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2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2274
Paul R. Donavan, Bruce Rymer
Abstract A measurement program was completed to assess driver input versus exterior noise generation for four vehicle designs and two different rumble strip designs. The vehicles included a small compact car, an immediate size car, a full sport utility vehicle, and a medium duty dump truck. The first rumble strip was a conventional design providing shorter wavelength input to the tire. The second was designed to provide longer wavelength, more harmonic input to the tire. The measurements included exterior pass-by noise and on-board exterior noise and interior measurements of sound pressure level and vibration level at the seat track and steering column. In general, the results indicated that the longer wavelength strips produced less overall A-weighted pass-by noise with little or no reduction in interior noise and vibration.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2320
Andreas Schuhmacher
Abstract Indoor vehicle pass-by noise applications deal with measuring the exterior noise from a vehicle fixed on a chassis dynamometer in a large hemi-anechoic room. During a standardised acceleration test, the noise is measured with an array of microphones placed in the far-field, and the overall noise level versus vehicle position can be simulated. The indoor facility allows controlled and repeatable measurements independent of weather. For engineering purposes, pass-by contribution analysis can be included in the test leading to information about the pass-by noise contribution from major noise sources. This work presents a novel application of blind source separation to vehicle measurements from an indoor pass-by measurement campaign. In contrast to the classical transfer path approach using point sources for modelling vehicle noise sources and combining an operational measurement with transfer functions, the blind approach does not consider a specific noise source model.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2321
Nicholas Oettle, Andrew Bissell, Sivapalan Senthooran, Mohammed Meskine
Abstract For the automotive industry, the quality and level of the wind noise contribution has a growing importance and therefore should be addressed as early as possible in the development process. Each component of the vehicle is designed to meet its individual noise target to ensure the wind noise passenger comfort level inside the vehicle is met. Sunroof broadband noise is generated by the turbulent flow developed over the roof opening. A strong shear layer and vortices impacting on the trailing edge of the sunroof are typical mechanisms related to the noise production. Sunroof designs are tested to meet broadband noise targets. Experimentally testing designs and making changes to meet these design targets typically involves high cost prototypes, expensive wind tunnel sessions and potentially late design changes.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2323
Abdelhakim Aissaoui, Ravindra S Tupake, Vilas Bijwe, Mohammed Meskine, Franck Perot, Alain Belanger, Rohit J Vaidya
For the automotive industry, acoustic comfort is of increasing importance. The market and customer expectation make the HVAC system noise quality a question to be addressed as early as possible in the vehicle development process. On one hand, the so-called traditional sources of annoyance such as engine, road-tires contact, exhaust systems and wind-noise have been significantly reduced for most traditional combustion engine vehicles. On the other hand, considered in the past as secondary noise sources, HVAC systems become the main sources for hybrid and electric and Stop-start vehicles. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of a CFD/CAA approach based on the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) to predict HVAC system noise including real and complex ducts, registers, mixing unit and blower geometries.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2314
Adrien Mann, Min-Suk Kim, Barbara Neuhierl, Franck Perot, Robert Powell, Thomas Rose, Jan Krueger
Abstract Exhaust and muffler noise is a challenging problem in the transport industry. While the main purpose of the system is to reduce the intensity of the acoustic pulses originating from the engine exhaust valves, the back pressure induced by these systems must be kept to a minimum to guarantee maximum performance of the engine. Emitted noise levels have to ensure comfort of the passengers and must respect community noise regulations. In addition, the exhaust noise plays an important role in the brand image of vehicles, especially with sports car where it must be tuned to be “musical”. However, to achieve such performances, muffler and exhaust designs have become quite complex, often leading to the rise of undesired self-induced noise. Traditional purely acoustic solvers, like Boundary Element Methods (BEM), have been applied quite successfully to achieve the required acoustic tuning.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2315
Giulio Lenzi, Giovanni Ferrara, Andrea Fioravanti
Abstract The acoustic performance of mufflers with single-inlet and single-outlet are well described using Insertion Loss (IL) and Transmission Loss (TL). These parameters represent the acoustic damping on the engine emission and on the incident pressure wave respectively. However, for mufflers with multi-inlet these parameters depend also on the sources characteristics, as consequence their use is quite difficult. In the present work the acoustic performance of a double-inlet and single-outlet muffler are experimentally evaluated in terms of reflection and transmission coefficients of each port of the muffler itself. These coefficients are used to evaluate the Insertion Loss of the manifold muffler taking into account specific sources on the inlets. The characteristic coefficients are also used to predict the acoustic emission of the manifold muffler using a known engine source on the two inlets.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2335
Scott Amman, Francois Charette, Paul Nicastri, John Huber, Brigitte Richardson, Gint Puskorius, Yuksel Gur, Anthony Cooprider
Abstract Hands-free phone use is the most utilized use case for vehicles equipped with infotainment systems with external microphones that support connection to phones and implement speech recognition. Critically then, achieving hands-free phone call quality in a vehicle is problematic due to the extremely noisy nature of the vehicle environment. Noise generated by wind, mechanical and structural, tire to road, passengers, engine/exhaust, HVAC air pressure and flow are all significant contributors and sources of noise. Other factors influencing the quality of the phone call include microphone placement, cabin acoustics, seat position of the talker, noise reduction of the hands-free system, etc. This paper describes the work done to develop procedures and metrics to quantify the effects that influence the hands-free phone call quality.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2333
Brandon Sobecki, Patricia Davies, J Stuart Bolton, Frank Eberhardt
Abstract Component sound quality is an important factor in the design of competitive diesel engines. One component noise that causes complaints is the gear rattle that originates in the front-of-engine gear train which drives the fuel pump and other accessories. The rattle is caused by repeated tooth impacts resulting from fluctuations in differential torsional acceleration of the driving gears. These impacts generate a broadband, impulsive noise that is often perceived as annoying. In most previous work, the overall sound quality of diesel engines has been considered without specifically focusing on predicting the perception of gear rattle. Gear rattle level has been quantified based on angular acceleration measurements, but those measurements can be difficult to perform. Here, the emphasis was on developing a metric based on subjective testing of the perception of gear rattle.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2337
Gordon Ebbitt, Todd Remtema
Abstract Speech communication from the front seat to the rear seat in a passenger vehicle can be difficult. This is particularly true in a vehicle with an acoustically absorptive interior. Speech Transmission Index (STI) measurements can quantify the speech intelligibility, but they require specialized signal processing. The STI calculations can be simplified if it is assumed that reverberation and echoes play an insignificant role in an automobile. A simplification of a STI measurement is described that uses a stationary reference speech signal from a talker mannequin in the driver's seat to create a signal at the rear passenger positions. On-road noise measurements are used for the noise level and the calculated signal to noise ratio is used to calculate a simplified STI value that tracks closely to a full implementation of the STI method for sedans.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2336
Anastasios Arvanitis, Jeff Orzechowski, Todd Tousignant, Kiran Govindswamy
Abstract Automotive companies are studying to add extra value in their vehicles by enhancing powertrain sound quality. The objective is to create a brand sound that is unique and preferred by their customers since quietness is not always the most desired characteristic, especially for high-performance products. This paper describes the process of developing a brand powertrain sound for a high-performance vehicle using the DFSS methodology. Initially the customer's preferred sound was identified and analyzed. This was achieved by subjective evaluations through voice-of-customer clinics using vehicles of similar specifications. Objective data were acquired during several driving conditions. In order for the design process to be effective, it is very important to understand the relationship between subjective results and physical quantities of sound. Several sound quality metrics were calculated during the data analysis process.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2328
Barbara Neuhierl, Sivapalan Senthooran, Reinier Toppinga, Anke Jäger, Maarten Brink, Timo Lemke, Philippe Moron, Raghu Mutnuri
Abstract The object of the validation study presented in this paper is a generic vehicle, the so-called SAE body, developed by a consortium of German car manufacturers (Audi, Daimler, Porsche, Volkswagen). Many experiments have been performed by the abovementioned consortium on this object in the past to investigate its behavior when exposed to fluid flow. Some of these experiments were used to validate the simulation results discussed in the present paper. It is demonstrated that the simulation of the exterior flow is able to represent the transient hydrodynamic structures and at the same time both the generation of the acoustic sources and the propagation of the acoustic waves. Performing wave number filtering allows to identify the acoustic phenomena and separate them from the hydrodynamic effects. In a next step, the noise transferred to the interior of the cabin through the glass panel was calculated, using a Statistical Energy Analysis approach.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2325
P. Bremner, C. Todter, S. Clifton
Abstract The authors report on the design and application of a high resolution micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS) microphone array for automotive wind noise engineering. The array integrates both sensors and random access memory (RAM) chips on a flexible circuit board that eliminates high channel count wiring and allows the array to be deployed on automobile surfaces in a convenient “stick-on/peel-off” configuration. These arrays have potential application to the quantitative evaluation of interior wind noise from measurements on a clay model in the wind tunnel, when used in conjunction with a body vibro-acoustic model. The array also provides a high resolution turbulence measurement tool, suitable for validation of computation fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for wind noise. The authors' report on the wavenumber-frequency structure of flow turbulence measured in different flow regions on a side glass and the corresponding contributions to interior wind noise.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2330
Christian Y. Glandier, Mark Eiselt, Oskar Prill, Eric Bauer
Abstract With the reduction of engine and road noise, wind has become an important source of interior noise when cruising at highway speed. The challenges of weight reduction, performance improvement and reduced development time call for stronger support of the development process by numerical methods. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and finite element (FE) vibroacoustic computations have reached a level of maturity that makes it possible and meaningful to combine these methods for wind noise prediction. This paper presents a method used for coupling time domain CFD computations with a finite element vibroacoustic model of a vehicle for the prediction of low-frequency wind noise below 500 Hz. The procedure is based on time segmentation of the excitation load and transformation into the frequency domain for the vibroacoustic computations. It requires simple signal processing and preserves the random character as well as the spatial correlation of the excitation signal.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2356
Huangxing Chen, David W. Herrin
Abstract The insertion loss of louvered terminations positioned at the end of a rectangular duct is determined using acoustic finite element analysis. Insertion loss was determined by taking the difference between the sound power with and without the louvers at the termination. Analyses were conducted in the plane wave regime and the acoustic source was anechoic eliminating any reflections from the source. The effect of different louver configurations on insertion loss was examined. Parameters investigated included louver length, angle, and spacing between louvers. Based on the analyses, equations were developed for the insertion loss of unlined louvers.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2360
Todd Freeman, Gabriella Cerrato
Abstract Source-path-contribution (SPC) analysis, or transfer-path-analysis, is a test based method to characterize noise and vibration contributions of a complex system. The methodology allows for the user to gain insight into the structural forces and acoustic source strengths that are exciting a system, along with the effects of the structural and acoustic paths between each source and a receiver position. This information can be utilized to understand which sources and/or paths are dominating the noise and vibration performance of a system, allowing for focused target cascading and streamlined troubleshooting efforts. The SPC process is widely used for automotive applications, but is also applicable for a wide range of product types. For each unique application the basic SPC principles remain constant, however best practices can vary for both measurement and analysis depending on the type of system being evaluated.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2357
Hiromichi Tsuji, Kimihiko Nakano
This paper presents a new technique to estimate the coherent operational forces, with respect to the evaluation location, at the connections of separated passive substructures with reciprocity. Since transfer path analysis is conducted with respect to the evaluation location, the forces applied onto the substructures are, therefore, also required to estimate the coherent operational forces. In order to estimate the forces, the coherent impedance matrix, which is the projection of the impedance matrix onto the subspace with respect to the evaluation location, is estimated without measuring it directly. The acceleration responses at the connections of the passive substructure are measured by the excitation at the evaluation location with reciprocity. The technique decomposes the acceleration responses into the output and input element vectors on the subspace. With those vectors, the coherent impedance matrix is constructed.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2226
Shishuo Sun, David W. Herrin, John Baker
Abstract Transmissibility is the most common metric used for isolator characterization. However, engineers are becoming increasingly concerned about energy transmission through an isolator at high frequencies and how the compliance of the machine and foundation factor into the performance. In this paper, the transfer matrix approach for isolator characterization is first reviewed. Two methods are detailed for determining the transfer matrix of an isolator using finite element simulation. This is accomplished by determining either the mobility or impedance matrix for the isolator and then converting to a transfer matrix. It is shown that results are similar using either approach. In both cases, the isolator is first pre-loaded before the transfer matrix is determined. The approach to find isolator insertion loss is demonstrated for an isolator between two plates, and the effect of making changes to the structural impedance on the machine side of the isolator by adding ribs is examined.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2217
Guohua Sun, Tao Feng, JI Xu, Mingfeng Li, Teik Lim
Abstract Current powertrain active noise control (ANC) systems are not sufficient enough to track the fast engine speed variations, and yield consistent convergence speeds for individual engine order such that a balanced noise reduction performance can be achieved over a broad frequency range. This is because most of these ANC systems are configured with the standard filtered-x least mean squares (FxLMS) algorithm, which has an inherent limitation in the frequency-dependent convergence behavior due to the existence of secondary path model (electro-acoustic path from the input of control loudspeaker to the output of monitoring error microphone) in the reference signal path. In this paper, an overview is given first to compare several recently modified FxLMS algorithms to improve the convergence speed for harmonic responses such as eigenvalue equalization FxLMS (EE-FXLMS) and normalized reference LMS (NX-LMS) algorithms.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2219
Al Ganeshkumar, Shinichi Fukuhara
Abstract Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) technology is widely used in automobiles to reduce engine harmonic noise [3]. ANC systems require one or more microphones mounted in the cabin to monitor the harmonic noise level and provide feedback to the DSP algorithm. The ideal locations for the microphones are as close as possible to the passenger seating locations and away from any wind turbulence that can impact the diaphragm of the microphone. Excessive wind turbulence on the diaphragm can cause the ANC adaptive filter weights to be perturbed enough resulting in audible ‘pumping’ type artifacts. For several practical reason it's not always possible to control the location of the microphones and hence a DSP software and/or mechanical solution needs to be incorporated in the system. This paper will primarily address the DSP software solutions to detect wind turbulence noise in ANC microphones so appropriate counter measures can be applied to eliminate the unwanted artifacts.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2216
Dong Chul Park, Eun Soo Jo, Seokgwan Hong, Michael Csakan
Abstract An important trend among vehicle NVH engineers is the production of attractive engine acceleration sound quality for the enhancement of a vehicle's image and performance. In addition, customers have increasing interest and enjoyment in customizing their cars to reflect their personal taste and preferences. The PESS (Personalized Engine Sound System) has been developed for making a unique and individually customizable vehicle concept. The system allows the customers an opportunity to create a variety of engine sounds in a single vehicle using active sound design technology. In this system, three different engine sound concepts are pre-defined, Dynamic, Sporty, and Extreme. Each of the engine sounds can then be adjusted with parameters that determine the timbre, such as main order, rumble, and high order. In addition, the pedal position during acceleration has also been used as a parameter to further personalize the experience.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2297
Insoo Jung, Jaemin Jin, Kwangmin Won, Seungwook Yang, Kyoungdoug Min, Hoimyung Choi
Abstract The combustion noise of a diesel engine can be deteriorated by combustion characteristics such as the maximum rate of heat release and the start of combustion. These combustion characteristics in turn are influenced by the factors such as the engine NVH durability, driving conditions, environmental factors and fuel properties. Therefore, we need to develop the robust combustion noise that is insensitive to these factors. To achieve this aim, methods for predicting combustion characteristics has been developed by analyzing the vibration signal measured from the engine cylinder block. The closed-loop control of injection parameters through combustion characteristics prediction has been performed to produce the desired engine combustion performance. We constructed an ECU logic for the closed-loop control and verified the design in a diesel passenger car. We also evaluated the effect of combustion noise and fuel consumption by applying the closed-loop control.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2296
Seunghyun Lee, Sungmoon Lee, Kyoungdoug Min, Insoo Jung
Abstract Diesel engine noise is classified into mechanical noise, flow dynamic noise and combustion noise. Among these, combustion noise level is higher than the others due to the high compression ratio of diesel combustion and auto ignition. The injected fuel is mixed with air in the ignition delay process, followed by simultaneous ignition of the premixed mixture. This process results in a rapid pressure rise, which is the main source of combustion noise. The amount of fuel burned during premixed combustion is mainly affected by the ignition delay. The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate has an impact on ignition delay, and thus, it influences the combustion noise characteristics. Therefore, during the transient state, the combustion noise characteristics change as the EGR rate deviates from the target value. In this study, the effect of the EGR rate deviation during the transient state of the combustion noise is examined.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2223
Rolf Schirmacher
Abstract Active Noise Control (ANC) has long been seen as emerging technology. During recent years, however, it became popular in new vehicle and infotainment platforms within a broad range of OEMs. This paper summarizes the current status and lessons learned of production systems (as well as those entering production soon) and gives an outlook on how ANC and related technologies will integrate in future vehicles and audio/infotainment architectures.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2183
Thomas Wellmann, Kiran Govindswamy, Jeff Orzechowski, Sudharsan Srinivasan
Abstract Integration of automatic engine Stop/Start systems in “conventional” drivetrains with 12V starters is a relatively cost-effective measure to reduce fuel consumption. Therefore, automatic engine Stop/Start systems are becoming more prevalent and increasing market share of such systems is predicted. A quick, reliable and consistent engine start behavior is essential for customer acceptance of these systems. The launch of the vehicle should not be compromised by the Stop/Start system, which implies that the engine start time and transmission readiness for transmitting torque should occur within the time the driver releases the brake pedal and de-presses the accelerator pedal. Comfort and NVH aspects will continue to play an important role for customer acceptance of these systems. Hence, the engine stop and re-start behavior should be imperceptible to the driver from both a tactile and acoustic standpoint.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2289
Joseph L. Stout, Vincent Solferino, Simon Antonov
Abstract Powerplant NVH decisions are sometimes made looking only at how the change impacts either the source radiated noise level or the source vibration. Depending on the engine configuration, those can be good approximations, but they can also be very misleading. By combining both noise sources into a vehicle equivalent noise level a much better analysis can be made of the impact of any proposed design change on the customer perceived loudness. This paper will investigate several different scenarios and identify how the airborne and the structureborne paths combine for I4, V6 and V8 engine configurations. Similar relationships will be shown for path as well as the source contributions.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2288
Abdelkrim Zouani, Joseph Stout, Salah Hanim, Changshen Gan, Gabriela Dziubinschi, William Baldwin, Zhi Fu
Abstract A new turbocharged 60° 2.7L 4V-V6 gasoline engine has been developed by Ford Motor Company for both pickup trucks and car applications. This engine was code named “Nano” due to its compact size; it features a 4-valves DOHC valvetrain, a CGI cylinder block, an Aluminum ladder, an integrated exhaust manifold and twin turbochargers. The goal of this engine is to deliver 120HP/L, ULEV70 emission, fuel efficiency improvements and leadership level NVH. This paper describes the upfront design and optimization process used for the NVH development of this engine. It showcases the use of analytical tools used to define the critical design features and discusses the NVH performance relative to competitive benchmarks.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2298
Stephen Chittick, Mark Swindell, Samir Raorane
Abstract Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) has designed and developed a new inline 4 cylinder engine family, branded Ingenium. In addition to delivering improved emissions and fuel economy over the outgoing engine, another key aim from the outset of the program was to reduce the combustion noise. This paper details the NVH development of the lead engine in this family, a 2.0 liter common rail turbo diesel. The task from the outset of this new program was to reduce the mass of the engine by 21.5 kg, whilst also improving the structural attenuation of the engine by 5 dB in comparison to the outgoing engine. Improving the structural attenuation by 5 dB was not only a key enabler in reducing combustion noise, but also helped to achieve a certified CO2 performance of 99 g/km in the all-new Jaguar XE model, by allowing more scope for increasing cylinder pressure forcing without compromising NVH.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2344
Murteza T. Erman
Abstract In today's world, automotive manufacturers are required to decrease CO2 emissions and increase the fuel economy while assuring driver comfort and safety. To achieve desired acoustic performance targets, automotive manufacturers use various Noise-Vibration-Harshness (NVH) materials which they apply to the vehicle Body-In-White structures either in the body or paint shop. Beside the sound deadening coatings applied onto the underbody of vehicles, they have historically used either constrained or free-layer sheets. The majority of these damping pads/sheets, so called asphalt sheets, are applied onto the floor pan inside the vehicle. These pre-manufactured and vehicle specific die-cut sheets are typically highly metal-carbonate, sulfate or silicate filled asphalt systems with a high specific gravity. Depending on the size of vehicle, the amount of these sheets can reach application weights of 10∼20 kg/vehicle. This paper will document the technical path that Dr. H.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2349
Jiantie Zhen, David Copley, Niranjan Londhe, Scott Fredrickson
Abstract Structure-borne inputs to hybrid FEA/SEA models could have significant effects on the model prediction accuracy. The purpose of this work was to obtain the structure-borne noise (SBN) inputs using a simplified transfer path analysis (TPA) and identify the significance of the structure-borne and airborne contributions to the spectator sound power of an engine with enclosure for future modeling references. Force inputs to the enclosure from the engine were obtained and used as inputs to a hybrid engine enclosure model for sound prediction.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2329
Paolo Di Francescantonio, Charles Hirsch, Piergiorgio Ferrante, Katsutomo Isono
Abstract A new method called Adaptive Spectral Reconstruction (ASR) for the stochastic reconstruction of broadband aeroacoustic sources starting from steady CFD analyses is presented and applied to the evaluation of the noise radiated by a model automotive side mirror. The new approach exploits some ideas from both SNGR and RPM, and for some aspects can be considered as a sort of mixing between the two methods since it permits to reconstruct both the frequency content of the turbulent field (as done by SNGR) and the spatial cross correlation (as done by RPM). The turbulent field is reconstructed with a sum of convected plane waves, but two substantial differences are introduced in respect of SNGR. The first difference concerns the spatial variation of the parameters that define each wave, that depends on the wavelength of each wave, rather than being kept constant or related to the CFD correlation length.
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