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Viewing 8521 to 8550 of 8672
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530168
E. V. Murphree, A. R. Cunningham, J. P. Haworth, A. F. Kaulakis
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530205
W. H. CLARK
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530263
M.C. Turkish
THE author shows how the success of a valve-spring design is intrinsically related to both the cam design and the valve gear dynamics obtained at high engine speeds. Good valve gear dynamics, which is characterized by minimum vibration, he says, minimizes hydraulic lifter pump-up tendency and greatly simplifies the job of making a satisfactory spring design. He shows that the use of the smooth-acceleration curve is very helpful in producing good valve gear dynamics, and that it is to be recommended over other types. The author also discusses the use of dual springs and cyclo-pelting and presetting of springs. Discussion of this and other papers on “Valve Gear Problems in Modern Overhead-Valve Engines” starts on page 714.
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530187
C.E. NELSON
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530185
M. L. FAST
1952-10-01
Magazine
1952-06-01
Standard
AMS3676A
This specification covers resin-bonded glass fibers in the form of felted pads, flat or in rolls.
1952-02-01
Standard
ARP266
This recommended practice is written to cover the installation of combustion heaters used in the following applications. Fuselage Compartment Heating: (All occupied regions, cargo space, and transparent area heating.) Thermatl Ice Prevention System Engine and Accessory Heating: (When heater is installed as part of the aircraft).
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520028
L. M. BALL
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520059
James V. Bernardo
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520061
T. H. McNARY
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520175
GIL F. RODDEWIG
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520236
Philip O. Johnson
THIS paper outlines the reasons why a continuous static testing program of a new body design should parallel development of the model until the first road car is produced. First, major deficiencies can be eliminated from the design before the road car is constructed, resulting in a considerable saving of time and money. Second, continuous static testing leads to a structurally satisfactory road car, leaving road tests free for the solution of problems involving suspension design, ride, and noise. Third, static testing points the way to efficient design of all structural components, whereas road test results are necessarily determined by overall structure. Static tests, founded on sound engineering principles, can lead to the development of optimum designs, rather than the acceptance of given designs. The writer stresses the need for tests which simulate actual service conditions, as well as correct interpretation of test results, based on a proper understanding of the difference between strength and rigidity.
1951-11-01
Magazine
1951-07-01
Magazine
1951-01-01
Magazine
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510207
Paul Huber
A FEW years ago traffic noise became so serious that the Traffic Noise Subcommittee of the SAE Truck and Bus Committee was organized to attack the problem in a scientific manner. Specifically, the subcommittee set itself the following objectives: 1. To determine a suitable procedure for the measurement of noise created by automotive vehicles. 2. To specify the equipment necessary to obtain comparable results. 3. To make traffic noise tests in several parts of the country. 4. To provide statistical data on the noise created by new vehicles. The results of the research work done by the subcommittee are given in the accompanying report.
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510001
ARTHUR S. BASSETTE
SUMMARY A short movie will be shown indicating the cars being tested for shake on the road and in the laboratory, and some of the equipment will be seen in operation. Next, eight slides will be shown and a detailed description will be made of each slide. The major context will be to show: 1. The functional arrangement of the equipment. 2. The method of interpreting the data for a single point under shake conditions. 3. The method of obtaining curves for multiple point studies. 4. The solution for a general problem.
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510040
W.F. PERKINS, W.F. Billingsley
1950-07-01
Magazine
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500053
CLARK A. TEA
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500054
V. D. POLHEMUS, Suspension Engineer
1949-11-01
Standard
AMS3676
This specification covers resin-bonded glass fibers in the form of felted pads, flat or in rolls.
1948-10-01
Magazine
1948-08-01
Magazine
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