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Viewing 1 to 30 of 11929
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1285
Tarun Mehra
Abstract Exploring and enhancement of biodiesel production from feedstock like non-edible vegetable oil is one of the powerful method to resolve inadequate amount of conventional raw materials and their high prices. The main aim of this study is to optimize the biodiesel production process parameters of a biodiesel obtained from non-edible feedstocks, namely Neem (Azadirachta indica) oil and Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) oil, with response surface methodology using Doehlert’s experimental design. Based on the results, the optimum operating parameters for transesterification of the mixture A50S50 oil mixture at 51.045° C over a period of 45 minutes are as follows: methanol-to-oil ratio: 8.45, and catalyst concentration: 1.933 wt.%. These optimum operating parameters give the highest yield for the A50S50 biodiesel with a value of 95.24%.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0893
Marek Tatur, Kiran Govindswamy, Dean Tomazic
Abstract Demanding CO2 and fuel economy regulations are continuing to pressure the automotive industry into considering innovative powertrain and vehicle-level solutions. Powertrain engineers continue to minimize engine internal friction and transmission parasitic losses with the aim of reducing overall vehicle fuel consumption. Strip friction methods are used to determine and isolate components in engines and transmissions with the highest contribution to friction losses. However, there is relatively little focus on friction optimization of Front-End-Accessory-Drive (FEAD) components such as alternators and Air Conditioning (AC) compressors. This paper expands on the work performed by other researchers’ specifically targeting in-depth understanding of system design and operating strategy.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0906
Thomas L. Darlington, Gary A. Herwick, Dennis Kahlbaum, Dean Drake
Abstract The Environmental Protection Agency, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and California Air Resources Board released the joint mid-term Technical Assessment Review of the light-duty GHG standards in July of 2016. The review generally asserted that the GHG standards adopted in calendar year 2012 for 2022-2025 model year vehicles were feasible. Although many different technologies were evaluated, the review did not assess the benefits of high compression ratio engines enabled by a high-octane low carbon fuel. This study fills in the gap in the Technical Assessment Review by examining the impacts of a 98-research octane number gasoline-ethanol blend with 25 percent ethanol. We find that this fuel would enable higher compression ratios to improve tailpipe greenhouse gas emissions by about 6 percent on most engines.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0957
Ian Smith, Thomas Briggs, Christopher Sharp, Cynthia Webb
Abstract It is projected that even when the entire on-road fleet of heavy-duty vehicles operating in California is compliant with 2010 emission standards of 0.20 g/bhp-hr, the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) requirements for ambient ozone will not be met. It is expected that further reductions in NOX emissions from the heavy-duty fleet will be required to achieve compliance with the ambient ozone requirement. To study the feasibility of further reductions, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) funded a research program to demonstrate the potential to reach 0.02 g/bhp-hr NOX emissions. This paper details the work executed to achieve this goal on the heavy-duty Federal Test Procedure (FTP) with a heavy-duty natural gas engine equipped with a three-way catalyst. A Cummins ISX-12G natural gas engine was modified and coupled with an advanced catalyst system.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1180
Stefan Brandstätter, Michael Striednig, David Aldrian, Alexander Trattner, Manfred Klell, Tomas Dehne, Christoph Kügele, Michael Paulweber
Abstract The limitation of global warming to less than 2 °C till the end of the century is regarded as the main challenge of our time. In order to meet COP21 objectives, a clear transition from carbon-based energy sources towards renewable and carbon-free energy carriers is mandatory. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) allow an energy-efficient, resource-efficient and emission-free conversion of regenerative produced hydrogen. For these reasons fuel cell technologies emerge in stationary, mobile and logistic applications with acceptable cruising ranges as well as short refueling times. In order to perform applied research in the area of PEMFC systems, a highly integrated fuel cell analysis infrastructure for systems up to 150 kW electric power was developed and established within a cooperative research project by HyCentA Research GmbH and AVL List GmbH in Graz, Austria. A novel open testing facility with hardware in the loop (HiL) capability is presented.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1187
Tatsuya Sugawara, Takuma Kanazawa, Naoki Imai, Yu Tachibana
Abstract This paper describes the motorized turbo compressor, which is a key technology for reducing the size of the fuel cell system for the Clarity Fuel Cell. The oxygen needed for fuel cell power generation is sent into the fuel cell by compressing the air from the atmosphere by a compressor. The conventionally used Lysholm compressor needed numerous sound absorbers, such as silencers and covers, to help achieve quietness when driving. Therefore, changing to a turbo compressor enhanced quietness and helped to eliminate or reduce the size of these auxiliary sound absorbers. Furthermore, a two-stage supercharging structure was used and the air pressure supplied to the fuel cell was increased to 1.7 times the previous air pressure. This increased the fuel cell power, which enabled to reduce the number of cells needed, and reduced the needed humidification amount which enabled to reduce the size of the humidifier. These enhancements helped to reduce the system size.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1189
Tsuyoshi Maruo, Masashi Toida, Tomohiro Ogawa, Yuji Ishikawa, Hiroyuki Imanishi, Nada Mitsuhiro, Yoshihiro Ikogi
Abstract Toyota Motor Corporation (TMC) has been developing fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) since 1992. As part of a demonstration program, TMC launched the FCHV-adv in 2008, which established major technical improvements in key performance areas such as efficiency, driving range, durability, and operation in sub-zero conditions. However, to encourage commercialization and widespread adoption of FCVs, further improvements in performance were required. During sub-zero operating conditions, the FC system output power was lower than under normal operating conditions. The FC stack in the FCHV-adv needed to dry the electrolyte membrane to remove unneeded water from the stack. This increased the stack resistance and caused low output power. In December 2014, TMC launched the world’s first commercially available FCV named the Mirai, which greatly improved output power even after start-up in sub-zero conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1188
Daisuke Hayashi, Atsushi Ida, Shota Magome, Takahisa Suzuki, Satoshi Yamaguchi, Ryosuke Hori
Abstract The key challenge in designing a high power density fuel cell is to reduce oxygen transport loss due to liquid water. However, liquid water transport from catalyst layers to channels under operating conditions is not completely understood. Toyota developed a high resolution space and time liquid water visualization technique using synchrotron x-ray (Spring-8) radiography. In addition, a simulation method was created based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to identify the cell performance relationship to water distribution. The relationship among gas diffusion layer (GDL) parameters, water distribution, and fuel cell performance was clarified by combining the techniques Toyota developed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1145
Eric De Hesselle, Mark Grozde, Raymond Adamski, Thomas Rolewicz, Mark Erazo
Abstract Hybrid electric vehicles are continuously challenged to meet cross attribute performance while minimizing energy usage and component cost in a very competitive automotive market. As electrified vehicles become more mainstream in the marketplace, hybrid customers are expecting more attribute refinement in combination with the enhanced fuel economy benefits. Minimizing fuel consumption, which tends to drive hybrid powertrain engines to operate under lugging type calibrations, traditionally challenge noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) metrics. Balancing the design space to satisfy the cost metrics, energy efficiency, noise and vibration & drivability under the hybrid engine lugging conditions can be optimized through the use of multiple CAE tools. This paper describes how achieving NVH metrics can put undesirable boundaries on Powertrain Operation which could affect other performance attributes.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0803
Christiane Behrendt, Alastair Smith
Injector cleanliness is well characterised in the literature as a key factor for maintained engine performance in modern diesel cars. Injector deposits have been shown to a reduce injector flow capacity and result in loss of full load power; however, deposit effects on fuel economy are less well characterised. A study was conducted with the aim of building understanding of diesel injector nozzle deposits on fuel economy. A series of tests have been run using a previously published chassis dynamometer test method. The test method was designed to evaluate injector deposit effects on performance under driving conditions more representative of real world driving than the high intensity test cycle of the industry standard, CEC DW10B engine test. A light duty Euro 5 certified vehicle was tested and performance degradation was compared with fuels with a keep-clean dose of a new fuel borne additive versus additive free and low additised fuels.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0654
Haiqiao Wei, Dengquan Feng, Mingzhang pan, JiaYing PAN
Abstract Combustion characteristics of neat 2-methylfuran (MF), 10% and 20% volumetric fraction 2-methylfuran gasoline blends were experimentally investigated in a single cylinder spark ignition engine, and the results were benchmarked against that of the research on octane number 97 neat gasoline. The investigation focused on the performance of cyclic variation of MF and its blends, and the effects of spark ignition timing, compression ratio, and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) were studied. Experiments were conducted at the engine speed of 1500 rpm, and loads between 7 and 11 bar indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) with using stoichiometric air-fuel ratio mixture. Index of the coefficient of variation of IMEP (COVIMEP) was used to evaluate the combustion stability of the tested fuels. The results show that neat MF and MF gasoline blended fuels have superior combustion stability compared with gasoline.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0774
Ehsan Faghani, Pooyan Kheirkhah, Christopher W.J. Mabson, Gordon McTaggart-Cowan, Patrick Kirchen, Steve Rogak
High-pressure direct-injection (HPDI) in heavy duty engines allows a natural gas (NG) engine to maintain diesel-like performance while deriving most of its power from NG. A small diesel pilot injection (5-10% of the fuel energy) is used to ignite the direct injected gas jet. The NG burns in a predominantly non-premixed combustion mode which can produce particulate matter (PM). Here we study the effect of injection strategies on emissions from a HPDI engine in two parts. Part-I will investigates the effect of late post injection (LPI) and Part II will study the effect of slightly premixed combustion (SPC) on emission and engine performance. PM reductions and tradeoffs involved with gas late post-injections (LPI) was investigated in a single-cylinder version of a 6-cylinder,15 liter HPDI engine. The post injection contains 10-25% of total fuel mass, and occurs after the main combustion event.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0683
Michael Fischer, Philipp Kreutziger, Yong Sun, Adam Kotrba
Abstract External Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) has been used on diesel engines for decades and has also been used on gasoline engines in the past. It is recently reintroduced on gasoline engines to improve fuel economy at mid and high engine load conditions, where EGR can reduce throttling losses and fuel enrichment. Fuel enrichment causes fuel penalty and high soot particulates, as well as hydrocarbon (HC) emissions, all of which are limited by emissions regulations. Under stoichiometric conditions, gasoline engines can be operated at high EGR rates (> 20%), but more than diesel engines, its intake gas including external EGR needs extreme cooling (down to ~50°C) to gain the maximum fuel economy improvement. However, external EGR and its problems at low temperatures (fouling, corrosion & condensation) are well known.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0699
Sampad Mukhopadhyay, Sunil Srinivas Badavath, Naeim Henein
Abstract The superior fuel economy of direct injection internal combustion engines (diesel and gasoline) is related to use of a high compression ratio to auto-ignite the fuel and the overall lean combustible mixture. Two of the major problems in diesel engine emissions are the NOx and soot emissions, which are caused by the heterogeneity of the charge and the properties of the diesel fuel. Conventional Direct Injection Spark Ignition Gasoline engines don't have these problems because of the fuel properties particularly its volatility. However, its efficiency and specific power output are limited by the knock, knock produced preignition and the sporadic preignition phenomenon. The Gasoline Direct Injection Compression Ignition (GDICI) engine combines the superior features of the two engines by increasing the compression ratio and use of gasoline as a fuel.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0720
Omar Ramadan, Luc Menard, David Gardiner, Aaron Wilcox, Gary Webster
Abstract This paper is a continuation of work previously discussed in SAE 2014-01-0179 [1] and SAE 2015-01-0805 [2], which was intended to improve the capability and precision of the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT™) and associated ASTM D6890 [3]/CEN EN 15195 [4]/EI IP 498 [5] Test Methods. The results presented in those two papers indicated how the new generation of IQT™ with the TALM Precision Package upgrade can markedly improve the precision of the ASTM D6890, CEN EN 15195 and EI IP 498 Derived Cetane Number (DCN) test methods. This paper will evaluate the performance of the upgraded instruments over the past 21 months of their participation in ASTM’s National Fuel Exchange Group (NEG) diesel fuel exchange program.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0874
Thorsten Langhorst, Felix Rosenthal, Thomas Koch
Abstract Throughout the world cost-efficient Naphtha streams are available in refineries. Owing to less processing, CO2 emissions emitted in the course of production of these fuels are significantly lower than with conventional fuels. In common CI/SI engines, however, the deployment of Naphtha is considerably restricted due to unfavourable fuel properties, e.g. low cetane/octane numbers. Former investigations illustrated high knocking tendency for SI applications and severe pressure rise for CI combustion. Moreover, the focus of past publications was on passenger vehicle applications. Hence, this paper centers on heavy-duty stationary engine applications. Consequently, measures to increase the technically feasible IMEP with regard to limitations in knocking behaviour and pressure rise were explored whilst maintaining efficient combustion and low emissions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0861
Balasubramanian N., Karthick Durairaj, Jayabalan Sethuraman
Abstract Asian countries hold a vast majority of the global two-wheeler population. Currently majority of these two wheelers are fueled by carburetors owing to their low cost and ease of maintenance. As these countries try to adopt emission norms similar to that of Euro 6 in a few years from now, they will be migrating to an injection system like port fuel injection (PFI), as it offers good control over emissions by using closed loop corrections, based on the exhaust lambda feedback. Stanadyne R&D has developed an innovative injection system that can be applied for such port fuel injection in two-wheelers. In this innovative design, the pump and injector are integrated into a single unit, making the system simple, compact and less expensive. The integrated injector uses a solenoid and spring arrangement, for pressurizing the fuel in a small chamber, and consumes less current. The pressurized fuel is then injected through orifice to produce spray in the intake port.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0581
Stephen C. Burke, Matthew Ratcliff, Robert McCormick, Robert Rhoads, Bret Windom
Abstract In some studies, a relationship has been observed between increasing ethanol content in gasoline and increased particulate matter (PM) emissions from vehicles equipped with spark ignition engines. The fundamental cause of the PM increase seen for moderate ethanol concentrations is not well understood. Ethanol features a greater heat of vaporization (HOV) than gasoline and also influences vaporization by altering the liquid and vapor composition throughout the distillation process. A droplet vaporization model was developed to explore ethanol’s effect on the evaporation of aromatic compounds known to be PM precursors. The evolving droplet composition is modeled as a distillation process, with non-ideal interactions between oxygenates and hydrocarbons accounted for using UNIFAC group contribution theory. Predicted composition and distillation curves were validated by experiments.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0533
Paul Dekraker, Mark Stuhldreher, Youngki Kim
Abstract The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Advanced Light-Duty Powertrain and Hybrid Analysis (ALPHA) tool was created to estimate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from light-duty vehicles. ALPHA is a physics-based, forward-looking, full vehicle computer simulation capable of analyzing various vehicle types with different powertrain technologies, showing realistic vehicle behavior, and auditing of all energy flows in the model. In preparation for the midterm evaluation (MTE) of the 2017-2025 light-duty GHG emissions rule, ALPHA has been refined and revalidated using newly acquired data from model year 2013-2016 engines and vehicles. The robustness of EPA’s vehicle and engine testing for the MTE coupled with further validation of the ALPHA model has highlighted some areas where additional data can be used to add fidelity to the engine model within ALPHA.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1002
Daisuke Tanaka, Ryo Uchida, Toru Noda, Andreas Kolbeck, Sebastian Henkel, Yannis Hardalupas, Alexander Taylor, Allen Aradi
Reducing engine-out particulates is one of the main issues of direct injection gasoline engines and further efforts are still needed to comply with near-future emission regulations. However, engine-out particulate emission characteristics strongly depend on fuel properties associated with the combustion design and/or calibration, due to the complicated mechanisms of particulate formation, including both physical and chemical processes. For these reasons, the purpose of this work was to gain a fundamental understanding of which fuel property parameters are responsible for particulate emission characteristics, associated with key intermediate behavior in the engine cylinder. Accordingly, engine tests were carried out using various fuels having different volatility and chemical compositions under different coolant temperature conditions. In addition, a fundamental spray and film visualization analysis was also conducted using a constant volume vessel.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1000
Jong Lee, Yu Zhang, Tom Tzanetakis, Michael Traver, Melanie Moses-DeBusk, John Storey, William Partridge, Michael Lance
With higher volatility and longer ignition delay characteristics than typical diesel fuel, low cetane naphtha fuel has been shown to promote partially premixed combustion and produce lower soot for improved fuel economy. In this study, emission performance of low cetane, low octane naphtha (CN 35, RON 60) as a drop-in fuel was examined on a MY13 Cummins ISX15 6-cylinder heavy-duty on-highway truck engine and aftertreatment system. Using the production hardware and development calibrations, both the engine-out and tailpipe emissions of naphtha and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuels were examined during the EPA’s heavy-duty emission testing cycles. Without any modification to the calibrations, the tailpipe emissions were comparable when using naphtha or ULSD on the heavy duty Federal Test Procedure (FTP) and ramped modal cycle (RMC) test cycles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0665
Hassan vafamehr, Alasdair Cairns, Mohammadmohsen Moslemin Koupaie
Abstract The experimental work was concerned with improving understanding of the competing effects of the latent heat of vaporization and auto-ignition delay times of different ethanol blended fuels during heaving knocking combustion. The unique single cylinder SI engine employed included full bore overhead optical access capable of withstanding unusually high in-cylinder pressures. Heavy knock was deliberately induced under moderate loads using inlet air heating and a primary reference fuel blend of reduced octane rating. High-speed chemiluminescence imaging and simultaneous in-cylinder pressure data measurement were used to evaluate the combustion events. Under normal operation the engine was operated under port fuel injection with a stoichiometric air-fuel mixture. Multiple centered auto-ignition events were regularly observed, with knock intensities of up to ~40bar. Additional excess fuel of varied blend was then introduced directly into the end-gas in short transient bursts.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1004
Jan Czerwinski, Pierre Comte, Norbert Heeb, Andreas Mayer, Volker Hensel
Abstract In the present paper some results of investigations of nanoparticles from five DI gasoline cars are represented. The measurements were performed at vehicle tailpipe and in CVS-tunnel. Moreover, five variants of “vehicle - GPF” were investigated. These results originate from the project GasOMeP (Gasoline Organic & Metal Particulates), which focused on metal-nanoparticles (including sub 20nm) from gasoline cars with different engine technologies. The PN-emission level of the investigated GDI cars in WLTC without GPF is in the same range of magnitude very near to the actual limit value of 6.0 × 1012 #/km. With the GPF’s with better filtration quality, it is possible to lower the emissions below the future limit value of 6.0 × 1011 #/km. There is no visible nuclei mode and the ultrafine particle concentrations below 10mm are insignificant. Some of the vehicles show at constant speed operation a periodical fluctuation of the NP-emissions, as an effect of the electronic control.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1003
Ye Liu, Gang Lv, Chenyang Fan, Na Li, Xiaowei Wang
Abstract The evolution of surface functional groups (SFGs) and the graphitization degree of soot generated in premixed methane flames are studied and the correlation between them is discussed. Test soot samples were obtained from an optimized thermophoretic sampling system and probe sampling system. The SFGs of soot were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) after removing the soluble impurities from the soot samples, while the graphitization degree of soot was characterized by Raman spectrum and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The results reveal that the number of aliphatic C-H groups and C=O groups shows an initial increase and then decrease in the sooting history. The large amount of aliphatic C-H groups and small amount of aromatic C-H groups in the early stage of the soot mass growth process indicate that aliphatic C-H groups make a major contribution to the early stage of soot mass growth.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1148
Toumadher Barhoumi, Hyunjun Kim, Dongsuk Kum
Abstract Finding optimal split hybrid configurations through exhaustive search is almost intractable, mainly due to the huge design space, e.g. 252 compound split configurations using two planetary gear sets (PG). Thus, a systematic exhaustive design methodology is required to find optimal configurations. While most of the prior studies proposed methodologies that assess the performance within the physical design space, i.e. based on the powertrain configurations, this paper proposes a compound lever-based comprehensive design methodology. The (virtual) compound lever is an attractive design tool defined by two design variables, i.e. α and β, that omits the redundancy existing within the physical design space, thus, reduces the computational load. The proposed method explores the entire (virtual) compound lever design space to find optimal compound split configurations with outstanding fuel economy and acceleration performance.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1175
Ran Bao, Victor Avila, James Baxter
Abstract Recovering as much braking energy as possible, and then fully reusing it, can significantly improve the vehicle powertrain efficiency, hence reducing the CO2 emissions and fuel consumption. A 48 V mild hybrid system recovers less braking kinetic energy than a HV (High Voltage) hybrid system due to the reduced peak power/current rating. However, the cost of the 48 V mild hybrid system is significantly less than the HV hybrid system which gives the 48 V mild hybrid system a much better cost-benefit ratio. The 48 V mild hybrid system can have several different system layouts (e- machines at different positions, or have numerous e-machines at different position combinations). The aim of this study is to investigate and explain how the system layout affects the powertrain system efficiency and CO2 benefit. Simulation models are used to predict the CO2 of three such configurations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0686
Mohammed Jaasim Mubarak Ali, Francisco Hernandez Perez, S. Vedharaj, R. Vallinayagam, Robert Dibble, Hong Im
Abstract Pre-ignition in SI engine is a critical issue that needs addressing as it may lead to super knock event. It is widely accepted that pre-ignition event emanates from hot spot(s) that can be anywhere inside the combustion chamber. The location and timing of hotspot is expected to influence the knock intensity from a pre-ignition event. In this study, we study the effect of location and timing of hot spot inside the combustion chamber using numerical simulations. The simulation is performed using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CONVERGE™. We simulate 3-D engine geometry coupled with chemistry, turbulence and moving structures (valves, piston). G-equation model for flame tracking coupled with multi-zone model is utilized to capture auto-ignition (knock) and solve gas phase kinetics. A parametric study on the effect of hot spot timing and location inside the combustion chamber is performed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0682
Yuedong Chao, Haifeng Lu, Zongjie Hu, Jun Deng, Zhijun Wu, Liguang Li, Yuan Shen, Shuang Yuan
Abstract In this paper comparisons were made between the fuel economy improvement between a High Pressure loop (HP) water-cooled Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system and a Low Pressure loop (LP) water-cooled EGR system. Experiments were implemented on a 1.3-Litre turbocharged PFI gasoline engine in two pars. One was EGR rate as single operating point to compare the different effect of HP- and LP-EGR. The other was mini map from 1500rpm to 3000rpm and BMEP from 2bar to 14bar because of the relative narrow available range of HP-EGR system. In consideration of practical application of EGR system, the coolant used in this experiment was kept almost the same temperature as in real vehicles (88±3°C) instead of underground water temperature, besides a model was built to calculate constant volume ratio (CVR). The results indicated that the effect of HP-EGR was weaker than that of LP-EGR under the same EGR rate, which could be seen from change of combustion parameters.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0727
Ida Truedsson, Christine Rousselle, Fabrice Foucher
Abstract The transportation sector adds to the greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. One way to decrease this impact from transportation is by using renewable fuels. Ethanol is a readily available blend component which can be produced from bio blend­stock, currently used blended with gasoline from low to high concentrations. This study focuses on a high octane (RON=97) gasoline blended with 0, 20, and 50, volume % of ethanol, respectively. The high ethanol blended gasoline was used in a light duty engine originally designed for diesel combustion. Due to the high octane rating and high ignition resistance of the fuel it required high intake temperatures of 443 K and higher to achieve stable combustion in in homogeneously charged compression ignition (HCCI) combustion operation at low load. To enable combustion with lower intake temperatures more commonly used in commercial vehicles, ozone was injected with the intake air as an ignition improver.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0726
Muhammad Waqas, Nimal Naser, Mani Sarathy, Jeroen Feijs, Kai Morganti, Gustav Nyrenstedt, Bengt Johansson
Abstract Gasoline-ethanol-methanol (GEM) blends, with constant stoichiometric air-to-fuel ratio (iso-stoichiometric blending rule) and equivalent to binary gasoline-ethanol blends (E2, E5, E10 and E15 in % vol.), were defined to investigate the effect of methanol and combined mixtures of ethanol and methanol when blended with three FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) Gasolines, I, J and A corresponding to RON 70.2, 73.8 and 83.9, respectively, and their corresponding Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs). A Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine was used under Spark Ignition and Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignited modes. An ignition quality tester was utilized in the Compression Ignition mode. One of the promising properties of GEM blends, which are derived using the iso-stoichiometric blending rule, is that they maintain a constant octane number, which has led to the introduction of methanol as a drop-in fuel to supplement bio-derived ethanol.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 11929