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Viewing 1 to 30 of 7299
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0105
Atsushi Maruyama, Gaku Naoe
Abstract For a small general purpose engine, the authors have studied on “combustion noise”, the mechanical noise originating from combustion. The purpose of this study is to clarify the mechanisms of combustion noise generation. The engine used in this study was a 4-stroke air-cooled single-cylinder engine with the typical characteristics of 3.5 kW-class small general purpose engines, which was specifically designed for experiments. We analyzed the operational behaviors of parts such as the crankshaft, the flywheel and the crankcase during the time of occurrence of combustion noise. Results of the analysis showed that the primary component of combustion noise in small general purpose engines is radiated from the flywheel connected to the crankshaft, and that the vibration mode that radiates the noise is excited by bending deformation of the crankshaft under explosion load. Based on these results, this paper will also discuss the effect of the stiffness of the main bearings on combustion noise.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2863
Jouji Kimura, Shinichiro Kobayashi, Katsuhiro Hoshina, Kousuke Kawase, Koji Matsui, Atsushi Yamamoto
Abstract This paper describes the characteristics and mechanism of crankshaft impact noise that radiates from the cylinder body at full load medium engine speeds, based on the mechanism for axial vibration of crankshaft coupled with torsional vibration of crankshaft.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2864
Daniela Siano, Fabio Bozza, Luigi Teodosio, Vincenzo De Bellis
This paper reports 1D and 3D CFD analyses aiming to improve the gas-dynamic noise emission of a downsized turbocharged VVA engine through the re-design of the intake air-box device, consisting in the introduction of external or internal resonators. Nowadays, modern spark-ignition (SI) engines show more and more complex architectures that, while improving the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), may be responsible for the increased noise radiation at the engine intake mouth. In particular VVA systems allow for the actuation of advanced valve strategies that provide a reduction in the BSFC at part load operations thanks to the intake line de-throttling. In these conditions, due to a less effective attenuation of the pressure waves that travel along the intake system, VVA engines produce higher gas-dynamic noise levels. The worsening of the engine gas-dynamic performance can be compensated with a partial re-design of the air-box device, without significantly penalizing the engine power output.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2676
Takayuki Fuyuto, Masahiro Taki, Reiko Ueda, Yoshiaki Hattori, Hiroshi Kuzuyama, Tsutomu Umehara
Abstract An author's previous studies addressed a combustion system which reduces emissions, noise, and fuel consumption by using PCCI with the split injection of fuel. This concept relies on the premixed combustion of the first injected fuel and accelerated oxidation by the second injected fuel. Although this combustion system requires the optimization of the timing of the second injection, the details of how noise and emissions are reduced have not been elucidated. In this paper, the authors explain the mechanism whereby emissions and noise are reduced by the second injection. In-cylinder visualizations and numerical simulations both showed an increase in smoke and CO as the second injection timing was advanced, as induced by the inhibited oxidation of the rich flame. When the second injection timing is excessively retarded, the amount of soot forming around the near-nozzle increased. The second fuel injection at the optimum timing can mix with the air in the inner-region of the cavity, such that no soot is formed in the near-nozzle region.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2317
Rahul Ramola, G Senthilkumar, P Kannan, Muralidharan Chennakrishnan
Abstract The demand for comfort level in commercial vehicles is steadily increasing. Hence, fine-tuned performance parameters and attributes are required to fulfill the expectations from these vehicles. Refinement of noise and vibration without affecting performances of sub-systems and components has become extremely challenging with increasing customer requirements. This paper presents an approach to identify and reduce the high level whistling noise that was perceived in the passenger compartment while the vehicle was accelerated above 50 kmph. Interior noise measurements in static engine run-up condition reveal that the whistling noise is of specific order. Since, whistling noise is related to aerodynamic response of components, engine cooling fan, turbo charger, alternators and compressors were suspected. Using order tracking and near field measurements, HVAC alternator was confirmed as the main cause for whistling noise. Noise measurements confirmed that orders related to alternator cooling fan became dominant above 50 kmph.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2318
Masahiro Akei, Takayuki Koizumi, Nobutaka Tsujiuchi, Takayuki Yamauchi
Abstract This paper describes an identification of a sound source model for a diesel engine installed on an agricultural machine by Inverse-Numerical Acoustic analysis (INA), and the applicability of the identified sound source model. INA is a method to identify surface vibrations from surrounding sound pressures. This method is applicable for a complicated-shaped sound source like an engine. In order to confirm the accuracy of the identified sound source model, the surface vibrations of the engine are compared with the measured results. Moreover, in the condition of the simulated engine room, the surrounding sound pressure levels of the engine are predicted using the sound source model and the boundary element method (BEM). For the verification of the prediction accuracy, the surrounding sound pressures of the engine are measured using the testing device which simulated actual engine room, namely an enclosure. As a result, the sound source model of the diesel engine is identified accurately using the INA.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2482
Meechai Sriwiboon, Nipon Tiempan, Kritsana Kaewlob, Seong Kwan Rhee
The influence of processing conditions on Low-Copper NAO disc pads were investigated as part of an effort to develop Low-Copper disc pad formulations as this kind of information is not readily available in open literature. Processing conditions as well as formulation modifications are found to influence friction, pad wear, disc wear and brake squeal. Low-Copper disc pads for pick-up trucks, equivalent to an OE pad, are developed. It is also found that brake squeal measured during the SAE J2522 (AK Master) Performance testing is related to the combined total wear rate of the disc plus the inner/outer pads or the disc wear rate alone, and that there is a threshold wear rate, above which brake squeal increases rapidly.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2491
SeongJoo Lee, JooSeong Jeong, ShinWook Kim, ShinWan Kim, Seong Rhee
A previous investigation showed that minor variations in alloying elements in gray cast iron disc contributed to measurable differences in friction and disc wear. This investigation was undertaken to find out if and how the increased friction and disc wear might affect brake squeal. The SAE J2522 and J2521 dynamometer procedures as well as an OEM noise dynamometer procedure and a chassis dynamometer noise procedure were used to find out if a correlation between disc wear and brake squeal could be discovered. In all cases, as the wear rate of a disc increases under a given set of test conditions, disc material transfer to the pad surface increases, which results in increased friction and brake squeal. Also a good method to detect disc variability (disc to disc, within a disc) is discussed.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2510
Jung Hoon Woo, Jeongkyu Kim, Kwang Yun Kim, Daekyung Ko
Abstract Creep groan noise occurs in a just moving vehicle by the simultaneous application of torque to the wheel and the gradual release of brake pressure in-vehicle. It is the low frequency noise giving the driver a very uncomfortable feeling. It is caused by the stick-sleep phenomenon at the lining and disc interface. Recently, the field claim of low frequency creep groan has increased. There are a lot of efforts to improve creep groan noise by means of modification of lining material. In this paper, Transfer path of creep groan noise was analyzed through ODS and TPA. Additionally the correlation between Source (Brake torque variation, Brake vibration) and Creep Groan Sound level was discussed. Finally countermeasure to Creep Groan noise was suggested.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2515
Jin kuk Park, Hyun Bum Jung, Min Gyu Han, Nam ill Jeon
Abstract Prediction of noise and vibration of a gear train is important to achieve a competitive design. Objective of this paper is to develop a dynamic simulation model for vibration analysis and a synthesis process to predict vehicle interior noise using TPA (Transfer Path Analysis). The hybrid gear model is developed to simulate the stiffness of teeth and meshing characteristics in a gear pair. It is modeled by using the teeth stiffness map which is following real contact characteristics of a gear pair. The teeth stiffness is obtained by structural analysis. The multi-body model is composed of flexible bodies, shafts and nonlinear bearings. Input forces at the mounting point (input point) of the gear train are calculated by accelerations from dynamic analysis under real operating conditions. Calculated forces are used to synthesize a vehicle interior noise. Predicted noise is compared with experiment data.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2516
Katsuhiro Uchiyama, Yuji Shishido
Abstract Last year, we presented the “spring - mass model” FEA simulation from stick-slip phenomenon standpoint for improvement of “creep groan”. “Creep groan” is one of representative groan of brake system for automobile and it is clarified by µ vs velocity (µ−V) property of friction material. This time, we will present our study for reduction of creep groan by pad shape parameter (chamfer and slot) with “advanced” spring - mass model” FEA simulation which used actual pad shape as mass model. In addition, this paper was revised based on oral presentation which we presented at SAE 2013.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2513
Taeho Jung, Jeongkyu Kim
Abstract Rust accumulated on disc surfaces causes brake judder and grind noise. This paper deals with grind noise(wire brush brake noise) in vehicles which is a low frequency vibration and broadband noise problem at 100∼1kHz that appears in low vehicle speed. Recently, the customer complaints have increased for grind and creep groan noise more than squeal noise. Low frequency brake noise is a combined effect of brake and suspension systems working with each other. The noise transfer path is also important. Experimental results are confirmed through ODS, Modal, TPA and 3D acoustic camera for noise transmission path. Finally, reduction methods of grind noise are presented.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2514
Prashant Mahale, Aziz Bohari, Raajha M P
Abstract Brake noise is an emerging concern in Indian Auto-industry; with brake squeal being the most evident form of brake NVH. Squeal noise generation attributes to many parameters including kinematics of braking parts during pressure application, structural dynamic behavior which in turn depends on coupling at resonant frequencies of different parts of a brake assembly, material of brake parts, operating clearances in the mating parts etc. The genesis of brake squeal lies in the generation of unstable frictional forces during braking event. These frictional forces induce uncontrolled amplification of brake parts vibration, which in turn tend to produce perceivable sound or noise. The magnitude this vibration induced squeal depends on co-efficient of friction, braking pressure, speed and temperature of friction material. It is known from typical squeal evaluations on dynamometer that at different temperatures of friction, the ability/ occurrence, of squeal is different, typically in the range of 50°C to 200°C.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2512
Hidetoshi Shimizu, Yasunori Oura, Tatsuya Suzuki, Yoshinori Sano
Abstract SAE J2521 noise tests are conducted to examine the impact of shim and grease on brake squeal generation. The impact of adhesive (bonded) shim, clip-on shim and grease for noise generation are examined. Low frequency squeal is eliminated by the application of grease on both adhesive (bonded) shims and clip-on shims. The role of shim and grease for reducing brake squeal is discussed. Adhesive (bonded) shims were found to be effective for high frequency squeal (pad bending mode) by increasing damping. Grease is effective for low frequency squeal (pad rigid mode). The mechanism to eliminate low frequency squeal by the application of grease is investigated. Friction between the shim and caliper piston/finger is reduced. Pads contact directly to the anchor bracket. As a result the contact stiffness is increased. The mechanism is confirmed by experiments.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2517
Kun Diao, Lijun Zhang, Dejian Meng
Abstract Disc brake squeal has always been a great challenge to the automotive industry. Based on the pin-on-disc system, a series of frictional squeal bench tests are carried out, which show significant time-varying characteristics on occurrence, sound pressure and frequency of frictional squeal. To investigate the generation mechanism of time-varying characteristics of frictional squeal, a four-degree-of-freedom (4DOF) lumped parameter model considering the time-varying tangential contact stiffness, the normal contact stiffness and the friction coefficient is established in this paper. Through both the system stability analysis and the transient response analysis, the time-varying frictional squeal is predicted successfully, and the generation mechanism and the key impact factors are also investigated in depth. The simulation results show that the time-varying characteristics of frictional squeal are influenced by the frictional contact characteristics of the friction pair, including tangential contact stiffness, normal contact stiffness and friction coefficient.
2014-09-18
Standard
J1166_201409
This SAE Standard sets forth the procedures to be used in measuring sounds levels and determining the time weighted sound level at the operator's station(s) of specified off-road self-propelled work machines. This document applies to the following work machines which have operator stations as specified in SAE J1116: • Crawler Loader • Grader • Log Skidder • Wheel Loader • Crawler Tractor with Dozer • Pipelayer • Dumper • Wheel Tractor with Dozer • Trencher • Tractor Scraper • Backhoe • Sweeper • Roller/Compactor • Hydraulic Excavator • Pad Foot Wheel Compactor with Dozer • Excavator and Wheel Feller-Buncher The instrumentation requirements and specific work cycles for these machines are described. The method used to calculate the time weighted average sound level at the operator station(s) is specified for Leq(5), or optional exchange rates, during continuous operation in a work cycle representing continuous medium to heavy work. The work cycles provide a repeatable reproduceable means to uniformly measure working machines against a “yard stick.
2014-09-17
Standard
J994_201409
The scope of this SAE Standard is the definition of the functional, environmental, and life cycle test requirements for electrically operated backup alarm devices primarily intended for use on off-road, self propelled work machines as defined by SAE J1116 (limited to categories of 1) construction, and 2) general purpose industrial). This purpose of this document is to define a set of performance requirements for backup alarms, independent of machine usage. The laboratory tests defined in this document are intended to provide a uniform and repeatable means of verifying whether or nor a test alarm meets the stated requirements. For on-machine requirements and test procedures, refer to SAE J 1446.
2014-08-13
Standard
J184_201408
Various SAE vehicle sound level measurement procedures require use of a sound level meter which meets the Type 1 or Type 2 requirements of ANSI S1.4-1983 (see 2.1.1.1), or an alternative system which can be proved to provide equivalent test data. The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to provide a procedure for determining if a sound data acquisition system (SDAS) has electro-acoustical performance equivalent to such a meter. By assuring equivalent performance of the test instrumentation, the equivalence of test data is assured. Two general configurations of sound data acquisition systems will be encompassed (see Figure 1). The first configuration consists of instrument sections which perform as a sound level meter. The second configuration is a system which records data for later processing. The intent of this document is to establish guidelines which permit the test engineer to insure equivalence of sound data acquisition systems to a sound level meter. It requires that the test engineer have a working knowledge of the characteristics of the sound data being measured.
2014-07-10
Magazine
Off-highway engines advance beyond Tier 4 With Tier 4 Final/Stage IV needs met, engine OEMs direct their focus and competitive energies toward optimizing competitive solutions. At the same time, they need to keep a weather eye out for future regulations, which many expect. Autonomous vehicle challenges span many fields Many of the challenges faced by military and commercial design teams are similar. Racket busters With a quiet cab at the top of many tractor buyers' wish lists, agricultural equipment manufacturers are pursuing every opportunity possible to shed decibels.
2014-07-01
Standard
AIR4362A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) protection considerations for environmental control system (ECS) design. It is intended to familiarize the ECS designer with the subject in order to know what information will be required to do an ECS design where NBC protection is a requirement. This is not intended to be a thorough discussion of NBC protection. Such a document would be large and would be classified. Topics of NBC protection that are more pertinent to the ECS designer are discussed in more detail. Those of peripheral interest, but of which the ECS designer should be aware are briefly discussed. Only radiological aspects of nuclear blast are discussed. The term CBR (Chemical, Biological, and Radiological) has been used to contrast with NBC to indicate that only the radiological aspects of a nuclear blast are being discussed. This is actually a more accurate term to describe the subject of this paper, but NBC has become more widely used in the aircraft industry.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2072
Christoph Meier, Dirk Lieske, Stefan Bikker
Abstract Electric cars are getting popular more and more and the expectations of the customers are very challenging. Concerning comfort, the situation is clear: customers want an electric car to be quiet and without any annoying noise from the powertrain. To develop an electric powertrain with a minimum noise level and minimized whining it is necessary to have an accurate CAE-simulation and precise criteria to assess whining noise. Based on the experience with electric powertrains in research cars the CAE-modelling was improved and a new ‘whining intensity factor’ was acquired for the development of Daimler's electric cars. The results are a very low noise level and a minimized whining noise, nearly not noticeable giving a comfortable sound to the customers of the smart electric drive and the B-Class Electric Drive.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2066
Ennes Sarradj, Thomas Geyer, Christoph Jobusch, Sebastian Kießling, Alexander Neefe
Abstract The development of energy-efficient and lightweight vehicles is a major challenge for researchers and engineers in the automotive industry, with one solution being the use of micro gas turbines in serial hybrid vehicles. Among other advantages, the use of a micro gas turbine instead of a reciprocating engine enables a high reliability and low emissions. What makes the concept of using a gas turbine even more interesting are its special NVH characteristics, which are quite different from those of a reciprocating engine. Besides the fact that a gas turbine in general produces less noise and vibration than a diesel engine of the same power, the characteristic noise spectrum is also very different. In this paper, the noise characteristics of a micro gas turbine are compared to those typical for a common reciprocating engine and the sources of the noise are considered. The data that form the basis for these analyses were obtained using measurements on a 70 kW micro gas turbine that is designed to be used in a serial hybrid concept for buses.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2067
Michael Klanner, Mathias Mair, Franz Diwoky, Oszkar Biro, Katrin Ellermann
Abstract The noise vibration and harshness (NVH) simulation of electric machines becomes increasingly important due to the use of electric machines in vehicles. This paper describes a method to reduce the calculation time and required memory of the finite element NVH simulation of electrical machines. The stator of a synchronous electrical machine is modeled as a two-dimensional problem to reduce investigation effort. The electromagnetic forces acting on the stator are determined by FE-simulation in advance. Since these forces need to be transferred from the electromagnetic model to the structural model, a coupling algorithm is necessary. In order to reduce the number of nodes, which are involved in the coupling between the electromagnetic and structural model, multipoint constraints (MPC) are used to connect several coupling nodes to one new coupling node. For the definition of the new coupling nodes, the acting load is analyzed with a 2D-FFT. After the coupling with MPCs, forces are only acting on the newly defined coupling nodes.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2045
Hiromichi Tsuji, Satoshi Takabayashi, Eiji Takahashi, Hitoshi Murakami, Shinichi Maruyama
A finite element (FE) model of vibro-acoustic coupling analysis, such as a vehicle noise and vibration, is utilized for the improvement of the performance in the vehicle development phase. However, the accuracy of the analysis is not enough for substituting a prototype phase with a digital phase in the product development phases. Therefore, conducting the experiments with the prototype vehicle or the existed production vehicle is still very important for the performance evaluation and the model validation. The vehicle noise transfer function of the road noise performance cannot be evaluated with the existed excitation equipment, such as the 3 or 6 directional electromagnetic shaker. Therefore, this paper proposes new experimental method to measure the road noise vehicle transfer function. This method is based on the reciprocity between the tire contact patch and the driver's ear location. The reaction force sensor of the tire contact patch is newly developed for the reciprocal loud speaker excitation at the passenger ear location.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2047
Georg Eisele, Klaus Wolff, Jannis Hoppermanns, Peter Genender
Abstract Transfer path analysis is a powerful tool to support the vehicle NVH development. On the one hand it is a fast method to gain an overview of the complex interplay in the vehicle noise generation process. On the other hand it can be used to identify critical noise paths and vehicle components responsible for specific noise phenomena. FEV has developed several tools, which are adapted to the considered noise phenomena: Powertrain induced interior noise and vibration is analyzed by VINS (Vehicle Interior Noise Simulation), which allows the deduction of improvement measures fast enough for application in the accelerated vehicle development process. Further on vehicle/powertrain combinations not realized in hardware can be evaluated by virtual installation of the powertrain in the vehicle, which is especially interesting in the context of engine downsizing from four to three or six to four cylinders. Road induced interior noise is investigated by “Chassis-VINS” or “Fast-VINS”, depending on the required level of detailing and project timing.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2041
Alexander Ulz, Alfred Rust, Bernhard Graf, Alois Sontacchi
Abstract Due to future directives of the European Union regarding fuel consumption and CO2 emissions the automotive industry is forced to develop new and unconventional technologies. These include for example stop-start-systems, cylinder deactivation or even reduction of the number of cylinders which however lead to unusual acoustical perceptions and customer complaints. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the sound character of engines with low numbers of cylinders (2 and 3 cylinders) and also the differences to the character of the more common 4-cylinder engines. Psychoacoustic parameters are used to describe and understand the differences. Based on the gained knowledge possible potentials for improvement can be derived in the future. The used data base consists of artificial head recordings of car interior noise according to defined driving conditions measured on the AVL test track. Naturally, there are more recordings available for 4-cylinder engines than for 2- and 3-cylinder engines.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2044
Yong Che
Abstract As motor assembly of Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) replaces engine system of Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) vehicle, interior structure-borne noise induced by road random excitation becomes more prominent under middle and high speed. The research is focused on central driving type BEV. In order to improve interior noise in middle and low frequency range, dynamic load of BEV body must be identified. Consequently the structural noise induced by road excitation is conducted. The limitations of common identification method for dynamic body load are analyzed. The applied several identification methods are proposed for deterministic dynamic load such as engine or motor. Random dynamic load generated by road excitation is different from deterministic dynamic load. The deterministic load identification method cannot be applied to the random load directly. An identification method of dynamic body load for BEV is presented based on power spectrum decomposition. The procedure of BEV body load identification is described.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2043
Bryce Gardner, Tiago Macarios
Abstract Speech transmissibility is a critical factor in the design of public address systems for passenger cabins in trains, aircraft and coaches. Speech transmissibility is primarily affected by the direct field, early low order reflections, and late reflections (reverberation) of the source. The direct and low order reflections are affected by the relative location of speakers and seats as well as the acoustic properties of the reflecting walls. To properly capture these early reflections, measures of speech transmissibility typically require time domain information. However, another important factor for speech transmissibility is background noise due to broadband exterior sources such as a flow noise sources. The background noise is typically modeled with broadband steady state assumptions such as in statistical energy analysis (SEA). This works presents an efficient method for predicting speech transmissiblity by combining ray tracing with SEA. In this method, the direct field and low order reflections are modelled using raytracing, while the reverberant field and background noise are modelled using SEA.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2054
Alessandro Zanon, Michele De Gennaro, Helmut Kuehnelt, Domenico Caridi, Daniel Langmayr
Abstract In hybrid and electrical vehicles new challenges in meeting the drivers' expectation with regards to acoustic comfort arise. The absence of the internal combustion engine noise enhances the passengers' perception of other noise sources, such as the Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system. Therefore efficient and reliable numerical models able to predict flow-induced broadband noise have become a major research topic in automotive industry. In this framework, the Zonal LES coupled with the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FWH) acoustic analogy are capable to simulate broadband noise from low speed axial fan. As demonstrated in previous works from the authors, this approach is able to cope with the complexity of the physical phenomena involved (i.e. turbulent noise generation, laminar-to-turbulent transition, etc.), even though the numerical model requires a careful setup of the mesh topology, boundary conditions and simulation parameters. The aim of this article is to provide the scientific community with the latest developments of our research work on numerical modelling of broadband noise from axial fans, focusing on the performance of two different mesh topologies to locate and estimate the noise sources.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2053
Xiaohong Kuang, Jian Pang, Haiyan Zhang, Liang Yang, Jiang-hua FU
Abstract The paper describes the identification and control methods of turbocharger surge noise. Some parameters, such as temperature, flow quantity, pressure, vibration, turbocharger rpm and noise, are provided to identify surge noise. The advantages and disadvantages for each parameter are analyzed. The paper identifies that some special vehicle interior noise is contributed by turbocharger surge noise by using correlation analysis of the turbocharger inlet temperature, outlet pressure and vehicle internal noise. Spectral filtration analysis shows that the surge noise frequency components are above 1000Hz with wide frequency band. Quarter wave tuner's effective frequency range is found to be consistent with the surge noise frequency band. A panfluter-resonator which is a combination of several special quarter wave tuners is invented to diminish the wide band high frequency noise. After the panfluter-resonator is installed on a turbocharger system, the vehicle interior surge noise is significantly reduced.
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