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Viewing 15061 to 15090 of 15393
1954-05-01
Standard
AMS3247
ABSTRACT
1954-05-01
Standard
AMS3245
ABSTRACT
1954-05-01
Standard
AMS3280
ABSTRACT
1954-05-01
Standard
AMS3665
null, null
ABSTRACT
1954-03-01
Magazine
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540120
L. E. KASSEBAUM, E. B. OGDEM
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540061
L. H. FRAILING
1953-10-01
Standard
ARP260
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides the definition for a control lever connection with 60° "V" serrations for aircraft power or control levers.
1953-09-01
Magazine
1953-06-01
Magazine
1953-06-01
Standard
AMS3620A
ABSTRACT
1953-04-15
Standard
ARP277
No scope available.
1953-03-01
Magazine
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530039
E. CRANKSHAW, R. C. SAVAGE
1952-11-01
Standard
AMS7205
This specification covers tubular-shaped pins, fabricated from carbon steel, having a full-length longitudinal slot to permit flexure when inserted into a hole.
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520012
W. E. THILL
Abstract One approach to the problem of the proper installation of engine bearings is to consider the following points individually (Figure 1). 1. Is the housing (connecting rod or main bearing saddle) into which the bearing is being assembled round, reasonably smooth, straight, and of proper size? 2. Is the new insert bearing to the correct physical requirements; that is, similar grooving and oil holes, proper materials, and correct undersize for the replacement? 3. Is the shaft round, smooth and straight, and of correct size? 4. Is the oil clearance correct? 5. Will good clean oil be supplied to the bearings under pressure? These are the major elements when confined to one engine bearing. Deviations from practical limits on any of these can lead to trouble, in the form of shortened bearing life or possible immediate failure, depending upon the degree of the deviation. Obviously when more than one bearing in a direct line is involved, alignment of the two or more bearings becomes an additional consideration.
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520001
Arthur F. Underwood, Arvid E. Roach
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520003
ARTHUR R. SHAW
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520133
E. J. BARTH, T. BACKUS
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520155
W. E. KAVASCH
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520211
T.H. Peirce, J.B. Robinson
THIS paper has been divided into two sections; the first, by Mr. Peirce, deals with the problems of engine mounting, and the second, by Mr. Robinson, deals with torsional vibration dampers. The object of the paper has been to present: (1) the problems of engine mounting to obtain optimum performance with respect to smoothness, quietness, and the function of accessories and controls, (2) illustrations of the various types of engine mountings and their locations on truck and bus engines, (3) results of torsional tests on various types of engines and the torsional performance characteristics of commercially used vibration dampers on such engines, and (4) illustrations of typical torsional vibration damper designs applicable to commercial engines. The authors hope that a discussion of the practical problems of both engine mountings and torsional vibration damper designs will contribute to a better understanding of the many problems that must be solved to maintain in the future the requisite standards of engine mounting and torsional vibration damper performance.
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520221
D.T. Sicklesteel
THREE phases of the torque-converter problem are discussed here: 1. Cooling systems - vehicle driving conditions that should be considered in their design, temperature rise tests. 2. Fluids - their functions and characteristics. 3. Seals - types, materials used in their construction.
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520123
BERNARD GROSS
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