Display:

Results

Viewing 31 to 60 of 9352
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1850
Christian Thomas, Nouredine Atalla
In passenger aircraft the most important noise control treatment is the primary insulation attached to the fuselage. Next to its acoustic properties the primary insulation main purpose is the thermal insulation and the minimization of condensed water. In general it consists of fibrous materials like glass wool wrapped in a thin foil. Due to stringent flame, smoke and toxicity requirements the amount of available materials is limited. Furthermore the amount of material installed in aircraft per year is much smaller compared to needs in the automotive industry. Therefore the best lay-up of the available materials is needed in terms of acoustics. This paper presents a tool for numerical optimization of the sound insulation package. To find an improved insulation the simulation tool is used in interaction with a measurement database. The databank is constructed from aircraft grade materials such as fibrous materials, foams, resistive screens and impervious heavy layers.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1853
Timo Hartmann, Gregor Tanner, Gang Xie, David J. Chappell
Abstract Car floor structures typically contain a number of smaller-scale features which make them challenging for vibro-acoustic modelling beyond the low frequency regime. The floor structure considered here consists of a thin shell floor panel connected to a number of rails through spot welds leading to an interesting multi-scale modelling problem. Structures of this type are arguably best modelled using hybrid methods, where a Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) description of the larger thin shell regions is combined with a finite element model (FEM) for the stiffer rails. In this way the modal peaks from the stiff regions are included in the overall prediction, which a pure SEA treatment would not capture. However, in the SEA regions, spot welds, geometrically dependent features and directivity of the wave field are all omitted. In this work we present an SEA/FEM hybrid model of a car floor and discuss an alternative model for the SEA subsystem using Discrete Flow Mapping (DFM).
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1855
Alastair Jay, Thomas Deighan, Nozomu Kato, Kiyofumi Sato
Abstract Requirements for reducing powertrain NVH drives the selection of low piston skirt to liner clearances contradicting the requirement to maintain larger skirt clearances for minimizing engine friction. Whilst this clearance trade-off between low friction and low NVH is fundamental, piston design features have a significant effect on where the trade-off curve sits on the friction/NVH map. Design features can therefore be viewed not by either friction or NVH improvement measures but a shift in the friction-NVH trade off curve. Specifically, some piston design features which may be targeted at reducing friction can be viewed as either a friction benefit for similar NVH or an NVH improvement for similar friction levels. The ability to realistically quantify the effect of the design changes on NVH is therefore critical to determining what design changes to recommend, the direction of the piston design being highly sensitive to the process by which the impact on NVH is assessed.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1761
Antonio Acri, Guenter Offner, Thomas Resch, Eugene Nijman, Roberto Corradi
Abstract For vibration and acoustics vehicle development, one of the main challenges is the identification and the analysis of the noise sources, which is required in order to increase the driving comfort and to meet the stringent legislative requirements for the vehicle noise emission. Transfer Path Analysis (TPA) is a fairly well established technique for estimating and ranking individual low-frequency noise or vibration contributions via the different transmission paths. This technique is commonly applied on test measurements, based on prototypes, at the end of the design process. In order to apply such methodology already within the design process, a contribution analysis method based on dynamic substructuring of a multibody system is proposed with the aim of improving the quality of the design process for vehicle NVH assessment and to shorten development time and cost.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1763
Thierry Bourdon, Rodrigue Bouete
Abstract Either from a legislative point of view or because of OEM demands, the automotive industry is increasingly facing of reducing vibration & noise in the vehicle. More particularly on the engine area, the development of Gasoline and Diesel fuel components based on high pressure pumps, rails, any pipes and injectors are more and more subject of a particular NVH (Noise Vibration and Harshness) attention. The use of modern digital techniques such as 3D FEM vibroacoustic, leads to use virtual prototyping as complementary to traditional real hardware prototypes development. Among interest, number of iterative loops to reach a best design brings an important value to new product development with an optimized cost. Basically the core part of virtual prototyping is about a 3D FEM model definition for each component.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1794
Jonathan Caprile, Claire Chaufour, Pierre Emile Chartrain
Abstract In automotive NVH, the noise generated by a powertrain is still one of the major noise sources especially at low and mid vehicle velocity. For this reason automotive OEMs are continuously focusing on methods to efficiently analyze this noise source. For this purpose, a well-established simulation methodology can provide results thoroughly, within a limited amount of time and with a reduced cost contrary to experiments which are involved in late design phases and are more expensive. This paper aims at presenting an approach to simulate efficiently the acoustic radiation from automotive components. With this aim in mind, the acoustic response of a realistic powertrain unit subjected to working conditions ranging from 1000 RPM to 4500 RPM is studied until 3000 Hz. Several radiating boundary conditions will be assessed in order to detect the most efficient set-up for this kind of problem and to extract the optimized modeling guidelines.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1795
Charly Faure, Charles Pezerat, Frédéric Ablitzer, Jérôme Antoni
In this paper, a local method of structure-borne noise source characterization is presented. It is based on measurements of transverse displacement and local structural operator knowledge and allows to localize and quantify sources without any need of boundary condition information. To fix the instability caused by measurement noise, the regularization step inherent to inverse problem is realized with a probabilistic approach, within the Bayesian framework. When a priori distributions about noise and sources are considered as Gaussian, the Bayesian regularization is equivalent to the well-known Tikhonov regularization. The optimization of the regularization is then performed by the Gibbs Sampling (GS) algorithm, which is part of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques. The whole probability of the regularized solution is inferred, providing access to confidence intervals.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1798
Quentin Buisson, Jean-Louis Guyader, Serge Puvilland, Xavier Carniel, Maximilien Soenen
Abstract The goal of the present study is to provide a simple method to compare structure borne noise sources in order to choose the most efficient one, considering the transmission of dynamic forces. It is well known that mechanical sources are not only dependent of the source itself but also of the receiving structure, in addition real sources cannot be reduced to a transverse force acting on the structure but more complicated effect like moment excitation must be taken into account. The advantage of the reception plate method is to characterize the source globally by the level of vibration of the reception plate whatever the type of excitation, the idea is basically to characterize mechanical sources as it is done for acoustical sources in reverberant rooms. A reception plate test bench has been developed to determine the power injected by mechanical sources. Two prototype plates have been designed in order to have different receiving mobilities.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1799
Corentin Chesnais, Nicolas Totaro, Jean-Hugh Thomas, Jean-Louis Guyader
Abstract The source field reconstruction aims at identifying the excitation field measuring the response of the system. In Near-field Acoustic Holography, the response of the system (the radiated acoustic pressure) is measured on a hologram using a microphones array and the source field (the acoustic velocity field) is reconstructed with a back-propagation technique performed in the wave number domain. The objective of the present works is to use such a technique to reconstruct displacement field on the whole surface of a plate by measuring vibrations on a one-dimensional holograms. This task is much more difficult in the vibratory domain because of the complexity of the equation of motion of the structure. The method presented here and called "Structural Holography" is particularly interesting when a direct measurement of the velocity field is not possible.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1788
Charles Pezerat
Abstract Identification of vibration sources, defects and/or material properties consists generally in solving inverse problems. The called RIFF method (French acronym meaning Windowed and Filtered Inverse Solving) is one way to solve this kind of inverse problem. The basic principle of the RIFF approach consists in measuring vibration displacement on a meshgrid in a local area of interest, injecting measured data in the motion equation and calculating the searched unknown. Compared to other usual inverse techniques, the RIFF method has the curious particularity of needing the knowledge of the local motion equation only. Boundary conditions, sources or dynamic behaviors outside the area of interest can be completely ignored, whereas they are required for the direct problem solving. The searched unknown can then be identified locally with respect to the frequency and can be mapped by using a scanning process of the area of interest.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1791
Noé F. Melo, Claus Claeys, Elke Deckers, Bert Pluymers, Wim Desmet
Abstract The NVH performance of conventional panels and structures is mainly driven by their mass. Silence often requires heavy constructions, which conflicts with the emerging trend towards lightweight design. To face the challenging and often conflicting task of merging NVH and lightweight requirements, novel low mass and compact volume NVH solutions are required. Vibro-acoustic metamaterials with stopband behavior come to the fore as possible novel NVH solutions combining lightweight requirements with superior noise and vibration insulation, be it at least in some targeted and tunable frequency ranges, referred to as stopbands. Metamaterials are artificial materials or structures engineered from conventional materials to exhibit some targeted performance that clearly exceeds that of conventional materials. They consist typically of (often periodic) assemblies of unit cells of non-homogeneous material composition and/or topology.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1792
Aurélien Lonni, Olivier Tanneau
Abstract Nowadays, downsizing and turbochargers are more frequently used, mostly for petrol engines. It can lead to an increase of NVH issues related to the turbos, such as the hiss noise propagation in the air ducts. Hutchinson, among all its activities, supplies rubber and plastic parts for the car industry, especially in fluid management systems. The turbocharger’s airborne noise issue has now been tackled for ten years by implementing acoustic devices in the line and providing solutions to car manufacturers with our hot-side rubber ducts. In this paper, will be first presented the main HP air loop NVH issues, and then explained an approach to design technical solutions. Generally speaking, the noise propagates inside the hot side air hoses, crosses the weakest parts of the system by acoustic emissivity to reach finally the driver and passengers’ ears.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1793
Sandra Forget, Nicolas Totaro, Jean-Louis Guyader, Michel Schaeffer
Abstract The constant evolution in the automotive sector to achieve more eco-friendly vehicles has induced the development of more efficient systems with new components and innovative materials. To evaluate the impact of these technologies or to improve them in terms of NVH performances, acoustic engineers rely on experimental tests and numerical computations. In this context, the use of experimental noise sources identification and characterization methods can provide interesting approaches. However, classical methods usually used in industry like the Nearfield Acoustical Holography (NAH) or the Beamforming techniques are quickly limited, in particular in terms of precision in localization, for such analysis support. The presented method, named M-iPTF for Mixed inverse Patch Transfer Functions, is more suitable as it is able to localize and quantify all acoustic source fields directly on the real geometry of a complex structure.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1773
Shanjin Wang
Abstract Currently, new technologies in automotive industry are mainly driven by CO2 regulation and fuel economy. For most of the OEMs, the priority is to optimize internal combustion engines, make light-weighting and develop hybrid vehicles or fully electric vehicles. In this context, it is difficult and expensive trying to reach absolute silence in the cars. A good NVH strategy for non-specialist OEMs will be to keep the noise to an acceptable level and make it as homogenous as possible. This article presents several NVH guidelines for the powertrain in order to achieve homogenous noise in the cars. Firstly, master the level of powertrain vibration and maintain it at a suitable level. Secondly, eliminate abnormal noises which are unpleasant and disturbing, such as transient Diesel clatter noise. Thirdly, reduce the levels of emerging noises from powertrain components, such as turbo charger whistling so that they can be masked by background noise.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1772
Romualdo Ruotolo, Davide Donna, Giuseppe Credo, Michele Belluscio
Abstract Current Diesel engines development is facing challenging vibro-acoustic requirements and at the same time is struggling with the need to reduce as much as possible the cost and the weight of the engine. The latter obviously has become a key player for fuel consumption reduction. Large covers are commonly used in the base engine design and their noise contribution to total radiated noise is not negligible. Typical covers architecture shows thick cast and ribbed plates, meaning heavy and expensive covers. An interesting option is represented by using thin stamped covers either in aluminum or in steel, that have to show a low vibrational response. The current paper focuses on the structural optimization of such a peculiar design, trying to mitigate as much as possible its noise radiation with the intent to avoid any additional acoustic enabler (e.g. wrapping by means of acoustic foams) that will increase the final cost of the component.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1775
Thomas Resch, Oliver Knaus, Siegmund Thomann, Stephan Brandl
Abstract Modern powertrain noise investigation in the development process and during trouble shooting is a combination of experiment and simulation. In simulation in recent years main focus was set on model completeness, consideration of all excitation mechanisms and efficient and stabile numerical algorithms. By that the total response of the virtual powertrain is already comparable to the overall noise level of the real powertrain. Actual challenge is to trace back the overall response to its main excitation and noise generating mechanism as well as to their main driving parameters to support the engineer not only in reaching absolute values, but also to derive the root cause of a response or potential problem and to get hints on how to improve the specific behavior. Approaches by parameter sensitivity studies are time consuming and not unambiguous.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1774
Gert Herold, Thomas Geyer, Philipp Markus, Ennes Sarradj
Abstract The sound power level is the most important quantity that characterizes the noise emission of machinery. Following standardized procedures, it is usually calculated from sound pressure levels measured at a number of reference positions on a surface enveloping the object. The resulting value does not hold any direct information on the noise contributions of subcomponents. However, effective noise reduction necessitates a prior identification of acoustic sources and their characteristics. Combining the enveloping-surface method with microphone array measurements facilitates the evaluation of synchronously noise-emitting subcomponents. The application of this technique on a water pump with a four-stroke engine as power source is presented in this paper. The microphones are arranged on a cuboid surface surrounding the setup. The measured data is processed so as to yield sound power levels in a defined 3D focus region.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1766
Thomas Deighan, Nozomu Kato, Kiyofumi Sato
Abstract An engine configuration has a significant influence on the sound quality from the powertrain. Whilst the fundamental order content can be readily apparent from the firing order over the engine, or bank of a V engine, some characteristics and how the engine design can influence them requires some more specific investigation. Understanding, on a fundamental level, the aspects of the engine design which influence these characteristics is critical to allow more detailed analysis and development work to be focused appropriately. The configuration of a Boxer engine gives a distinctive sound characteristic producing a unique sound compared to an In-Line configuration. Depending on the application it may be desirable to enhance or subdue some of these characteristics.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1765
Kelly Savva, Ahmed Haris, Eliot Motato, Mahdi Mohammadpour, Stephanos Theodossiades, Homer Rahnejat, Patrick Kelly, Alexander Vakakis, Lawrence Bergman, Donald McFarland
Abstract Legislation on vehicle emissions and the requirements for fuel efficiency are currently the key development driving factors in the automotive industry. Research activities to comply with these targets point to engine downsizing and new boosting technologies, which have adverse effects on the NVH performance, durability and component life. As a consequence of engine downsizing, substantial torsional oscillations are generated due to high combustion pressures. Meanwhile, to attenuate torsional vibrations, the manufacturers have implemented absorbers that are tuned to certain frequency ranges, including clutch dampers, Dual Mass Flywheel (DMF) and centrifugal pendulum dampers. These devices add mass/inertia to the system, potentially introducing negative effects on other vehicle attributes, such as weight, driving performance and gear shiftability.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1770
Insoo Jung, Jaemin Jin, Dongchul Lee, Seunghyun Lee, Seungwook Yang, Kyoungdoug Min
Abstract This paper presents two closed-loop control methods for monitoring and improving the combustion behavior and the combustion noise on two 4-cylinder diesel engines, in which an in-cylinder pressure and an accelerometer transducer are used to monitor and control them. Combustion processes are developed to satisfy the stricter and stricter regulations on emissions and fuel consumption. These combustion processes are influenced by the factors such as engine durability, driving conditions, environmental influences and fuel properties. Combustion noise could be increased by these factors and is detrimental to interior sound quality. Therefore, it is necessary to develop robust combustion behaviors and combustion noise. For this situation, we have developed two closed-loop control methods. Firstly, a method using in-cylinder pressure data was developed for monitoring and improving the combustion noise of a 1.7L engine.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1768
He Changming, Xu Sichuan
For an in-line diesel engine with four cylinder operating in four-stroke mode, the second-order reciprocating inertia forces generally cannot be well balanced with direct approach. The unbalanced second-order inertia forces are the main reason to cause vibration and noise in a diesel engine within low frequency range. The more superior tone quality for modern diesel engine has been expected even for bus application all the time, and there are tougher requirements for truck noise in developed countries, i.e. in Europe and USA. In present research a unique crankshaft system configuration was proposed, which including opposed piston, inner and outer connecting rod, and crankshaft but running in two-stroke mode, to eliminate the second-order inertia force considerably rather than by adding an extra balance shaft mechanism.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1782
Kyoung-Jin Chang, Dong Chul Park
Abstract This paper discusses approaches to emotionally improve the driving sound based on Active Sound Design (ASD). In the first step, target sound design methods are suggested in order to represent the vehicle’s concept and brand image via a driving sound. In this method, formant filter and musical chords are applied to the target sound synthesis. In the second step, a technique to make a target sound realistic in ASD system is discussed, which enables to stimulate the customers' emotion. In this technique, the process to simulate a musical instrument sound for a vivid driving sound and synthesize the sound with FIR filter is studied. Finally, the improved driving sound is demonstrated in ASD system.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1787
Thomas Deighan, Graeme Maclean, Nozomu Kato, Kiyofumi Sato
Abstract A robust analytical process for evaluating the effects of engine component design on the powertrain NVH has been developed. The work presented focuses on design modifications for refinement of the NVH levels and sound quality of a 4 cylinder Boxer engine with automatic transmission. Assessment focuses on the powertrain structure, cranktrain, torque converter and valvetrain. Comparison of predicted mount vibrations with measurements on a fired engine are made. Through detailed post-processing of the analysis results, looking at modal contributions, modal excitations and loading contributions, the causes and contributions to the NVH are understood and used to direct potential modifications to the powertrain and component design. The models are used to quantify the relative benefit of these modifications in terms of both overall vibration levels and sound quality through implementation of a rumble metric.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1778
Gesche Fender, Steffen Marburg, Fabian Duddeck
Abstract One method to lower noise in a cabin is to position damping layers on vibrating panels, thereby reducing their radiated power. To assess the damping effect, criteria like the ERP (equivalent radiated power) are widely employed, which estimate the radiated sound power of a panel without taking into account the actual complex system. Advantageously only a part of the structure has to be modeled, but the optimal solution found on the simplified model then often fails for the complete, coupled system, especially if several variants of a cabin have to be considered. Hence, it is proposed to use the structure-only optimization for identification of a set of candidate solutions for optimal positioning of damping layers. These candidate solutions used as initial designs for the coupled investigations should be well distributed in the design space to avoid being wrongly stuck in an optimum with inferior coupled performance.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1786
Per Alenius, Magnus Olsson, Thomas Lindbom
Abstract Highly refined NVH (Noise, Vibration and Harshness) is a key attribute for premium segment passenger cars. All noise sources such as powertrain, tires, wind, climate unit and etc. must be well balanced and at such a low level that the customer expectations are met or exceeded. However, not only are the NVH levels of importance but the character of the noise must also meet the high demands from premium car customers. This is especially true for diesel engines which historically have been more prone to have a less refined engine noise character than petrol engines. This paper will describe an investigation of what is defined as “engine presence” in four-cylinder diesel engine cars. The scope is to define a method for consistent subjective assessment of engine presence and to find the relationship and investigate the correlation between the “perceived loudness”, “perceived harshness” and the overall engine presence interior of the car.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1781
Matthew Maunder, Phil Grant, Duncan Mawdsley
Abstract Engine sound quality is a key attribute for sporty cars - it powerfully conveys the brand image to the driver/passengers and onlookers, and provides driver involvement by giving instant feedback about how a car is operating. Providing this has become more difficult with tighter pass-by noise regulations and the near-universal adoption of turbocharging. In the last two decades, sporty sound inside the cabin has been regained using intake sound generator systems that transfer sound more directly to the vehicle interior. The high cost of these systems is more recently driving a move towards electronic Active Sound Design with systems delivering synthetic sound through loudspeakers. However, the purist sports car market perceives this approach to be fake or artificial. An alternative approach is provided by a system for Realistic Augmented Sound by Ricardo (RAS-R) that offers a choice of two realistic engine sound sources.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1777
Sebastian Oberst, Zhi Zhang, Joseph CS Lai
Abstract Despite significant progress made in the past 20 years in discovering some of the mechanisms of brake squeal, it remains difficult to predict the underlying friction-induced instabilities reliably. Most numerical analyses are based on linear deterministic analyses of structural vibrations such as the complex eigenvalue analysis (CEA). However, nonlinear multi-scale processes govern friction contact with high sensitivities to operating and/or environmental conditions. In addition, uncertainties in the material properties and boundary conditions such as contact and friction laws are rarely considered. Hence, it is quite common to underpredict or overpredict the number of instabilities and extensive brake noise dynamometer tests are still required in industry to ensure acceptable brake noise performance. In this paper, simplified finite element brake models are used to illustrate the role of nonlinearity in brake squeal.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1779
Sergio Carvajal, Daniel Wallner, Reinhard Helfrich, Michael Klein
Abstract Numerical methods for brake squeal analysis are widely accepted in industry. The use of complex eigenvalue analysis is a successful approach to predict the appearance of squeal noise. Using simulation in an early design stage reduces time to market, saves costs, and improves the physical behavior and robustness of the brake system. State of the art of brake simulation comprises sampling for many parameter sets in a wide range of interesting values. Based on high performance, stability maps can be created in short time containing many results, which gives a deep insight into the brake behavior under varying parameters. An additional benefit of sampling is the possibility to detect parts with high potential for improving the NHV comfort. In the sequel, mathematical optimization methods like topology optimization or shape optimization are used for systematic improvements.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1780
Francesca Ronzio, Theophane Courtois
Abstract In automotive acoustics, body NVH design is traditionally carried out without considering the acoustic trim parts. Nevertheless, the vibro-acoustic interaction of body structure and insulation trim cannot be neglected in the middle frequency range, where structure borne propagation might still be dominating and where classical statistical approaches are generally not able to represent the influence of local changes in stiffness and damping. This, together with the market requirement of lightweight and more efficient sound package solutions, is leading the CAE engineers to evaluate new design approaches dedicated to vehicle components such as dash or floor systems, for which the multi-physics interaction between damping, body stiffness and trim impedance is important.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1783
Oliver Engler
Mercedes-AMG GmbH specializes in unique, high-performance vehicles. The image of AMG as the successful performance brand of Mercedes-Benz is reflected in its impressive successes in the world of motorsport and its unique vehicles. One of these vehicles is the SLS AMG Coupé Electric Drive. After an elaborate series of tests as well as numerous test drives, we have created the SLS eSound which captures the exceptional dynamism of this unique super sports car with electric drive. Starting with a characteristic start-up sound, which rings out on pressing the "Power" button on the AMG DRIVE UNIT, the occupants can experience a tailor-made driving sound for each driving situation: incredibly dynamic when accelerating, subdued when cruising and as equally characteristic during recuperation. The sound is not only dependent on road speed, engine speed and load conditions, but also reflects the driving situation and the vehicle's operating state with a suitable driving noise.
Viewing 31 to 60 of 9352

Filter

Subtopics