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Viewing 181 to 210 of 9380
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0513
Yohei Miki, Hisao Futamata, Masahiko Inoue, Masashi Takekoshi, Kohbun Yamada
Abstract Unexpected noise may occur around air intake manifold when the throttle valve is quickly opened. In order to solve this problem, mesh is often mounted into the air flow between the intake manifold and the throttle body. In this study the effect of mesh design on the noise reduction was investigated. Several designs of the mesh were tested with an actual automobile and the developed test equipment taking advantage of an intake manifold unit, and the noise attenuation was discussed with measuring the noise and observation of the mesh deformation. Based on those experiments, the mesh design for noise reduction was optimized. Furthermore integration of mesh and rubber gasket was examined. Finally, rubber mesh-gaskets which provide sealing and noise attenuation for air intake has been proposed in this study.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1295
Atsushi Itoh, ZongGuang Wang, Toshikazu Nosaka, Keita Wada
Abstract Without engine noise, the cabin of an electric vehicle is quiet, but on the other hand, it becomes easy to perceive refrigerant-induced noise in the automotive air-conditioning (A/C) system. When determining the A/C system at the design stage, it is crucial to verify whether refrigerant-induced noise occurs in the system or not before the real A/C systems are made. If refrigerant-induced noise almost never occurs during the design stage, it is difficult to evaluate by vehicle testing at the development stage. This paper presents a 1D modeling methodology for the assessment of refrigerant-induced noise such as self-excitation noise generated by pressure pulsation through the thermal expansion valve (TXV). The GT-SUITE commercial code was used to develop a refrigerant cycle model consisting of a compressor, condenser, evaporator, TXV and the connecting pipe network.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1296
Yuntao Cao, Dengfeng Wang, Tonghang Zhao, Xining Liu, Chao Li, Hangsheng Hou
Abstract Noise excitation sources are different between electric vehicles and conventional vehicles due to their distinct propulsion system architecture. This work focuses on an interior noise contribution analysis by experimental measurements and synthesis approach using a methodology established based on the principle of noise path analysis. The obtained results show that the structure-borne noise from the tire-road excitation acts as a major contributor to the overall interior noise level, and the structure-borne noise from the power plant system contributes noticeably as well, whereas contributions from the electric motor and tire are relatively insignificant.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1294
Jonggyu Kim, Pyoung Beom Kim, YoungChan Lee, Sunghee Jung, Byeong-Ug Choi
Abstract This study presents the NVH characteristics of a passenger vehicle with a three-cylinder engine and a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT) and an optimization procedure to achieve balance between fuel economy and NVH. The goal of this study is to improve fuel economy by extending the lock-up area of the damper clutch at low vehicle speed and to minimize booming noise and body vibration caused by the direct connection of the engine and transmission. Resonance characteristics of the chassis systems and driveline have been studied and optimized by the experiment. NVH behavior of the vehicle body structure is investigated and modifications for refinement of booming and body vibration are proposed by simulation using MSC NASTRAN. Calibration parameters for CVT control are optimized for fuel economy and NVH.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0643
Jian Zhang, Changwen Liu, Fengrong Bi, Yiqiang Pei, Xiaobo Bi
Abstract Knock threshold detection is the key of closed loop control of ignition in gasoline engine, and it is also the difficult point in knock measurement. In this paper, an investigation of knock detection in turbocharged gasoline engine using bispectrum slice and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) based on the engine cylinder head vibration signals is presented. By adding some finite amplitude Gaussian white noises to the signal, EEMD keeps the signal continuous in different time span, and therefore the mode mixing inhering in the classical empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method is alleviated. Power spectrum density (PSD) estimation is used to determine the band range of the resonance frequency generated by knock component. EEMD is used to decompose the original signals, the time-frequency characteristics of the Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) are analyzed using Continues Wavelet Transform (CWT) due to its excellent time-frequency resolution.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0632
Domenico Crescenzo, Viktor Olsson, Javier Arco Sola, Hongwen Wu, Andreas Cronhjort, Eric Lycke, Oskar Leufven, Ola Stenlaas
Abstract Due to demanding legislation on exhaust emissions for internal combustion engines and increasing fuel prices, automotive manufacturers have focused their efforts on optimizing turbocharging systems. Turbocharger system control optimization is difficult: Unsteady flow conditions combined with not very accurate compressor maps make the real time turbocharger rotational speed one of the most important quantities in the optimization process. This work presents a methodology designed to obtain the turbocharger rotational speed via vibration analysis. Standard knock sensors have been employed in order to achieve a robust and accurate, yet still a low-cost solution capable of being mounted on-board. Results show that the developed method gives an estimation of the turbocharger rotational speed, with errors and accuracy acceptable for the proposed application. The method has been evaluated on a heavy duty diesel engine.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1186
Dong Hao, Yongping Hou, Jianping Shen, Liying Ma
Abstract The vehicular fuel cell stack is unavoidably impacted by the vibration in the real-world usage due to the road unevenness. However, effects of vibration on stacks have yet to be completely understood. In this work, the mechanical integrity and gas-tightness of the stack were investigated through a strengthen road vibration test with a duration of 200 h. The excitation signals applied in the vibration test were simulated by the acceleration of the stack, which were previously measured in a vehicle vibration test. The load signals of the vehicle vibration test were iterated through a road simulator from vehicle acceleration signals which were originally sampled in the proving ground. Frequency sweep test was conducted before and after the vibration test. During the vibration test, mechanical structure inspection and pressure maintaining test of the stack were conducted at regular intervals.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1094
Fang Liao, Weimin Gao, Yan Gu, Fei Kang, Yinan Li, Cheng Wang
Abstract Generally, the gear rattle noise prediction models are composed of the mass and stiffness elements. The proposals are about the gear inertia or backlash and the shaft inertia or stiffness, but there are many detailed designs in the same inertia, stiffness or backlash conditions. Therefore, these proposals can’t guide detailed designs. These models only investigate the rattle in the rotating degree, and ignore rattle contribution in the radical and axial directions. Those prediction models only consider one or several factors which affect the rattle noise performance. It is difficult to predict the influence of individual factor and multi-factors coupling on the gear rattle noise in a rattle simulation model.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1124
Luca Castellazzi, Andrea Tonoli, Nicola Amati, Alessandro Piu, Enrico Galliera
Abstract The term driveability describes the driver's complex subjective perception of the interactions with the vehicle. One of them is associated to longitudinal acceleration aspects. A relevant contribution to the driveability optimization process is, nowadays, realized by means of track tests during which a considerable amount of driveline parameters are tuned in order to obtain a good compromise of longitudinal acceleration response. Unfortunately, this process is carried out at a development stage when a design iteration becomes too expensive. In addition, the actual trend of downsizing and supercharging the engines leads to higher vibrations that are transmitted to the vehicle. A large effort is therefore dedicated to develop, test and implement ignition strategies addressed to minimize the torque irregularities. Such strategies could penalize the engine maximum performance, efficiency and emissions. The introduction of the dual mass flywheel is beneficial to this end.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1121
Fang Liao, Weimin Gao, Yan Gu, Fei Kang, Yinan Li, Cheng Wang
Abstract Noise signals of the driver’s right ear include those of engine, environment, chassis dynamometer, loaded gears and unloaded gears when they are recorded in full vehicle on chassis dynamometer in semi-anechoic room. Gear rattle noise signals of the driver’s right ear caused by unloaded gear pairs can’t be identified or quantified directly. To solve the problems, relative approaches are used to identify and quantify the gear rattle noise signals. Firstly, the rattle noise signals of the driver’s right ear are filtered by human ear characteristic functions and steady noise signals are extracted by regression and smoothing processes. The noise signals are regressed at 200ms interval in the hearing critical frequency bands and smoothed in the flanking frequencies. Then, the noise relative approaches are obtained by subtracting the steady noise signals from the filtered noise signals, which are the transient noise signals of the unloaded gear pairs inducing the rattle noise.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1127
Enrico Galvagno, Guido Ricardo Guercioni, Alessandro Vigliani
Abstract This paper presents a methodology for the assessment of the NVH (noise vibration and harshness) performance of Dual Clutch Transmissions (DCTs) depending on some transmission design parameters, e.g. torsional backlash in the synchronizers or clutch disc moment of inertia, during low speed maneuvers. A 21-DOFs nonlinear dynamic model of a C-segment passenger car equipped with a DCT is used to simulate the torsional behavior of the driveline and to estimate the forces at the bearings. The impacts between the teeth of two engaging components, e.g. gears and synchronizers, generate impulses in the forces, thus loading the bearings with force time-history characterized by rich frequency content. A broadband excitation is therefore applied to the gearbox case, generating noise and vibration issues.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1123
Ante Bozic
Abstract Among the various types of hydrostatic transmissions, those based on radial piston multi-stroke machines are well-known solutions for off-road mobile machines. The balance between compactness, efficiency, control, comfort and price is the main reason for this. For the same reason, several car companies have tried to introduce hydrostatic transmissions into on-road applications. All such efforts have failed, mainly due to the whine noise produced by the hydrostatic machines. In particular, well-known standard solutions that aim to address the noise of radial piston multi-stroke machines, such as optimized relief grooves known as ‘notches’, are oriented toward reduction of the noise level. Unfortunately, the remaining whine noise, even with well-optimized notches, is unacceptable for automotive NVH standards.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1114
Jinsung Kim
Abstract A dry clutch induces judder phenomenon which is caused by variations in the vehicle load condition and frictional material properties. Such a problem may lead to the stick-slip limit cycle that results in undesired longitudinal vibrations of vehicles. To solve this problem, a vibration suppression control is proposed. The amplitude of vibrations is detected by the signal conditioning from the measurements with the transmission input shaft speed and the wheel speed sensors. Based upon this, a perturbation torque is applied additionally on the nominal launch controller to make the drive shaft oscillation vanish. It can be achieved by the control design without any extra hardware cost. Finally, experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1128
Bo Peng, Tao Liu, Sifa Zheng, Xiaomin Lian
Abstract Neutral-idle strategy has been applied for years to improve the fuel consumption of automatic transmission cars. The updated demand is the use of expanded slipping control strategy for further improvement of the transmission efficiency and response speed. However, one major drawback of the continuous slipping clutches is the high tendency to produce shudder or low frequency variation. In this research, a special neutral-idle shudder phenomenon is presented. This special shudder is not only related to slipping clutches but also related to the vibration and structure of the powertrain system. Simulations and experiments are conducted to give an insight view of this phenomenon. The analysis reveals that this special shudder is caused by both torsional vibration of the driveline and rigid-body vibration of the powertrain system. A positive feedback loop between those two kinds of vibrations leads to this special neutral-idle shudder.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1069
Masayoshi Otaka, Taro Kasahara, Kenichi Komaba
Abstract As a means of further improving combustion efficiency of gasoline engine, an increase in compression ratio, which enhances the risk of knocking, is thinkable. To optimize engine combustion parameters, a technology that can precisely detect knocking is desirable. Presently skillful experts have been evaluating knocking subjectively by listening to radiation noise so far. The authors developed a device that can precisely detect knocking by means of processing sound signals, which are captured by a high-performance microphone that is sensitive in the wide frequency range. Shock waves induced by knocking cause in-cylinder gas vibrations that emits metallic hit noises from the outer engine wall. We studied how to identify the feature values of frequency characteristics when knocking occurs, under the assumption that the engine radiation noise includes more than 2nd-order harmonic components with respect to the basic frequency of the in-cylinder gas vibration mode.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0479
Kuniaki Goto, Takashi Kondo, Masakiyo Takahira, Eiji Umemura, Masashi Komada, Yasuhiko Nishimura
Abstract Generally, pass-by noise levels measured outdoors vary according to the influence of weather conditions, background noise and the driver’s skill. Manufactures, therefore, are trying to reproduce proving ground driving conditions on a chassis dynamometer. The tire noise that occurs on actual road surfaces, however, is difficult to reproduce in indoor tests. In 2016, new pass-by noise regulations (UN R51-03) will take effect in Europe, Japan and other countries. Furthermore, stricter regulations (2dB) will take effect in 2020. In addition to the acceleration runs required under current regulations, UN R51-03 will require constant speed runs. Therefore, an efficient measurement methods are necessary for vehicle development. To solve the above mentioned issues, an indoor evaluation system capable of reproducing the tire noise that occurs on road surfaces has been developed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1325
Masanori Watanabe, Yosuke Tanabe, Naoki Yoneya
Abstract We have developed an excitation source identification system that can distinguish excitation sources on a sub-assembly level (around 30mm) for vehicle components by combining a measurement and a timing analysis. Therefore, noise and vibration problems can be solved at an early stage of development and the development period can be shortened. This system is composed of measurement, control, modeling, and excitation source identification parts. The measurement and the excitation source identification parts are the main topics of this paper. In the measurement part, multiple physical quantities can be measured in multi-channel (noise and vibration: 48ch, general purpose: 64ch), and these time data can be analyzed by using a high-resolution signal analysis (Instantaneous Frequency Analysis (IFA)) that we developed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1355
Jeffrey R. Hodgkins, Walter Brophy, Thomas Gaydosh, Norimasa Kobayashi, Hiroo Yamaoka
Abstract Current vehicle acoustic performance prediction methods, CAE (computer aided engineering) or physical testing, have some difficulty predicting interior sound in the mid-frequency range (300 to 1000 Hz). It is in this frequency range where the overall acoustic performance becomes sensitive to not only the contributions of structure-borne sources, which can be studied using traditional finite element analysis (FEA) methods, but also the contribution of airborne noise sources which increase proportional to frequency. It is in this higher frequency range (>1000 Hz) that physical testing and statistical CAE methods are traditionally used for performance studies. This paper will discuss a study that was undertaken to test the capability of a finite element modeling method that can accurately simulate air-borne noise phenomena in the mid-frequency range.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1044
Toshiaki Kobayashi
Abstract This paper describes the establishment of a new method for predicting piston skirt scuffing in the internal combustion engine of a passenger car. The authors previously constructed and reported a method that uses 3D piston motion simulation to predict piston slap noise and piston skirt friction. However, that simulation did not have a clear index for evaluation of scuffing that involves piston skirt erosion, and it impressed shortage of the predictive accuracy of a scuffing. Therefore, the authors derived a new evaluation index for piston skirt scuffing by actually operating an internal combustion engine using multiple types of pistons to reproduce the conditions under which scuffing occurs, and comparing with the results of calculating the same conditions by piston motion simulation.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0488
Takashi Izawa, Motohiko Koushima
Abstract In order to determine the seizure limit of the main bearings of passenger vehicles under actual operating conditions, evaluations were conducted in environments containing noise factors (Various factors which designer cannot adjust and which make function vary were defined as noise factors in this paper.) [1,2] It was shown that noise factors have an effect on seizure limit performance in relation to performance under ideal test conditions (test conditions in which no noise is present). In relation to oil properties, the results showed that a reduction in viscosity as a result of dilution affected seizure limit performance. In relation to the shape of the sliding sections of the test shaft, seizure limit performance declined in a shaft in which the central section was swollen (“convex shaft” below).
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1125
Hiromichi Tsuji, Kimihiko Nakano
Abstract This paper presents a study of experimental transfer path contribution with the estimation technique of the projected operational force under CVT clutch lockup operational condition. Since transfer path analysis is conducted with respect to the evaluation location, the forces applied onto the substructures are, therefore, also required to estimate the coherent operational forces. In order to estimate the forces, the coherent inertance matrix, which is the projection of the inertance matrix onto the subspace with respect to the evaluation location, is estimated without measuring it directly. The acceleration responses at the connections of the passive substructure are measured by the excitation at the evaluation location with reciprocity. The proposed technique decomposes the acceleration responses into the output and input element vectors on the subspace. With those vectors, the coherent full inertance matrix considering cross coupling effects is constructed.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1304
Tadayoshi Fukushima, Hitoshi Takagi, Toshio Enomoto, Hiroyuki Sawada, Tomoyuki Kaneda
Abstract Interior noise caused by exterior air flow, or wind noise, is one of the noise-and-vibration phenomena for which a systematic simulation method has been desired for enabling their prediction. One of the main difficulties in simulating wind noise is that, unlike most other noises from the engine or road input, wind noise has not one but two different types of sources, namely, convective and acoustic ones. Therefore, in order to synthesize the interior sound pressure level (SPL), the body sensitivities (interior SPL/outer source level) for both types of sources have to be considered. In particular, sensitivity to the convective input has not been well understood, and hence it has not been determined. Moreover, the high-frequency nature of wind noise (e.g., the main energy range extends up to 4000 Hz) has limited the effective application of CAE for determining body sensitivities, for example, from the side window glass to the occupants’ ears.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1307
Yuntao Cao, Dengfeng Wang, Tonghang Zhao, Xining Liu, Yulei He, Hangsheng Hou
Abstract A vehicle vibration issue emerged for a hybrid prototype during low speed driving in EV mode. This work is focused on the effort to identify the root cause and resolve the issue. The endeavor begins by performing a motor test in moderate acceleration with an imposed constant torque load. All relevant information is simultaneously recorded, including vehicle speed, vibration of motor structure and seat track, motor rpm, voltage and current signals, etc. Then analyses are carried out to strive for a better understanding of the vibration characteristics and identify its mechanism. It is found that the torque ripple from the driving motor is the root cause of the low speed vehicle vibration in EV mode, and the torque ripple is found to be induced by the current distortion resulted from the current sensor drift and electromagnetic interference due to high current signals.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1595
Haibo Wu, Jiangbin Zhou, Qian Chen, Gongwen Liu, Chaoqun Qian
Abstract In this paper we present the work which was done at Shanghai-VW for using computational aero-acoustic (CAA) simulation in the vehicle development process to assess and improve the buffeting behavior of a vehicle when the rear side window is open. In the first step, a methodology was established and validated against wind tunnel tests using a Sedan. The methodology consists of a calibration of the CAA model to represent the properties of the cabin interior of the real car in terms of damping, wall compliance and leakage followed by CAA simulations of the full vehicle at different wind speeds to obtain the transient flow field around the exterior shape and inside the passenger compartment. The interior noise spectra are directly calculated from the transient pressure inside the cabin.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1316
Vincent Rovedatti, Jacob Milhorn, Richard DeJong, Gordon Ebbitt
Abstract A 1/4 scale model vehicle profile has been tested in a wind tunnel with speeds up to 360 km/h. In order to simulate the free field flow over the vehicle, the top surface of the wind tunnel is contoured. A CFD simulation of the free field flow at various speeds is used to identify the desired top streamline. Then the boundary layer growth on the top surface is calculated and the top contour is adjusted accordingly. Since this contour changes very little with flow speeds of interest, an average contour is used for a fixed top surface of the wind tunnel. Pressure drop measurements are used to verify the flow similarity to the CFD model. Wind noise measurements using surface mounted pressure transducer arrays are used to determine the acoustic loads on the vehicle surfaces.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2015-01-9153
André Lundkvist, Arne Nykänen
Abstract The number of advanced driver assistance systems is constantly increasing. Many of the systems require visual attention, and a way to reduce risks associated with inattention could be to use multisensory signals. A driver's main attention is in front of the car, but inattention to surrounding areas beside and behind the car can be a risk. Therefore, there is a need for driver assistance systems capable of directing attention to the sides. In a simulator study, combined visual, auditory and vibrotactile signals for directional attention capture were designed for use in driver assistance systems, such as blind spot information, parking assistance, collision warnings, navigation, lane departure warning etc. An experiment was conducted in order to measure the effects of the use of different sensory modalities on directional attention (left/right) in driver assistance systems.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2015-01-9152
André Lundkvist, Arne Nykänen, Roger Johnsson
Abstract Many of the information systems in cars require visual attention, and a way to reduce both visual and cognitive workload could be to use sound. An experiment was designed in order to determine how driving and secondary task performance is affected by the use of information sound signals and their spatial positions. The experiment was performed in a driving simulator utilizing Lane Change Task as a driving scenario in combination with the Surrogate Reference Task as a secondary task. Two different signal sounds with different spatial positions informed the driver when a lane change should be made and when a new secondary task was presented. Driving performance was significantly improved when both signal sounds were presented in front of the driver. No significant effects on secondary task performance were found. It is recommended that signal sounds are placed in front of the driver, when possible, if the goal is to draw attention forward.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1310
Yitian Zhang, David W. Herrin, T. Wu, Xin Hua
Abstract Prior research on assessing multiple inlet and outlet mufflers is limited, and only recently have researchers begun to consider suitable metrics for multiple inlet and outlet mufflers. In this paper, transmission loss and insertion loss are defined for multiple inlet and outlet mufflers using a superposition method that can be extended to any m-inlet n-outlet muffler. Transmission loss is determined assuming that the sources and terminations are anechoic. On the other hand, insertion loss considers reflections. For both metrics, the amplitude and phase relationship between the sources should be known a priori. This paper explains both metrics, and measurement of transmission and insertion loss are demonstrated for a 2-inlet 2-outlet muffler with good agreement.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1303
Haiqing Xu, Chang Jin, Hong Zhou, Yi Zhou
Abstract On the study of reducing the disturbance on driver’s attention induced by low frequency vehicle interior stationary noise, a subjective evaluation is firstly carried out by means of rank rating method which introduces Distraction Level (DL) as evaluation index. A visual-finger response test is developed to help evaluating members better recognize the Distraction Level during the evaluation. A non-linear back propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) is then modeled for the prediction of subjective Distraction Level, in which linear sound pressure RMS amplitudes of five Critical Band Rates (CBRs) from 20 to 500Hz are selected as inputs of the model. These inputs comprise an input vector of BPANN. Furthermore, active noise equalization (ANE) on DL is realized based on Filtered-x Least Mean Square (FxLMS) algorithm that controls the gain coefficients of inputs of trained BPANN.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1298
Shukai Yang, Zuokui Sun, Yingjie Liu, Bingwu Lu, Tao Liu, Hangsheng Hou
Abstract This work carries out complex modal analyses and optimizations to resolve an 1800 Hz front brake squeal issue encountered in a vehicle program development phase. The stability theory of complex modes for brake squeal simulation is briefly explained. A brake system finite element model is constructed, and the model is validated by the measurement in accordance with the SAE 2521 procedure. The key parameters for evaluating the stability of the brake system complex modes are determined. The modal contributions of relevant components to unstable modes are analyzed and ranked. Finally, in order to resolve the squeal issue, the design improvements of rotor, caliper and pad are proposed and numerical simulations are carried out. The obtained results demonstrate that the optimized rotor and pad design can alleviate the squeal issue significantly while the optimized clipper design could essentially eliminate the squeal issue.
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