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Viewing 1 to 30 of 6906
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0061
Rama Subbu, Baskar Anthony Samy, Piyush Mani Sharma, Prasanna Mahendiran
Abstract Ride comfort, driving stability and drivability are vital factors in terms of vehicle performance and customer satisfaction. Crankshaft unbalance is a source for the vibration that reduces the vehicle performance and it needs to be controlled to some extent such that the vehicle performance will be improved. The IC engine is made up of reciprocating and rotating parts. They produce unbalance forces during their operation and produces vibration in Vehicle. The vibration reduction will be possible by minimizing these unbalance forces and by optimizing the crankshaft of the two wheeled vehicle engine design. Many researches were made to find the causes for the vibration and to reduce it. But still there is a research gap on the testing and simulation of engine components (crankshaft, connecting rod and piston assembly). In this study, an attempt is made to represent the engine vibrations and its isolation to provide a gate way for the future work on it. This study shows the various steps carried out on the multibody modeling of the IC engine components including engine crankshaft and their orientations.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0105
Atsushi Maruyama, Gaku Naoe
Abstract For a small general purpose engine, the authors have studied on “combustion noise”, the mechanical noise originating from combustion. The purpose of this study is to clarify the mechanisms of combustion noise generation. The engine used in this study was a 4-stroke air-cooled single-cylinder engine with the typical characteristics of 3.5 kW-class small general purpose engines, which was specifically designed for experiments. We analyzed the operational behaviors of parts such as the crankshaft, the flywheel and the crankcase during the time of occurrence of combustion noise. Results of the analysis showed that the primary component of combustion noise in small general purpose engines is radiated from the flywheel connected to the crankshaft, and that the vibration mode that radiates the noise is excited by bending deformation of the crankshaft under explosion load. Based on these results, this paper will also discuss the effect of the stiffness of the main bearings on combustion noise.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0018
Kenichi Morimoto, Kenichi Tanaka
Abstract There have been a number of attempts to clarify the relationship between motorcycle specifications and shimmy phenomenon. Some of such efforts are based on equations of motion. The methods used in those efforts are suitable for analyzing motions in a fundamental structure. However, when the degree of freedom is large, it is extremely difficult to deliver an equation of motion. Therefore, a practical method cannot be found generally when applying the methods employing equations of motion. We also conducted the analysis of shimmy using multi-body dynamics simulation. The yielded results were useful only for clarifying the differences in shimmy levels among motorcycles. However, they were not helpful to understand the relationships between specifications and shimmy phenomenon. In this study, we focused clarifying these relationships and we took four study steps shown below: 1 Narrowing down the motorcycle specifications affecting shimmy2 Determining physical parameters influential to shimmy3 Investigating how a change of physical parameters affects shimmy using simplified model4 Analyzing how the changes of motorcycle specifications affect the shimmy Following these steps, we clarified the relationships between motorcycle's specifications and shimmy by using only three physical parameters.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0053
Yoshihiro Nakagawa, Shinya Takahashi, Mikihito Masaki, Ranju Imao
Abstract In brake squeal analyses using FE models, minimizing the discrepancies in vibration characteristics between the measurement and the simulation is a key issue for improving its reproducibility. The discrepancies are generally adjusted by the shape parameters and/or material properties applied to the model. However, the discrepancy cannot be easily adjusted, especially, for the vibration characteristic of the disc model of a motorcycle. One of the factors that give a large impact on this discrepancy is a thermal history of the disc. That thermal history includes the one experienced in manufacturing process. In this paper, we examine the effects of residual stress on the natural frequency of motorcycle discs. The residual stress on the disc surface was measured by X-ray stress measurement method. It was followed by an eigenvalue analysis. In this analysis, we developed a unique method in which the residual stress was substituted by thermal stress. Using this method, the discrepancy between measurement and calculation of the natural frequency was reduced from ±5.2% to ±1.3%.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0121
Kazuhiko Tanaka, Haruomi Sugita, Hibiki Saito, Masahiko Sekita
Abstract Recently, it has been widely practiced in motorcycle developments that the same type of engine is commonly applied to various vehicle categories. Accordingly, it is drawing more attention to develop the methodology for creating the best suitable sound for each individual vehicle category regardless of restriction from the engine configurations. In our study, we aimed to establish a procedure to control exhaust sounds beyond the borders across the inherent sound qualities originated from their engine configurations. Firstly, we conducted subjective tests in order to extract essential factors, depicted by adjectives that appear in verbal expressions commonly used to illustrate sound qualities in general. The results enabled us to conduct quantitative evaluations of the exhaust sound qualities of various motorcycles. Next, we clarified the relationships among the individual factors of sound qualities under our study and physical parameters in waveforms of the sounds. Finally, we tried to design the target sound quality having required physical parameters by using a one-dimensional simulation tool.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0120
Sara Gronchi, Riccardo Maccherini, Raffaele Squarcini, Fabio Guglielmo, Emanuela Ligarò
Abstract In the modern engine of both small and large size, the acoustic emission is a very important matter increasingly studied as per specific international standards. This paper presents the study of the acoustic emission of a hydraulic rotary oil pump by means of measurement techniques and numerical approaches. This activity aims at showing a complete test-case in which both methods are used to face a noise issue and highlighting also the “weight” of the hydraulic excitation in both cases. In particular, an oil pump has been completely characterized on a test bench to verify the hydraulic performances and the noise radiation. A structural modification has been suggested with the target of altering the noise spectrum of the pump, achieving an optimization of the noise generation. From this assumption, experimental and numerical activities have started in parallel. Measurements have been carried out by means of the intensimetric method and supported also by conventional acquisitions performed with hydraulic pressure transducers, accelerometers and microphones.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0123
Vishnu Kumar Kuduva Shanthulal, Kannan Marudachalam, V Pattabiraman, S Jabez Dhinagar, Chandramouli Padmanabhan
Abstract The diesel power train (engine and transmission) is the most significant mass contributor in a three- wheeled vehicle. High idling vibrations from the engine get transmitted to the structure and the body panels through the engine mounts. Isolation of these vibrations by proper design of rubber mounts is the most effective engineering approach to improve ride quality of vehicle. In the present study, a mathematical model of the powertrain and mount system is developed; with the engine and transmission being assumed to behave as a rigid body (6 degrees-of-freedom) and the compliance comes from the mounts. As a first step, the modes and natural frequencies are obtained. Following this the response to unbalanced inertial forces for an excitation frequency range of 20-60 Hz (1200-3600 rpm) has been obtained. The model is validated by comparing its results with results of previous published research work. Also, motoring experiments are conducted on a baseline configuration to obtain the vibration response at mounts and mode shapes through ODS (Operational Deflection Shape) for validating the math model.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0129
Giancarlo Chiatti, Erasmo Recco, Ornella Chiavola, Silvia Conforto
Abstract In the last years, the increasing concern for the environmental issues of IC engines has promoted the development of new strategies capable of reducing both pollutant emissions in atmosphere and noise radiation. Engines can produce different types of noise: 1) aerodynamic noise due to intake and exhaust systems and 2) surface radiated noise. Identification and analysis of noise sources are essential to evaluate the individual contribution (injection, combustion, piston slap, turbocharger, oil pump, valves) to the overall noise with the aim of selecting appropriate control strategies. Previous paper focused on the combustion related noise emission. The research activity aimed at diagnosing and controlling the combustion process via acoustic measurements. The optimal placement of the microphone was selected, where the signal was strongly correlated to the in-cylinder pressure development during the combustion process. Analysis and processing of the sound emission allowed the acoustic contribution of the combustion event to be isolated.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0132
Hiroki Ikeda, Norimasa Iida, Hiroshi Kuzuyama, Tsutomu Umehara, Takayuki Fuyuto
Abstract A combustion method called Noise Canceling Spike (NC-Spike) Combustion [1, 2] has been reported in the co-author's previous paper, which reduces combustion noise in PCCI with split injection. This NC-Spike Combustion uses interference of the following “spike” of pressure rise on the preceding peak of pressure rise. The overall combustion noise is reduced by lowering the maximum frequency component of the noise spectrum. The period of this frequency is two times of the time interval between the two peaks of the pressure rise rate. This maximum load range of conventional PCCI combustion is limited by the combustion noise, since the maximum pressure rise rate increases as the amount of injected fuel increases. The NC-Spike Combustion has a potential to extend of the operating range of PCCI combustion. In this paper, we investigated feasibility and controllability of the two-peak heat release rate during high temperature heat release by adding fuel in the adiabatic compression process of pre-mixed gas.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0059
Antonio Agresta, Francesca Di Puccio, Paola Forte, Gabriele Benigni
Abstract NVH simulations for an automotive component industry represent a convenient mean to compare different solutions and make decisions on design choices based on the predictions of the component vibro-acoustic behavior. This paper presents the vibro-acoustic characterization and comparison of two fuel rail assemblies (FRAs) by mean of simulations in Ansys Workbench & LMS Virtual.Lab. These simulations required a preliminary finite element (FE) modal analysis on the FRAs. To verify the reliability of the FE models, an experimental modal analysis was performed on one of the two fuel rails in free-free condition. The correlation between FE and test models highlighted some differences: a sensitivity study proved that the differences depend on the modeling of some brazed joints. The results of the following NVH simulations were checked by performing an acoustic impact test on the two FRAs in free-free condition inside an anechoic chamber. The comparison between the test and FE results proved that only a tuned FE model provides reliable results.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0119
Diego Copiello, Ze Zhou, Gregory Lielens
Abstract This paper addresses the numerical simulation of motorcycle exhaust system noise using a transfer matrix method (TMM) supporting high order analytical acoustic modes representation combined with finite element method (FEM) included in the Actran software, R15. In the state-of-the-art of hybrid TMM/FEM approach the main assumption consists in a 1D plane wave acoustic propagation in the components connections which is intrinsically limiting the maximum frequency of the analysis. In motorcycle exhaust systems this limitation is even stronger because typical geometries exhibit strong curvatures and bends causing the scattering of the acoustic wave into higher order modes. Therefore, results might be erroneous even at frequencies at which only the plane wave is expected to be propagating. The improved transfer matrix method presented in this paper overcomes this limitation allowing to increase the range of applicability of this method. Specifically, the method is theoretically described and then validated on a set of test cases directly derived from a typical motorcycle exhaust system.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0026
Alessandro Franceschini, Emanuele Pellegrini, Raffaele Squarcini
Abstract Nowadays the challenge in design of auxiliary devices for automotive small engines is focused on packaging reduction and on the increase of the performance. These requirements are in contrast to each other and in order to fulfil the project specifications, new and more refined design tools and procedures need to be developed. This paper presents a calculation loop developed by Pierburg Pump Technology Italy S.p.A. (PPT). It supports the design of a variable displacement oil pump component for engine applications. The work is focused on the fatigue life evaluation of a joint, which transmits the drive torque from the engine to the oil pump. The aim of the procedure is to calculate the onset of the surface fatigue phenomenon in the hexagonal joint which drives the oil pump, taking into account the axes misalignment and the flat-to-flat clearance. The study has involved several matters, experimental measures, CFD, MBA and FEM analyses. A calculation procedure has been set up in order to consider all the necessary loads applied on the joint.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0047
Mohamed El Morsy, Gabriela Achtenova
Abstract Using the PULSE platform for vibration analysis, which has been developed as an advanced solution for vibration measurements, the Robust Diagnostic Concept (RDC) was elaborated. The PULSE setup is designed to aid in fault diagnosis of a vehicle gearbox - the main part of a vehicle powertrain. Time Domain, Continuous Wavelet Transformation Technique (CWT), FFT and order analysis measurements are used for detection of an artificial pitting defect in a gear by tracking the gearbox response at accelerated speed and different loads. The test stand is equipped with three dynamometers; the input dynamometer serves as the internal combustion engine, the output dynamometers introduce the load on the flanges of the output joint shafts. The pitting defect is manufactured on the tooth side of the fifth speed gear on the intermediate shaft. The effect of temperature on the vibration measurements was also investigated to study its impact on the fault diagnosis. The presented concept has an important application in the field of mechanical fault diagnosis.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0063
Daniela Siano, Fabio Bozza, Danilo D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta Panza
Abstract In the present work, an Auto Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) model and a Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) are applied on vibrational signals, acquired by an accelerometer placed on the cylinder block of a Spark Ignition (SI) engine, for knock detection purposes. To the aim of tuning such procedures, the same analysis has been carried out by using the traditional MAPO (Maximum Amplitude of Pressure Oscillations) index and an Inverse Kinetic Model (IKM), both applied on the in-cylinder pressure signals. Vibrational and in-cylinder pressure signals have been collected on a four cylinder, four stroke engine, for different engine speeds, load conditions and spark advances. The results of the two vibrational based methods are compared and in depth discussed to the aim of highlighting the pros and cons of each methodology. The presented outcomes show the capability of the vibration based detection algorithms in accurately monitor the presence of knock phenomena, and to determine its intensity according to the IKM and MAPO based methods.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2703
Xiuliang Zhao, Yong Cheng, Limei Wang
Abstract The surface vibration signals are widely used since they have much combustion information. However, for an Internal Combustion Engine (ICE), the measured surface vibration signals are difficult to utilize because they contain non in-cylinder pressure excitation response. The vibration response signals excited by the in-cylinder pressure excitation (ICPE) and the reciprocating inertia force excitation (RIFE) are overlapped in both time and frequency domain. That means they cannot be separated effectively by conventional signal processing method. In this paper, a new strategy to extract ICPE response from measured vibration signals by pattern recognition method is proposed. A model is established to describe the RIFE response. Then, the RIFE response could be predicted and subtracted directly from the measured vibration velocity signals. The processing results indicate that a fourth-order model and the data of initial compression stroke can reach satisfactory results. The impact of the speed fluctuation can be ignored.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2867
Zhiyong Chen, Zhiyuan Chen, Yang Mao, Wenku Shi, Guihui Zhang
Abstract To research the torsional vibration damping characteristic of magneto-rheological fluid dual mass flywheel (MRF-DMF) and the control system in power train, the multi-degree power train torsional vibration model which contains MRF-DMF and semi-active fuzzy control model are built, then the damping characteristic of MRF-DMF in several conditions are gained and compared with MRF-DMF when no control system. The result indicates: the damping characteristic of MRF-DMF effect on power train when using control is better than without control in idle, speed up, slow down, ignition and stalling, while the damping characteristic is less obvious in constant speed because the simulation condition and damping moment relatively stable.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2870
Yuan Fang, Tong Zhang
Abstract Because of the vehicle market competitive and of the raise of customers' demanding, NVH performance became an important job, especially for new energy vehicles. As the electric vehicle moving into the direction of high speed and large torque, electric vehicle vibration and noise problems highlighted gradually. In recent years, CAE has played an increasing role in the design, development and optimization of powertrain NVH at component and system levels. The subject of this paper was the numerical and experimental evaluation of the electromagnetic and vibro-acoustic behavior of an electric powertrain. For this purpose, a coupled and fully flexible dynamics model of the electric powertrain was developed. Then electromagnetic forces including both radial and tangential force and gear mesh excitations including time-varying meshing stiffness, meshing error and meshing impact were computed, which were used to perform forced response analysis on the full FE mesh of the powertrain housing.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2863
Jouji Kimura, Shinichiro Kobayashi, Katsuhiro Hoshina, Kousuke Kawase, Koji Matsui, Atsushi Yamamoto
Abstract This paper describes the characteristics and mechanism of crankshaft impact noise that radiates from the cylinder body at full load medium engine speeds, based on the mechanism for axial vibration of crankshaft coupled with torsional vibration of crankshaft.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2849
Wei Guo, Henry Guo, Xiaowei Du, Daniel Wang
Turbochargers are widely used to boost internal combustion engines for both on and off high way applications to meet emission and performance requirements. Due to the high operating temperature, turbochargers are subjected to hostile environment. Low vibration level is one of the key requirements while designing turbo for every application. An engine bracket is employed to support turbine housing to reduce total vibration level. Turbine housing in the turbocharger is commonly equipped with boss to accommodate the engine bracket supporting which eventually includes additional constraints in the turbocharger system. Additional constraints in the turbine housing can lead to adverse impact in the Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue (TMF) life of the housing component. Boss generally has critical influence to thermal stress distribution of the turbine housing. Bad design of boss location could bring severe thermal cracking and surface fracture that leads to loss of functionality and serious accident.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2862
Georg Johann Meingaßner, Hermann Pflaum, Karsten Stahl
Downsizing and downspeeding are currently important development approaches of the automobile industry to improve fuel efficiency and to reduce emissions. Decreased operational speeds in combination with higher combustion pressures lead to an increase of the excitation of torsional vibrations by the combustion engine. Torsional vibrations in powertrains can cause strength and NVH problems as well as lower driving comfort and reliability of the vehicle. Currently, conventional systems for reduction of torsional vibrations are increasingly reaching their limits. In cooperation with several institutes of the Technische Universität München (TUM) innovative concepts for an improved reduction of torsional vibrations in automotive powertrains have been developed. Several of those concepts have been realized as prototype assemblies engineered by the Gear Research Centre (FZG). ([6], [7], [8], [12], [13], [14]) During the design process, different challenges with regard to mass, mass moment of inertia and space demands have to be considered to ensure system performance and to meet vehicle-related requirements.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2864
Daniela Siano, Fabio Bozza, Luigi Teodosio, Vincenzo De Bellis
This paper reports 1D and 3D CFD analyses aiming to improve the gas-dynamic noise emission of a downsized turbocharged VVA engine through the re-design of the intake air-box device, consisting in the introduction of external or internal resonators. Nowadays, modern spark-ignition (SI) engines show more and more complex architectures that, while improving the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), may be responsible for the increased noise radiation at the engine intake mouth. In particular VVA systems allow for the actuation of advanced valve strategies that provide a reduction in the BSFC at part load operations thanks to the intake line de-throttling. In these conditions, due to a less effective attenuation of the pressure waves that travel along the intake system, VVA engines produce higher gas-dynamic noise levels. The worsening of the engine gas-dynamic performance can be compensated with a partial re-design of the air-box device, without significantly penalizing the engine power output.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2676
Takayuki Fuyuto, Masahiro Taki, Reiko Ueda, Yoshiaki Hattori, Hiroshi Kuzuyama, Tsutomu Umehara
Abstract An author's previous studies addressed a combustion system which reduces emissions, noise, and fuel consumption by using PCCI with the split injection of fuel. This concept relies on the premixed combustion of the first injected fuel and accelerated oxidation by the second injected fuel. Although this combustion system requires the optimization of the timing of the second injection, the details of how noise and emissions are reduced have not been elucidated. In this paper, the authors explain the mechanism whereby emissions and noise are reduced by the second injection. In-cylinder visualizations and numerical simulations both showed an increase in smoke and CO as the second injection timing was advanced, as induced by the inhibited oxidation of the rich flame. When the second injection timing is excessively retarded, the amount of soot forming around the near-nozzle increased. The second fuel injection at the optimum timing can mix with the air in the inner-region of the cavity, such that no soot is formed in the near-nozzle region.
2014-10-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-9029
Uday Nayak, S Aravind, Sunil Aundhekar
Abstract The present competitive market scenario and customer requirements demand for improved NVH quality and to meet statutory norms without increased cost. When gears are used for power transmission, gear noise is of particular concern. The noise may be created due to harmonics of the rotating and meshing internal components. This has a significant effect on the overall vehicle sound quality. Various factors contribute to gearbox noise. Some of them include shaft misalignments, gear geometry, lubrication, bearings and loose mountings. Hence it is essential to study which factors contribute to the gearbox noise and to develop countermeasures for the same. Although a number of factors may contribute to gear noise as mentioned, the scope of this paper is limited to the effect of gear geometry alone on the gearbox noise. This paper offers an experimental investigation of reducing the noise levels in Ashok Leyland gearbox by modifying the gear tooth profile on one of the gear trains in order to meet the futuristic noise statutory norms.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2316
Masahiro Akei, Takayuki Koizumi, Nobutaka Tsujiuchi, Takayuki Yamauchi
Abstract This paper describes a prediction of vibration and the transfer path analysis (TPA) using an engine multi body dynamics (MBD) model and measured frequency response functions (FRFs). TPA is used in order to analyze each contribution of vibration transfer paths. In the TPA, input forces from vibration source to passive part should be identified accurately. In the traditional TPA, an identification of input forces is done using only experimental results. Therefore, a parametric study to an improvement of a structure or an isolation system is impossible. In this study, the MBD model of engine is constructed, and input forces from engine to mainframe of agriculture machine are predicted. The accuracy of prediction is confirmed, compared with the results from the traditional TPA method. The contribution of each transfer path is analyzed, and the vibration levels of operator position are predicted using the measured FRFs and the simulated input forces. As a result, the input forces and the vibration levels of operator position can be predicted accurately.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2317
Rahul Ramola, G Senthilkumar, P Kannan, Muralidharan Chennakrishnan
Abstract The demand for comfort level in commercial vehicles is steadily increasing. Hence, fine-tuned performance parameters and attributes are required to fulfill the expectations from these vehicles. Refinement of noise and vibration without affecting performances of sub-systems and components has become extremely challenging with increasing customer requirements. This paper presents an approach to identify and reduce the high level whistling noise that was perceived in the passenger compartment while the vehicle was accelerated above 50 kmph. Interior noise measurements in static engine run-up condition reveal that the whistling noise is of specific order. Since, whistling noise is related to aerodynamic response of components, engine cooling fan, turbo charger, alternators and compressors were suspected. Using order tracking and near field measurements, HVAC alternator was confirmed as the main cause for whistling noise. Noise measurements confirmed that orders related to alternator cooling fan became dominant above 50 kmph.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2318
Masahiro Akei, Takayuki Koizumi, Nobutaka Tsujiuchi, Takayuki Yamauchi
Abstract This paper describes an identification of a sound source model for a diesel engine installed on an agricultural machine by Inverse-Numerical Acoustic analysis (INA), and the applicability of the identified sound source model. INA is a method to identify surface vibrations from surrounding sound pressures. This method is applicable for a complicated-shaped sound source like an engine. In order to confirm the accuracy of the identified sound source model, the surface vibrations of the engine are compared with the measured results. Moreover, in the condition of the simulated engine room, the surrounding sound pressure levels of the engine are predicted using the sound source model and the boundary element method (BEM). For the verification of the prediction accuracy, the surrounding sound pressures of the engine are measured using the testing device which simulated actual engine room, namely an enclosure. As a result, the sound source model of the diesel engine is identified accurately using the INA.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2314
John Stuart, Stefano Cassara, Brendan Chan, Nicholas Augustyniak
Wobble and shimmy vibrations are commonly observed in commercial highway vehicles with solid-beam front axles. These vibrations are typically self-excited and manifest themselves as sustained oscillations about the kingpin and axle tramp. A study was initiated to investigate and quantify wobble and shimmy behaviors, with a primary focus on wobble. A cross functional team including test and simulation engineers evaluated a vehicle exhibiting these behaviors. The team developed an ADAMS model to reproduce the behaviors and developed a DOE to quantify the impact of variables and combinations of variables. The evaluation demonstrated that dynamic imbalance in the rotating masses is a primary source of excitation. Wheel run-out, caster angle, tire brand, tire wear and tire inflation are also significant sources. Future studies will use these findings to mitigate the concern.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2315
John Anderson
Abstract This paper describes the development and testing of a Dynamic Vibration Absorber to reduce frame beaming vibration in a highway tractor. Frame beaming occurs when the first vertical bending mode of the frame is excited by road or wheel-end inputs. It is primarily a problem for driver comfort. Up until now, few options were available to resolve this problem. The paper will review the phenomenon, design factors affecting a vehicle's sensitivity to frame beaming, and the principles of Dynamic Vibration Absorbers (AKA Tuned Mass Dampers). Finally, the paper will describe simulation and testing that led to the development of an effective vibration absorber as a field fix.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2482
Meechai Sriwiboon, Nipon Tiempan, Kritsana Kaewlob, Seong Kwan Rhee
The influence of processing conditions on Low-Copper NAO disc pads were investigated as part of an effort to develop Low-Copper disc pad formulations as this kind of information is not readily available in open literature. Processing conditions as well as formulation modifications are found to influence friction, pad wear, disc wear and brake squeal. Low-Copper disc pads for pick-up trucks, equivalent to an OE pad, are developed. It is also found that brake squeal measured during the SAE J2522 (AK Master) Performance testing is related to the combined total wear rate of the disc plus the inner/outer pads or the disc wear rate alone, and that there is a threshold wear rate, above which brake squeal increases rapidly.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2491
SeongJoo Lee, JooSeong Jeong, ShinWook Kim, ShinWan Kim, Seong Rhee
A previous investigation showed that minor variations in alloying elements in gray cast iron disc contributed to measurable differences in friction and disc wear. This investigation was undertaken to find out if and how the increased friction and disc wear might affect brake squeal. The SAE J2522 and J2521 dynamometer procedures as well as an OEM noise dynamometer procedure and a chassis dynamometer noise procedure were used to find out if a correlation between disc wear and brake squeal could be discovered. In all cases, as the wear rate of a disc increases under a given set of test conditions, disc material transfer to the pad surface increases, which results in increased friction and brake squeal. Also a good method to detect disc variability (disc to disc, within a disc) is discussed.
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