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2017-06-17
Journal Article
2017-01-9550
David Neihguk, M. L. Munjal, Arvind Ram, Abhinav Prasad
Abstract A production muffler of a 2.2 liter compression ignition engine is analyzed using plane wave (Transfer Matrix) method. The objective is to show the usefulness of plane wave models to analyze the acoustic performance (Transmission Loss, TL) of a compact hybrid muffler (made up of reactive and dissipative elements). The muffler consists of three chambers, two of which are acoustically short in the axial direction. The chambers are separated by an impervious baffle on the upstream side and a perforated plate on the downstream side. The first chamber is a Concentric Tube Resonator (CTR). The second chamber consists of an extended inlet and a flow reversal 180-degree curved outlet duct. The acoustic cavity in the third chamber is coupled with the second chamber through the acoustic impedances of the end plate and the perforated plate.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1753
Jack Hall Riddle, Ya-Juan Bemman, Tom Frei, Sihui Wu, Ishang Padalkar
Abstract Demands for engines to operate at low-frequency firing order are increasing in the automotive market. This requirement is driven by consumer and regulatory demand for vehicles which are more efficient in the use of fuel. As a result, engine and transmission technologies have been developed which permit operation of engines with fewer cylinders at increasingly low RPM’s. The resulting low frequency exhaust noise is more difficult to attenuate than in vehicles in years past. At the same time, vehicles often have less packaging space for mufflers, when larger volume would otherwise be needed to attenuate at lower frequencies. A further challenge is the demand for increasingly refined performance sounds from the exhaust systems of premium cars despite the technical obstacles involved in even maintaining sound quality. Finally, legally permissible sound levels are decreasing in some markets. These market and regulatory demands require new solutions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1755
Frank C. Valeri, James T. Lagodzinski, Scott M. Reilly, John P. Miller
Abstract Hybrid powertrain vehicles inherently create discontinuous sounds during operation. The discontinuous noise created from the electrical motors during transition states are undesirable since they can create tones that do not correlate with the dynamics of the vehicle. The audible level of these motor whines and discontinuous tones can be reduced via common noise abatement techniques or reducing the amount of regeneration braking. One electronic solution which does not affect mass or fuel economy is Masking Sound Enhancement (MSE). MSE is an algorithm that uses the infotainment system to mask the naturally occurring discontinuous hybrid drive unit and driveline tones. MSE enables a variety of benefits, such as more aggressive regenerative braking strategies which yield higher levels of fuel economy and results in a more pleasing interior vehicle powertrain sound. This paper will discuss the techniques and signals used to implement MSE in a hybrid powertrain equipped vehicle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1754
Kyoung-Jin Chang, Seonghyeon Kim, Dong Chul Park, So Youn Moon, Sunghwan Park, Myung Hwan Yun
Abstract This paper aims to establish a systematic process of developing a brand driving sound. Firstly, principal factors of a brand sound identity are extracted from factor analysis of many sample cars. As a result, brand sound positioning map is drawn using jury test data. Also, the multiple regression analysis of subjective and objective test results is carried. As a result, the principal factors are expressed by objective test data and brand sound positioning map can be easily updated from the measurement data. In addition, what should be improved for designing a target sound is reviewed. Secondly, various technologies of target sound design are discussed to involve the brand identity and vehicle’s character in driving sound. Also, an efficient tool to implement the target sound with an active sound design (ASD) system in a vehicle is introduced. This tool enables to efficiently design, tune and simulate a target sound for ASD system in a laboratory.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1757
Matthew Maunder, Benjamin Munday
Abstract Excitement, image and emotion are key attributes for cars, particularly those with higher power ratings. Engine sound has traditionally acted as the car’s voice, conveying these attributes to the driver and passengers along with the brand image. Engine sound also underpins the dynamic driving experience by giving instant feedback about how a car is operating, enhancing the connection between driver and vehicle. For decades, the automotive industry has engineered engine sound to achieve these benefits, thereby defining the ‘language’ of car sound. Electric vehicles deliver strong and responsive performance but naturally lack the acoustic feedback that internal combustion engines provide. While this gives advantages in terms of comfort and environmental noise, the benefits of engine sound are lost. Carefully controlled acoustic feedback inside the car’s cabin brings tangible and valuable benefits both for the dynamic driving experience and to convey the brand image.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1758
Seung Min Lee, Dong Chul Park, Seonghyeon Kim, Sang Kwon Lee
Abstract Recently the interior sound is actively generated by the active sound design (ASD) device in a passenger car. Therefore, the objective evaluation method for the sound quality of actively designed sounds is required. In previous research, the sound quality of interior sound has been presented with powerful and pleasant for the existing passenger car. This paper presents a novel approach method for the objective evaluation of powerfulness and pleasantness of actively designed interior sound. The powerfulness has been evaluated based on the degreed of modulation and a quantity of low frequency booming of the sound in the paper. On the other hand, the pleasantness is evaluated based on the slope ratio of harmonic orders per octave in frequency domain. These evaluation methods are successfully applied to the objective evaluation of luxury passenger car.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1761
Daniel Fernandez Comesana, Graciano Carrillo Pousa, Emiel Tijs
Abstract The automotive industry is currently increasing the noise and vibration requirements of vehicle components. A detailed vibro-acoustic assessment of the supplied element is commonly enforced by most vehicle manufacturers. Traditional End-Of-Line (EOL) solutions often encounter difficulties adapting from controlled environments to industrial production lines due the presence of high levels of noise and vibrations generated by the surrounding machinery. In contrast, particle velocity measurements performed near a rigid radiating surface are less affected by background noise and they can potentially be used to address noise problems even in such conditions. The vector nature of particle velocity, an intrinsic dependency upon surface displacement and sensor directivity are the main advantages over conventional solutions. As a result, quantitative measurements describing the vibro-acoustic behavior of a device can be performed at the final stage of the manufacturing process.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1817
Steven M. Gasworth, Vasudev Nilajkar, Matteo Terragni
Abstract Polycarbonate (PC) glazing as a one-for-one glass replacement offers a 50% weight reduction, but exhibits several dB lower sound transmission loss (STL) in the low frequency range where tire and engine noise are dominant. In the high frequency range where wind noise is dominant, PC glazing offers an STL at least comparable to its glass counterpart, and an STL exceeding glass when this frequency range encompasses the glass coincidence frequency. However, a key value proposition of PC glazing is the opportunity for feature integration afforded by the injection molding process generally used for forming such glazing. Two-component (2K) molding fuses a second shot of plastic material behind, and along the perimeter of, the transparent PC first shot. This second shot can incorporate features and implement functions that require additional components attached or peripheral to a glass version.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1800
Robert White
Abstract Several analytical tools exist for estimating a driveshaft’s critical speed, from simple elementary beam theory to sophisticated FEA models. Ultimately, nothing is better than a test, because no one will argue with the outcome from a well-designed measurement. Impact response measurements are easy, but they tend to over predict the critical speed. A test which sweeps the shaft speed up until failure is telling, but the speed causing failure is strongly dependent on even small amounts of variation in rotor unbalance. Waterfall plots of shaft displacement measurements offer the best indication of critical speed, however sometimes the resonance isn’t unmistakable or multiple resonances exist, making the critical speed unclear. A method less susceptible to system variation is offered here, fitting shaft orbit measurements to the theoretical single degree of freedom equation.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1808
Francis Nardella
Abstract In a previous report, it was shown that power transmission through the camshaft reduced the first mode natural frequency of the power train and translated its convergence with dominant engine excitatory harmonics to a lower engine speed resulting in a marked reduction in torsional vibration while achieving 2/1 gear reduction for a 4-stroke 6-cylinder compression ignition (CI) engine for aviation. This report describes a sweep though 2 and 4-stroke engines with differing numbers of cylinders configured as standard gear reduction (SGRE) and with power transmission through the camshaft (CDSE) or an equivalent dedicated internal driveshaft (DISE). Four and 6-cylinder 4-stroke engines were modeled as opposed boxer engines. Four and 6-cylinder 2-stroke engines and 8, 10 and 12-cylinder 2-stroke and 4-stroke engines were modeled as 180° V-engines. All 2-stroke engines were considered to be piston ported and configured as SGRE or DISE.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1804
Chulwoo Jung, Hyeon Seok Kim, Hyuckjin Oh, Kwang Hyeon Hwang, Hun Park
Abstract An efficient method to determine optimal bushing stiffness for improving noise and vibration of passenger cars is developed. In general, a passenger vehicle includes various bushings to connect body and chassis systems. These bushings control forces transferred between the systems. Noise and vibration of a vehicle are mainly caused by the forces from powertrain (engine and transmission) and road excitation. If bushings transfer less force to the body, levels of noise and vibration will be decreased. In order to manage the forces, bushing stiffness plays an important role. Therefore, it is required to properly design bushing stiffness when developing passenger vehicles. In the development process of a vehicle, bushing stiffness is decided in the early stage (before the test of an actual vehicle) and it is not validated until the test is performed.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1820
Martin Sopouch, Josip Hozmec, Alessandro Cadario
Abstract This paper presents a simulation environment and methodology for noise and vibration analyses of a driven rear axle in a bus application, with particular focus on medium to high frequency range (400 Hz to 3 kHz). The workflow demonstrates structure borne noise and sound radiation analyses. The fully flexible Multi-Body Dynamics (MBD) model - serving to cover the actual mechanical excitation mechanisms and the structural domain - includes geometrical contacts of hypoid gear in the central gear and planetary gear integrated at hubs, considering non-linear meshing stiffness. Contribution of aforementioned gear stages, as well as the propeller shaft universal joint at the pinion axle, on overall axle noise levels is investigated by means of sensitivity analysis. Based on the surface velocities computed at the vibrating axle-housing structure the Wave Based Technique (WBT) is employed to solve the airborne noise problem and predict the radiated sound.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1823
Dennis J. Kinchen
Abstract Powertrain mounting systems design and development involves creating and optimizing a solution using specific mount rates and evaluation over multiple operating conditions. These mount rates become the recommended “nominal” rates in the specifications. The powertrain mounts typically contain natural materials. These properties have variation, resulting in a tolerance around the nominal specification and lead to differences in noise and vibration performance. A powertrain mounting system that is robust to this variation is desired. The design and development process requires evaluation of these mounts, within tolerance, to ensure that the noise and vibration performance is consistently met. During the hardware development of the powertrain mounting system, a library of mounts that include the range of production variation is studied. However, this is time consuming.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1828
Jonathan Christian, Dylan Stafford
Abstract The use of active noise control (ANC) systems in automotive applications has been common practice for well over a decade. Many of these systems utilize at least one error microphone that is placed inside the vehicle cabin and provides feedback to the algorithm in order to assess the effectiveness of the anti-noise signal as it attempts to cancel primary noise. Prior work pertaining to optimal error microphone placement has not provided any objective metrics that correlate to the noise reduction experienced inside the vehicle cabin. The goal of this paper is to establish empirically-based metrics which can be used to quantitatively describe why one microphone position in the vehicle is superior or less favorable when compared to another. These metrics are used when considering concurrent multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) ANC systems that utilize the same error microphones but are trying to attenuate both broadband and narrowband noise.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1827
Michael J. Santora, Cyril Gbenga Ige, Jeff Otto, David Egolf
Abstract A muffler attached to an engine attenuates sound over a dedicated frequency range. This research involves the development of an active muffler that is keyed to the revolutions per minute (rpm) of the engine and suppresses the fundamental frequency being exhausted through the tailpipe. The active muffler consists of a tracking side-branch resonator terminated with a composite piezoelectric transducer. The use of an exponential horn as a resonating cavity and terminated with a composite piezoelectric transducer is presented. This would create Electromechanical Active Helmholtz Resonator (EMAHR) creates a notch that can be moved between 200-1000 Hz. The use of acoustical-to-mechanical, mechanical-to-electrical, and analog-to-digital transformations to develop a system model for the active muffler are presented. These transforms will be presented as two-port network parameters. The use of two-port networks to model the electroacoustic system are a defining factor in the analysis.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1836
Fangfang Wang, Peter Johnson, Hugh Davies, Bronson Du
Abstract Whole-body vibration (WBV) is associated with several adverse health and safety outcomes including low-back pain (LBP) and driver fatigue. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three commercially-available air-suspension truck seats for reducing truck drivers’ exposures to WBV. Seventeen truck drivers operating over a standardized route were recruited for this study and three commercially-available air suspension seats were evaluated. The predominant, z-axis average weighted vibration (Aw) and Vibration Dose Values (VDV) were calculated and normalized to represent eight hours of truck operation. In addition, the Seat Effective Amplitude Transmissibility (SEAT), the ratio of the seat-measured vibration divided by the floor-measured vibration, was compared across the three seats. One seat had significantly higher on-road WBV exposures whereas there were no differences across seats in off-road WBV exposures.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1839
Edward T. Lee
Abstract It is common for automotive manufacturers and off-highway machinery manufacturers to gain insight into the system’s structural dynamics by evaluating the system inertance functions near the mount locations. The acoustic response of the operator’s ears is a function of the vibro-acoustic characteristics of the system structural dynamics interacting with the cavity, with the actual load applied at the mount locations. The overall vibro-acoustic characteristics can be influenced by a change in local stiffness. To analyze the response of a system, it is necessary to go beyond analyzing its transfer functions. The actual load needs to be understood and applied to the transfer function set. Finite element (FE) based analysis provides a good foundation for deterministic solutions. However the finite element method decreases in accuracy as frequency increases.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1840
Thierry Bourdon, Rainer Weber, Johann Massinger
Abstract Virtual NVH Engineering is going to be reviewed in this paper for the development of FIE (fuel injection equipment) components. Some examples based on high pressure pumps and SCR air cooling injectors will illustrate the explanation. The use of a 3D FEM vibro-acoustic model is essential to support virtual NVH Engineering. Therefore, a review of techniques to study components is done first. Model correlation is also an important topic which will be discussed and which makes any NVH engineer confident in using a model instead of real HW. It is quite challenging to establish these models, as they must mimic the entire physical phenomenon of real structure borne hardware sound in the whole audible frequency range. Limitations of models are also identified and allow answering one true question: Should we stay considering only each component separately or as an assembly of parts of a larger system in the development process?
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1844
Jiawei Liu, Yangfan Liu, J. Stuart Bolton
Abstract In modern engine design, downsizing and reducing weight while still providing an increased amount of power has been a general trend in recent decades. Traditionally, an engine design with superior NVH performance usually comes with a heavier, thus sturdier structure. Therefore, modern engine design requires that NVH be considered in the very early design stage to avoid modifications of engine structure at the last minute, when very few changes can be made. NVH design optimization of engine components has become more practical due to the development of computer software and hardware. However, there is still a need for smarter algorithms to draw a direct relationship between the design and the radiated sound power. At the moment, techniques based on modal acoustic transfer vectors (MATVs) have gained popularity in design optimization for their good performance in sound pressure prediction.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1845
Jon Furlich, Jason Blough, Darrell Robinette
Abstract When a manual transmission (MT) powertrain is subjected to high speeds and high torques, the vehicle driveshaft, and other components experience an increase in stored potential energy. When the engine and driveshaft are decoupled during an up or down shift, the potential energy is released causing clunk during the shift event. The customer desires a smooth shift thus reduction of clunk will improve experience and satisfaction. In this study, a six-speed MT, rear-wheel-drive (RWD) passenger vehicle was used to experimentally capture acoustic and vibration data during the clunk event. To replicate the in-situ results, additional data was collected and analyzed for powertrain component roll and pitch. A lumped parameter model of key powertrain components was created to replicate the clunk event and correlate with test data. The lumped parameter model was used to modify clutch tip-out parameters, which resulted in reduced prop shaft oscillations.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1848
Richard DeJong
Abstract From 1983 to 1995, Richard H. Lyon published several papers on Statistical Phase Analysis, showing that the average phase of the transfer functions in complex systems grows with frequency in proportion to the modal density of the system. In one dimensional systems this phase growth is the same as that of freely propagating waves. However, in two and three dimensional systems this phase growth is much larger than the corresponding freely propagating wave. Recent work has shown that these phase growth functions can be used as mode shape functions in discrete system models to obtain results consistent with Statistical Energy Analysis. This paper reviews these results and proposes naming the statistical mode shape functions in honor of Lyon.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1852
Satyajeet P. Deshpande, Pranab Saha, Kerry Cone
Abstract Most of NVH related issues start from the vibration of structures where often the vibration near resonance frequencies radiates the energy in terms of sound. This phenomenon is more problematic at lower frequencies by structureborne excitation from powertrain or related components. This paper discusses a laboratory based case study where different visco-elastic materials were evaluated on a bench study and then carried on to a system level evaluation. A body panel with a glazing system was used to study both airborne and structureborne noise radiation. System level studies were carried out using experimental modal analysis to shift and tune the mode shapes of the structure using visco-elastic materials with appropriate damping properties to increase the sound transmission loss. This paper discusses the findings of the study where the mode shapes of the panel were shifted and resulted in an increase in sound transmission loss.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1856
Junji Yoshida, Koki Tanaka, Rie Nakamoto, Ken Fukasawa
Abstract In this study, we combined operational transfer path analysis (OTPA) method with CAE technique to obtain high contributing vibration modes. A rear frame model of a small construction machine was employed for the analysis. 20 vibration modes were obtained by CAE (eigenmode analysis) under 200 Hz. Subsequently, operational test, in which a sinusoidal input force was given, was carried out. For applying OTPA, acceleration signals at 15 points on the rear frame were used as the reference signals and the cab vibration positioned on the frame via rubber bushes was used as the response signal. These acceleration signals were then measured simultaneously in the operational condition. As the result of OTPA, high contributing principal component modes were calculated and high contributing vibration modes were also extracted using mode shape correlation between them. Two in the 20 calculated vibration modes remained as the important modes to the cab vibration through the analyses.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1858
James Haylett, Andrew Polte
Abstract Truck and construction seats offer a number of different challenges compared to automotive seats in the identification and characterization of Buzz, Squeak, and Rattle (BSR) noises. These seats typically have a separate air or mechanical suspension and usually a larger number and variety of mechanical adjustments and isolators. Associated vibration excitation tend to have lower frequencies with larger amplitudes. In order to test these seats for both BSR and vibration isolation a low-noise shaker with the ability to test to a minimum frequency of 1 Hz was employed. Slowly swept sine excitation was used to visualize the seat mode shapes and identify nonlinearities at low frequencies. A sample set of seat BSR sounds are described in terms of time and frequency characteristics, then analyzed using sound quality metrics.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1855
Ramakanta Routaray
Abstract The basic function of a motorcycle frame is somewhat similar to that of the skeleton in the human body, i.e. to hold together the different parts in one rigid structure. One of the major benefits (for a motorcycle enthusiast) of using an advanced frame design lies in the sporty handling characteristics of the bike. A well designed frame can add to the joy of riding a motorcycle as the bike would feel more stable, effortless, and confident around corners, in straight lines and while braking. A well approved modeling [2] techniques or adequate guide line principles have to be followed while designing the body and chassis in order to achieve the vibration within control. This paper depicts a methodological right approach (guide lines) while designing the body and chassis of a two wheeler in order to control noise and vibration of the body and chassis.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1862
Rajesh Babu Channamaneni, P. Kannan, Karalmarx Rajamohan
Abstract New legislation’s, competition from global players and change in customer perception related to comfort parameters are key factors demanding manufactures to design and manufacture vehicles with very low saloon noise levels. The main causes for higher noise levels at passenger saloon compartment can be attributed to source noises (Powertrain, Driveline, Intake and Exhaust etc.), acoustic isolation and structural sensitivity of the body. Out of all above parameters, powertrain noise and acoustic isolation are two critical parameters effecting interior noise performance. This paper is an attempt to explain acoustic source contribution analysis through transfer function measurement in a passenger vehicle. Acoustic transfer function between engine bay and passenger ear level was measured using reciprocity technique (reciprocal method) with reference source placed at various locations inside the vehicle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1859
Filip Franek, Jungu Kang, Jeon Uk, Sunguk Choi
Abstract Structure-born vibrations are often required to be localized in a complex structure, but in such dispersive medium, the vibration wave propagates with speed dependent on frequency. This property of solid materials causes an adverse effect for localization of vibrational events. The cause behind such phenomenon is that the propagating wave envelope changes its phase delay and amplitude in time and space as it travels in dispersive medium. This problem was previously approached by filtering a signal to focus on frequencies of the wave propagating with a similar speed, with improved accuracy of cross-correlation results. However, application of this technique has not been researched for localization of vibrational sources. In this work we take advantage of filtering prior to cross-correlation calculation while using multiple sensors to indicate an approximate location of vibration sources.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1864
Joshua Wheeler
Abstract The performance of a vehicle’s Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) system is dependent on the signal to noise ratio (SNR) in the cabin at the time a user voices their command. HVAC noise and environmental noise in particular (like road and wind noise), provide high amplitudes of broadband frequency content that lower the SNR within the vehicle cabin, and work to mask the user’s speech. Managing this noise is a vital key to building a vehicle that meets the customer’s expectations for ASR performance. However, a speech recognition engineer is not likely to be the same person responsible for designing the tires, suspension, air ducts and vents, sound package and exterior body shape that define the amount of noise present in the cabin.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1863
Bhaskar Avutapalli, Mayuresh Pathak, Shalini Solipuram, Ken Buczek, Aaron Lock
Abstract Road noise and speech intelligibility are becoming ever more important, irrespective of the vehicle size, due to vehicle refinement as well as connectivity with mobile communication equipment. With better aerodynamic designs, development of refined powertrains, and a tectonic shift from I.C. engine to electric motors, road noise and wind noise will become more apparent to the customer and hence will become a priority for automakers to refine their vehicles. This paper describes the efforts undertaken to identify the road noise paths and develop countermeasures for a compact SUV vehicle. A hybrid test/CAE approach was followed to improve road noise performance of this vehicle. This effort involved developing tire CAE models from physical hardware and creating synthesized road-load input from data taken on roads.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1871
Nobutaka Tsujiuchi, Masahiro Akei, Akihito Ito, Daisuke Kubota, Koichi Osamura
Abstract This paper describes new method for selecting optimal field points in Inverse-Numerical Acoustic analysis (INA), and its application to construction of a sound source model for diesel engines. INA identifies the surface vibration of a sound source by using acoustic transfer functions and actual sound pressures measured at field points located near the sound source. When measuring sound pressures with INA, it is necessary to determine the field point arrangement. Increased field points leads to longer test and analysis time. Therefore, guidelines for selecting the field point arrangement are needed to conduct INA efficiently. The authors focused on the standard deviations of distance between sound source elements and field points and proposed a new guideline for optimal field point selection in our past study. In that study, we verified the effectiveness of this guideline using a simple plate model.
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