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2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2214
Shuguang Zuo, Guo Long, Xudong Wu, Jiajie Hu, Longyang Xiang, Jun Zhang
Abstract In order to reduce high-frequency harmonic noise produced by the blower in the auxiliary system of a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), a narrowband active noise control (ANC) method instead of conventional passive mufflers is adopted since the blower demands clean air condition and expects good acoustic performance. However, in ANC practical applications, the frequency difference between reference signal and actual primary signal, i.e., frequency mismatch (FM), can significantly degrade the high-frequency performance of narrowband ANC system. In this paper, a new narrowband ANC system is proposed to compensate for the performance degeneration due to the existence of FM and improve noise reduction at high frequencies. The proposed system consists of two parts: the Filtered Error Least Mean Square (FELMS) algorithm filtering the primary signals at wide frequency range other than those at the targeted frequencies, and the FM removal algorithm proposed by Yegui Xiao.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2258
Gil-Jun Lee, Kichang Kim, Jay Kim
Abstract Squeak and rattle (S&R) noises are undesirable noises caused by friction-induced vibration or impact between surfaces. While several computer programs have been developed to automatically detect and rate S&R events over the years, no reported work has been found that can detect squeak and rattle noises and distinguish them. Because the causes of squeak noises and rattle noises are different, knowing if it is a squeak noise or rattle noise will be very helpful for automotive engineers to choose an appropriate measure to solve the problem. The authors have developed a new algorithm to differentiate squeak noises and rattle noises, and added it to the S&R detection algorithm they had developed previously. The new algorithm utilizes a combination of sound quality metrics, specifically sharpness, roughness, and fluctuation strength.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2247
Masao Nagamatsu
Abstract The sound localization methods are used for detection of noise source locations of prototypes of mechanical products including automobile engines. There are several types of sound localization methods. In middle frequency around 1kHz, which is most sensitive frequency for human auditory, these sound localization methods have enough resolution in their reconstructed images, and they are effective to localize the sound sources. For high frequency sound localization, the holographic type methods take long time in its measurement. To overcome this problem, I have developed a converted method of Nearfield Acoustic Holography (NAH) method, which is one of conventional holographic sound localization method. However, in low frequency, all holographic localization methods do not have enough resolution in reconstructed images. I am now developing new sound localization method, Double Nearfield Acoustic Holography (DNAH) method.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2171
Winston Spencer, Djamel Bouzit, Joseph Pace, Sudeep Dhillon
Driveline plunge mechanism dynamics has a significant contribution to the driver's perceivable transient NVH error states and to the transmission shift quality. As it accounts for the pitch or roll movements of the front powerplant and rear drive unit, the plunging joints exhibit resisting force in the fore-aft direction under various driveline torque levels. This paper tackles the difficult task of quantifying the coefficient of static friction and the coefficient of dynamic friction in a simple to use metric as it performs in the vehicle. The comparison of the dynamic friction to the static friction allows for the detection of the occurrence of stick-slip in the slip mechanism; which enables for immediate determination of the performance of the design parameters such as spline geometry, mating parts fit and finish, and lubrication. It also provides a simple format to compare a variety of designs available to the automotive design engineer.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2176
Rajkumar Bhagate, Ajinkya Badkas, Kiran Mohan
Abstract Gear rattle is an annoying noise phenomena of the automotive transmission, which is mainly induced by torsional fluctuation of engine. In this study, torsional vibration of 3 cylinder powertrain is analyzed and improved for reducing the gear rattle from transmission by using parametric optimization. One dimensional Multi-body mathematical model for the torsional vibrations of front wheel drive automotive drivetrain is developed and utilized for the optimization of sensitive parameters of the driveline. Second order differential equations of the mathematical model are solved by using MATLAB and the output response is validated with the test data. Parametric optimization is conducted by using design of experiment method. The updated model is further utilized for optimizing the flywheel inertia, driveshaft stiffness and clutch stiffness. Mathematical modelling and optimization process has helped to achieve NVH targets for driveline.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2359
Craig Reynolds, Jason Blough, Carl Anderson, Mark Johnson, Jean Schweitzer
Sound power can be determined using a variety of methods, but precision methods require the volume of the noise source to be less than 1% of the chamber volume leading to relatively large test chambers. Automotive torque converter performance and noise testing is completed in an enclosed metallic test fixture which inhibits the use of precision methods due to volume and space limitations. This paper describes a new method developed to accurately determine sound power of an automotive torque converter in a relatively small enclosure through characterization of the test environment. The test environment was characterized using two reference noise sources designed to represent torque converter noise output and physical geometry. Sound pressure levels of the sources were measured at multiple microphone locations and at three source amplitude levels to characterize the environment.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2202
Catheryn Jackson, Justin E. Gimbal, Dhara Metla
Abstract Over the past decade damping materials have contributed major improvements to passenger comfort. Noise Vibration and Harshness (NVH) engineers have further shaped material specifications to reflect key targeted properties that improve vehicle design. The specified damping material is then applied to the formed surfaces of the vehicle body to provide optimal performance and achieve the required results. This paper describes how liquid dampers have advanced to meet increased performance requirements through improved loss modulus of the final coating. Data generated by dynamic mechanical analysis shows that this viscoelastic behavior is what drives the performance in damping materials. Through the correlation of loss moduli to damping performance of Oberst bars, the mechanism can be further quantified and explained.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2367
David Lennström, Arne Nykänen
Abstract When it comes to the acoustic properties of electric cars, the powertrain noise differs dramatically compared to traditional vehicles with internal combustion engines. The low frequency firing orders, mechanical and combustion noise are exchanged with a more high frequency whining signature due to electromagnetic forces and gear meshing, lower in level but subject to annoyance. Previous studies have highlighted these differences and also investigated relevant perception criteria in terms of psycho-acoustic metrics. However, investigations of differences between different kinds of electric and hybrid electric cars are still rare. The purpose of this paper was to present the distribution of tonal components in today's hybrid/electric vehicles. More specifically, the number of prominent orders, their maximum levels and frequency separation were analyzed for the most critical driving conditions. The study is based upon measurements made on 13 electrified cars on the market.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2183
Thomas Wellmann, Kiran Govindswamy, Jeff Orzechowski, Sudharsan Srinivasan
Abstract Integration of automatic engine Stop/Start systems in “conventional” drivetrains with 12V starters is a relatively cost-effective measure to reduce fuel consumption. Therefore, automatic engine Stop/Start systems are becoming more prevalent and increasing market share of such systems is predicted. A quick, reliable and consistent engine start behavior is essential for customer acceptance of these systems. The launch of the vehicle should not be compromised by the Stop/Start system, which implies that the engine start time and transmission readiness for transmitting torque should occur within the time the driver releases the brake pedal and de-presses the accelerator pedal. Comfort and NVH aspects will continue to play an important role for customer acceptance of these systems. Hence, the engine stop and re-start behavior should be imperceptible to the driver from both a tactile and acoustic standpoint.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2191
Peng Yu, Tong Zhang, Shiyang Chen, Jing Li, Rong Guo
Abstract In view of the problem of low-frequency (less than 10Hz, such as 0.5Hz, 1.15Hz, 8Hz in this paper) longitudinal vibration exists in a pure electric vehicle, modeling methods of drive-line torsion vibration system are conducted. Firstly, dynamometer test is performed, signals of motor speed and seat rail acceleration are obtained, the frequency characteristics of flutter is determined using the order analysis and time frequency analysis. Then four types of modeling and analysis are investigated facing the drive-line torsion vibration problem, including single model without electromagnetic stiffness, branch model without electromagnetic stiffness, single model considering electromagnetic stiffness and branch model considering electromagnetic stiffness.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2344
Murteza T. Erman
Abstract In today's world, automotive manufacturers are required to decrease CO2 emissions and increase the fuel economy while assuring driver comfort and safety. To achieve desired acoustic performance targets, automotive manufacturers use various Noise-Vibration-Harshness (NVH) materials which they apply to the vehicle Body-In-White structures either in the body or paint shop. Beside the sound deadening coatings applied onto the underbody of vehicles, they have historically used either constrained or free-layer sheets. The majority of these damping pads/sheets, so called asphalt sheets, are applied onto the floor pan inside the vehicle. These pre-manufactured and vehicle specific die-cut sheets are typically highly metal-carbonate, sulfate or silicate filled asphalt systems with a high specific gravity. Depending on the size of vehicle, the amount of these sheets can reach application weights of 10∼20 kg/vehicle. This paper will document the technical path that Dr. H.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2244
Ulhas Mohite, Niket Bhatia, Prashant Bhavsar
Abstract In this paper the approach to predict engine noise under combustion forces is presented. This Methodology is divided into three stages: 1. Multi body dynamic (MBD) Simulation to determine excitation forces 2. Vibration analysis of engine under combustion load 3. Acoustic analysis of engine to predict Sound Pressure Level (SPL). Important parts of motorcycle engine with single cylinder are considered as flexible bodies for MBD simulation. It is necessary to accurately model crankshaft ball bearing for capturing the accurate transmissibility of combustion forces from crankshaft to casings. In this work crankshaft ball bearing is modeled with 6×6 stiffness matrix. It provides coupling between radial, axial and tilting deflections of bearing and it also allows moment transfer from crankshaft to casing. It helps to predict the realistic forces at bearings. Forces predicted from MBD simulation are applied to engine FE model for carrying out vibration analysis.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2241
Hiromichi Tsuji, Shinichi Maruyama, Koichi Onishi
Road Noise is generated by the change of random displacement input inside the tire contact patch. Since the existing 3 or 6 directional electromagnetic shakers have a flat surface at the tire contact patch, these shakers cannot excite the vehicle in a manner representative of actual on-road road noise input. Therefore, this paper proposes a new experimental method to measure the road noise vehicle transfer function. This method is based on the reciprocity between the tire contact patch and the driver's ear location. The reaction force sensor of the tire contact patch is newly developed for the reciprocal loud speaker excitation at the passenger ear location. In addition, with this equipment, it is possible to extract the dominant structural mode shapes creating high sound pressure in the automotive interior acoustic field. This method is referred to as experimental structure mode participation to the noise of the acoustic field in the vibro-acoustic coupling analysis.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2245
Mohammad Moetakef, Abdelkrim Zouani
Abstract A CAE method has been developed to address engine tonal noise and whine due to the excitation from a gerotor oil pump. The method involves a multidisciplinary approach including CFD, frequency-response structural analysis and acoustic analysis. The results from the application of the method applied to a couple of pumps with different designs are discussed. Engine tonal noise improvement through reduction in the excitation source from the pump and also stiffening the excitation path from the pump to the engine are studied. The effect of component modal alignment with oil pump orders is addressed as well.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2238
Marina Roche, Marco Mammetti, Claudi Crifaci
Abstract Emissions and fuel consumption reduction for the year 2020 have led to the development of new powertrain solutions. The development of new electric concepts presents vehicle integration challenges, involving among others, NVH. Energy flow is controlled by inverters that transform the energy from DC to AC by working at frequencies of the order of kilohertz with a control strategy that can abruptly switch, and motors introduce high orders and electro-magnetic forces due to their topology, inducing phenomena that are not present in internal- combustion engine vehicles. In Particular, a common characteristic of permanent magnet motors is cogging torque, which is due to the attraction of the rotor poles and stator slots that induces a torque ripple causing comfort challenges at low speed and low torque conditions.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2289
Joseph L. Stout, Vincent Solferino, Simon Antonov
Abstract Powerplant NVH decisions are sometimes made looking only at how the change impacts either the source radiated noise level or the source vibration. Depending on the engine configuration, those can be good approximations, but they can also be very misleading. By combining both noise sources into a vehicle equivalent noise level a much better analysis can be made of the impact of any proposed design change on the customer perceived loudness. This paper will investigate several different scenarios and identify how the airborne and the structureborne paths combine for I4, V6 and V8 engine configurations. Similar relationships will be shown for path as well as the source contributions.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2295
Aniket Parbat, Todd Tousignant, Kiran Govindswamy
Abstract The definition of vehicle and powertrain level NVH targets is one of the first tasks toward establishing where a vehicle's NVH behavior will reside with respect to the current or future state of industry. Realization of vehicle level NVH targets relies on a combination of competitive powertrain (source) and vehicle (path) NVH performance. Assessment of vehicle NVH sensitivity is well understood, and can be accomplished through determination of customer interface NVH response to measured excitations at the source input locations. However, development of appropriate powertrain source targets can be more difficult, particularly related to sound quality. This paper discusses various approaches for definition of powertrain targets for sound quality, with a specific focus on impulsive noise.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2297
Insoo Jung, Jaemin Jin, Kwangmin Won, Seungwook Yang, Kyoungdoug Min, Hoimyung Choi
Abstract The combustion noise of a diesel engine can be deteriorated by combustion characteristics such as the maximum rate of heat release and the start of combustion. These combustion characteristics in turn are influenced by the factors such as the engine NVH durability, driving conditions, environmental factors and fuel properties. Therefore, we need to develop the robust combustion noise that is insensitive to these factors. To achieve this aim, methods for predicting combustion characteristics has been developed by analyzing the vibration signal measured from the engine cylinder block. The closed-loop control of injection parameters through combustion characteristics prediction has been performed to produce the desired engine combustion performance. We constructed an ECU logic for the closed-loop control and verified the design in a diesel passenger car. We also evaluated the effect of combustion noise and fuel consumption by applying the closed-loop control.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2298
Stephen Chittick, Mark Swindell, Samir Raorane
Abstract Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) has designed and developed a new inline 4 cylinder engine family, branded Ingenium. In addition to delivering improved emissions and fuel economy over the outgoing engine, another key aim from the outset of the program was to reduce the combustion noise. This paper details the NVH development of the lead engine in this family, a 2.0 liter common rail turbo diesel. The task from the outset of this new program was to reduce the mass of the engine by 21.5 kg, whilst also improving the structural attenuation of the engine by 5 dB in comparison to the outgoing engine. Improving the structural attenuation by 5 dB was not only a key enabler in reducing combustion noise, but also helped to achieve a certified CO2 performance of 99 g/km in the all-new Jaguar XE model, by allowing more scope for increasing cylinder pressure forcing without compromising NVH.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2343
Jian Pan, Yuksel Gur
Abstract OEMs are racing to develop lightweight vehicles as government regulations now mandate automakers to nearly double the average fuel economy of new cars and trucks by 2025. Lightweight materials such as aluminum, magnesium and carbon fiber composites are being used as structural members in vehicle body and suspension components. The reduction in weight in structural panels increases noise transmission into the passenger compartment. This poses a great challenge in vehicle sound package development since simply increasing weight in sound package components to reduce interior noise is no longer an option [1]. This paper discusses weight saving approaches to reduce noise level at the sources, noise transmission paths, and transmitted noise into the passenger compartment. Lightweight sound package materials are introduced to treat and reduce airborne noise transmission into multi-material lightweight body structure.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2175
Jason Ley, Zhaohui Sun, William Braun, Jeffrey Nyquist
Abstract This paper presents the propshaft liner development that is expanded from previously published SAE technical paper and US patents. The new developments will expand in two facets: liner tuning adjustment and refinement, along with the implications to and solutions for broadband attenuation. Methods for developing a liner with higher tuning adjustment capability will be discussed, along with the results for a design-of-experiments study. In addition, concerns are explored and addressed of broadband attenuation in balancing the tuning effectiveness for particularly targeted frequency range. A particular application of the newly developed liner, trade-marked as Sylent liner, was illustrated and discussed in detail.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2236
Parimal Tathavadekar, Ricardo O. de Alba Alvarez, Michael Sanderson, Rabah Hadjit
Abstract Finite element analysis (FEA) is commonly used in the automotive industry to predict low frequency NVH behavior (<150 Hz) of structures. Also, statistical energy analysis (SEA) framework is used to predict high frequency (>400 Hz) noise transmission from the source space to the receiver space. A comprehensive approach addressing the entire spectrum (>20 Hz) by taking into account structure-borne and air-borne paths is not commonplace. In the works leading up to this paper a hybrid methodology was employed to predict structure-borne and air-borne transfer functions up to 1000 Hz by combining FEA and SEA. The dash panel was represented by FE structural subsystems and the noise control treatments (NCTs) and the pass-throughs were characterized via testing to limit uncertainty in modeling. The rest of the structure and the fluid spaces were characterized as SEA subsystems.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2313
Bryce Gardner, Abderrazak Mejdi, Chadwyck Musser, Sébastien Chaigne, Tiago De Campos Macarios
Abstract Flow strongly affects the propagation of acoustics wave transmission within a duct and this must be addressed by the vibro-acoustic modelling of duct systems subject to non-uniform flow. Flow impacts both the effective sound propagation speed in a duct and refracts the sound towards or away from the duct walls depending on whether the acoustic waves are propagating in the direction of the flow or against the flow. Accurate modeling of the acoustic propagation within a duct is crucial for design and “tuning” of muffler systems that need to strongly attenuate narrowband acoustic sources from the engine. Muffler systems that may avoid matching acoustic resonances to engine narrowband sources when no flow is present may experience shifting of resonances to frequencies that match engine sources and cause problems when the flow during a real operating condition is present.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2300
Robert Fiedler, Chadwyck Musser, Petr Cuchý
Abstract This paper addresses the NVH design of a light rail vehicle whose maximum allowable interior SPL levels at certain speeds are regulated and may vary between countries, states, and cities. The objective of this study was to predict sound pressure levels (SPL) at several interior locations across a wide range of frequencies and estimate if the current design configuration will meet the noise level limits. Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) was used to predict interior SPL and to understand and rank the various noise contribution paths and give a better understanding of the physics of transmission and what types of design changes are most effective to reduce the overall interior SPL to meet targets. A typical light rail vehicle is composed of a frame-like structure covered by lightweight panels and with interior panels that are increasingly made from composites, sandwich, laminated, or honeycomb materials or extruded panels.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2302
Yuksel Gur, Jian Pan, David Wagner
Lightweighting of vehicle panels enclosing vehicle cabin causes NVH degradation since engine, road, and wind noise acoustic sources propagate to the vehicle interior through these panels. In order to reduce this NVH degradation, there is a need to develop new NVH sound package materials and designs for use in lightweight vehicle design. Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) model can be an effective CAE design tool to develop NVH sound packages for use in lightweight vehicle design. Using SEA can help engineers recover the NVH deficiency created due to sheet metal lightweighting actions. Full vehicle SEA model was developed to evaluate the high frequency NVH performance of “Vehicle A” in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 10 kHz. This correlated SEA model was used for the vehicle sound package optimization studies. Full vehicle level NVH laboratory tests for engine and tire patch noise reduction were also conducted to demonstrate the performance of sound package designs on “Vehicle A”.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2352
Chaitanya Krishna Balla, Sudhakara Naidu, Milind Narayan Ambardekar
Abstract Noise Vibration and Harshness (NVH) refinement is one of the important parameters in modern vehicle development. In city traffic conditions, idling is an engine operating condition where a driver focuses attention more to his/her vehicle. Tactile vibration & noise levels inside the cab play an important role in all vehicles, especially those powered by diesel engines where combustion pressures are higher. They lead to discomfort & fatigue of passengers of even a low cost vehicle. Now its idle NVH is influenced mainly by vibration-isolation provided by power-train (PT) mounting design, This paper describes steps taken to improve the idle vibrations at a driver seat of a small commercial vehicle (SCV) with a 2-cylinder diesel engine of 800 cc through redesign of PT-mounting along with fine tuning of idle speed of the engine. A resonance was avoided between the first firing order at idling and PT rigid-body mode in pitching.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2347
James A. Mynderse, Alexander Sandstrom, Zhaohui Sun
Abstract The American Axle & Manufacturing Inc. driveline dynamometer provides immense value for experimental validation of product NVH performances. It has been intensively used to evaluate product design robustness in terms of build variations, mileage accumulation, and temperature sensitivity. The current driveline dynamometer input motor system has multiple torsional modes which create strong coupling with test part gear mesh dynamics. Mechanical Engineering seniors at Lawrence Technological University designed, fabricated, and validated a mechanism to decouple the driveline dynamics from the driveline dynamometer dynamics. The student-designed decoupler mechanism is presented with experimental validation of effectiveness in decoupling driveline dynamometer dynamics from the driveline under test.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2219
Al Ganeshkumar, Shinichi Fukuhara
Abstract Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) technology is widely used in automobiles to reduce engine harmonic noise [3]. ANC systems require one or more microphones mounted in the cabin to monitor the harmonic noise level and provide feedback to the DSP algorithm. The ideal locations for the microphones are as close as possible to the passenger seating locations and away from any wind turbulence that can impact the diaphragm of the microphone. Excessive wind turbulence on the diaphragm can cause the ANC adaptive filter weights to be perturbed enough resulting in audible ‘pumping’ type artifacts. For several practical reason it's not always possible to control the location of the microphones and hence a DSP software and/or mechanical solution needs to be incorporated in the system. This paper will primarily address the DSP software solutions to detect wind turbulence noise in ANC microphones so appropriate counter measures can be applied to eliminate the unwanted artifacts.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2249
Saad Bennouna, Said Naji, Olivier Cheriaux, Solene Moreau, Boureima Ouedraogo, Jean Michel Ville
Abstract Passengers' thermal comfort inside a car cabin is mainly provided by the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) module. Air provided by HVAC is blown via a blower, passing through different components: flaps, thermal exchangers, ducts… and then distributed to car cabin areas. Interaction between airflow and HVAC components generates noises that emerge in car cabin. Due to this fact, noise is naturally created and its level is linked to flow rate. Valeo is aiming, though CEVAS project, to develop a prediction tool which will provide HVAC spectrum and sound quality data. This tool will be based, in particular, on aeroacoustic measurements using 2N-ports model and Particle Image Velocimetry methods to provide characteristics of HVAC components.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2230
Thomas L. Lago
Abstract Chatter vibrations are causing large monetary losses daily in industry. New materials have increased the challenges with harmful vibration levels. Since the vibrations, when observed as a final result, are chaotic and the vibration process nonlinear, it is a challenging task to deal with it. It is also a common “understanding” in the cutting industry that chatter is RPM (the rotational speed) dependent, since the behavior changes with RPM. Many attempts have been done over many years to mitigate and understand the vibrations. In our vast research on these topics, we have found that it is rewarding to classify the vibrations into categories, enabling a better understanding of its underlying physics and “source of vibrations,” and thus also the formulation of a possible remedy. An analysis approach has been developed where vibrations are analyzed and categorized and a GO/NOGO indicator is telling if the machine has the “right type of vibrations.”
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