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Viewing 61 to 90 of 8653
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Jan Hendrik Elm, Jens Viehöfer, Jan-Welm Biermann
Abstract The automotive industry permanently enhances Downsizing concepts due to environmental commitments and energy consumption concerns. Even in the category of city- and supermini-cars, great efforts are made for the development of highly charged engines with small displacement. So far the main focus of these developments is set on the reduction of CO2 emissions and fuel consumption. However these are not the only aspects, which have to be fulfilled by the vehicle in order to meet the demands of the customers and to be successful in competition. The NVH characteristics of such Downsizing vehicles have to match a class-specific level, which can only be achieved by additional measures. Regarding this, a view of the dynamic behavior of the entire vehicle is required. At the Institut für Kraftfahrwesen Aachen (ika) the potential for reducing fuel consumption and CO2 emissions of a Downsizing concept is investigated using a city-car as reference. For this purpose, among other things, the three-cylinder-engine of the reference car is replaced by a highly charged two-cylinder-engine with same power output but smaller displacement.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Alexander Ulz, Alfred Rust, Bernhard Graf, Alois Sontacchi
Abstract Due to future directives of the European Union regarding fuel consumption and CO2 emissions the automotive industry is forced to develop new and unconventional technologies. These include for example stop-start-systems, cylinder deactivation or even reduction of the number of cylinders which however lead to unusual acoustical perceptions and customer complaints. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the sound character of engines with low numbers of cylinders (2 and 3 cylinders) and also the differences to the character of the more common 4-cylinder engines. Psychoacoustic parameters are used to describe and understand the differences. Based on the gained knowledge possible potentials for improvement can be derived in the future. The used data base consists of artificial head recordings of car interior noise according to defined driving conditions measured on the AVL test track. Naturally, there are more recordings available for 4-cylinder engines than for 2- and 3-cylinder engines.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Alois Sontacchi, Matthias Frank, Franz Zotter, Christian Kranzler, Stephan Brandl
Abstract Today, the number of downsized engines with two or three cylinders is increasing due to an increase in fuel efficiency. However, downsized engines exhibit unbalanced interior sound in the range of their optimal engine speed, largely because of their dominant engine orders. In particular, the sound of two-cylinder engines yields half the perceived engine speed of an equivalent four-cylinder engine at the same engine speed. As a result when driving, the two-cylinder engine would be shifted to higher gears much later, diminishing the expected fuel savings. This contribution presents an active in-car sound generation system that makes a two-cylinder engine sound like the more familiar four-cylinder engine. This is done by active, load-dependent playback of signals extracted from the engine vibration through a shaker mounted on the firewall. A blind test with audio experts indicates a significant reduction of the engine speed when shifting to a higher gear. In the blind test, experts favored the interior sound of the proposed sound generation system and perceived better interaction with the vehicle.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Hiromichi Tsuji, Satoshi Takabayashi, Eiji Takahashi, Hitoshi Murakami, Shinichi Maruyama
A finite element (FE) model of vibro-acoustic coupling analysis, such as a vehicle noise and vibration, is utilized for the improvement of the performance in the vehicle development phase. However, the accuracy of the analysis is not enough for substituting a prototype phase with a digital phase in the product development phases. Therefore, conducting the experiments with the prototype vehicle or the existed production vehicle is still very important for the performance evaluation and the model validation. The vehicle noise transfer function of the road noise performance cannot be evaluated with the existed excitation equipment, such as the 3 or 6 directional electromagnetic shaker. Therefore, this paper proposes new experimental method to measure the road noise vehicle transfer function. This method is based on the reciprocity between the tire contact patch and the driver's ear location. The reaction force sensor of the tire contact patch is newly developed for the reciprocal loud speaker excitation at the passenger ear location.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Matthias Frank, Franz Zotter, Alois Sontacchi, Stephan Brandl, Christian Kranzler
Abstract When employing in-car active sound generation (ASG) and active noise cancellation (ANC), the accurate knowledge of the vehicle interior sound pressure distribution in magnitude as well as phase is paramount. Revisiting the ANC concept, relevant boundary conditions in spatial sound fields will be addressed. Moreover, within this study the controllability and observability requirements in case of ASG and ANC were examined in detail. This investigation focuses on sound pressure measurements using a 24 channel microphone array at different heights near the head of the driver. A shaker at the firewall and four loudspeakers of an ordinary in-car sound system have been investigated in order to compare their sound fields. Measurements have been done for different numbers of passengers, with and without a dummy head and real person on the driver seat. Transfer functions have been determined with a log-swept sine technique. According to the measurements, the shape of the sound field produced by the shaker is more balanced than one produced by the loudspeakers, albeit the shaker's frequency response is limited to low frequencies.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Bryce Gardner, Tiago Macarios
Abstract Speech transmissibility is a critical factor in the design of public address systems for passenger cabins in trains, aircraft and coaches. Speech transmissibility is primarily affected by the direct field, early low order reflections, and late reflections (reverberation) of the source. The direct and low order reflections are affected by the relative location of speakers and seats as well as the acoustic properties of the reflecting walls. To properly capture these early reflections, measures of speech transmissibility typically require time domain information. However, another important factor for speech transmissibility is background noise due to broadband exterior sources such as a flow noise sources. The background noise is typically modeled with broadband steady state assumptions such as in statistical energy analysis (SEA). This works presents an efficient method for predicting speech transmissiblity by combining ray tracing with SEA. In this method, the direct field and low order reflections are modelled using raytracing, while the reverberant field and background noise are modelled using SEA.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Yong Che
Abstract As motor assembly of Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) replaces engine system of Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) vehicle, interior structure-borne noise induced by road random excitation becomes more prominent under middle and high speed. The research is focused on central driving type BEV. In order to improve interior noise in middle and low frequency range, dynamic load of BEV body must be identified. Consequently the structural noise induced by road excitation is conducted. The limitations of common identification method for dynamic body load are analyzed. The applied several identification methods are proposed for deterministic dynamic load such as engine or motor. Random dynamic load generated by road excitation is different from deterministic dynamic load. The deterministic load identification method cannot be applied to the random load directly. An identification method of dynamic body load for BEV is presented based on power spectrum decomposition. The procedure of BEV body load identification is described.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Barry M. James, Andreas Hofmann
Abstract The noise performance of fully electric vehicles is essential to ensure that they gain market acceptance. This can be a challenge for several reasons. Firstly, there is no masking from the internal combustion engine. Next, there is pressure to move to cost-efficient motor designs such as Switched Reluctance Motors, which have worse vibro-acoustic behaviour than their Permanent Magnet counterparts. Finally, power-dense, higher speed motors run closer fundamental frequency to the structural resonances of the system [1]. Experience has shown that this challenge is frequently not met. Reputable suppliers have designed and developed their “quiet” subsystems to state of the art levels, only to discover that the assembled E-powertrain is unacceptably noisy. The paper describes the process and arising results for the noise simulation of the complete powertrain. The dynamic properties are efficiently modelled as a complete system and subjected to motor excitation (torque ripple, electro-magnetic forces and rotor imbalance).
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Sameh AFFI
Abstract Many car manufacturers are introducing Stop & Start systems based on conventional ring gear starter, which represents an economical solution without heavy modifications of their existent architectures especially if they consider hybrid technology. However, this solution is unfortunately not very satisfying from NVH point of view. Indeed, customers usually accept a noisy and quite long engine restart when it happens only one time at the kick-off. However, for hybrid vehicles, an inaudible and quick restart is required because it happens without any drivers' demand and thus it may disturb them. In this paper, we focused on NVH analysis of engine restart sequence with conventional ring gear starter. Some solutions were tested in order to optimize restart duration and noise level. Permanently engaged starter and high power starter are two simple and economical solutions that allow reducing significantly both starter noise level and engine restart duration, which makes this technology acceptable for hybrid vehicles.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Albert Albers, Jan Fischer, David Landes, Matthias Behrendt
Abstract The driving comfort is an important factor for buying decisions. Especially for battery electric vehicles (BEV) the acoustic quality is an elementary distinguishing feature, since the masking of an internal combustion engine (ICE) is no longer present. Opposing the importance of the acoustic quality is the lack of knowledge of how to measure and interpret the high frequency noise generated by an electric powertrain with respect to the NVH behavior influencing the passengers [1, 2]. In this contribution a method for measuring and interpreting the transfer path of acoustic phenomena from the drivetrain of a battery electric vehicle into the passenger cabin is presented. Due to the lack of masking by the ICE in case of BEV, high frequency phenomena must be considered as well. In order to determine the airborne transfer function from the electric powertrain to the driver cabin, a dodecahedral speaker is used for reciprocal measurements. Therefore in a first step, the sound power and the emission characteristic of the dodecahedron is investigated in a novel approach by laser scanning vibrometry and by measurements according to DIN EN ISO 3745:2012 [3].
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Jean-Baptiste Dupont, Racha Aydoun, Pascal Bouvet
Abstract The noise radiated by an electrical motor is very different from the one generated by an internal combustion engine. It is characterized by the emergence of high frequency pure tones that can be annoying and badly perceived by future drivers, even if the overall noise level is lower than that of a combustion engine. A simulation methodology has been proposed, consisting in a multi-physical approach to simulate the dynamic forces and noise radiated by electric motors. The principle is first to calculate the excitation due to electromagnetic phenomena (Maxwell forces) using an electromagnetic finite element solver. This excitation is then projected onto the structure mesh of the stator in order to calculate the dynamic response. Finally, the radiated sound power is calculated with the aid of a standard acoustic finite element method. The calculation methodology assumes a weak coupling between the different physical levels. It has been validated by comparison with the experiment.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Albert Albers, Rui Cai, Rainer Spengler, Christian Olfens, Matthias Behrendt
Abstract The driving comfort influences the customer purchase decision; hence it is an important aspect for the vehicle development. To better quantify the comfort level and reduce the experiment costs in the development process, the subjective comfort assessment by test drivers is nowadays more and more replaced by the objective comfort evaluation. Hereby the vibration comfort is described by scalar objective characteristic parameters that correlate with the subjective assessments. The correlation analysis requires the assessments and measurements at different vehicle vibration. To determine the objective parameters regarding the powertrain excitations, most experiments in the previous studies were carried out in several test vehicles with different powertrain units. Due to the different features among test vehicles, the subjective assessments and the objective measurements are influenced by further interfering factors, such as different wheel excitations between vehicles, which lead to an inevitable variance.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Michael Klanner, Mathias Mair, Franz Diwoky, Oszkar Biro, Katrin Ellermann
Abstract The noise vibration and harshness (NVH) simulation of electric machines becomes increasingly important due to the use of electric machines in vehicles. This paper describes a method to reduce the calculation time and required memory of the finite element NVH simulation of electrical machines. The stator of a synchronous electrical machine is modeled as a two-dimensional problem to reduce investigation effort. The electromagnetic forces acting on the stator are determined by FE-simulation in advance. Since these forces need to be transferred from the electromagnetic model to the structural model, a coupling algorithm is necessary. In order to reduce the number of nodes, which are involved in the coupling between the electromagnetic and structural model, multipoint constraints (MPC) are used to connect several coupling nodes to one new coupling node. For the definition of the new coupling nodes, the acting load is analyzed with a 2D-FFT. After the coupling with MPCs, forces are only acting on the newly defined coupling nodes.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Yuan feng Xia, Jian Pang, Chengtai Hu, Cui Zhou, Cong Wu
Abstract The paper analyzes the characteristics of driveline torsional vibration of a RWD vehicle and provides the control methods of transmission rattle noise caused by the system torsional resonances. A driveline dynamic model of the RWD vehicle is established by multi-body dynamic method. The natural frequencies and modal shapes are calculated for each gear position and torsional vibration responses are predicted by forced vibration analysis. The system sensitivity and DOE are analyzed based on the parameterized stiffness, inertia and damping. The 2nd and 3rd order modal results show that the transmission shaft possesses the maximum amplitudes and its corresponding modal frequencies vary with different gear position. The sensitivity analysis results show that the system torsional vibration is significantly reduced by reducing clutch stiffness, increasing propeller shaft stiffness, raising half shaft stiffness, increasing the input shaft inertia and increasing the clutch damping. The DOE analysis results show that the clutch stiffness, propeller shaft stiffness, and the inertia of axle pinion shaft and transmission input shaft play an important role in reducing torsional vibration of the transmission gear shafts.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Ennes Sarradj, Thomas Geyer, Christoph Jobusch, Sebastian Kießling, Alexander Neefe
Abstract The development of energy-efficient and lightweight vehicles is a major challenge for researchers and engineers in the automotive industry, with one solution being the use of micro gas turbines in serial hybrid vehicles. Among other advantages, the use of a micro gas turbine instead of a reciprocating engine enables a high reliability and low emissions. What makes the concept of using a gas turbine even more interesting are its special NVH characteristics, which are quite different from those of a reciprocating engine. Besides the fact that a gas turbine in general produces less noise and vibration than a diesel engine of the same power, the characteristic noise spectrum is also very different. In this paper, the noise characteristics of a micro gas turbine are compared to those typical for a common reciprocating engine and the sources of the noise are considered. The data that form the basis for these analyses were obtained using measurements on a 70 kW micro gas turbine that is designed to be used in a serial hybrid concept for buses.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Jean-Francois Rondeau, Ludovic Dejaeger, Antoine Guellec, Arnaud Caillet, Lars Bischoff
Abstract Strategies for weight reduction have driven the noise treatment advanced developments with a great success considering the already mastered weight decreases observed in the last years in the automotive industry. This is typically the case for all soft trims parts. In the early 2010's a typical european B-segment car soft trims weights indeed 30 to 40% less than in the early 2000's years. The main driver behind such a gap has been to combine insulation and absorption properties on a single part while increasing the number of layers. This product-process evolution was conducted using a significant improvement in the simulation capacities. In that sense, several studies presenting very good correlation results between Transmission Loss measurements and finite elements simulations on dashboard or floor insulators were presented. One may consider that those kinds of parts have already achieved a considerable improvement in performance. But the challenge of weight reduction continues due to up-coming CO2 emissions regulations.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Tom Knechten, Christophe Coster, Peter Van der Linden
Abstract The need for more durable mobility has led to a rapid introduction of new electric systems on vehicles. The result of the application of electrified drivelines is a shift in noise energy from the low mid frequencies towards the upper end of the audible range. Following this, the need for higher frequency noise control and accurate measurement has grown. The measurement of the acoustic transfer or vehicle body isolation at higher frequencies poses a challenge for the diffraction, source level and omni-directionality. This paper shows an improved method that increases the accuracy of acoustic transfer function measurements from the components to the ear at high frequencies. A simulation model based on the Boundary Element Methods(BEM) has been made to analyze higher frequency behavior of noise sources during reciprocal measurements up to 12 kHz. Some dedicated hardware was developed in combination with a new process. The simulation results have been validated by experimental test results, and application tests have been done on a full vehicle.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Ze Zhou, Jonathan Jacqmot, Gai Vo Thi, ChanHee Jeong, Kang-Duck Ih
Abstract The NVH study of trimmed vehicle body is essential in improving the passenger comfort and optimizing the vehicle weight. Efficient modal finite-element approaches are widely used in the automotive industry for investigating the frequency response of large vibro-acoustic systems involving a body structure coupled to an acoustic cavity. In order to accurately account for the localized and frequency-dependant damping mechanism of the trim components, a direct physical approach is however preferred. Thus, a hybrid modal-physical approach combines both efficiency and accuracy for large trimmed body analysis. Dynamic loads and exterior acoustic loads can then be applied on the trimmed body model in order to evaluate the transfer functions between these loads and the acoustic response in the car compartment. The scenario study of installing different trim components into the vehicle provides information on the acoustic absorption and dynamic damping with regard to added vehicle weight by the trim.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Gregor Tanner, David J. Chappell, Dominik Löchel, Niels Søndergaard
Abstract Modelling the vibro-acoustic properties of mechanical built-up structures is a challenging task, especially in the mid to high frequency regime, even with the computational resources available today. Standard modelling tools for complex vehicle parts include finite and boundary element methods (FEM and BEM), as well as Multi-Body Simulations (MBS). These methods are, however, robust only in the low frequency regime. In particular, FEM is not scalable to higher frequencies due to the prohibitive increase in model size. We have recently developed a new method called Discrete Flow Mapping (DFM), which extends existing high frequency methods, such as Statistical Energy Analysis or the so-called Dynamical Energy Analysis (DEA), to work on meshed structures. It provides for the first time detailed spatial information about the vibrational energy of a whole built-up structure of arbitrary complexity in this frequency range. The response of small-scale features and coupling coefficients between sub-components are obtained through local FEM models integrated in the global DFM treatment.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Koen Vansant, Hadrien Bériot, Claudio Bertolini, Giuseppe Miccoli
Abstract As the legislation for pass-by noise (PBN) has recently become more stringent, car manufacturers face again a challenging task to reach the new SPL objective (70dB(A)). A good design of the engine bay is therefore required to sufficiently attenuate the noise coming from sources as the engine and the intake. This involves proper design of the engine bay's panels including apertures, and a good selection of the type and location of acoustic treatments. For a given engine bay design, the PBN SPL results can be obtained with a PBN test or by an equivalent simulation. Using simulation models it is possible to create the perfect test environment virtually and moreover to obtain acoustic results for a large number of designs upfront of any actual testing or prototype. The challenge for simulation models is however that, as the results should typically be available from 20 Hz up to 4 or 5 kHz and overall SPL results should be retrieved from a narrow band response over this large frequency range, the CAE models required can become very large and many frequencies need to be computed resulting in long solving times.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Gregor Koners, Ralf Lehmann
Abstract Low interior noise levels in combination with a comfortable sound is an important task for passenger cars. Due to the reduction of many noise sources over the last decades, nowadays tire-road noise has become one of the dominant sources for the interior noise. Especially for manufactures of luxury cars, the reduction of tire-road noise is a big challenge and therefore a central part of NVH development. The knowledge of the noise transmission behavior based on the characteristics of the relevant sources is a fundamental of a modern NVH - development process. For tire-road noise the source characteristics can be described by wheel forces and radiated airborne noise. In combination with the related vehicle transfer functions it is possible to describe the noise transmission behavior in detail. A method for estimating wheel forces and radiated airborne noise is presented. The method is based on TPA (= Transfer Path Analysis) via matrix inversion and involves the measurement of the vehicle transfer functions.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Christoph Meier, Dirk Lieske, Stefan Bikker
Abstract Electric cars are getting popular more and more and the expectations of the customers are very challenging. Concerning comfort, the situation is clear: customers want an electric car to be quiet and without any annoying noise from the powertrain. To develop an electric powertrain with a minimum noise level and minimized whining it is necessary to have an accurate CAE-simulation and precise criteria to assess whining noise. Based on the experience with electric powertrains in research cars the CAE-modelling was improved and a new ‘whining intensity factor’ was acquired for the development of Daimler's electric cars. The results are a very low noise level and a minimized whining noise, nearly not noticeable giving a comfortable sound to the customers of the smart electric drive and the B-Class Electric Drive.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Gilles Nghiem, Shanjin Wang
Abstract The vehicle pass-by noise regulation will change in the near future and noise limits will be lowered significantly. This evolution will require improvement of engine's sound radiation. On the other hand, under the current pressure for fuel economy, future engines will be more and more lightened, and this will have negative impact on engine's sound emission. Therefore, the requirements related to the new pass-by noise regulation should be taken into account in the design of new powertrains, and in some cases, innovative solutions must be developed in order to improve the level of noise of the engine while reducing the masse of the engine. One effective way is to optimize the design of some key engine parts, such as crankshaft and engine bottom structure. Original approaches had been conducted and showed how much these engine parts can affect powertrain radiated noise, and in addition to find a quantitative relationship between crankshaft stiffness and powertrain radiated noise.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Barbara Neuhierl, David Schroeck, Sivapalan Senthooran, Philippe Moron
Abstract This paper presents an approach to numerically simulate greenhouse windnoise. The term “greenhouse windnoise” here describes the sound transferred to the interior through the glass panels of a series vehicle. Different panels, e.g. the windshield or sideglass, are contributing to the overall noise level. Attached parts as mirrors or wipers are affecting the flow around the vehicle and thus the pressure fluctuations which are acting as loads onto the panels. Especially the wiper influence and the effect of different wiper positions onto the windshield contribution is examined and set in context with the overall noise levels and other contributors. In addition, the effect of different flow yaw angles on the windnoise level in general and the wiper contributions in particular are demonstrated. As computational aeroacoustics requires accurate, highly resolved simulation of transient and compressible flow, a Lattice-Boltzmann approach is used. The noise transmission through the interior is then modeled by statistical energy analysis (SEA), representing the vehicle cabin and the panels excited by the flow.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Denis Blanchet, Anton Golota, Nicolas Zerbib, Lassen Mebarek
Abstract Recent developments in the prediction of the contribution of wind noise to the interior SPL have opened a realm of new possibilities in terms of i) how the convective and acoustic sources terms can be identified, ii) how the interaction between the source terms and the side glass can be described and finally iii) how the transfer path from the sources to the interior of the vehicle can be modelled. This paper discusses in detail these three aspects of wind noise simulation and recommends appropriate methods to deliver required results at the right time based on i) simulation and experimental data availability, ii) design stage and iii) time available to deliver these results. Several simulation methods are used to represent the physical phenomena involved such as CFD, FEM, BEM, FE/SEA Coupled and SEA. Furthermore, a 1D and 2D wavenumber transformation is used to extract key parameters such as the convective and the acoustic component of the turbulent flow from CFD and/or experimental data whenever available.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Xiaohong Kuang, Jian Pang, Haiyan Zhang, Liang Yang, Jiang-hua FU
Abstract The paper describes the identification and control methods of turbocharger surge noise. Some parameters, such as temperature, flow quantity, pressure, vibration, turbocharger rpm and noise, are provided to identify surge noise. The advantages and disadvantages for each parameter are analyzed. The paper identifies that some special vehicle interior noise is contributed by turbocharger surge noise by using correlation analysis of the turbocharger inlet temperature, outlet pressure and vehicle internal noise. Spectral filtration analysis shows that the surge noise frequency components are above 1000Hz with wide frequency band. Quarter wave tuner's effective frequency range is found to be consistent with the surge noise frequency band. A panfluter-resonator which is a combination of several special quarter wave tuners is invented to diminish the wide band high frequency noise. After the panfluter-resonator is installed on a turbocharger system, the vehicle interior surge noise is significantly reduced.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Alessandro Zanon, Michele De Gennaro, Helmut Kuehnelt, Domenico Caridi, Daniel Langmayr
Abstract In hybrid and electrical vehicles new challenges in meeting the drivers' expectation with regards to acoustic comfort arise. The absence of the internal combustion engine noise enhances the passengers' perception of other noise sources, such as the Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system. Therefore efficient and reliable numerical models able to predict flow-induced broadband noise have become a major research topic in automotive industry. In this framework, the Zonal LES coupled with the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FWH) acoustic analogy are capable to simulate broadband noise from low speed axial fan. As demonstrated in previous works from the authors, this approach is able to cope with the complexity of the physical phenomena involved (i.e. turbulent noise generation, laminar-to-turbulent transition, etc.), even though the numerical model requires a careful setup of the mesh topology, boundary conditions and simulation parameters. The aim of this article is to provide the scientific community with the latest developments of our research work on numerical modelling of broadband noise from axial fans, focusing on the performance of two different mesh topologies to locate and estimate the noise sources.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Georg Eisele, Klaus Wolff, Jannis Hoppermanns, Peter Genender
Abstract Transfer path analysis is a powerful tool to support the vehicle NVH development. On the one hand it is a fast method to gain an overview of the complex interplay in the vehicle noise generation process. On the other hand it can be used to identify critical noise paths and vehicle components responsible for specific noise phenomena. FEV has developed several tools, which are adapted to the considered noise phenomena: Powertrain induced interior noise and vibration is analyzed by VINS (Vehicle Interior Noise Simulation), which allows the deduction of improvement measures fast enough for application in the accelerated vehicle development process. Further on vehicle/powertrain combinations not realized in hardware can be evaluated by virtual installation of the powertrain in the vehicle, which is especially interesting in the context of engine downsizing from four to three or six to four cylinders. Road induced interior noise is investigated by “Chassis-VINS” or “Fast-VINS”, depending on the required level of detailing and project timing.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Dirk Mayer, Jonathan Militzer, Thilo Bein
Abstract The automotive industry is aiming at both reducing the weight of the vehicles while improving a high level of comfort. This causes contradicting requirements for the systems used for noise and vibration control. Thus, active systems are investigated which may enhance the performance of passive noise and vibration control in vehicles without adding excessive weight. In this paper, basic principles for the implementations of those systems with a focus on the control systems are reviewed. Examples from implementations in automotive applications are presented, including control of engine vibrations, structure borne noise transmitted from the road into the passenger compartment and low-frequency chassis vibrations. Based on adaptive filter systems already widely used in active noise control adaptation of the control algorithms to the specific application scenarios are discussed. This includes different configurations for feedforward and feedback control, single- and multichannel control systems and the utilization of different actuator concepts like active mounts, inertial mass actuators and active tuned absorbers, as well as different control sensors like accelerometers and microphones.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Hiromichi Tsuji, Kimihiko Nakano PhD
This paper presents new technique to estimate the projected operational forces, which is the operational forces with respect to the evaluation location, at the connections of the separated passive substructures with reciprocity. Since the transfer path analysis (TPA) is conducted with respect to the evaluation location, the forces for the substructures are, therefore, also required only to estimate the projected operational forces. In order to estimate the forces, the projected inertance matrix, which is the projection of the inertance matrix onto the subspace with respect to the evaluation location, is estimated without measuring it directly. The acceleration responses at the connections of the passive substructure are measured by the excitation at the evaluation location with the reciprocity. The technique decomposes the acceleration responses into the output and input element vectors on the subspace. With those vectors, the projected inertance matrix is constructed. The projected operational forces at the passive substructure can be estimated by the operational accelerations pre-multiplied by the inverted projected inertance matrix.
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