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Viewing 181 to 210 of 8794
2014-08-12
Article
Johnson Controls has opened a new crash test facility at its automotive seating headquarters in Plymouth, MI. One of the highlights of the facility is a Seattle Safety ServoSled that allows the automotive supplier to offer what it claims is the most accurate, standardized safety testing of seats globally through collaboration with its other testing facilities located in Burscheid, Germany; Changchun and Shanghai, China; and Yokohama, Japan.
2014-08-04
Article
HBM Inc.’s new industrial measurement amplifier enables users to make precise, dynamic measurements of raw and filtered torque, frequency, pulse, speed, and angle of rotation.
2014-08-04
Article
The SAB 32 shield connection clip from Conta-Clip provides a quick, simple connection when cables require shielding from interference.
2014-08-04
Article
The R&S SMW200A high-end vector signal generator from Rohde & Schwarz supports frequencies up to 20 GHz.
2014-08-04
Article
Sonoscan’s AW322 200 automated system for ultrasonic inspection of MEMS wafers images and identifies internal gap-type defects down to 5µm in size.
2014-08-04
Article
The Model XLUS88 subminiature, bidirectional tension/compression load cell from tecsis LP operates from 150 g to 1000 lb.
2014-07-30
Article
The Electric Power Research Institute has announced a collaboration with 8 automakers and 15 utilities to develop and demonstrate an open grid integration platform for plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs).
2014-07-29
Article
To develop an electric powertrain with a minimum noise level and minimized whining it is necessary to have accurate CAE simulation and precise criteria to assess whining noise.
2014-07-23
Article
In development of an advanced test engine to demonstrate fuel-saving and emissions-reducing technologies, the EPA is using ANSYS FORTÉ CFD software, giving its engineers the ability to quickly and inexpensively make multiple design iterations.
2014-07-16
Article
Ram’s official move to adopt the SAE J2807 towing standard for validating all three (1500, 2500, and 3500) of its pickup weight classes raises the competitive bar for the industry's other pickup players. Meanwhile, Ford has engineered its latest F-450 with half the GCVW capability of a Class-8 tractor-trailer.
2014-07-15
Article
Opel recently broke ground on a €210 million expansion of its Rüsselsheim International Technical Development center (ITDC) that will be used to develop and test engines. The 36,000-m² (400,000-ft²) expansion will be completed in 2017.
2014-07-15
Article
Northrop Grumman Corp. broke ground on a new $20 million Maryland Space Assembly and Test (M-SAT) facility on its Baltimore campus adjacent to Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.
2014-07-15
Article
VPT Inc. has added a comprehensive radiation laboratory and test services facility to its Chelmsford, MA, facility. The 5000-ft² VPT Rad facility, which will serve the radiation and related test needs of aerospace electronics manufacturers, provides specialized environments and equipment for evaluating electronics used in applications where ionizing radiation can degrade device performance.
2014-07-10
Magazine
Off-highway engines advance beyond Tier 4 With Tier 4 Final/Stage IV needs met, engine OEMs direct their focus and competitive energies toward optimizing competitive solutions. At the same time, they need to keep a weather eye out for future regulations, which many expect. Autonomous vehicle challenges span many fields Many of the challenges faced by military and commercial design teams are similar. Racket busters With a quiet cab at the top of many tractor buyers' wish lists, agricultural equipment manufacturers are pursuing every opportunity possible to shed decibels.
2014-07-07
Article
Recently, with increased vehicle safety requirements, vehicle manufacturers are installing cutting-edge testing equipment in their own crash test facilities.Chrysler Group LLC partnered with Messring Systembau GmbH to upgrade Chelsea Proving Grounds, the central testing facility in Chelsea, MI.
2014-07-01
Standard
AIR4362A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) protection considerations for environmental control system (ECS) design. It is intended to familiarize the ECS designer with the subject in order to know what information will be required to do an ECS design where NBC protection is a requirement. This is not intended to be a thorough discussion of NBC protection. Such a document would be large and would be classified. Topics of NBC protection that are more pertinent to the ECS designer are discussed in more detail. Those of peripheral interest, but of which the ECS designer should be aware are briefly discussed. Only radiological aspects of nuclear blast are discussed. The term CBR (Chemical, Biological, and Radiological) has been used to contrast with NBC to indicate that only the radiological aspects of a nuclear blast are being discussed.
2014-06-30
Article
Camber Corp. signed an agreement with Texas A&M–Corpus Christi (TAMUCC) to be the lead systems and business integrator for the Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center (LSUASC) Test Site. The LSUASC is one of six unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) test sites identified by the FAA.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2094
Matteo Kirchner, Eugene Nijman
Abstract Automotive industry is becoming more and more interested in assessing the noise of electric motors, since their integration in many types of road vehicles is rapidly growing in a market oriented to hybridization and electrification. The acoustic characterization of an electric motor is often being performed numerically, having as consequence the fact that the investigation is confined to one specific model belonging to one particular type of motor. This paper proposes an experimental airborne sound characterization methodology, suitable for any type of cylindrical source, based on a set of data acquired following a cylindrical Nearfield Acoustical Holography (NAH) scheme. Such an approach allows the evaluation of sound intensity, as well as pressure level and particle velocity.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2093
Vishal Parmar, Daniele Di Rocco, Martin Sopouch, Philippe Albertini
Abstract Over the past 30 years, simulation of the N&V (Noise and Vibration) behaviour of automotive drivelines became an integral part of the powertrain development process. With current and future HEVs (Hybrid-Electrical Vehicles), additional phenomena and effects have entered the scene and need to be taken into account during layout/design as well as optimization phase. Beside effects directly associated with the e-components (namely electric whistle and whine), torque changes caused by activation/deactivation of the e-machine give rise to vibration issues (e.g. driveline shuffle or clonk) as well. This is in particular true for transient operation conditions like boosting and recuperation. Moreover, aspects of starting the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) using the built-in e-machine in conjunction with the dynamic behaviour of torsional decoupling devices become increasingly important. In order to cope with above-mentioned effects a multi-physics simulation approach is required.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2091
Zoran Radmilovic, Josef Zehetner, Daniel Watzenig
Abstract Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) with a power-split system offer a variety of possibilities in reduction of CO2 emissions and fuel consumption. Power-split systems use a planetary gear sets to create a strong mechanical coupling between the internal combustion engine, the generator and the electric motor. This concept offers rather low oscillations and therefore passive damping components are not needed. Nevertheless, during acceleration or because of external disturbances, oscillations which are mostly influenced by the ICE, can still occur which leads to a drivability and performance downgrade. This paper proposes a design of an active damping control system which uses the electric motor to suppress those oscillations instead of handling them within the ICE control unit. The control algorithm is implemented as part of an existing hybrid controller without any additional hardware introduced.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2092
Giorgio Veronesi, Christopher Albert, Eugène Nijman, Jan Rejlek, Arnaud Bocquillet
Abstract In many application fields, such as automotive and aerospace, the full FE Biot model has been widely applied to vibro-acoustics problems involving poro-elastic materials in order to predict their structural and acoustic performance. The main drawback of this approach is however the large computational burden and the uncertainty of the input data (Biot parameters) that may lead to less accurate prediction. In order to overcome these disadvantages industry is asking for more efficient techniques. The vibro-acoustic behaviour of structures coupled with poroelastic trims and fluid cavities can be predicted by means of the Patch Transfer Function (PTF) approach. The PTF is a sub-structuring procedure that allows for coupling different sub-systems via impedance relations determined at their common interfaces. The coupling surfaces are discretised into elementary areas called patches.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2089
Mahdi Mohammadpour, Ramin Rahmani, Homer Rahnejat
Abstract This paper presents an investigation of Cylinder De-Activation (CDA) technology on the performance of big end bearings. A multi-physics approach is used in order to take into account more realistic dynamic loading effects on the tribological behavior. The power loss, minimum film thickness and maximum temperature of big end bearings have been calculated during maneuver pertaining to the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). Results show that bearing efficiency runs contrary to efficiency gained through combustion and pumping losses. Under CDA mode, the power loss of big end bearings is more than the power loss under engine normal mode. The problem is predominant at higher engine speeds and higher Brake mean Effective Pressures (BMEP) in active cylinders. It is also observed that the minimum film thickness is reduced under the CDA mode. This can affect wear performance. In addition, same behavior is noted for the maximum temperature rise which is higher under CDA.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2090
Joël Perret-Liaudet, Alexandre Carbonelli, Emmanuel Rigaud, Brice Nelain, Pascal Bouvet, C. Jacques Vialonga
Abstract The main source of excitation in gearboxes is generated by the meshing process, which generates vibration transmitted to the casings through shafts and bearings. Casing vibration generates leads to acoustic radiation (whining noise). It is usually assumed that the transmission error and variation of the gear mesh stiffness are the dominant excitation mechanisms. These excitations result from tooth deflection and tooth micro-geometries (voluntary profile modifications and manufacturing errors). For real cases, the prediction of noise induced by the Static Transmission Error (STE) remains a difficult problem. In this work, an original calculation procedure is implemented by using a finite element method and taking into account the parametric excitations and their coupling (Spectral Iterative Method, developed by the Ecole Centrale de Lyon).
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2085
Ki-Sang Chae, Seung Hwan Lim, Ji Woo Yoo, Seok-Gil Hong
Abstract Dash panel is the most important path of structure-borne and air-borne interior noise for engine-driven vehicles. Reinforcements, which are added to dash panel, are mainly designed in order to suppress the structure-borne noise contribution from the dash panel. However, the effects of dash reinforcements do not seem clear in the viewpoint of air-borne noise. In this paper, the insulation performance of a dash structure with spot-welded reinforcements is studied through several STL (Sound Transmission Loss) tests and STL simulations. The results of this study could be utilized for increasing the sound insulation performance of vehicle body structure.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2083
Arnaud Caillet, Antoine Guellec, Denis Blanchet, Thomas Roy
Abstract Since the last decade, the automotive industry has expressed the need to better understand how the different trim parts interact together in a complete car up to 400 Hz for structureborne excitations. Classical FE methods in which the acoustic trim is represented as non-structural masses (NSM) and high damping or surface absorbers on the acoustic cavity can only be used at lower frequencies and do not provide insights into the interactions of the acoustic trims with the structure and the acoustic volume. It was demonstrated in several papers that modelling the acoustic components using the poroelastic finite element method (PEM) can yield accurate vibro-acoustic response such as transmission loss of a car component [1,2,3]. The increase of performance of today's computers and the further optimization of commercial simulation codes allow computations on full vehicle level [4,5,6] with adequate accuracy and computation times, which is essential for a car OEM.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2086
Roland Sottek, Bernd Philippen
Abstract In the engine development process, the ability to judge NVH comfort as early as possible is a great benefit. The prediction of engine noise on the basis of a prototype engine without the need to install it in a real car significantly speeds up the development process and leads to a cost reduction, as prototype modifications can be evaluated faster. Meaningful predictions of the perceived NVH comfort cannot be achieved just by comparing order levels, but require listening to an auralization of the engine noise at the driver's position. With the methods of Transfer Path Analysis and Synthesis (TPA/TPS) a prototype engine can be virtually installed in a car using test-bench data. The interior noise can be estimated by combining source signals containing near-field airborne noise radiation and mount forces with transfer functions describing the transmission to the target position in the cabin.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2062
Matt Maunder, Steven A Amphlett, Mathias S Perchanok, Martin Kukacka, Patrick C Niven
Abstract Intake and exhaust system development is an important step in automotive design. The intake system must allow sufficient air to flow into the engine, and the exhaust system must allow exhaust gases to depart at the rear of the vehicle, without excessive pressure loss. These systems must also attenuate the acoustic pressure pulsations generated by the engine, such that the noise emitted from the intake and exhaust orifices is constrained within reasonable limits, and exhibits a sound quality in keeping with the brand and vehicle image. Pressure loss and orifice noise tend to be in conflict, so an appropriate trade-off must be sought. Simulation of both parameters allows intake and exhaust systems to be designed effectively, quickly, cheaply and promptly. Linear simulation approaches have been widely used for intake and exhaust acoustic prediction for many decades.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2064
Yuan feng Xia, Jian Pang, Chengtai Hu, Cui Zhou, Cong Wu
Abstract The paper analyzes the characteristics of driveline torsional vibration of a RWD vehicle and provides the control methods of transmission rattle noise caused by the system torsional resonances. A driveline dynamic model of the RWD vehicle is established by multi-body dynamic method. The natural frequencies and modal shapes are calculated for each gear position and torsional vibration responses are predicted by forced vibration analysis. The system sensitivity and DOE are analyzed based on the parameterized stiffness, inertia and damping. The 2nd and 3rd order modal results show that the transmission shaft possesses the maximum amplitudes and its corresponding modal frequencies vary with different gear position. The sensitivity analysis results show that the system torsional vibration is significantly reduced by reducing clutch stiffness, increasing propeller shaft stiffness, raising half shaft stiffness, increasing the input shaft inertia and increasing the clutch damping.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2063
Farokh Kavarana, Kin Yu, Tyler Robbins, John DeYoung
Abstract The advantages of hydraulic mounts over conventional elastomeric mounts for NVH refinement are well known, particularly in the area of engine and suspension mounts. Recently, hydraulic mounts have been successfully employed as body mounts between the frame and cab, principally to control freeway hop in pickup trucks. Due to their ability to provide increased damping at small displacements, hydraulic body mounts also have good potential to reduce smooth road shake. This paper documents the reduction in smooth road shake performance of a full size pickup truck. Hydraulic body mounts tuned to the frequency of the smooth road shake sensitivity area were added to the rearmost cab mount location. Both tire-wheel balance and uniformity were set to the highest production level specification allowed and the effect of hydraulic cab mount was measured experimentally during smooth road driving at medium to high speeds.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2056
Kasper Steen Andersen, Fuyang Liu
The tailpipe noise from an aftertreatment system must comply with legislation and meet customer expectations. The approach to capture the influence of complicated geometries and the ceramic substrates included in full aftertreatment systems (ATS) is implemented by coupling the 1D analytical solution of the substrates with the 3D FEM solution. The simulations are verified with measurements in a flow acoustic test rig.
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