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Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Augusto Medeiros, Tiago Macarios, Gregorio Azevedo, Bryce Gardner
Abstract Transmission loss (TL) is a common metric for the comparison of the acoustic performance of mufflers. Muffler TL can be computed from a Boundary Element Method (BEM) model. Perforated tube elements are commonly used in automotive muffler applications. These can be modeled with a detailed BEM model that includes each individual hole in the perforated tube. The main drawback with such a straightforward BEM approach is that the discretionary of the perforated surfaces can result in computationally expensive models. The current work uses an approach that is a more computationally-efficient, yet, precise way of modeling complex mufflers that contain perforated surfaces with BEM. In this approach, instead of explicitly modeling the perforations explicitly they are taken into account as equivalent transfer impedances. There are several models in the literature that can be used to develop the transfer impedance model of the perforated surface. This paper investigates how these models can be used in a BEM prediction and also how one needs to be careful in selecting the cases used to evaluate the models.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Kasper Steen Andersen, Fuyang Liu
The tailpipe noise from an aftertreatment system must comply with legislation and meet customer expectations. The approach to capture the influence of complicated geometries and the ceramic substrates included in full aftertreatment systems (ATS) is implemented by coupling the 1D analytical solution of the substrates with the 3D FEM solution. The simulations are verified with measurements in a flow acoustic test rig.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Antti Hynninen, Mats Abom
Abstract The after treatment devices (ATD) used in internal combustion engine (IC-engine) exhaust systems are mainly designed with emphasis on emission control, i.e. chemical efficiency, while paying less attention to the acoustic performance. In automotive applications, the duct diameters are so small that studying the acoustic wave propagation only in the plane wave frequency range is usually sufficient. In the case of medium speed IC-engines, used for example in power plants and ships, the three dimensional acoustic phenomena must also be taken into account. The main elements of the medium speed IC-engine ATD are the selective catalytic reducer (SCR) and oxidation catalyst (OC), which are based on a large amount of coated channels, i.e. the substrates. The number and type of the substrates depends not only on the regional environment legislations but also on the engine type. In this study the acoustic attenuation of a medium speed IC-engine ATD is simulated and the results are compared with measurements.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Dennis Bönnen, Djahanchah Bamdad-Soufi, Hannes Steinkilberg, Kwin Abram
Abstract In recent years the automotive industry has been using an increasing number of high powered engines with fewer cylinders, with the goal to reduce weight and fuel consumption and hence to achieve lower CO2 emissions. In the following paper, an overview about the currently existing methods and products within the exhaust development is given which follow automotive lightweight trend. Continuous innovations in new materials, structural design and manufacturing process as well as mastering the integration of the components and modules within the system with a thorough understanding and optimization of the system behavior is enabling the reduction of weight in exhaust system. Another possibility to reduce the weight is the use of additional components such as valves. In the following, a discussion about the different types of valves is presented. These valves can be implemented within the exhaust system in order to bring a constraint in the system and consequently additional acoustic damping.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Mahdi Mohammadpour, Ramin Rahmani, Homer Rahnejat
Abstract This paper presents an investigation of Cylinder De-Activation (CDA) technology on the performance of big end bearings. A multi-physics approach is used in order to take into account more realistic dynamic loading effects on the tribological behavior. The power loss, minimum film thickness and maximum temperature of big end bearings have been calculated during maneuver pertaining to the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). Results show that bearing efficiency runs contrary to efficiency gained through combustion and pumping losses. Under CDA mode, the power loss of big end bearings is more than the power loss under engine normal mode. The problem is predominant at higher engine speeds and higher Brake mean Effective Pressures (BMEP) in active cylinders. It is also observed that the minimum film thickness is reduced under the CDA mode. This can affect wear performance. In addition, same behavior is noted for the maximum temperature rise which is higher under CDA.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Roland Sottek, Bernd Philippen
Abstract In the engine development process, the ability to judge NVH comfort as early as possible is a great benefit. The prediction of engine noise on the basis of a prototype engine without the need to install it in a real car significantly speeds up the development process and leads to a cost reduction, as prototype modifications can be evaluated faster. Meaningful predictions of the perceived NVH comfort cannot be achieved just by comparing order levels, but require listening to an auralization of the engine noise at the driver's position. With the methods of Transfer Path Analysis and Synthesis (TPA/TPS) a prototype engine can be virtually installed in a car using test-bench data. The interior noise can be estimated by combining source signals containing near-field airborne noise radiation and mount forces with transfer functions describing the transmission to the target position in the cabin. Even the transfer functions of a predecessor car could be used if the new car body is not yet available.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Arnaud Caillet, Antoine Guellec, Denis Blanchet, Thomas Roy
Abstract Since the last decade, the automotive industry has expressed the need to better understand how the different trim parts interact together in a complete car up to 400 Hz for structureborne excitations. Classical FE methods in which the acoustic trim is represented as non-structural masses (NSM) and high damping or surface absorbers on the acoustic cavity can only be used at lower frequencies and do not provide insights into the interactions of the acoustic trims with the structure and the acoustic volume. It was demonstrated in several papers that modelling the acoustic components using the poroelastic finite element method (PEM) can yield accurate vibro-acoustic response such as transmission loss of a car component [1,2,3]. The increase of performance of today's computers and the further optimization of commercial simulation codes allow computations on full vehicle level [4,5,6] with adequate accuracy and computation times, which is essential for a car OEM. This paper presents a study of a fully trimmed vehicle excited by structureborne excitations with almost all acoustic trims such as seats, dash insulator, instrument panel, headliner… which are modelled as poroelastic finite element (PEM) parts.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Ki-Sang Chae, Seung Hwan Lim, Ji Woo Yoo, Seok-Gil Hong
Abstract Dash panel is the most important path of structure-borne and air-borne interior noise for engine-driven vehicles. Reinforcements, which are added to dash panel, are mainly designed in order to suppress the structure-borne noise contribution from the dash panel. However, the effects of dash reinforcements do not seem clear in the viewpoint of air-borne noise. In this paper, the insulation performance of a dash structure with spot-welded reinforcements is studied through several STL (Sound Transmission Loss) tests and STL simulations. The results of this study could be utilized for increasing the sound insulation performance of vehicle body structure.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Rebecca Cowles, Andrew Shives, Daniel Rauchholz
Abstract To satisfy the increased expectations of customers, engineers are challenged to increase fuel economy while also improving noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) performance. In order to improve fuel economy, engine compartment designs have become more compact with reduced air flow. Elevated temperatures caused by these designs can degrade the durability and acoustic performance of the fibrous acoustic insulator material. A typical method for protecting insulators from elevated temperatures is to apply an aluminum foil patch to the surface. However, foil patches can restrict the insulator's ability to absorb sound and can be difficult to apply to complex part shapes. Foil patches can be perforated to allow the insulator to absorb sound, but there is a cost penalty as well as potential for long term performance degradation due to blocked perforations. Since NVH targets are also increasing, it's important to maximize the benefit of each part. Given these performance challenges, a heat reflective coating (HRC) has been developed as a cost effective alternative to perforated foils.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Matteo Kirchner, Eugene Nijman
Abstract Automotive industry is becoming more and more interested in assessing the noise of electric motors, since their integration in many types of road vehicles is rapidly growing in a market oriented to hybridization and electrification. The acoustic characterization of an electric motor is often being performed numerically, having as consequence the fact that the investigation is confined to one specific model belonging to one particular type of motor. This paper proposes an experimental airborne sound characterization methodology, suitable for any type of cylindrical source, based on a set of data acquired following a cylindrical Nearfield Acoustical Holography (NAH) scheme. Such an approach allows the evaluation of sound intensity, as well as pressure level and particle velocity. Practical aspects of cylindrical holography such as positioning error, background noise, hologram distance, spatial sampling, measurement aperture are investigated and discussed with the aid of numerical examples.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Janko Slavic, Martin Cesnik, Miha Boltezar
Abstract Car components are exposed to the random/harmonic/impact excitation which can result in component failure due to vibration fatigue. The stress and strain loads do depend on local stress concentration effects and also on the global structural dynamics properties. Standardized fatigue testing is long-lasting, while the dynamic fatigue testing can be much faster; however, the dynamical changes due to fatigue are usually not taken into account and therefore the identified fatigue and structural parameters can be biased. In detail: damage accumulation results in structural changes (stiffness, damping) which are hard to measure in real time; further, structural changes change the dynamics of the loaded system and without taking this changes into account the fatigue load in the stress concentration zone can change significantly (even if the excitation remains the same). This research presents a new approach for accelerated vibration testing of real structures. The new approach bases on phase locked harmonic excitation and can be used for identification of natural frequencies and damping while the damage due to vibration is being accumulated.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Giorgio Veronesi, Christopher Albert, Eugène Nijman, Jan Rejlek, Arnaud Bocquillet
Abstract In many application fields, such as automotive and aerospace, the full FE Biot model has been widely applied to vibro-acoustics problems involving poro-elastic materials in order to predict their structural and acoustic performance. The main drawback of this approach is however the large computational burden and the uncertainty of the input data (Biot parameters) that may lead to less accurate prediction. In order to overcome these disadvantages industry is asking for more efficient techniques. The vibro-acoustic behaviour of structures coupled with poroelastic trims and fluid cavities can be predicted by means of the Patch Transfer Function (PTF) approach. The PTF is a sub-structuring procedure that allows for coupling different sub-systems via impedance relations determined at their common interfaces. The coupling surfaces are discretised into elementary areas called patches. Since the patch impedances can be determined in either computational or experimental manner, the PTF approach offers full modularity.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Vishal Parmar, Daniele Di Rocco, Martin Sopouch, Philippe Albertini
Abstract Over the past 30 years, simulation of the N&V (Noise and Vibration) behaviour of automotive drivelines became an integral part of the powertrain development process. With current and future HEVs (Hybrid-Electrical Vehicles), additional phenomena and effects have entered the scene and need to be taken into account during layout/design as well as optimization phase. Beside effects directly associated with the e-components (namely electric whistle and whine), torque changes caused by activation/deactivation of the e-machine give rise to vibration issues (e.g. driveline shuffle or clonk) as well. This is in particular true for transient operation conditions like boosting and recuperation. Moreover, aspects of starting the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) using the built-in e-machine in conjunction with the dynamic behaviour of torsional decoupling devices become increasingly important. In order to cope with above-mentioned effects a multi-physics simulation approach is required. The following paper proposes a simulation approach that incorporates the domains of the ICE thermodynamics, the mechanical driveline system, the electric components, the vehicle, as well as the fundamental control functions.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Joël Perret-Liaudet, Alexandre Carbonelli, Emmanuel Rigaud, Brice Nelain, Pascal Bouvet, C. Jacques Vialonga
Abstract The main source of excitation in gearboxes is generated by the meshing process, which generates vibration transmitted to the casings through shafts and bearings. Casing vibration generates leads to acoustic radiation (whining noise). It is usually assumed that the transmission error and variation of the gear mesh stiffness are the dominant excitation mechanisms. These excitations result from tooth deflection and tooth micro-geometries (voluntary profile modifications and manufacturing errors). For real cases, the prediction of noise induced by the Static Transmission Error (STE) remains a difficult problem. In this work, an original calculation procedure is implemented by using a finite element method and taking into account the parametric excitations and their coupling (Spectral Iterative Method, developed by the Ecole Centrale de Lyon). The procedure is based on a modal approach developed in the frequency domain, particularly efficient to analyze systems having many degrees of freedom.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Zoran Radmilovic, Josef Zehetner, Daniel Watzenig
Abstract Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) with a power-split system offer a variety of possibilities in reduction of CO2 emissions and fuel consumption. Power-split systems use a planetary gear sets to create a strong mechanical coupling between the internal combustion engine, the generator and the electric motor. This concept offers rather low oscillations and therefore passive damping components are not needed. Nevertheless, during acceleration or because of external disturbances, oscillations which are mostly influenced by the ICE, can still occur which leads to a drivability and performance downgrade. This paper proposes a design of an active damping control system which uses the electric motor to suppress those oscillations instead of handling them within the ICE control unit. The control algorithm is implemented as part of an existing hybrid controller without any additional hardware introduced. Because the system is rather slow and acting upon detection of oscillations has no reasonable effect, the controller has to predict the future behavior and the torque distribution in the drive-train.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Matthias Frank, Franz Zotter, Alois Sontacchi, Stephan Brandl, Christian Kranzler
Abstract When employing in-car active sound generation (ASG) and active noise cancellation (ANC), the accurate knowledge of the vehicle interior sound pressure distribution in magnitude as well as phase is paramount. Revisiting the ANC concept, relevant boundary conditions in spatial sound fields will be addressed. Moreover, within this study the controllability and observability requirements in case of ASG and ANC were examined in detail. This investigation focuses on sound pressure measurements using a 24 channel microphone array at different heights near the head of the driver. A shaker at the firewall and four loudspeakers of an ordinary in-car sound system have been investigated in order to compare their sound fields. Measurements have been done for different numbers of passengers, with and without a dummy head and real person on the driver seat. Transfer functions have been determined with a log-swept sine technique. According to the measurements, the shape of the sound field produced by the shaker is more balanced than one produced by the loudspeakers, albeit the shaker's frequency response is limited to low frequencies.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Ze Zhou, Jonathan Jacqmot, Gai Vo Thi, ChanHee Jeong, Kang-Duck Ih
Abstract The NVH study of trimmed vehicle body is essential in improving the passenger comfort and optimizing the vehicle weight. Efficient modal finite-element approaches are widely used in the automotive industry for investigating the frequency response of large vibro-acoustic systems involving a body structure coupled to an acoustic cavity. In order to accurately account for the localized and frequency-dependant damping mechanism of the trim components, a direct physical approach is however preferred. Thus, a hybrid modal-physical approach combines both efficiency and accuracy for large trimmed body analysis. Dynamic loads and exterior acoustic loads can then be applied on the trimmed body model in order to evaluate the transfer functions between these loads and the acoustic response in the car compartment. The scenario study of installing different trim components into the vehicle provides information on the acoustic absorption and dynamic damping with regard to added vehicle weight by the trim.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Rainer Stelzer, Theophane Courtois, Ki-Sang Chae, Daewon SEO, Seok-Gil Hong
Abstract The assessment of the Transmission Loss (TL) of vehicle components at Low-Mid Frequencies generally raises difficulties associated to the physical mechanisms of the noise transmission through the automotive panel. As far as testing is concerned, it is common in the automotive industry to perform double room TL measurements of component baffled cut-outs, while numerical methods are rather applied when prototype or hardware variants are not available. Indeed, in the context of recent efforts for reduction of vehicle prototypes, the use of simulation is constantly challenged to deliver reliable means of decision during virtual design phase. While the Transfer matrix method is commonly and conveniently used at Mid-High frequencies for the calculation of a trimmed panel, the simulation of energy transfer at low frequencies must take into account modal interactions between the vehicle component and the acoustic environment. After providing a brief review of the established approaches for TL simulation at LF, the article will present a new FE methodology for TL simulation and introduce the advantages of “in-situ” TL simulations by means of fluid-structure FE calculation.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Gregor Koners, Ralf Lehmann
Abstract Low interior noise levels in combination with a comfortable sound is an important task for passenger cars. Due to the reduction of many noise sources over the last decades, nowadays tire-road noise has become one of the dominant sources for the interior noise. Especially for manufactures of luxury cars, the reduction of tire-road noise is a big challenge and therefore a central part of NVH development. The knowledge of the noise transmission behavior based on the characteristics of the relevant sources is a fundamental of a modern NVH - development process. For tire-road noise the source characteristics can be described by wheel forces and radiated airborne noise. In combination with the related vehicle transfer functions it is possible to describe the noise transmission behavior in detail. A method for estimating wheel forces and radiated airborne noise is presented. The method is based on TPA (= Transfer Path Analysis) via matrix inversion and involves the measurement of the vehicle transfer functions.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Gregor Tanner, David J. Chappell, Dominik Löchel, Niels Søndergaard
Abstract Modelling the vibro-acoustic properties of mechanical built-up structures is a challenging task, especially in the mid to high frequency regime, even with the computational resources available today. Standard modelling tools for complex vehicle parts include finite and boundary element methods (FEM and BEM), as well as Multi-Body Simulations (MBS). These methods are, however, robust only in the low frequency regime. In particular, FEM is not scalable to higher frequencies due to the prohibitive increase in model size. We have recently developed a new method called Discrete Flow Mapping (DFM), which extends existing high frequency methods, such as Statistical Energy Analysis or the so-called Dynamical Energy Analysis (DEA), to work on meshed structures. It provides for the first time detailed spatial information about the vibrational energy of a whole built-up structure of arbitrary complexity in this frequency range. The response of small-scale features and coupling coefficients between sub-components are obtained through local FEM models integrated in the global DFM treatment.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Dirk Mayer, Jonathan Militzer, Thilo Bein
Abstract The automotive industry is aiming at both reducing the weight of the vehicles while improving a high level of comfort. This causes contradicting requirements for the systems used for noise and vibration control. Thus, active systems are investigated which may enhance the performance of passive noise and vibration control in vehicles without adding excessive weight. In this paper, basic principles for the implementations of those systems with a focus on the control systems are reviewed. Examples from implementations in automotive applications are presented, including control of engine vibrations, structure borne noise transmitted from the road into the passenger compartment and low-frequency chassis vibrations. Based on adaptive filter systems already widely used in active noise control adaptation of the control algorithms to the specific application scenarios are discussed. This includes different configurations for feedforward and feedback control, single- and multichannel control systems and the utilization of different actuator concepts like active mounts, inertial mass actuators and active tuned absorbers, as well as different control sensors like accelerometers and microphones.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Ashish Shah, David Lennström, Per-Olof Sturesson, William Easterling
Abstract The increased focus and demands on the reduction of fuel consumption and CO2 requires the automotive industry to develop and introduce new and more energy efficient powertrain concepts. The extensive utilisation of downsizing concepts, such as boosting, leads to significant challenges in noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) integration. This is in conflict with the market expectation on the vehicle's acoustic refinement, which plays an increasingly important role in terms of product perception, especially in the premium or luxury segment. The introduction of the twin charger boosting system, i.e. combining super and turbo charging devices, enables downsizing/speeding in order to achieve improved fuel economy as well as short time-to-torque, while maintaining high driving dynamics. This concept requires also extensive consideration to NVH integration. The NVH challenges when integrating a roots type supercharger are very extensive. The high frequency source characteristics of the supercharger result in complex wave propagation inside the intake duct system since exciting pulsation orders are well above duct cut-on frequencies.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Daniel Fernandez Comesana, Emiel Tijs, Daewoon Kim
Abstract For (benchmark) tests it is not only useful to study the acoustic performance of the whole vehicle, but also to assess separate components such as the engine. Reflections inside the engine bay bias the acoustic radiation estimated with sound pressure based solutions. Consequently, most current methods require dismounting the engine from the car and installing it in an anechoic room to measure the sound emitted. However, this process is laborious and hard to perform. In this paper, two particle velocity based methods are proposed to characterize the sound radiated from an engine while it is still installed in the car. Particle velocity sensors are much less affected by reflections than sound pressure microphones when the measurements are performed near a radiating surface due to the particle velocity's vector nature, intrinsic dependency upon surface displacement and directivity of the sensor. Therefore, the engine does not have to be disassembled, which saves time and money. An array of special high temperature particle velocity probes is used to measure the radiation simultaneously at many positions near the engine of a compact class car.
Article
2014-06-20
Omega’s PR-21 series of RTD (resistance temperature detector) sensors with M12 connector feature a welded 316L stainless steel housing and an integral 4-pin M12 connector for easy connection.
Article
2014-06-12
The cause of the issue was an error in the process Ford engineers used to correlate wind-tunnel testing into their Total Road Load Horsepower (TRLHP) factor that is key to the vehicle fuel economy models that are ultimately submitted to the U.S. EPA.
Article
2014-06-11
Reaction Design worked with a German premium automotive company to build cylinder-combustion simulations for a high-performance diesel engine with the goal of accurately and quickly predicting combustion performance and the effects of varied operating conditions on soot emissions.
Standard
2014-06-06
Description of Material—The materials classified under this specification are: a. Mastic vibration damping materials used to reduce the sound emanating from metal panels. b. Mastic underbody coatings used to give protection and some vibration damping to motor vehicle underbodies, fenders, and other parts.
Article
2014-06-03
The LC411-USBH series high-speed USB load cells from Omega connect directly to your computer and offer up to 1000 readings per second.
Article
2014-05-31
Hexagon Metrology’s Leica T-Scan 5 handheld system for laser trackers is said to operate more than 15 times faster than the previous model.
Article
2014-05-30
PCB Piezotronics’ surface microphone for R&D testing features a low-profile design ideal for testing in confined spaces and windy environments.
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