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Technical Paper
1947-01-01
D. S. KING
Technical Paper
1947-01-01
W. E. BURNHAM
Technical Paper
1947-01-01
L. F. HOPE
Magazine
1946-12-01
Magazine
1946-05-01
Technical Paper
1946-01-01
Stanley Lippert
Investigators in this country and abroad have experimentally determined human response to the kinds of vibration encountered in street traffic, elevators, ships, trains, automobiles and airplanes. Each has covered a limited range of frequencies and amplitudes and employed different descriptive terms for grading their effects on the human body. In this article the findings of a number of studies on the effects of vertical vibration are reconciled graphically, making possible an easy classification of the human responses to a vertical sinusoidal motion. The range of vibrations covered by the graph - namely, for frequencies between 0.1 and 256 cps and amplitudes between 100 and 0.00003 inches, includes the regions of interest in all modes of transportation.
Technical Paper
1946-01-01
L. M. Ball
ABSTRACT
Magazine
1945-08-01
Technical Paper
1945-01-01
Frederic P. Porter
Magazine
1944-08-01
Technical Paper
1944-01-01
LLOYD WITHROW, ARTHUR S. FRY
EXPERIMENTS have been run to find relationships between the primary causes and the outward effects of roughness as produced by a single-cylinder engine and by an 8-in-line engine. This was done by recording simultaneously on a multi-element oscillograph, oscillograms of the following phenomena: 1. Sound pressure near the engine. 2. Vibrations of the crankcase structure. 3. Lateral vibrations of the flywheel. 4. Lateral vibrations of the crankshaft. 5. Pressure development in the combustion chamber. A study of the oscillograms reveals that the sensation of roughness in both of these engines is closely related to a shock type of excitation that is developed in the crankshaft-flywheel system. In the single-cylinder engine this phenomenon was affected by any change in engine conditions which altered the development of the combustion pressures. Moreover, the sensation of roughness was greatly diminished by using a so-called “flexi-disc flywheel.” In the multicylinder engine, the shock type of excitation of the crankshaft-flywheel system as well as the sensation of roughness could be affected in two different ways: 1.
Standard
1943-11-01
This specification is written to cover heating and ventilating equipment under four main classifications, namely; A. HEATING AND VENTILATING EQUIPMENT - GENERAL - Dealing with features applicable to all makes and uses. B. HEATING AND VENTILATING EQUIPMENT - MILITARY - Dealing with features applicable only to military aircraft. C. HEATING AND VENTILATING EQUIPMENT - COMMERCIAL - Dealing with features applicable only to commercial aircraft. D. DESIRABLE DESIGN FEATURES - General information for use of those concerned in meeting requirements contained herein.
Technical Paper
1943-01-01
Ralph M. Guerke, George P. Knapp
Magazine
1941-12-01
Magazine
1939-12-01
Magazine
1939-07-01
Magazine
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
1939-01-01
S. M. Cadwell, R. A. Merrill, C. M. Sloman, F. L. Yost
Technical Paper
1939-01-01
Ernest E. Wilson, Paul Huber
THE authors introduce their paper by outlining the various sources of noise existing in the motor car, together with some of the suppression means. Noise measurement, test methods, and the mechanism of the transmission of forces generated by the contact between the tire and the road to the body and frame are discussed. The authors state that, since these forces produce motion and deflection of the body, they are responsible for the road noise, and conclude that the proper approach to a method for suppressing road noise is through the structural design of the vehicle. They suggest, in the main, the localizing of stress to stress members, the raising of the resonant frequencies of the structure, the detuning of the suspension system, the body, and the frame, together with some isolation at selected points.
Technical Paper
1939-01-01
Charles M. Kearns
COMPLETE isolation of the airplane propeller from the engine, except for a very flexible torque drive, appears to be the only satisfactory solution of the vibration problem in the future, Mr. Kearns believes. Under such conditions, he explains, much lighter propeller blades can be used to maintain even greater horsepowers than are available at present so that, in spite of the trend toward more power, the increase in overall weight of the powerplant may be delayed considerably. This problem of the vibration characteristics of the engine and propeller when operating jointly, he points out, recently has become practically the determining factor in the selection of the proper propeller for use with a given airplane-engine combination. An intensive investigation of this problem, studying both experimental and analytical approaches to the causes and solution of the high-stress conditions found in some engine-propeller combinations, is reported. In his paper, Mr. Kearns discusses the various sources of excitation and resultant modes of motion frequently found in present-day powerplants.
Magazine
1938-08-01
Magazine
1938-04-01
Technical Paper
1938-01-01
H. W. Prentis
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