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2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2467
Alessandro Ferrari, Federica Paolicelli
The modal analysis of a Common Rail fuel injection system equipped with solenoid injectors of the latest generation has been performed in the frequency domain. A complete lumped parameter model of the high-pressure hydraulic circuit from the pump delivery to the injector nozzles has been realized and validated by comparison with the frequency modal values obtained by applying a peak-picking technique to the measured pressure time history. Three main modal motions have been identified in the considered injection apparatus and the possible resonances with the external forcing terms, i.e., pump delivered flow-rate, pressure control valve discharged flow-rate and flow-rates expelled by the solenoid injector, have been highlighted and discussed. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis of the frequency domain performance to key geometrical features of the high-pressure system layout has been carried out.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2462
Fabio Auriemma, Heiki Tiikoja
The acoustic impedance exerted by a new type of element for noise control, the Micro-Grooved Elements (MGEs), has been broadly studied in this paper. The MGEs are typically composed of at least two overlying layers presenting macroscopic slots and a number of micro-grooves at least on one of the contact surfaces. Similarly to the Micro-Perforated Elements (MPEs), the MGEs have been proved to provide effective dissipation of acoustic energy by the means of viscous losses taking place in the micro-channels. However, in contrast to the typical MPEs, the MGEs use the grooves, instead of the holes, which the air is forced to pass through. It results in more cost effective elements, which have been found to represent an adequate alternative for fibrous materials, typically present in silencer units. This study represents a refined investigation on the acoustic impedance of the MGEs, aiming to provide a general formulation, valid for different internal configurations.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2472
Nikolaos Papadopoulos, Pavlos Aleiferis
The design of a Diesel injector is a key factor in achieving higher engine efficiency. The injector’s fuel atomisation characteristics are also critical for minimising toxic emissions such as unburnt Hydrocarbons (HC). However, when developing injection systems, the small dimensions of the nozzle render optical experimental investigations very challenging under realistic engine conditions. Therefore, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can be used instead. For the present work, transient, Volume Of Fluid (VOF), multiphase simulations of the flow inside and immediately downstream of a real-size multi-hole nozzle were performed, during and after the injection event with a small air chamber coupled to the injector downstream of the nozzle exit. A Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach was used to account for turbulence. Grid dependency studies were performed with 200k–1.5M cells.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2364
Xianpai Zeng, Jared Liette, Scott Noll, Rajendra Singh
Abstract The vibration isolation effectiveness of powertrain mount configurations is examined for electric vehicle application by considering the effect introduced by internal mount resonances. Unlike internal combustion engines where mounts are typically designed only for static support and low frequency dynamics, electric motors have higher excitation frequencies in a range where mount resonances often occur. The problem is first analytically formulated by considering a simple 3-dimensional powertrain system, and the vibration isolation effectiveness significantly deteriorates at the mount resonance(s). It is shown that by modifying the mount shape, the mount resonance(s) can be shifted while maintaining the same static rate, tuning the frequency away from any engine excitation or natural frequencies. Further, internal mount resonances are utilized to improve vibration isolation over a narrow frequency range, using non-identical mounts to split mount resonance peaks.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2350
Jiantie Zhen, Scott Fredrickson
Abstract Off-highway machine mounting system isolation, especially the cab mounting system, significantly affects the operator comfort by providing damping to the harsh inputs and isolating the structure-borne energy from traveling into the cab. Mounting system isolation performance is decided not only by the isolation component, but also the mounting bracket structure, and should be treated as a system. This paper gives a review of how the mounting system isolates structural energy and the effect of the bracket structure stiffness to the mounting system isolation performance.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2368
Babitha Kalla, Sanjeevgouda Patil, Mansinh Kumbhar
Abstract Idle NVH (Noise Vibration Harshness) is one of the major quality parameters that customer looks into while buying the vehicle. Idle shake is undesirable vibrations generated from Engine while it is in idling condition. These low frequency vibrations affects both driver and passenger comfort. Vibrations are perceived by customer through the interfaces such as the seats, floor, and steering wheel. The frequencies of vibration felt by customer ranges between 10-30 Hz and varies based on engine configurations. There are two factors that are critical to the vehicle idle NVH quality, 1. Engine excitation force and 2. Vehicle sensitivity to excitation forces (Transfer function). Even though the engine excitation forces are governed by cylinder combustion process inside the cylinder and engine mass, it is also largely affected by how well the engine and transmission are supported on vehicle through isolators.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2178
Mohamed El Morsy, Gabriela Achtenova
Abstract When localized fault occurs in a bearing, the periodic impulsive feature of the vibration signal appears in time domain and the corresponding Bearing Characteristic Frequencies (BCFs) emerge in frequency domain. The common technique of Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) and Envelope Detection (ED) are always used to identify faults occurring at the BCFs. In the early stage of bearing failures, the BCFs contain very little energy and are often overwhelmed by noise and higher-level macro-structural vibrations. In order to extract the weak fault information submerged in strong background noise of the gearbox vibration signal, an effective signal processing method would be necessary to remove such corrupting noise and interference. Optimal Morlet Wavelet Filter and Envelope Detection (ED) are applied in this paper.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2190
Manchi Venkateswara Rao, S Nataraja Moorthy, Prasath Raghavendran
Abstract Mount development and optimization plays an important role in the NVH refinement of vehicle as they significantly influence overall driving experience. Dynamic stiffness is a key parameter that directly affects the mount performance. Conventional dynamic stiffness evaluation techniques are cumbersome and time consuming. The dynamic stiffness of mount depends on the magnitude of load, frequency of application and the working displacement. The above parameters would be far different in the test conditions under which the mounts are normally tested when compared to operating conditions. Hence there is need to find the dynamic stiffness of mounts in actual vehicle operating conditions. In this paper, the dynamic stiffness of elastomeric mounts is estimated by using a modified matrix inversion technique popularly termed as operational path analysis with exogenous inputs (OPAX).
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2212
A. Elsawaf, H. Metered, T. Vampola, Z. Sika
Abstract Active vibration control is the most effective method used for suppressing vibrations from external sources. This paper presents the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to search about the optimum feedback controller gains for the active mount suspension, for the first time, to reduce the vibrations level of a structural system. It consists of vibrating mass and flexible beam subjected to an external disturbance. A mathematical model and the equations of motion of the structure system with an active mount suspension are simulated using Matlab/Simulink software. The active controller was designed to control the first three modes of the structure. The proposed PSO algorithm aims to minimize the acceleration of the suspended mass as the objective function with constraint of the actuator force. Vibrations level is examined theoretically in order to assess the effectiveness of the proposed controller.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2229
Benjamin Joodi, Scott Allen Noll, Jason Dreyer, Rajendra Singh
Abstract Elastomeric joints are utilized in many automotive applications, and exhibit frequency and excitation amplitude dependent properties. Current methods commonly identify only the cross-point joint property using displacement excitation at stepped single frequencies. This process is often time consuming and is limited to measuring a single dynamic stiffness term of the joint stiffness matrix. This study focuses on developing tractable laboratory inverse experiments to identify frequency dependent stiffness matrices up to 1000 Hz. Direct measurements are performed on a commercial elastomer test system and an inverse experiment consisting of an elastic beam (with a square cross section) attached to a cylindrical elastomeric joint. Sources of error in the inverse methodology are thoroughly examined and explained through simulation which include ill-conditioning of matrices and the sensitivity to modeling error.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2227
Scott Allen Noll, Benjamin Joodi, Jason Dreyer, Rajendra Singh
Abstract Elastomeric joints such as mounts and suspension bushings undergo broadband excitation and are often characterized through a cross-point dynamic stiffness measurement; yet, at frequencies above 100 Hz for many elastomeric components, the cross- and driving-point dynamic stiffness results significantly deviate. An illustrative example is developed where two different sized mounts, constructed of the same material and are shaped to achieve the same static stiffness behavior, exhibit drastically different dynamic behavior. Physical insight is provided through the development of a reduced order single-degree-of-freedom model where an internal resonance is explained. Next, a method to extract the parameters for the reduced order model from a detailed finite element bushing model is provided.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2225
Peng Yu, Tong Zhang, Jing Li, Shiyang Chen, Rong Guo
Abstract Faced on transient vibration of EV, considering the characteristics of the electric drive system, active and passive integrated transient vibration control method of power train mounting system was proposed. Models of power train system and mounting system were established, modal characteristics were grasped by simulation and experiment. A feed-forward controller was constructed from the facet of active control, mounting system transient vibration and power train torsion vibration were reduced. Based on this, further optimization of mounting system was conducted from a passive control perspective. Results show that the active and passive integrated control method can effectively reduce the dynamic reaction force of mounting points, improve the vibration conditions of power train and vehicle body as well.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2352
Chaitanya Krishna Balla, Sudhakara Naidu, Milind Narayan Ambardekar
Abstract Noise Vibration and Harshness (NVH) refinement is one of the important parameters in modern vehicle development. In city traffic conditions, idling is an engine operating condition where a driver focuses attention more to his/her vehicle. Tactile vibration & noise levels inside the cab play an important role in all vehicles, especially those powered by diesel engines where combustion pressures are higher. They lead to discomfort & fatigue of passengers of even a low cost vehicle. Now its idle NVH is influenced mainly by vibration-isolation provided by power-train (PT) mounting design, This paper describes steps taken to improve the idle vibrations at a driver seat of a small commercial vehicle (SCV) with a 2-cylinder diesel engine of 800 cc through redesign of PT-mounting along with fine tuning of idle speed of the engine. A resonance was avoided between the first firing order at idling and PT rigid-body mode in pitching.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1740
Kelsie S. Richmond, Stephen Henry, Russell Richmond, David Belton
Gasket materials are utilized for various different types of high temperature testing to prevent leaking at bolted joints. In particular, the automotive test services field uses flanged-gasket bolted exhaust joints to provide a convenient method for installation & removal of exhaust components like catalytic converters for aging, performance testing, etc. Recent improvements in the catalyst aging methods require flanged-gasket joints that can withstand exhaust temperatures as high as 1200°C. Gasket materials previously used in these applications like the graphite based gasket materials have exhibited physical breakdowns, severe leakage, and general thermal failures under these extreme temperatures. In order to prevent these leaks, metal-reinforced gasket materials in a number of configurations were introduced to these extreme temperature environments to evaluate their robustness to these temperatures.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1743
Tanmay Santra, Vikas Kumar Agarwal
An inadequate sealing of the combustion chamber gasket interface may have severe consequences on both the performance & emission of an engine. In this investigation, both the distribution of the contact pressure on the gasket and the stresses of the cylinder head at different loading conditions are explored and improved by modifying the design. A single cylinder gasoline engine cylinder head assembly has been analyzed by means of an uncoupled FEM simulation to find the sealing pressure of the multi-layer steel (MLS) gasket, strength & deformation of the components involved. The thermal loads are computed separately from CFD simulations of cylinder head assembly. The cylinder head assembly consisting of head, blocks, liner, cam shaft holder, bolts, gaskets, valve guides & valve seats, is one of the most complicated sub-assembly of an IC engine.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0235
Shiv Shankar Prasad, Jahangir Mansoori, Jin Seo Park
Abstract A vehicle horn is a sound-making device used to warn others of any approaching vehicle or of its presence. Some countries require horns by law. Conventional Horns are electromechanical with steel diaphragm and electromagnet acting upon it. Switching of horn is performed by mechanical contact breaker assembly that repeatedly interrupts the current to electromagnetic. Up-Down movement of diaphragm with response to the current creates a sound wave across horn. Conventional Horn faces the problem of wear and tear of mechanical contact and internal parts. Switching of contacts results in arcing. There is no current and surge voltage protection for the coil of conventional horn. These problems of conventional system might be accepted in the general market, but in specific markets which are using horn frequently; these have to be considered as serious issues. Especially, horns are one of the most abusive parts of vehicle in India.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0431
KI Woo Sung, Jong Gurl Kim, Dae-Un Sung, Hye Mi Kim
Abstract This study examined various warranty data analysis methods to identify and study the one most suitable for Hyundai Motor warranty data. The drawbacks of the conventional life table method were overcome to develop an analysis method optimized for vehicle characteristics. The proposed method was examined for its suitability to various applications, such as providing the information necessary for determining the service life of parts, verifying the effects of design changes, and designing warranty and maintenance policies. The analysis data used in this study were derived from the 10-year powertrain parts warranty data of vehicles sold in the USA, South Korea, and China.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0918
Daniel Duke, Andrew Swantek, Alan Kastengren, Kamel Fezzaa, Christopher Powell
Abstract Cavitation plays an important role in fuel injection systems. It alters the nozzle's internal flow structure and discharge coefficient, and also contributes to injector wear. Quantitatively measuring and mapping the cavitation vapor distribution in a fuel injector is difficult, as cavitation occurs on very short time and length scales. Optical measurements of transparent model nozzles can indicate the morphology of large-scale cavitation, but are generally limited by the substantial amount of scattering that occurs between vapor and liquid phases. These limitations can be overcome with x-ray diagnostics, as x-rays refract, scatter and absorb much more weakly from phase interfaces. Here, we present an overview of some recent developments in quantitative x-ray diagnostics for cavitating flows. Measurements were conducted at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, using a submerged plastic test nozzle.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0923
Mohamed Chouak, Alexandre Mousseau, Damien Reveillon, Louis Dufresne, Patrice Seers
Abstract The transient characteristics of the internal flow dominate all the ensuing processes: spray, fuel-air mixture formation as well as combustion and pollutants formation. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the dynamics of the injectors' internal flow. The objective of this work is to study all transient effects that may impact the internal flow of a single hole injector under different conditions. Since the numerical investigation of such a complex flow is hampered by several factors for the real operating conditions-namely the turbulence, the cavitation and the needle motion-this work is divided into two parts. In the first part, only the effects of turbulence and cavitation are considered through the study of the effects of the fuel properties as well as the injection conditions at the fully open needle position. The impact of these effects is studied by means of the Reynolds and the cavitation number.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0944
Maryam Moulai, Ronald Grover, Scott Parrish, David Schmidt
Abstract A computational and experimental study was performed to characterize the flow within a gasoline injector and the ensuing sprays. The computations included the effects of turbulence, cavitation, flash-boiling, compressibility, and the presence of non-condensible gases. The flow domain corresponded to the Engine Combustion Network's Spray G, an eight-hole counterbore injector operating in a variety of conditions. First, a rate tube method was used to measure the rate of injection, which was then used to define inlet boundary conditions for simulation. Correspondingly, injection under submerged conditions was simulated for direct comparison with experimental measurements of discharge coefficient. Next, the internal flow and external spray into pressurized nitrogen were simulated under the base spray G conditions. Finally, injection under flashing conditions was simulated, where the ambient pressure was below the vapor pressure of the fuel.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0948
Le (Emma) Zhao, Ahmed Abdul Moiz, Jeffrey Naber, Seong-Young Lee, Sam Barros, William Atkinson
Abstract High-speed spray-to-spray liquid impingement could be an effective phenomenon for the spray propagation and droplet vaporization. To achieve higher vaporization efficiency, impingement from two-hole nozzles is analyzed in this paper. This paper focuses on investigating vaporization mechanism as a function of the impingement location and the collision breakup process provided by two-hole impinging jet nozzles. CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) is adopted to do simulation. Lagrangian model is used to predict jet-to-jet impingement and droplet breakup conditions while KH-RT breakup and O'Rourke collision models are implemented for the simulation. The paper includes three parts: First, a single spray injected into an initially quiescent constant volume chamber using the Lagrangian approach is simulated to identify the breakup region, which will be considered as a reference to study two-hole impinging jet nozzles.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0949
Mathis Bode, Tobias Falkenstein, Vincent Le Chenadec, Seongwon Kang, Heinz Pitsch, Toshiyuki Arima, Hiroyoshi Taniguchi
Abstract Compared to conventional injection techniques, Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) has a lot of advantages such as increased fuel efficiency, high power output and low emission levels, which can be more accurately controlled. Therefore, this technique is an important topic of today's injection system research. Although the operating conditions of GDI injectors are simpler from a numerical point of view because of smaller Reynolds and Weber numbers compared to Diesel injection systems, accurate simulations of the breakup in the vicinity of the nozzle are very challenging. Combined with the complications of experimental techniques that could be applied inside the nozzle and at the nozzle exit, this is the reason for the lack of understanding the primary breakup behavior of current GDI injectors.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0892
Alastair Smith, Rod Williams
Abstract The formation of deposits within injector nozzle holes of common-rail injection fuel systems fitted to modern diesel cars can reduce and disrupt the flow of fuel into the combustion chamber. This disruption in fuel flow results in reduced or less efficient combustion and lower power output. Hence there is sustained interest across the automotive industry in studying these deposits, with the ultimate aim of controlling them. In this study, we describe the use of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) imaging to characterise fuel injector hole deposits at intervals throughout an adaptation of the CEC Direct Injection Common Rail Diesel Engine Nozzle Coking Test, CEC F-98-08 (DW10B test)[1]. In addition, a similar adaptation of a previously published Shell vehicle test method [2] was employed to analyse fuel injector hole deposits from a fleet of Euro 5 vehicles.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0911
Juliane Wetzel, Michael Henn, Mark Gotthardt, Hermann Rottengruber
Abstract The optimization of the mixture formation represents great potential to decrease fuel consumption and emissions of spark-ignition engines. The injector and the nozzle are of major importance in this concern. In order to adjust the nozzle geometry according to the requirements an understanding of the physical transactions in the fuel spray is essential. In particular, the primary spray break-up is still described inadequately due to the difficult accessibility with optical measuring instruments. This paper presents a methodology for the characterization of the nozzle-near spray development, which substantially influences the entire spray shape. Single hole injectors of the gasoline direct injection (GDI) with different nozzle hole geometries have been investigated in a high pressure chamber by using the MIE scattering technique. To examine the spray very close to the nozzle exit a long-distance microscope in combination with a Nd:YAG-laser was used.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0669
Nagarjun Jawahar, Saharash Khare
Abstract Automotive OEM's are looking for innovative solutions to capture the possible failure due to warpage and shrinkage of an insert molded part through virtual simulations with help of FEA tools, thereby saving the mold cost, material cost and time. This work demonstrates an approach to study and simulate the failure of an insert molded part which happened after few days of the part molding under idle condition. To simulate the above failure, an innovative approach coupling Moldflow and Abaqus software was derived. First, a flow simulation including phase change of plastic material was carried out with derived parameters, results of which were exported as input to the Abaqus structural solver. Secondly, a thermo-mechanical analysis of the model was then carried out considering the thermal and moisture effect on material property. A good correlation was achieved between the actual failure location and max stress location as predicted by said coupled approach.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0686
Kenji Matsumoto, Hideharu Koga, Yuji Mihara
Abstract When evaluating the wear properties of slide bearings for car engines, it is a common practice to conduct long-term physical test using a bearing tester for screening purposes according to the revolution speed of the shaft, supply oil temperature and bearing pressure experienced in the actual use of engines. The loading waveform applied depends on the capability of the tester that is loaded, and it is often difficult to apply a loading waveform equivalent to that of actual engines. To design an engine that is more compact or lighter, it is necessary to reduce the dimensions of slide bearings and the distance between bearings. This requires loading tests on a newly designed engine by applying a loading waveform equivalent to that of actual engines to slide bearings and their vicinity before conducting a firing test. We therefore conducted an engine firing test by attaching thin-film sensors to the slide bearing part of the engine and measured the actual load distribution.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0520
Takaaki Kitahara, Takuo Imai, Osamu Ishigo, Miodrag Perovic
Abstract There has been a requirement for automotive bearings materials to be free of the toxic material lead, in accordance with ELV regulations and from the perspective of environmental problems. Currently, bismuth is used as a replacement for lead in copper alloy based main journal bearings and connecting rod bearings for automotive engines. In recent years, there has been changing to lead-free materials for truck engine bearings. Compared with automotive engines, lots of contaminations in the oil and local contact between the shaft and bearings can occur in truck engines. The ability to tolerate contamination and local contact is therefore required for truck engine bearings. In this development, we find that the addition of 8 mass% bismuth and 1.5 mass% molybdenum carbide particles into copper-tin alloy is effective for improving the ability which allow the contamination and local contacts.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0548
Andrew Halfpenny, Robin Anderson, Xiaobin Lin
Abstract This paper reviews the topic of Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue (TMF) as applied to automotive components such as cylinder heads, pistons, manifolds, turbochargers and exhaust components. The paper starts by looking at the physical influence of temperature on the microscopic failure of materials, in particular concentrating on the mechanisms of creep, fatigue, oxidation and their interactions. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) techniques suitable for high-temperature environments are discussed briefly, in particular the applications of elastic, elastic-plastic or elastic-viscoplastic analyses. Finally, methods for high-temperature fatigue and creep-fatigue based on the Chaboche approach are reviewed. The paper concludes with a review of laboratory tests on several materials at elevated temperatures under combined creep and fatigue conditions. Two case studies are then presented on a turbocharger housing and an exhaust-gas recirculation valve housing.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0547
Dengfeng Wang, Rongchao Jiang
Abstract In this paper, the dynamic stress of the front subframe of a passenger car was obtained using modal stress recovery method to estimate the fatigue life. A finite element model of the subframe was created and its accuracy was checked by modal test in a free hanging state. Furthermore, the whole vehicle rigid-flexible coupling model of the passenger car was built up while taking into account the flexibility of the subframe. Meanwhile, the road test data was used to verify the validity of the dynamic model. On this basis, the modal displacement time histories of the subframe were calculated by a dynamic simulation on virtual proving ground consisting of Belgian blocks, cobblestone road and washboard road. By combining the modal displacement time histories with modal stress tensors getting from normal mode analysis, the dynamic stress time histories of the subframe were obtained through modal stress recovery method.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0605
Guoyu Yang, Scott Kish
Strength and fatigue life prediction is very difficult for stamped structural steel parts because the manufacturing process alters the localized material properties. Traditional tensile tests cannot be used to obtain material properties due to size limitations. Because of this, FEA predictions are most often “directional” at best. In this paper an improved prediction methodology is suggested. With a material library developed from standard homogenous test specimens, or even textbook material property tables, localized strength and plastic strain numbers can be inferred from localized hardness tests(1). The new method, using standard ABAQUS static analysis (not commercial fatigue analysis software with many unknowns), is shown to be very accurate. This paper compares the new process FEA strength and fatigue life predictions to laboratory test results using statistical confidence intervals.
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