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2017-01-15
Book
This is the electronic format of the Journal.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0044
Gaku Naoe
One of the issues involved in compression ignition combustion is the increase in combustion noise from engine mechanical systems caused by rapid combustion. When using natural gas of high ignition temperature in the fuel, the compression ratio is increased relative to gasoline, and combustion becomes more rapid. The present research pursues the issue of noise by clarifying the distinctive features of combustion noise through tests focused on the two topics of stroke bore ratio (S/B ratio), and ignition timing. In order to verify S/B ratio and in-cylinder pressure change rate, combustion noise was measured in five types of engine with the same displacement and the S/B ratio varying from 0.8 to 2.1. The test results seemed that the effect of input load reduction due to the smaller bore caused a reduction in combustion noise at the same in-cylinder pressure change rate.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0039
Andrea Fioravanti, Giovanni Vichi, Isacco Stiaccini, Giovanni Ferrara, Lorenzo Ferrari
In recent years, the motorcycle muffler design are moving to dissipative silencer architectures. Indeed due to the increase of restrictions on noise emissions both dissipative and coupled reactive-dissipative mufflers, thanks to their higher noise efficiency coupled with a size reduction, have substituted the reactive silencers. A dissipative muffler is composed by a perforated pipe that crosses a cavity volume that is usually filled by a fibrous porous material. The acoustic performance of this kind of muffler are strictly dependent on the porosity of the perforated pipe and the flow resistivity of the porous material. The interaction between these elements and the mass flow rate of gas passing through the silencer influences the muffler performance.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0041
Chao-Kai LI, Jia-Siou Wu, Yuh-Yih Wu
Today, motorcycle is one of the main noise pollution in Asia. In addition, the design of motorcycle muffler is closely related with how noise is made as the regulation is getting crucial these years. Therefore, Transmission Loss (TL) is an important index to evaluate the characteristic of muffler, but conventional trial and error method results in time wasting muffler tests. In this paper, in order to shorten the development period, Ricardo WAVE software is used to discuss the simulate analysis TL of motorcycle muffler. In this paper uses the huge heavy motorbike (400cc) made from manufacture to simulate TL. Due to the complex interior design of the target muffler which is mainly made of simple elements, this research put simulate analysis on simple elements like single chamber, non-coaxial and insert expansion chamber, clapboard chamber and sound absorbing materials at first place. There are three goals in this research.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2311
Arun Prasath G, Saravanan Duraiarasan, R Govindarajan
Indian two wheeler market is one of the largest and highly competitive in the world. Indian scooter segment grows at a pace of around 30% YOY. The stiff competition among OEM’s to increase the market share with fuel efficient and high performance products pushes development and calibration engineers to burn the midnight oil to concoct innovative methods to design technology boosted product. Customer expectations are always high in terms of fuel economy, drivability and NVH. Due to higher level of complexity involved in CVT (Continuously Varying Transmission) engine, it is daunting task to optimize for achieving best of NVH characteristics along with Fuel Economy, drivability and reduced exhaust emission. This paper describes the experiment conducted during the development of 110cc CVT four stroke scooter engine. The development and calibration of this scooter was mainly based on real world usage pattern (RWUP).
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2343
Mark Devlin, Darryl Williams, Michael Glasgow, Karen Hux, Aaron Whitworth, Timothy Cameron
Abstract Improving vehicle fuel efficiency is a key market driver in the automotive industry. Typically lubricant chemists focus on reducing viscosity and friction to reduce parasitic energy losses in order to improve automotive fuel efficiency. However, in a transmission other factors may be more important. If an engine can operate at high torque levels the conversion of chemical energy in the fuel to mechanical energy is dramatically increased. However high torque levels in transmissions may cause NVH to occur. The proper combination of friction material and fluid can be used to address this issue. Friction in clutches is controlled by asperity friction and hydrodynamic friction. Asperity friction can be controlled with friction modifiers in the ATF. Hydrodynamic friction control is more complex because it involves the flow characteristics of friction materials and complex viscosity properties of the fluid.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2258
Yoshihiro Okoshi, Shinsuke Kikuchi, Yuta Mitsugi, Kotaro Tanaka, Masaaki Kato, Tomoya Tsuji, Mitsuru Konno
Abstract Dimethyl ether (DME) is a promising alternative fuel for compression ignition (CI) engines. DME features good auto ignition characteristics and soot-free combustion. In order to develop an injection system suitable for DME, it is necessary to understand its fuel properties. Sound speed is an important fuel property that affects the injection characteristics. However, the measurement data under high-pressures corresponding to those in fuel injection systems are lacking. The critical temperature of DME is lower than that of diesel fuel, and is close to the injection condition. It is important to understand the behavior of the sound speed around the critical point, since the sound speed at critical point is extremely low. In this study, sound speed in DME in a wide pressure and temperature range of 1 MPa to 80 MPa, 298.15 K to 413.15 K, including the vicinity of the critical point, was measured.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8051
Jixiu Zhang, Shuming Chen, Dengfeng Wang
Abstract In order to predict the interior noise of a commercial vehicle cab, a finite element model of a heavy commercial vehicle cab was established. An acoustic-structure coupling model of the cab was built based on experimentally validated structure model and acoustic model of a commercial vehicle cab. Moreover, based on the platform of Virtual. Lab, the acoustic field modes of the acoustic model of the commercial vehicle cab and the coupled modes of the acoustic-structure coupling model were analyzed by using the acoustic-structure coupling analysis technique. The excitation of the vehicle cab was tested at an average speed on an asphalt road. Then, the interior noise of the heavy commercial vehicle cab was predicted based on FEM-FEM method and FEM-BEM method with all the parameters and excitation. Furthermore, the predicted interior noise of the commercial vehicle cab was compared with the tested interior noise.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8101
Yoshimune Mori, Akifumi Yoshimura, Nobutaka Tsujiuchi, Akihito Ito, Atsushi Fujimoto, Zenzo Yamaguchi, Koichi Honke
Abstract In a typical mechanical product such as an automobile or construction machinery, it is important to identify deformation modes, for which experiments and analyses can result in significant improvements. It is also important to consider how to improve the structure with high rigidity by using a technique such as the strain energy method in conventional design and development. However, the abovementioned method often generates conflicting results with regard to weight saving and cost reduction of development requirements. Transfer path analysis (TPA) using the finite element method (FEM) is an effective way to reduce noise and vibration in the automobile with respect to these issues. TPA can reveal the transfer path from the input to the response of the output point and the contribution of the path, and to efficiently consider improved responses.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8143
Jerry Syms, Theresia Manns, Björn Bergqvist
Abstract The noise generated by the flow of air past a transport truck is a key design factor for the manufacturers of these vehicles as the sound levels in the cabin are a significant component of driver comfort. This paper describes a collaboration between Volvo GTT and the National Research Council Canada to measure the in-cabin aeroacoustics of a full-scale cab-over tractor in the NRC 9 m Wind Tunnel. Acoustic instrumentation was installed inside the tractor to record cabin noise levels and externally to acquire tunnel background noise data. Using a microphone mounted on the driver’s-side tunnel wall as a reference to remove variations in background noise levels between data points, differences in cabin noise levels were able to be detected when comparing the tractor with different configurations. The good repeatability of the data allowed for differences of as little as 0.5 dB to be measured.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2009
Natasha Barbely, Narayanan Komerath
Abstract Coaxial rotors are finding use in advanced rotorcraft concepts. Combined with lift offset rotor technology, they offer a solution to the problems of dynamic stall and reverse flow that often limit single rotor forward flight speeds. In addition, coaxial rotorcraft systems do not need a tail rotor, a major boon during operation in confined areas. However, the operation of two counter-rotating rotors in close proximity generates many possible aerodynamic interactions between rotor blades, blades and vortices, and between vortices. With two rotors, the parameter design space is very large, and requires efficient computations as well as basic experiments to explore aerodynamics of a coaxial rotor and the effects on performance, loads, and acoustics.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1917
Bongho Kim, Jeongkyu Kim, Kwang Yun Kim, Jung Hoon Woo
Abstract Creep groan noise occurs in a just moving vehicle by the simultaneous application of torque to the wheel and the gradual release of brake pressure in-vehicle. It is the low frequency noise giving the driver a very uncomfortable feeling. Recently, the field claims regarding the creep groan noise are increasing. So far, creep groan noise has been improved by means of chassis modification the transfer system. But vehicle body the response system does not. In this paper, the effect between vibration characteristics of vehicle body, creep groan noise was analyzed. Then presented analysis method for vehicle body effect regarding creep groan noise.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1918
Yusuke Aoki, Yasuyuki Kanehira, Yukio Nishizawa
Abstract Brake squeal is an uncomfortable noise that occurs while braking. It is an important issue in automobile quality to prevent brake products from squealing. Brake shims are widely used to reduce squeal occurrence rate. The anti-squeal effect of shims is quantified as damping properties measured with a bending mode tester, instead of repeating many dynamometer tests. However, there are cases where measurement results have less correlation to actual squeal suppression rate. Therefore, the evaluation of the anti-squeal effect with a dynamometer or on an actual car is needed until the best shim can be selected. To improve the predicted accuracy of the anti-squeal effect, the difference between measurement conditions and actual braking conditions of shims, was focused on. The bending mode tester measures loss factor under pressure-free conditions, even though shims are compressed by pistons or cylinders towards the backplate of the pad.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1922
Yongchang Du, Yujian Wang
Abstract Modelling of disc is crucial in analyzing brake squeal since the disc rotates past the non-rotating pads and the pads are coupled with different areas of the disc at different times. However, in most of the complex eigenvalue analysis of brake squeal, the effect of disc rotation was ignored. This paper proposes a closed-loop coupling model for brake squeal analysis. A modal parameter-based rotating disc model, whose dynamic behavior is represented by rotation speed-dependent equivalent modal parameters, is built through space and time-frequency transformation between reference and moving coordinate systems. The orthogonality of the equivalent modal parameters in state-space is derived. By performing modal synthesis in state-space, the rotating disc is incorporated into brake squeal closed-loop coupling model with other stationary components. Dynamic instability of the system is solved through complex eigenvalue analysis in state-space.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1921
Yusuke Sunagawa, Tsuyoshi Kondo
Abstract Brake squeal noise is generally classified into two vibration modes of disc. One is called “out-of plane mode” which vibrates in disc’s out-of-plane direction. The other is “In-plane mode” which vibrates in disc’s in-plane direction, it means the disc is contracted partially or is extended. There are few “In-plane noise” analysis reports from Disc pad standpoint, so it has been unclear how disc pad contributes to “In-plane mode” until now. This paper confirms that we successfully analyzed direct pad vibration mode by laser scanning under in-plane mode condition. Based on these results, we assume that pad stiffness affected in-plane mode and carried out validation tests.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1915
Meechai Sriwiboon, Seong Rhee, Kritsana Kaewlob, Nipon Tiempan, Rungrod Samankitesakul
Abstract As some brake engineers believe that brake squeal can be related to pad hardness, friction coefficient or compressibility while others disagree, a study has been undertaken to develop further insights. Two commercial formulas, one low-copper NAO and the other copper-free NAO, were made into disc pads of varying porosity without an underlayer and they were checked for specific gravity, porosity, hardness (HRS and HRR), natural frequencies, compressibility, friction, wear and squeal. With increasing porosity, the hardness and natural frequencies continue to decrease. The compressibility definitely does not increase, but rather slightly decrease or stays the same. The coefficient of friction decreases for the low-copper along with pad and disc wear reduction, and increases for the copper-free along with pad wear increase with no change in disc wear. No obvious correlation emerges between brake squeal and pad hardness, friction coefficient or compressibility.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1919
Joo Sang Park, Min Gyu Han, Seon Yeol Oh
Abstract This paper introduces the experimental test results of an investigation to understand the relationship between the leading offset and squeal propensity. In addition Transient Analysis (TA) and Complex Eigenvalue Analysis (CEA) are used simultaneously as a means to compare the experimental approach to two different numerical tools, so evaluating the validity of each theoretical approach. To confirm the CAE results. An ODS was recorded of the brake using a 3D laser scanning vibrometer. Even though the CEA approach is very popular in the study of brake squeal noise, there are some limitations and difficulties in replicating the real phenomenon especially containing unstable behavior. The differences are due to weak pad contact stiffness and friction characteristics which are dependent on the relative interface velocity between pad and rotor. It is necessary to consider stick-slip vibration and time domain analysis in addition.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1944
Seongjoo Lee, JeSung Jeon, ShinWook Kim, ShinWan Kim, Seong Rhee, Wan Gyu Lee, Young Sun Cho, Jeongkyu Kim
When two identical brakes are simultaneously tested on a vehicle chassis dynamometer, very often the left hand brake is found to squeal more or less than the right hand brake, all at different frequencies. This study was performed to develop some understanding of this puzzling phenomenon. It is found that as the wear rate difference between the inner pad and the outer pad increases, low frequency (caliper and knuckle) squeals occur more and more, and as the differential wear becomes larger and larger, high frequency (disc) squeals occur less and less, finally disappearing all together. Discs and calipers are found to affect the differential pad wear, in turn affecting brake squeal generation.
2016-09-10
WIP Standard
AIR1811B
The purpose of this Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide guidelines for the selection and design of airborne liquid cooling systems. This publication is applicable to liquid cooling systems of the closed loop type and the expendable coolant type in which the primary function is transporting of heat from its source to a heat sink. Most liquid cooling system applications are oriented toward the cooling of electronics. Liquid cooling techniques, heat sinks, design features, selection of coolants, corrosion control, and servicing requirements for these systems are presented. Information on vapor compression refrigeration systems, which are a type of cooling system, is found in Reference 1.
CURRENT
2016-08-11
Standard
AIR1826A
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is limited in scope to the general consideration of environmental control system noise and its effect on occupant comfort. Additional information on the control of environmental control system noise may be found in 2.3 and in the documents referenced throughout the text. This document does not contain sufficient direction and detail to accomplish effective and complete acoustic designs.
CURRENT
2016-08-02
Standard
J1324_201608
This SAE Recommended Practice provides test methods for determining the characteristics of acoustical and thermal materials. Where applicable, methods of test developed by SAE and ASTM have been referenced.
2016-07-27
WIP Standard
J1455
The scope of this recommended practice encompasses the range of environments which influence the performance and reliability of the electronic equipment designed for heavy duty on and off road vehicles, as well as any appropriate stationary applications which also use these vehicle derived components. A few examples of such vehicles are on and off highway trucks, trailers, buses, construction equipment and agricultural equipment including implements.
CURRENT
2016-07-12
Standard
AMS3807C
This specification covers aluminum foil tape with a pressure sensitive adhesive.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1823
Andrea Grosso, Martin Lohrmann
Abstract Operational Transfer Path Analysis (OTPA) assess the possible ways of energy to transfer from the various sources of excitation to a given target location. Applied to vehicle engineering, the OTPA provides indication about dominant sources and path contributions. However, it can only analyze the actual system under test and cannot predict if an improvement can be achieved by applying a counter measure. A careful interpretation of the measurement results is therefore necessary in order to define an effective engineering solution strategy. In this paper the RMA (Response Modification Analysis) technique is used to facilitate a sensitivity analysis, gaining insight whether energy is likely to be rerouted. This gives additional understanding of OTPA results, indicating which counter measure is most effective. The RMA is applied to a real measurement scenario, showing the advantage of the combination of OTPA with RMA for correctly identifying the relevant sources and paths.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1805
Florian Zenger, Clemens Junger, Manfred Kaltenbacher, Stefan Becker
Abstract A low pressure axial fan for benchmarking numerical methods in the field of aerodynamics and aeroacoustics is presented. The generic fan for this benchmark is a typical fan to be used in commercial applications. The design procedure was according to the blade element theory for low solidity fans. A wide range of experimental data is available, including aerodynamic performance of the fan (fan characteristic curve), fluid mechanical quantities on the pressure and suction side from laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) measurements, wall pressure fluctuations in the gap region and sound characteristics on the suction side from sound power and microphone array measurements. The experimental setups are described in detail, as to ease reproducibility of measurement positions. This offers the opportunity of validating aerodynamic and aeroacoustic quantities, obtained from different numerical tools and procedures.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1806
Sumon Sinha, Farokh Kavarana, Dan Williams, Kazuya Asao
Abstract A high performance rigid airfoil profile sunroof wind deflector has been developed for high speed freeway driving with the sunroof open. This deflector is clearly superior to the conventional bar type deflector and less expensive compared to tall flexible fabric mesh deflectors applied on high end vehicles today. It provides superior speech intelligibility under high speed driving with sunroof open. The criterion for designing this deflector was to get the highest airspeed possible to span the sunroof opening under all conditions. The customized shape also utilizes flow unsteadiness, including those at the onset of buffeting, in order to condition the shear layer. The airfoil profiled deflector yielded superior mid and high frequency acoustic performance with acceptable low frequency performance. A shorter airfoil deflector was sufficient to keep the external airflow from entering the forward tilted sunroof opening on a mid-size SUV under test.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1803
Hannes Frank, Claus-Dieter Munz
Avoiding narrowband components in the acoustic spectrum is one of the most critical objectives in the automotive aeroacoustic optimization process. The underlying physical mechanisms are not completely understood. In a preceding numerical and experimental investigation, we performed large eddy simulations of an early-development stage realistic side-view mirror, where tonal noise was captured and the principle mechanisms were identified. In this contribution, we present simulations on a simplified two-dimensional geometry that is based on these findings. It is shown that the basic flow topology relevant for tonal noise generation on the original side-view mirror as well as the tonal noise source is reproduced in the 2D case. Furthermore, we present comparisons with measurements and the necessity and influence of a splitter plate downstream of the 2D body to avoid large scale vortex shedding.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1802
Mehdi Mehrgou, Franz Zieher, Christoph Priestner
Abstract Recently, hybrid and fully electric drives have been developing widely in variety, power and range. The new reliable simulation approaches are needed, in order to meet the defined NVH targets of these systems and implementing CAE methods for front loading, Design Validation Process (DVP). This paper introduces the application of a novel NVH analysis workflow on an electric vehicle driveline including both electromagnetic and mechanical excitations for an absolute evaluation of the NVH performance. At first, the electromagnetic field is simulated using FEM method to extract the excitations on the stator, rotor bearings as well as the drive torque. Then, the multibody dynamic model of the driveline is built-up, driven by this torque. The effect of eccentricity and skew angle of rotor in electromagnetic excitations are shown.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1796
Aurélien Cloix, Jean-Luc Wojtowicki
Abstract The current paper is based on the French research program TESSA (“Transfert des Efforts des Sources Solidiennes Actives”). A specific task within TESSA project consists in the characterization of the measurements variability between several laboratories, of the blocked forces on a water pump of a heat engine. This paper focuses only on the measurements carried out at Vibratec laboratory. Two kinds of measurements have been carried out: direct measurements, using force sensors, which is the target of the inter-laboratory measurements, and an inverse method without force sensor requirements. Reproducibility and repeatability tests have been done in order to quantify the measurement variability within the same laboratory, in preparation for the inter-laboratory disparity analysis.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1798
Quentin Buisson, Jean-Louis Guyader, Serge Puvilland, Xavier Carniel, Maximilien Soenen
Abstract The goal of the present study is to provide a simple method to compare structure borne noise sources in order to choose the most efficient one, considering the transmission of dynamic forces. It is well known that mechanical sources are not only dependent of the source itself but also of the receiving structure, in addition real sources cannot be reduced to a transverse force acting on the structure but more complicated effect like moment excitation must be taken into account. The advantage of the reception plate method is to characterize the source globally by the level of vibration of the reception plate whatever the type of excitation, the idea is basically to characterize mechanical sources as it is done for acoustical sources in reverberant rooms. A reception plate test bench has been developed to determine the power injected by mechanical sources. Two prototype plates have been designed in order to have different receiving mobilities.
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