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Viewing 1 to 30 of 9806
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2283
Anand Prabu Kalaivanan, Gnanasekaran Sakthivel
Abstract Electronic Fuel Injection Systems have revolutionised Fuel Delivery and Ignition timing in the past two decades and have reduced the Fuel Consumption and Exhaust Emissions, ultimately enhancing the Economy and Ecological awareness of the engines. But the ignition/injection timing that commands the combustion is mapped to a fixed predefined table which is best suited during the stock test conditions. However continuous real time adjustments by monitoring the combustion characteristics prove to be highly efficient and be immune to varying fuel quality, lack of transient performance and wear related compression losses. For developing countries, Automotive Manufacturers have been Tuning the Ignition/Injection timing Map assuming the worst possible fuel quality. Conventional knock control system focus on engine protection only and doesn't contribute much in improving thermal efficiency.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2333
Marcos Gutierrez, Andres Castillo, Juan Iniguez, Gorky Reyes
Abstract Aiming for cleaner and more efficient energy from the internal combustion engines makes necessary to ensure the special conditions for exploitation of alternative fuels. The engine vibrations are primarily understood as effects of mechanical failures, but they are also a subject of the fuel combustion effects. These effects depend on the fuel type and its ability to complete the combustion process. The vibrations of a diesel engine were measured and analyzed with a frequency spectrum calculated with fast Fourier transforms. The engine was operated with a fuel blend of 10 % recycled lubricating oil with 90% diesel fuel as well as with neat diesel. It was found that the engine operation with this fuel blend has a lower vibration level in comparison with the use of neat diesel fuel. The goal of this research is to determine the properties of the fuel blend, which provide more stability to the engine by means of vibrations reduction.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2426
Zhiming Zhang, Weimin Wang, Jiangtao Wang, Jiming Zhang, Yuanda Chen, Wenlong Zhang, Guofang Yang, Fugui Fan, Wenxiang Zhang, Fengqin Huang, Xiangwang Li
Abstract In recent years, Turbo-charged GDI technology is more and more widely used, which can meet the high demand of the engine performance and efficiency, but the resulting reliability and NVH issues also need to be paid attention to [1]. Traditional NVH performance improvement is mostly based on the experience design and repeatable test, which lead to longer development period, high cost, and also ineffective results. NVH performance simulations play more important role in engine vibration and noise prediction along with the development of the simulation technology[2][3]. The force response analysis is usually used to evaluate the NVH performance of the engine structure under the standard excitation. However, dynamic analysis of the crank train, valve train, and piston can be carried out based on the AVL software family, also the vibration and airborne noise of whole engine can be predicted directly at different speed and load [4].
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2428
Peilin Dai, Ying Huang, Donghao Hao, Ting Zhang
Abstract The vehicle driveline suffers low frequency torsional vibration due to the abrupt change of input torque and torque fluctuation under variable frequency. This problem can be solved by model based control, so building a control oriented driveline model is extremely important. In this paper, an on-line recursive identification method is proposed for control oriented model and validated based on an electric car. First of all, the control oriented driveline model is simplified into a six-parameter model with double inertia. Secondly, based on stability analysis, motor torque and motor speed are chosen as input signal for on-line model identification. A recursive identification algorithm is designed and implemented based on Simulink. Meanwhile a detail model of the vehicle which considering driveline parameter variation is built based on ADAMS. Thirdly, on-line identification is conducted by using co-simulation of ADAMS and Simulink.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2137
Dnyaneshwar V. Kadam, Sangram D. Jadhav
Abstract Vibration is the most considerable factor in dynamics of machinery. Vibration causes an adverse effect on engine components and may reduce the life of the engine. The conventional fossil fuel sources are limited in the world. The dependency on diesel should be reduced by using biodiesel as an alternative fuel in next few years. The input parameters are affected on engine performance and emission. The present study mainly focuses on an optimization of vibrations, performance and emission using Taguchi and multiple regression analysis for biodiesel as a fuel. The test was performed on a single cylinder, four-stroke, diesel engine with VCR. Taguchi method is used to prepare the design of experiment of the L16 array to minimize the number of experiments and multiple regression analysis used for finding the best relationship between the input and output parameters. The selected input parameters are- fuel fraction, compression ratio, injection pressure and injection timing.
CURRENT
2017-09-19
Standard
J2555_201709
This SAE Standard describes a procedure to be used to evaluate a disturbance known as “idle gear rattle” which can exist in vehicles equipped with manual transmissions and clutches. Other types of noises associated with operation at idle are also briefly described.
CURRENT
2017-09-19
Standard
AIR902A
A photographic technique is described for determining minimum observer-to-aircraft distances during acoustic "fly-over" tests. Possible sources of error are discussed, and it is shown that with ordinary care results are sufficiently accurate to require no correction.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2485
Tarun Teja Mallareddy, Peter Blaschke, Sarah Schneider, Daniel J. Alarcón
Abstract Brake squeal is an NVH issue experienced by brake systems and vehicle manufacturers for decades. This leads to customer dissatisfaction and the questioning of the quality of the brake system. Advanced testing tools, design modification, dynamometer testing, vehicle validation etc., are performed to study, analyze and eliminate this problem. But still it continues to exist nowadays. One of the most important reasons is the complexity of the brake pad having non-linear material properties. Therefore, it is imperative to understand the behavior of the brake pad in terms of its dynamic properties (eigenfrequencies, damping and mode shapes) under varying boundary conditions. Experimental Modal Analysis (EMA) is used to study the dynamic properties of any structure and is generally performed under free-free boundary conditions. An approach to study brake pads under pressure condition is a step towards reality, as brake pads squeal only during braking events.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2484
Yoshiyuki Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi Kondo
Abstract Previous studies have shown that the disc vibration mode during braking noise is not always the same and there are some types of mode. Until now, disc brake noise studies are reported regarding out of plane noise primarily, and there are many noise countermeasure methods. On the other hand, there is short research history of “Inplane mode noise” which disc vibrates to circumstance direction with extension and contraction movement. Therefore, there are few studies which are explained the noise mechanism in detail in the view point of pad. In this report, we discuss energy which flows into pad surface at inplane noise braking and focused friction force variation by the surface pressure change especially. The inflow energy was calculated by the pad’s displacement of disc rotating direction(ΔX) and pad thickness variation(Δh) which is acquired by 3D scanning laser Doppler measurement system. This technique was made in reference to the past research.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2486
Kyung Jae Lee, Dong Won Kim, Daekyung Ko
Abstract Brake grinding noise is caused by the friction of the disc and pads. The friction generates vibration and it transmits to the body via the chassis system. We called it structure-borne noise. To improve the noise in the vehicle development, the aspects of chassis or body's countermeasure occurs many problems, cost and time. In this reason many brake companies try to make solution with brake system, like brake pad materials or disc surface condition. However the countermeasures of excitation systems also have a lot of risk. It could be occurred side-effects of braking performance, and need to re-verify brake noise like Creep-groan, Groan, Squeal, Judder and so on. For this reason, it is essential to make a robust chassis system in the initial development stage of the vehicle for the most desirable grinding noise-resistant vehicle. This paper is about rear brake grind noise path analysis and countermeasure of chassis system. There are two steps to analysis.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2487
Yasuyuki Kanehira, Yusuke Aoki, Yukio Nishizawa
Abstract Brake squeal is uncomfortable noise that occurs while braking. It is an important issue for automobile quality to prevent brake products from squealing. Brake shims are widely used to reduce squeal occurrence rate. In particular, laminated shims can effectively suppress squeal via the viscoelastic damping of an adhesive layer. However, there are cases where the damping performance at low temperature and the durability performance at high temperature deteriorate. In that regard, we thought of applying frictional damping to shims instead of relying on a temperature-sensitive adhesive layer. To study the application of frictional damping for shims, it is necessary to clarify the characteristics thereof. In order to quantify the damping performance of shims, loss factor has been generally measured with a bending mode tester. However, the influence of friction cannot be evaluated because it is measured under pressure-free condition.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2488
Manuel Pürscher, Peter Fischer
Abstract Vehicle road tests are meaningful for investigations of creep groan noise. However, problems in reproducing experiments and partly subjective evaluations may lead to imprecise conclusions. This work proposes an experimental test and evaluation procedure which provides a precise and objective assessment of creep groan. It is based on systematic corner test rig experiments and an innovative characterization method. The exemplary setup under investigation consisted of a complete front wheel suspension and brake system including all relevant components. The wheel has been driven by the test rig’s drum against a brake torque. The main parameters within a test matrix were brake pressure and drum velocity. Both have been varied stepwise to scan the relevant operating range of the automobile corner system for potential creep groan noise. Additionally, the experiments were extended to high brake pressures, where creep groan cannot be observed under road test conditions.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2489
Christian Ball, Li Lee, Weicherng Wang
Abstract The standard method for using FEA to predict and eliminate brake squeal has been to use complex eigenvalue analysis (CEA). Energy flow analysis has been adapted for use with FEA for brake squeal as an alternate mechanism for squeal prediction. This paper demonstrates an implementation of energy flow analysis with commercially available FEA software. The approach leverages the ability of commercial FEA solvers to obtain a quasi-static, pre-loaded brake model, as well as their eigenvalue extraction algorithms to create a modal space for energy flow calculations. The modal spaces as well as the pre-loaded stiffness matrix are then utilized to calculate energy flow values between nearby system modes. Three case studies are presented that compare the results of CEA and energy flow to different systems and countermeasures adopted to reduce noise occurrence in physical testing.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2494
Severin Huemer-Kals, Manuel Pürscher, Peter Fischer
Abstract Complex Eigenvalue Analysis (CEA) is widely established as a mid- to high-frequency squeal simulation tool for automobile brake development. As low-frequency phenomena like creep groan or moan become increasingly important and appropriate time-domain methods are presently immature and expensive, some related questions arise: Is it reasonable to apply a CEA method for low-frequency brake vibrations? Which conditions in general have to be fulfilled to evaluate a disk brake system’s noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) behavior by the use of CEA simulation methods? Therefore, a breakdown of the mathematical CEA basis is performed and its linear, quasi-static approach is analyzed. The mode coupling type of instability, a common explanation model for squeal, is compared with the expected real world behavior of creep groan and moan phenomena.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2530
Georg Peter Ostermeyer, Johannes Otto, Seong Kwan Rhee
Abstract The dynamics and, in particular, the NVH phenomena in brakes are still in the focus of research. Recent investigations of for example Rhee et al. show two principal vibrational forms of the linings on the rotor [1]. The first form is characterized by vibrations where both linings are in-phase (minimal differential torque between the inner pad and the outer pad). This produces in-plane vibrations of the rotor and results in high-frequency squealing events in the brake. The second form is an antiphase vibration of the brake linings with respect to each other (increased differential torque between the inner pad and the outer pad). This produce directly out-of-plane vibrational modes of the disc, which results in lower-frequency caliper and rotor oscillations. One hypothesis is that different wear densities of the linings essentially characterize the two vibrational modes.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2528
Seongjoo Lee, JeSung Jeon, JooSeong Jeong, Byeongkyu Park, ShinWook Kim, ShinWan Kim, Seong Kwan Rhee, Wan Gyu Lee, Young sun Cho
It is widely believed or speculated that higher pad compressibility leads to reduced brake squeal and that caliper design can affect brake squeal. After encountering anecdotal contradictory cases, this investigation was undertaken to systematically generate basic data and clarify the beliefs or speculations. In order to adjust pad compressibility, it is common to modify pad molding temperatures, pressures and times, which in addition to changing the compressibility, changes friction coefficient and physical properties of the pad at the same time. In order to separate these two effects, NAO disc pads were prepared under the same molding conditions while using different thicknesses of the underlayer to achieve different compressibilities, thus changing the compressibility only without changing the friction coefficient and physical properties of the pad.
2017-09-17
Journal Article
2017-01-2482
Meechai Sriwiboon, Nipon Tiempan, Kritsana Kaewlob, Seong K Rhee, Donald Yuhas
Abstract Disc pad physical properties are believed to be important in controlling brake friction, wear and squeal. Thus these properties are carefully measured during and after manufacturing for quality assurance. For a given formulation, disc pad porosity is reported to affect friction, wear and squeal. This investigation was undertaken to find out how porosity changes affect pad natural frequencies, dynamic modulus, hardness and compressibility for a low-copper formulation and a copper-free formulation, both without underlayer, without scorching and without noise shims. Pad natural frequencies, modulus and hardness all continuously decrease with increasing porosity. When pad compressibility is measured by compressing several times as recommended and practiced, the pad surface hardness is found to increase while pad natural frequencies and modulus remain essentially unchanged.
2017-09-17
Journal Article
2017-01-2523
Seonho Lee, Yoongil Choi, Kyuntaek Cho, Hyounsoo Park
Abstract Raceway Brinell damage is one major cause of wheel bearing (hub unit) noise during driving. Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) customers have asked continuously for its improvement to the wheel bearing supply base. Generally, raceway Brinelling in a wheel hub unit is a consequence of metallic yielding from high external loading in a severe environment usually involving a side impact to the wheel and tire. Thus, increasing the yielding strength of steel can lead to higher resistance to Brinell damage. Both the outer ring and hub based on Generation 3 (Gen. 3) wheel unit are typically manufactured using by AISI 1055 bearing quality steel (BQS); these components undergo controlled cooling to establish the core properties then case hardening via induction hardening (IH). This paper presents a modified grade of steel and its IH design that targets longer life and improves Brinell resistance developed by ILJIN AMRC (Advanced Materials Research Center).
2017-09-17
Journal Article
2017-01-2529
Jae Seol Cho, JongYun Jeong, Hyoung Woo Kim, Hwa Sun Lee, Yang Woo Park, Junghwan Lim, Yoonjae Kim, Jinwoo Kim, Byung Soo Joo, Ho Jang
Abstract A semi-empirical index to evaluate the noise propensity of brake friction materials is introduced. The noise propensity index (NPI) is based on the ratio of surface and matrix stiffness of the friction material, fraction of high-pressure contact plateaus on the sliding surface, and standard deviation of the surface stiffness of the friction material that affect the amplitude and frequency of the stick-slip oscillation. The correlation between noise occurrence and NPI was examined using various brake linings for commercial vehicles. The results obtained from reduced-scale noise dynamometer and vehicle tests indicated that NPI is well correlated with noise propensity. The analysis of the stick-slip profiles also indicated that the surface property affects the amplitude of friction oscillation, while the mechanical property of the friction material influences the propagation of friction oscillation after the onset of vibration.
2017-09-13
Article
Ford and Virginia Tech Transportation Institute are testing a Ford-designed method for self-driving vehicles to signal their "intent" to pedestrians; the research is hoped to help develop common standards for such communication.
2017-09-06
Article
The Yokogawa DL350 ScopeCorder is a compact, fully portable measuring instrument available for capturing, displaying, recording and analyzing a wide variety of electrical and physical parameters in industry sectors including automotive, electronics, energy, transport and mechatronics.
2017-09-06
Article
The MTEK Subsystem (Marvin Test Expansion Kit) from Marvin Test Solutions (MTS), Inc. adds test capabilities to legacy semiconductor test systems that lack the ability to meet the test requirements of current devices.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0049
Matteo De Cesare, Federico Covassin, Enrico Brugnoni, Luigi Paiano
Abstract The new driving cycles require a greater focus on a wider engine operative area and especially in transient conditions where a proper air path control is a challenging task for emission and drivability. In order to achieve this goal, turbocharger speed measurement can give several benefits during boost pressure transient and for over-speed prevention, allowing the adoption of a smaller turbocharger, that can further reduce turbo-lag, also enabling engine down-speeding. So far, the use of turbocharger speed sensor was considered expensive and rarely affordable in passenger car applications, while it is used on high performance engines with the aim of maximizing engine power and torque, mainly in steady state, eroding the safe-margin for turbocharger reliability. Thanks to the availability of a new cost effective turbocharger speed technology, based on acoustic sensing, turbocharger speed measurement has become affordably also for passengers car application.
2017-08-27
Article
Engineered Propulsion Systems (EPS) Graflite V8 4.3-L, four-stroke engine is rated at 320 to 420 hp. It is expected to go into production in 2018.
2017-08-22
Article
Dr. Rolf Bulander makes a robust case for diesel's future potential, while AE experiences a Real World Driving Emissions test run.
2017-08-21
Article
The Institute for Advanced Automotive Propulsion Systems is scheduled to open in early 2020. Two University of Bath professors discuss the details.
2017-08-12
Article
Eaton manufactured engine-driven pumps for the first flying MC-21 prototype and supplied additional system sub-components including thermal bypass valves, while Pratt & Whitney supplied its PW1000G GTF engine and Rockwell Collins, Honeywell, and Elbit supplies various avionics systems.
2017-08-12
Article
A Protonex and Insitu development team focused on packaging and integrating existing PEM fuel cell technology with the airframe. The resulting design comprised a redundant double stack design that produces 1.2 kW of power.
CURRENT
2017-08-11
Standard
J2846_201708
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a laboratory test procedure for measuring the acoustical performance of a system consisting of a body cavity filler material formed into a rectangular cross-section channel. Materials for this test may include both heat reactive and chemically reactive products, with or without a shelf to simulate a baffle in an application, or a combination of body cavity filler and aluminum foil to enhance the performance. These materials are commonly installed in transportation systems such as ground vehicles, and thus reduce the noise propagation through the rails, rockers, and pillar/posts. This document is intended to rank order the acoustical performance of materials for application on channels using general automotive steel, such that the effects of sealing of pinch welds in addition to the material could be easily evaluated.
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