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Viewing 121 to 150 of 9351
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1317
Peng Wang, Xin Hua, T. Wu, David W. Herrin
Abstract Insertion loss in one-third or octave bands is widely used in industry to assess the performance of large silencers and mufflers. However, there is no standard procedure for determining the transmission loss in one-third or octave bands using measured data or simulation. In this paper, assuming that the source is broadband, three different approaches to convert the narrowband transmission loss data into one-third and octave bands are investigated. Each method is described in detail. To validate the three different approaches, narrowband transmission loss data of a simple expansion chamber and a large bar silencer is converted into one-third and octave bands, and results obtained from the three approaches are demonstrated to agree well with one another.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1325
Masanori Watanabe, Yosuke Tanabe, Naoki Yoneya
Abstract We have developed an excitation source identification system that can distinguish excitation sources on a sub-assembly level (around 30mm) for vehicle components by combining a measurement and a timing analysis. Therefore, noise and vibration problems can be solved at an early stage of development and the development period can be shortened. This system is composed of measurement, control, modeling, and excitation source identification parts. The measurement and the excitation source identification parts are the main topics of this paper. In the measurement part, multiple physical quantities can be measured in multi-channel (noise and vibration: 48ch, general purpose: 64ch), and these time data can be analyzed by using a high-resolution signal analysis (Instantaneous Frequency Analysis (IFA)) that we developed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1324
Yuntao Cao, Tonghang Zhao, Chao Li, Meng Yang, Hangsheng Hou
Abstract The primary noise sources of electric vehicles differ from that of traditional vehicles due to the fundamental differences in their powertrain architecture. In this work, some exterior noise test methods for electric vehicles are briefly introduced first, which include a pass-by noise measurement method during acceleration on the proving ground as well as a similar measurement in a semi-anechoic room. The obtained results based on those two methods from a production electric vehicle are compared and analyzed. Then the mechanism of the source, path, and contribution is illustrated, and a model of path-source-contribution for electric vehicles is established. The model validation is subsequently carried out by correlating the calculated outcomes with the measured results under real operating conditions. Finally, by using the model, contribution analyses are carried out to identify the primary exterior noise sources.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1322
Tonghang Zhao, Xining Liu, Yuntao Cao, Chao Li, Hangsheng Hou
Abstract A hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) will start the engine which drives its motor to charge the battery even at idle whenever the battery power is detected to be insufficient. The activation of idle battery charging could lead to serious NVH problems if powertrain parameters are not designed or calibrated properly. This work is focused on a noise issue encountered during idle charging for a specific prototype vehicle, and investigates control strategies to contain the noise level. Based on basic principles of automobile vibration and noise control along with the specific characteristics of the hybrid vehicle architecture, this work analyzes and elucidates methods of the engine idle charging noise control from the perspectives of powertrain modal alignment, idle speed optimization, and electric motor control algorithm.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1348
Kenichi Higuchi, Fumihiko Toyoda, Hirohito Terashima, Shinji Ikeda, Eitaku Nobuyama
Abstract 1 There are two design challenges of the flow path switching valve in a three-stage variable discharge oil pump. The first is to obtain the required discharge pressure characteristics and the other is to prevent hydraulic vibration. Therefore, we established technologies to determine the shape of the valve and the valve housing that resolve these two challenges. The technology to obtain the required discharge pressure characteristics solves equations that are statically true, such as the equations for the equilibrium of forces and hydraulic orifice. The hydraulic vibration control technology derives a differential equation that takes transient behavior, including oil elasticity and inertia, into account first. Then, the derived equations are converted to a transfer function that indicates the valve behavior according to the input of oil pressure changes. And then the stability criterion is applied to judge whether hydraulic vibration occurs or not.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1349
Siddharth Bhupendra Unadkat, Suhas Kangde, Mahalingesh Burkul, Mahesh Badireddy
Abstract In the current scenario, the major thrust is to simulate the customer usage pattern and lab test using virtual simulation methods. Going ahead, prime importance will be to reduce the number of soft tool prototype for all tests which can be predicted in CAE. Automotive door slam test is significantly complex in terms of prediction through simulation. Current work focuses on simulating the slam event and deriving load histories at different mounting locations through dynamic analysis using LSDyna. These extracted load histories are applied to trimmed door Nastran model and modal transient analysis is performed to find the transient stress history. This approach has a significant advantage of less computation time and stress-convergence with Nastran for performing multiple design iterations compared to LSDyna. Good failure correlation is achieved with the test using this approach.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1355
Jeffrey R. Hodgkins, Walter Brophy, Thomas Gaydosh, Norimasa Kobayashi, Hiroo Yamaoka
Abstract Current vehicle acoustic performance prediction methods, CAE (computer aided engineering) or physical testing, have some difficulty predicting interior sound in the mid-frequency range (300 to 1000 Hz). It is in this frequency range where the overall acoustic performance becomes sensitive to not only the contributions of structure-borne sources, which can be studied using traditional finite element analysis (FEA) methods, but also the contribution of airborne noise sources which increase proportional to frequency. It is in this higher frequency range (>1000 Hz) that physical testing and statistical CAE methods are traditionally used for performance studies. This paper will discuss a study that was undertaken to test the capability of a finite element modeling method that can accurately simulate air-borne noise phenomena in the mid-frequency range.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1673
Long Chen, Shuwei Zhang, Mingyuan Bian, Yugong Luo, Keqiang Li
Abstract The in-wheel-motor (IWM) drive system has some interesting features, such as the vibration of this structure at low velocity. An explanation of this phenomenon is given in this paper by considering the dynamics performance of the in-wheel motor drive system under small slip ratio conditions. Firstly, a frequency response function (FRF) is deduced for the drive system that is composed of a dynamic tire model and a simplified motor model. Furthermore, an equation between the resonance velocity with the parameters of the drive system is obtained by combining the resonance frequency of this drive system with the fundamental frequency of the motor. The correctness of the equation is demonstrated through simulations and experimental tests on different road surfaces. The impact of different parameters on the vibration can be explained by this equation, which can give the engineer some instructions to design a control method to avoid this feature.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1668
Hideki Fukudome
Abstract This study analyzed the longitudinal vibration of a vehicle body and unsprung mass. Calculations and tests verified that longitudinal vibration can be reduced using in-wheel motors, which generate torque very quickly. Despite increasing demand for measures to enhance ride comfort considering longitudinal vibration, this type of vibration cannot be absorbed or controlled using a conventional suspension. This paper describes the reduction of vehicle longitudinal vibration that cannot be controlled by conventional actuators.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1680
Suresh Abasaheb Patil, Indrajit Dinkar More
Abstract This paper incorporates the on-road real time ride comfort testing and simulation analysis of the typical passenger cars. The main objective is to analyze the vibrations to the passenger’s seat through the irregularities on road surface. This analysis is carried out with the help state-of-the-art of FFT analyzer for different classes of passenger car for variety of road conditions which have been validated by simulation analysis in the 20-Sim simulation software.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1678
Etsuo Katsuyama, Ayana Omae
Abstract Vehicles equipped with in-wheel motors (IWMs) are capable of independent control of the driving force at each wheel. These vehicles can also control the motion of the sprung mass by driving force distribution using the suspension reaction force generated by IWM drive. However, one disadvantage of IWMs is an increase in unsprung mass. This has the effect of increasing vibrations in the 4 to 8 Hz range, which is reported to be uncomfortable to vehicle occupants, thereby reducing ride comfort. This research aimed to improve ride comfort through driving force control. Skyhook damper control is a typical ride comfort control method. Although this control is generally capable of reducing vibration around the resonance frequency of the sprung mass, it also has the trade-off effect of worsening vibration in the targeted mid-frequency 4 to 8 Hz range. This research aimed to improve mid-frequency vibration by identifying the cause of this adverse effect through the equations of motion.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0220
Ban Gu, Xiaohong Yuan
Abstract With great development of thermoelectric exhaust heat recovery technology, more and more attention has been paid to optimization of automotive thermoelectric generators (ATEGs). A lot of work has been done on optimization of flow field and thermal analysis. However, investigation on acoustic optimization is rather limited. In this paper, efforts have been paid to study the acoustic performance of a flat-plate TEG, and the feasibility of integration of automotive exhaust thermoelectric generator with muffler was discussed. The internal configuration of heat exchanger looks like “fishbone”. Four factors have been taken into consideration: the spacing of two fins, angle of the fins, the diameter of inlet and outlet of exchanger; and filling sound absorbing material in heat exchanger chamber. Based on these four factors, acoustic analysis was carried out.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0249
Balashunmuganathan Vasanth, Kumar Sathish, Murali Govindarajalu, Mohsin Khan
In recent years reducing the automobile HVAC (Heating Ventilation and automobile conditioning) noise inside the vehicle cabin is one of the main criterions for all OEMs to provide comfort level to the passengers. The primary function of the HVAC is to deliver more air to the cabin with less noise generation for various blower speeds. Designing the optimum HVAC with less noise is one of the major challenges for all automotive manufacturers and HVAC suppliers. During the design stage, physical parts are not available and hence the simulation technique helps to evaluate the noise level of HVAC. In this study, a computational 1D (one dimensional) analysis is carried out to compute the airflow noise originated from the HVAC unit and propagated to the passenger cabin. Modeling has been done using unigraphics and the analysis is carried out using the commercial 1D software GT suite.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0277
Xingxing Feng, Kaimin Zhuo, Jinglai Wu, Vikas Godara, Yunqing Zhang
Abstract Interval inverse problems can be defined as problems to estimate input through given output, where the input and output are interval numbers. Many problems in engineering can be formulated as inverse problems like vehicle suspension design. Interval metrics, instead of deterministic metrics, are used for the suspension design of a vehicle vibration model with five degrees of freedom. The vibration properties of a vehicle vibration model are described by reasonable intervals and the suspension interval parameters are to be solved. A new interval inverse analysis method, which is a combination of Chebyshev inclusion function and optimization algorithm such as multi-island genetic algorithm, is presented and used for the suspension design of a vehicle vibration model with six conflicting objective functions. The interval design of suspension using such an interval inverse analysis method is shown and validated, and some useful conclusions are reached.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0632
Domenico Crescenzo, Viktor Olsson, Javier Arco Sola, Hongwen Wu, Andreas Cronhjort, Eric Lycke, Oskar Leufven, Ola Stenlaas
Abstract Due to demanding legislation on exhaust emissions for internal combustion engines and increasing fuel prices, automotive manufacturers have focused their efforts on optimizing turbocharging systems. Turbocharger system control optimization is difficult: Unsteady flow conditions combined with not very accurate compressor maps make the real time turbocharger rotational speed one of the most important quantities in the optimization process. This work presents a methodology designed to obtain the turbocharger rotational speed via vibration analysis. Standard knock sensors have been employed in order to achieve a robust and accurate, yet still a low-cost solution capable of being mounted on-board. Results show that the developed method gives an estimation of the turbocharger rotational speed, with errors and accuracy acceptable for the proposed application. The method has been evaluated on a heavy duty diesel engine.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0643
Jian Zhang, Changwen Liu, Fengrong Bi, Yiqiang Pei, Xiaobo Bi
Abstract Knock threshold detection is the key of closed loop control of ignition in gasoline engine, and it is also the difficult point in knock measurement. In this paper, an investigation of knock detection in turbocharged gasoline engine using bispectrum slice and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) based on the engine cylinder head vibration signals is presented. By adding some finite amplitude Gaussian white noises to the signal, EEMD keeps the signal continuous in different time span, and therefore the mode mixing inhering in the classical empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method is alleviated. Power spectrum density (PSD) estimation is used to determine the band range of the resonance frequency generated by knock component. EEMD is used to decompose the original signals, the time-frequency characteristics of the Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) are analyzed using Continues Wavelet Transform (CWT) due to its excellent time-frequency resolution.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0513
Yohei Miki, Hisao Futamata, Masahiko Inoue, Masashi Takekoshi, Kohbun Yamada
Abstract Unexpected noise may occur around air intake manifold when the throttle valve is quickly opened. In order to solve this problem, mesh is often mounted into the air flow between the intake manifold and the throttle body. In this study the effect of mesh design on the noise reduction was investigated. Several designs of the mesh were tested with an actual automobile and the developed test equipment taking advantage of an intake manifold unit, and the noise attenuation was discussed with measuring the noise and observation of the mesh deformation. Based on those experiments, the mesh design for noise reduction was optimized. Furthermore integration of mesh and rubber gasket was examined. Finally, rubber mesh-gaskets which provide sealing and noise attenuation for air intake has been proposed in this study.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0517
Kentaro Kimura, Ryoji Habuchi, Tetsuya Kono, Tadashi Mori, Kaname Arimizu
Abstract To reduce cabin noise and vehicle weight (for lower fuel consumption), a lightweight soundproofing cover was developed as a countermeasure to sources of noise, using the Biot theory (vibration propagation theory in poroelastic materials). This report also presents the results of its application to a metal belt-type continuously variable transmission (CVT) used in Toyota Motor Corporation’s 2.0L vehicles.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1432
Alexander Siefert
Abstract Predicting the vibration comfort is a difficult challenge in seat design. There is a broad range of requirements as the load cases strongly vary, representing different excitation levels, e.g. cobblestones or California roads. Another demand is the driver expectation, which is different for a pickup and a sports car. There are several approaches for assessing the vibrations of occupants while driving. One approach is the evaluation of comfort by integral quantities like the SEAT value, taking into account a weighting based on the human body sensitivity. Another approach is the dimension of perception developed by BMW, which is similar to psychoacoustics as the frequency range is separated with respect to occurring vibration phenomena. The seat transmissibility is in the focus of all activities. In the frequency range it defines the relation between the input at the seat slides and the output at the interface of human body and trim.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1378
Takanori Ide, Kentaro Toda, Yasunori Futamura, Tetsuya Sakurai
Abstract Efficient method to solve large-scale eigenvalue problem in vibration is presented. NVH (Noise, Vibration and Harshness) performance is an important quality measure of vehicles. Therefore, the reduction of vibration is one of the key considerations of new automatic transmission design. In addition, reduction of product design time is another important requirement. Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) is becoming a more important methodology to reduce product design time. However, computational time of eigenvalue problem takes long. We propose parallel eigenvalue computation (Sakurai-Sugiura method) for large-scale eigenvalue problems. This method has a good parallel scalability according to a hierarchical structure of the method. As the demonstrative problem, we consider large-scale computation of eigenvalue problem for AISIN AW FWD automatic transmission.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1375
Masahiro Ueda, Satoshi Ito, Daichi Suzuki
Abstract Ride quality is an important purchasing consideration for consumers. It is typically defined in terms of noise, vibration and harshness. These phenomena are a result of vibrations caused at the engine/powertrain and from the road surface, which are transmitted to the passenger cabin. To minimize such vibrations, rubber parts are used extensively at mounting points for the cabin, such as engine mountings and suspension bushings. The vehicle development process increasingly requires performance testing, including rubber parts using CAE, prior to prototype evaluation. This in turn requires a rubber material model that can accurately describe dynamic characteristics of rubber components, particularly frequency and amplitude dependency.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1395
Syed F. Haider, Zissimos Mourelatos
Abstract To improve fuel economy, there is a trend in automotive industry to use light weight, high strength materials. Automotive body structures are composed of several panels which must be downsized to reduce weight. Because this affects NVH (Noise, Vibration and Harshness) performance, engineers are challenged to recover the lost panel stiffness from down-gaging in order to improve the structure borne noise transmitted through the lightweight panels in the frequency range of 100-300 Hz where most of the booming and low medium frequency noise occurs. The loss in performance can be recovered by optimized panel geometry using beading or damping treatment. Topography optimization is a special class of shape optimization for changing sheet metal shapes by introducing beads. A large number of design variables can be handled and the process is easy to setup in commercial codes. However, optimization methods are computationally intensive because of repeated full-order analyses.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1294
Jonggyu Kim, Pyoung Beom Kim, YoungChan Lee, Sunghee Jung, Byeong-Ug Choi
Abstract This study presents the NVH characteristics of a passenger vehicle with a three-cylinder engine and a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT) and an optimization procedure to achieve balance between fuel economy and NVH. The goal of this study is to improve fuel economy by extending the lock-up area of the damper clutch at low vehicle speed and to minimize booming noise and body vibration caused by the direct connection of the engine and transmission. Resonance characteristics of the chassis systems and driveline have been studied and optimized by the experiment. NVH behavior of the vehicle body structure is investigated and modifications for refinement of booming and body vibration are proposed by simulation using MSC NASTRAN. Calibration parameters for CVT control are optimized for fuel economy and NVH.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1301
Shishuo Sun, David W. Herrin, John Baker
Abstract One of the more useful metrics to characterize the high frequency performance of an isolator is insertion loss. Insertion loss is defined as the difference in transmitted vibration in decibels between the non-isolated and isolated cases. Insertion loss takes into account the compliance on the source and receiver sides. Accordingly, it has some advantages over transmissibility especially at higher frequencies. In the current work, the transfer matrix of a spring isolator is determined using finite element simulation. A static analysis is performed first to preload the isolator so that stress stiffening is accounted for. This is followed by modal and forced response analyses to identify the transfer matrix of the isolator. In this paper, the insertion loss of spring isolators is examined as a function of several geometric parameters including the spring diameter, wire diameter, and number of active coils.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1300
Jacob Milhorn, Vincent Rovedatti, Richard DeJong, Gordon Ebbitt
Abstract Road tests on a pickup truck have been conducted to determine the acoustic loads on the back panel surfaces of the vehicle. Surface mounted pressure transducers arrays are used to measure both the turbulent flow pressures and the acoustic pressures. These measurements are used to determine the spatial excitation parameters used in an SEA model of the transmission loss through the back panel surfaces. Comparisons are made between tests on different road surfaces and at different speeds to identify the relative contributions of acoustic and wind noise.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1303
Haiqing Xu, Chang Jin, Hong Zhou, Yi Zhou
Abstract On the study of reducing the disturbance on driver’s attention induced by low frequency vehicle interior stationary noise, a subjective evaluation is firstly carried out by means of rank rating method which introduces Distraction Level (DL) as evaluation index. A visual-finger response test is developed to help evaluating members better recognize the Distraction Level during the evaluation. A non-linear back propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) is then modeled for the prediction of subjective Distraction Level, in which linear sound pressure RMS amplitudes of five Critical Band Rates (CBRs) from 20 to 500Hz are selected as inputs of the model. These inputs comprise an input vector of BPANN. Furthermore, active noise equalization (ANE) on DL is realized based on Filtered-x Least Mean Square (FxLMS) algorithm that controls the gain coefficients of inputs of trained BPANN.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1295
Atsushi Itoh, ZongGuang Wang, Toshikazu Nosaka, Keita Wada
Abstract Without engine noise, the cabin of an electric vehicle is quiet, but on the other hand, it becomes easy to perceive refrigerant-induced noise in the automotive air-conditioning (A/C) system. When determining the A/C system at the design stage, it is crucial to verify whether refrigerant-induced noise occurs in the system or not before the real A/C systems are made. If refrigerant-induced noise almost never occurs during the design stage, it is difficult to evaluate by vehicle testing at the development stage. This paper presents a 1D modeling methodology for the assessment of refrigerant-induced noise such as self-excitation noise generated by pressure pulsation through the thermal expansion valve (TXV). The GT-SUITE commercial code was used to develop a refrigerant cycle model consisting of a compressor, condenser, evaporator, TXV and the connecting pipe network.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1296
Yuntao Cao, Dengfeng Wang, Tonghang Zhao, Xining Liu, Chao Li, Hangsheng Hou
Abstract Noise excitation sources are different between electric vehicles and conventional vehicles due to their distinct propulsion system architecture. This work focuses on an interior noise contribution analysis by experimental measurements and synthesis approach using a methodology established based on the principle of noise path analysis. The obtained results show that the structure-borne noise from the tire-road excitation acts as a major contributor to the overall interior noise level, and the structure-borne noise from the power plant system contributes noticeably as well, whereas contributions from the electric motor and tire are relatively insignificant.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1299
Robert S. Ballinger
Abstract The complex eigenvalue analysis has been used by the brake research community to study friction-induced squeal in automotive disk brake assemblies. The analysis process uses a nonlinear static pre-stressed normal modes analysis simulation sequence followed by a complex eigenvalue extraction algorithm to determine the dynamic instabilities. When brake hardware exists, good correlation between analysis results and experimental data can be obtained. Consequently, complex eigenvalue analysis can be a valuable method in an effort to understand brake components that might have a propensity to influence the noise behavior of a brake system. However, when hardware does not exist and the complex eigenvalue method is asked to be predictive, it becomes a difficult, if not impossible task. This paper will focus on some of the reasons the complex eigenvalue analysis method is not a reliable predictor of friction-induced squeal in automotive disk brake assemblies.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1298
Shukai Yang, Zuokui Sun, Yingjie Liu, Bingwu Lu, Tao Liu, Hangsheng Hou
Abstract This work carries out complex modal analyses and optimizations to resolve an 1800 Hz front brake squeal issue encountered in a vehicle program development phase. The stability theory of complex modes for brake squeal simulation is briefly explained. A brake system finite element model is constructed, and the model is validated by the measurement in accordance with the SAE 2521 procedure. The key parameters for evaluating the stability of the brake system complex modes are determined. The modal contributions of relevant components to unstable modes are analyzed and ranked. Finally, in order to resolve the squeal issue, the design improvements of rotor, caliper and pad are proposed and numerical simulations are carried out. The obtained results demonstrate that the optimized rotor and pad design can alleviate the squeal issue significantly while the optimized clipper design could essentially eliminate the squeal issue.
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