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Viewing 6721 to 6750 of 6750
1926-01-01
Technical Paper
260008
D P BARNARD
Surfaces that slide upon one another can be lubricated by one of two mechanisms, (a) heavily loaded surfaces working at low speed depending upon the oiliness of the lubricant and (b) high-speed bearings depending upon its viscosity. In the latter, conditions must be adjusted so that an adequate supply of lubricant will be provided and an opportunity given for it to be trapped between the surfaces and actually to wedge them apart. The bearing must therefore have a certain clearance over the journal. Oil-grooves must supply means for the oil to enter the bearing and the assurance that it cannot escape without doing its work. In general, they should not be placed on the loaded side of the bearing. The tendency is to draw the oil from the point of minimum pressure through that at which the pressure is the maximum, and for the oil to spread out and travel in a spiral along the bearing toward the ends.
1926-01-01
Technical Paper
260005
ALBERT LE ROY TAYLOR
Tests made to ascertain the degree of crankcase-oil dilution beyond which it is unsafe to run an engine bearing are described and the data obtained are analyzed, the details of the apparatus used being specified. To study the effect of dilution only, new oil was used in each case and was diluted to the desired extent by adding to it the proper quantity of diluent; that is, samples of oil obtained from engine crankcases were distilled by heating, and the distillates were used to dilute the new oil. The apparatus used for distilling the crankcase oil was an ordinary glass still, which was operated in conformity with standard methods. Four lines of investigation were followed in making the tests, these being outlined. In general, the results of the tests indicate that dilution of the oil up to 50 per cent has no bad effect upon the engine as regards increased friction and temperature of the bearings, although the dilution may be injurious from other standpoints.
1925-01-01
Technical Paper
250057
PERRY L TENNEY
Periodically recurring problems of gear noise and wear which seem to arise from no specific cause frequently affect the manufacturing side of the automotive industry and especially the gear-manufacturers. While much has been written and discussed about the mathematics and geometry of gears, which should overcome all of these problems, the trouble unfortunately still persists. The paper outlines the experience of the organization with which the author is connected in solving a rather difficult problem that offered an opportunity for a more thorough analysis than did its predecessors. Laboratory and dynamometer analyses of the product showed that it compared favorably with the output, of other factories.
1924-01-01
Technical Paper
240018
L A DANSE
The Cadillac Company has used S.A.E. 3250 steel for at least 8 years. This is medium nickel-chromium steel. Many other kinds have also been tried. Experience has shown that transmission gears made of carburized steel are not within 30 per cent as accurate as those made of oil-treated steel. This may be because of the fact that more attention has been paid to oil-hardened than to carburized steel gears. Efforts to control the distortion of carburized gears were unsuccessful. The hardening was done in salt pots, lead pots and open furnaces, heated by gas, oil and electricity. The same thing applies to spur gears. Oil-treated steel for rear axles has not been tried. When transmission gears were made from drop-forged blanks made by the conventional pegged-out process from flat stock they became oval. Upset gear forgings are used as fast as the forging suppliers can become equipped for the work.
1924-01-01
Technical Paper
240014
F F CHANDLER
Lack of scientific research is specified by the author as being the cause of failure to develop steering-systems generaly to meet the present need for better and easier steering-ability. He comments upon the meager data available regarding steering-system faults and factors that influence design and emphasizes the necessity for determining the live stresses in steering-systems while the vehicle is traveling over roads of all kinds, so that designs can be made with greater confidence and greater safety attained. Defining comfort as being inclusive of easy steering, a comfortable sitting position, convenient location of the controls that must be handled frequently and peace of mind relative to steering accuracy and dependability, he analyzes the causes of hard steering, saying that the steering-system includes every part from the steering wheel through the steering-gear and linkage to the front wheels and that the steering-gear itself is simply the reduction mechanism. Assisted by H.
1923-01-01
Technical Paper
230020
S O BJORNBERG
Detroit Section Paper - Since a gear is a product of the cutting tool, the gear-cutting machine and the operator, it can be no more accurate than the combined accuracy of these fundamental factors. All gear manufacturers aim to eliminate split bearings, high and low bearings, flats and other inaccuracies in tooth contour, because a gear having teeth the contours of which comply with the geometrical laws underlying its construction is by far the most satisfactory. Illustrations are presented to convey an understanding of the geometrical principles involved, together with other illustrations of testing instruments and comments thereon. The application of these instruments is termed quality control, which is discussed in some detail under the headings of hob control, machine control and gear control.
1922-01-01
Technical Paper
220008
ROBERT E WILSON, DANIEL P BARNARD
The authors state that the coefficient of friction between two rubbing surfaces is influenced by a very large number of variables, the most important being, in the case of an oiled journal, the nature and the shape of the surfaces, their smoothness, the clearance between the journal and the bearing, the viscosity of the oil, the “film-forming” tendency or “oiliness” of the oil, the speed of rubbing, the pressure on the bearing, the method of supplying the lubricant and the temperature. The primary object of the paper is to present the best available data regarding the fundamental mechanism of lubrication so as to afford a basis for predicting the precise effect of these different variables under any specified conditions. Definitions of the terms used are given and the laws of fluid-film lubrication are discussed, theoretical curves for “ideal” bearings being treated at length.
1922-01-01
Technical Paper
220056
K L HERRMANN
The different gear noises are classified under the names of knock, rattle, growl, hum and sing, and these are discussed at some length, examples of defects that cause noise being given and a device for checking tooth spacing being illustrated and described. An instrument for analyzing tooth-forms that produce these different noises is illustrated and described. Causes of the errors in gears may be in the hardening process, in the cutting machines or in the cutters. A hobbing machine is used as an example and its possibilities for error are commented upon. Tooth-forms are illustrated and treated briefly, and the hardening of gears and the grinding of gear-tooth forms are given similar attention.
1922-01-01
Technical Paper
220058
JAMES A FORD
The process devised by the author was evolved to eliminate the difficulties incident to the finishing of the spline and body portions of a spline shaft, such as is used in transmission gearing, by grinding after the shaft has been hardened, and is the result of a series of experiments. The accuracy of the finished shaft was the primary consideration and three other groups of important considerations are stated, as well as four specific difficulties that were expected to appear upon departure from former practice. Illustrations are presented to show the tools used, and the method of using them is commented upon step by step. The shaft can be straightened to within 0.005 in. per ft. of being out of parallel with the true axis of the shaft, after the shaft has been hardened, and it is then re-centered true with the spline portion.
1921-01-01
Technical Paper
210013
WILLIAM T MAGRUDER
The time has come when greater attention must be given to the smaller parts and the various appliances found on automotive machinery. Previously, investigations have been made by the research laboratories of a few companies manufacturing engines, carbureters and some other parts, but chiefly engines; by the laboratories of research corporations, including the Bureau of Standards and the Bureau of Mines; and by the engineering laboratories of colleges and technical schools. The number and value of the researches that can be conducted and reported on from time to time by these agencies depend entirely upon the appropriations that they can obtain by act of legislation and upon the personnel of the staff that can be attracted by the opportunity to do this class of work.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190055
F C GOLDSMITH
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180016
F W GURNEY
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180005
G W CARLSON
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180025
A W SCARRATT
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170008
F. G. DIFFIN
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170016
ROLAND CHILTON
1915-01-01
Technical Paper
150033
A. L. STEWART
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130021
E. B. VAN WAGNER
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130046
A. RIEBE
1912-01-01
Technical Paper
120028
FRANK BURGESS
1912-01-01
Technical Paper
120011
J. B. HULL
1911-01-01
Technical Paper
110024
ARNOLD C. KOENIG
1911-01-01
Technical Paper
110030
CYRUS E. MEAD
1910-01-01
Technical Paper
100001
L. C. FREEMAN
The question of the selection of the proper sizes of ball-bearings for any given set of conditions is one that should properly receive the consideration of those most expert in their design and application. However, in change speed gear design, where the ratio between the diameters of the bearings and the diameters of the gears is small, the sizes of the bearings have so great an influence on the center distance of the shafts and the shape and outline of the casing that a change in the bearings from those originally laid out frequently necessitates the redesigning of the whole job.
1910-01-01
Technical Paper
100005
GEORGE WILLIAM SARGENT
1910-01-01
Technical Paper
100010
D. F. GRAHAM
1909-01-01
Technical Paper
090006
S. P. WETHERILL
1907-01-01
Technical Paper
070003
HENRY HESS
1906-01-01
Technical Paper
060002
HENRY HESS
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