitor the rotor bearings and turbine blades: the isotope wear detector and fiberoptic deflectometer (bearings), and the fiberoptic pyrometer (blades). Signal processing algorithms were evaluated for their ability to provide useful health data to maintenance personnel. Design modifications to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure turbopumps were developed to incorporate the sensors.
HISTORICAL
1984-10-01
Standard
AMS6352E
This specification covers an aircraft quality, low alloy steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate. These products have been used typically for heat treated parts and structures that may require welding during fabrication, but usage is not limited to such applications. It may be through-hardened to a minimum tensile strength of 180 ksi (1241 MPa) in sections 0.125 inch (3.18 mm) and under in nominal thickness and proportionately lower strength in heavier section thicknesses.
HISTORICAL
1984-10-01
Standard
AS604A
This Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the requirements for a heavy braid polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) lined, metallic reinforced, hose assembly suitable for use in high temperature, 400 °F, high pressure, 3000 psi, aircraft hydraulic fluid systems, also for use in pneumatic systems which allow some gaseous diffusion through the PTFE wall. The -20 size operating temperature is limited to 275 °F maximum.
HISTORICAL
1984-10-01
Standard
AS620A
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the requirements for a convoluted polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) lined, metallic reinforced, hose assembly suitable for use in aircraft fluid systems at temperatures of -65 to 400 °F and at operating pressures per Table 1.
HISTORICAL
1984-10-01
Standard
J964_198410
This SAE Recommended Practice describes methods for determining total and specular reflectance for mirrors with flat and curved surfaces and a method for determining diffuse reflectance and haze for mirrors with flat surfaces.
HISTORICAL
1984-10-01
Standard
J902_198410
This SAE Recommended Practice provides a test procedure and performance guideline for evaluating passenger car windshield defrosting systems. It is limited to results of tests that can be conducted on uniform test equipment in commercially available laboratory facilities. The current engineering practice prescribes that for laboratory evaluation of defroster systems, a known quantity of water shall be sprayed on the windshield to form an ice coating and then melted by the defroster under specific vehicle operating conditions. The procedure provides uniform and repeatable laboratory test results, even though under actual conditions such a coating would be removed by scraping before driving the vehicle. The performance obtained, therefore, does not directly relate to actual driving conditions, but serves as a laboratory performance indicator for comparing test results within or between systems.
1984-09-01
Technical Paper
841124
Walter P. Waskiewicz
A thin dense chromium coating has been developed that extends bearing life, particularly in problem environments. The coating possesses exceptional adhesion to the base metal, which allows it to withstand the extremely high unit loads present in bearing raceways. In conventional bearings life typically ends due to wear or an ultimate material failure in the raceway or rolling element. The actual cause of the failure can stem from many factors. Corrosion, contamination, loss of or poor lubrication, and mechanical damage, all accelerate failure. The coating reduces the detrimental impact of these factors, thus extending bearing life.
1984-09-01
Technical Paper
841214
H. E. Deen, J. Ryer
Automatic transmission fluids are specially designed to meet the many different requirements of automatic transmissions. This paper describes the properties of such fluids, the types of additives used to formulate them, and the tests used to evaluate ATF's. Also described are the powershift transmission fluids, Allison C-3 and Caterpillar TO-2, which are used in truck, bus, and heavy equipment transmissions.
1984-09-01
Technical Paper
841149
Dale Barsness, Wilfred Barbeau
Prevention of fluid leakage from threaded and flanged joints in newly-assembled vehicles is an active controversy. This paper explores design, material and human factors involved and offers case histories in which these limitations have been overcome. The paper concludes that certain chemical flange and thread sealants can serve as a protective umbrella over the many variables that contribute to fluid leakage.
1984-09-01
Technical Paper
841145
Les Horve
Radial lip seals are used throughout industry in a variety of applications that operate at widely varying conditions. These operating conditions can vary from high speed shaft rotation with a light oil mist to very low speeds in muddy environments. Variations in these operating conditions will affect seal performance. Studies have been made to determine how variations in sump temperature, sump pressure, shaft speed, eccentric misalignment and fluid type affect lip temperature, torque, power consumption and seal life.
1984-09-01
Technical Paper
841147
Henry J. Knott
The success of an elastomeric seal is highly dependent upon the temperature variation in the application. The sealing at the O.D. of the seal is often overlooked, especially when steel O.D. seals are pressed directly into an aluminum bore. There are both theoretical methods for calculating seal/bore interference and actual hardware tests which can be used to accurately determine seal/bore interference with varying temperatures.
1984-09-01
Technical Paper
841146
James A. Kent
A one piece axial face rotary shaft seal* of rubber provides a positive contact seal to keep dirt, dust and moisture from bearings and critical machine parts. The flexible lip is tolerant of angular mis-alignment, eccentricity, axial movement and introduces very low friction compared to conventional contact seals.
1984-09-01
Technical Paper
841224
Gunder Essig
The increased public interest in economic use of energy has lead to intense efforts by engineers to achieve a reduction in engine friction losses. Despite differences quoted in the literature, the proportion of the friction losses caused by the piston assembly is certainly of such an order as to justify considerable expenditure in the numerical determination of consumption improvements due to optimization of piston and rings. In engine tests carried out by Kolbenschmidt AG an accuracy of ≤ ± 0,5% has been achieved in the measurement of specific fuel consumption. This paper presents a basic description of the measurement method and the results of piston optimization for several small engines (four cylinder gasoline and diesel engines). A 3% - 5% fuel economy improvement under combined city/highway traffic conditions can be achieved by the use of an optimized Fuel Economy Piston. The contribution of the basic design parameters such as weight, skirt area and ring pack are discussed.
1984-09-01
Technical Paper
841220
Shinnosuke Uchida, Kenjiro Hara
The new 60° -V-6 crankshaft web thickness is reduced while maintaining its durability under turbo-charged gas presure by means of reasonable assumptions of stress concentration factors with finite element analysis and experimental data. In this way, it has been found that the crankshaft made of fillet-rolled Ductile Cast Iron material has adequate fatigue durability. In order to reduce the main bearing load at high RPM levels, five counter weights are provided. Finite element analysis has been successfully applied also for the evaluation of crankshaft stiffness. It has been found that the stiffness of the crankshaft arm between the pair pins of a crankthrow most effectively contributes toward the total stiffness. As a result, the new V-6 crankshaft featuring compact size low friction loss and adequate stiffness has been developed.
1984-09-01
Technical Paper
841295
R CERRATO, R GOZZELINO, R RICCI
1984-09-01
Technical Paper
841070
J. A. Gervé, M. J. Ehinger
This paper presents experimental and calculated results of a wear analysis of a piston rod bearing as a selected example for the multitude of possible applications of the radio nuclide technique RNT. After a description of the wear measurement device the six steps of the quality determination procedure and exemplary results are presented. It is shown how a wear analysis by RNT leads to an optimization.
1984-09-01
Technical Paper
841122
Adnan Kiblawi
Cleaner steels, advanced manufacturing techniques and the use of modern design methods have justified an increase of dynamic load ratings for cylindrical and tapered roller bearings as well as ball bearings. With the new load ratings, greater emphasis must be placed on the operating factors that influence the fatigue life of a bearing. These factors include reliability, material, lubrication, alignment and load distribution. A detailed discussion of load rating increases and the life adjustment factors is presented.
1984-09-01
Technical Paper
841123
N. Tsushima, H. Kashimura
Progress in the steel making process has improved the rolling contact fatigue life of bearing steels. Based on identical tests, conducted periodically over the past 20 years, improvements in the rolling contact fatigue life of through hardening bearing steels and various carburizing steels are described. Improvements in steel quality may alter the influence of various factors on rolling contact fatigue life, and because of this it is necessary for them to be re-examined. Based on recent test data, the influence of factors such as oxygen content, alloying elements, fibre orientation, steel making procedure and heat treatment factors such as microstructure and cooling speed during quenching on rolling contact fatigue life are described.
Viewing 15061 to 15090 of 19878

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