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2017-06-17
Journal Article
2017-01-9550
David Neihguk, M. L. Munjal, Arvind Ram, Abhinav Prasad
Abstract A production muffler of a 2.2 liter compression ignition engine is analyzed using plane wave (Transfer Matrix) method. The objective is to show the usefulness of plane wave models to analyze the acoustic performance (Transmission Loss, TL) of a compact hybrid muffler (made up of reactive and dissipative elements). The muffler consists of three chambers, two of which are acoustically short in the axial direction. The chambers are separated by an impervious baffle on the upstream side and a perforated plate on the downstream side. The first chamber is a Concentric Tube Resonator (CTR). The second chamber consists of an extended inlet and a flow reversal 180-degree curved outlet duct. The acoustic cavity in the third chamber is coupled with the second chamber through the acoustic impedances of the end plate and the perforated plate.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1867
Mustafa Tosun, Mehdi Yildiz, Aytekin Ozkan
Abstract Structure borne noises can be transmitted to interior cabin via physical connections by gearbox as well as other active components. Experimental Transfer Path Analysis (TPA) Methods are utilized to investigate main paths of vibrations which are eventually perceived as noise components inside the cabin. For identifying the structure and air borne noise transfer paths in a system, Matrix Inversion (MI), Mount Stiffness (MS), Operational Transfer Path Analysis (OTPA) and Operational Path Analysis with Exogenous Inputs (OPAX) Methods exist. In this study, contribution ranking of transmission paths from active system components through the physical connections into the interior cabin are investigated by MI and OPAX Methods and finally a comparison of them is presented based on the accuracy of obtained results. The modifications are applied on dominant transfer paths which are determined by the mentioned methods above, respectively.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1880
Guojian Zhou, Xiujie Tian, Keda Zhu, Wei Huang, Richard E. Wentzel, Melvyn J. Care, Kaixuan Mao, Jiu Hui Wu
Abstract A flexible rebound-type acoustic metamaterial with high sound transmission loss (STL) at low frequency is proposed, which is composed of a flexible, light-weight membrane material and a sheet material - Ethylene Vinyl Acetate Copolymer (EVA) with uneven distributed circular holes. STL was analyzed by using both computer aided engineering (CAE) calculations and experimental verifications, which depict good results in the consistency between each other. An obvious sound insulation peak exists in the low frequency band, and the STL peak mechanism is the rebound-effect of the membrane surface, which is proved through finite element analysis (FEA) under single frequency excitation. Then the variation of the STL peak is studied by changing the structure parameters and material parameters of the metamaterial, providing a method to design the metamaterial with high sound insulation in a specified frequency range.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1889
Todd Tousignant, Kiran Govindswamy, Georg Eisele, Christoph Steffens, Dean Tomazic
Abstract The automotive industry continues to develop new powertrain and vehicle technologies aimed at reducing overall vehicle-level fuel consumption. Specifically, the use of electrified propulsion systems is expected to play an increasingly important role in helping OEM’s meet fleet CO2 reduction targets for 2025 and beyond. Electric and hybrid electric vehicles do not typically utilize IC engines for low-speed operation. Under these low-speed operating conditions, the vehicles are much quieter than conventional IC engine-powered vehicles, making their approach difficult to detect by pedestrians. To mitigate this safety concern, many manufacturers have synthesized noise (using exterior speakers) to increase detection distance. Further, the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has provided recommendations pursuant to the Pedestrian Safety Enhancement Act (PSEA) of 2010 for such exterior noise signatures to ensure detectability.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1891
Todd Freeman, Kelby Weilnau
Abstract Similar to the automotive industry, the expectations from customers for the noise and vibration performance of personal vehicles such as golf carts, ATV’s, and side-by-side vehicles has continued to evolve. Not only do customers expect these types of vehicles to be more refined and to have acoustic signatures that match the overall performance capabilities of the vehicle, but marketing efforts continue to focus on product differentiators which can include the acoustic and vibration performance. Due to this increased demand for acoustic and vibration performance, additional NVH efforts are often required to meet these expectations. This paper provides a sample of some of the efforts that have occurred to further refine and develop the noise and vibration signature for golf carts.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1888
Rasheed Khan, Mahdi Ali, Eric C. Frank
Abstract Voice Recognition (VR) systems have become an integral part of the infotainment systems in the current automotive industry. However, its recognition rate is impacted by external factors such as vehicle cabin noise, road noise, and internal factors which are a function of the voice engine in the system itself. This paper analyzes the VR performance under the effect of two external factors, vehicle cabin noise and the speakers’ speech patterns based on gender. It also compares performance of mid-level sedans from different manufacturers.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1890
Xingyu Zhang, Bo Yang, Manchuang Zhang, Sanbao Hu
Abstract H-Bahn ("hanging railway") refers to the suspended, unmanned urban railway transportation system. Through the reasonable platform layout, H-Bahn can be easily integrated into the existing urban transit system. With the development of urban roads, the associated rail facilities can be conveniently disassembled, moved and expanded. The track beam, circuits, communication equipment, and sound insulation screen are all installed in a box-type track beam so that the system can achieve a high level of integration and intelligence. The carriage of the modern H-banh vehicle is connected with the bogies by two hanging devices. The vehicle is always running in the box-type track beam; therefore there are less possibilities of derailment. Consequently, the key work focuses on the running stability evaluation and curve negotiation performance analysis.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1903
Masami Matsubara, Nobutaka Tsujiuchi, Tomohiko Ise, Shozo Kawamura
Abstract The tire is one of the most important parts, which influence the noise, vibration, and harshness of the passenger cars. It is well known that effect of rotation influences tire vibration characteristics, and earlier studies presented formulas of tire vibration behavior. However, there are no studies of tire vibration including lateral vibration on effect of rotation. In this paper, we present new formulas of tire vibration on effect of rotation using a three-dimensional flexible ring model. The model consists of the cylindrical ring represents the tread and the springs represent the sidewall stiffness. The equation of motion of lateral, longitudinal, and radial vibration on the tread are derived based on the assumption of inextensional deformation. Many of the associated numerical parameters are identified from experimental tests.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1905
Kiran Patil, Javad Baqersad, Jennifer Bastiaan
Abstract Tires are one of the major sources of noise and vibration in vehicles. The vibration characteristic of a tire depends on its resonant frequencies and mode shapes. Hence, it is desirable to study how different parameters affect the characteristics of tires. In the current paper, experimental modal tests are performed on a tire in free-free and fixed conditions. To obtain the mode shapes and the natural frequencies, the tire is excited using a mechanical shaker and the response of the tire to the excitation is measured using three roving tri-axial accelerometers. The mode shapes and resonant frequencies of the tire are extracted using LMS PolyMax modal analysis. The obtained mode shapes in the two configurations are compared using Modal Assurance Criterion (MAC) to show how mode shapes of tires change when the tire is moved from a free-free configuration to a fixed configuration. It is shown that some modes of the tire are more sensitive to boundary conditions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1904
Tan Li, Ricardo Burdisso, Corina Sandu
Abstract Tire-pavement interaction noise (TPIN) is a dominant source for passenger cars and trucks above 40 km/h and 70 km/h, respectively. TPIN is mainly generated from the interaction between the tire and the pavement. In this paper, twenty-two passenger car radial (PCR) tires of the same size (16 in. radius) but with different tread patterns were tested on a non-porous asphalt pavement. For each tire, the noise data were collected using an on-board sound intensity (OBSI) system at five speeds in the range from 45 to 65 mph (from 72 to 105 km/h). The OBSI system used an optical sensor to record a once-per-revolution signal to monitor the vehicle speed. This signal was also used to perform order tracking analysis to break down the total tire noise into two components: tread pattern-related noise and non-tread pattern-related noise.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1907
Yang Wang, Yong Xu, Xiao Tan
Abstract The vibration isolation performance of vehicle powertrain mounting system is mostly determined by the three-directional stiffness of each mount block. Because of the manufacturing tolerance and the coupling effect, the stiffness of mounts cannot be maintained stable. The purpose of this study was to find out the way to optimize the stiffness of mounts via the design of experiments (DOE). According to the DOE process, a full factorial design was implemented. The z-direction stiffness of three mount blocks in the mounting system was selected as the three analysis factors. The maximum and the minimum stiffness of each mount block within the manufacturing tolerance were selected as the two levels. The measured vibration of vehicle body under certain loading case was selected as the response factor. After eight times of experiment, the DOE parameters were analyzed with statistical methods.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1908
Rong Guo, Jun Gao, Xiao-kang Wei, Zhao-ming Wu, Shao-kang Zhang
Abstract The statement of the engine shake problem is presented through comparing the quarter vehicle models with the rigid-connected and flexible-connected powertrain which is supported on the body by a rubber mount. Then the model is extended by replacing the rubber mount as a hydraulic engine mount (HEM) with regard to the inertia and resistance of the fluid within the inertia track. Based on these, a full vehicle model with 14 degree of freedoms (DOFs) is proposed to calculate the engine shake, which consists of 6 of the powertrain, 1 of the fluid within the inertia track of the HEM, 3 of the car body and 4 of the unsprung mass. Simulation analysis based on the proposed model is implemented, through which the conclusion is drawn that the HEM has great influence on the body and seat track response subjected to front wheel inputs, compared with the rubber mount.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1909
Joel Bruns, Jason Dreyer
Abstract The application of hydraulic body mounts between a pickup truck frame and cab to reduce freeway hop and smooth road shake has been documented in literature and realized in production vehicles. Previous studies have demonstrated the potential benefits of these devices, often through iterative prototype evaluation. Component dynamic characterization has also shown that these devices exhibit significant dependence to preload and dynamic amplitude; however, analysis of these devices has not addressed these dependences. This paper aims to understand the amplitude and preload dependence on the spectrally-varying properties of a production hydraulic body mount. This double-pumping, three-spring mount construction has a shared compliant element between the two fluid-filled chambers.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1751
Nicolas Schaefer, Bart Bergen, Tomas Keppens, Wim Desmet
Abstract The continuous pursuit for lighter, more affordable and more silent cars, has pushed OEMs into optimizing the design of car components. The different panels surrounding the car interior cavity such as firewall, door or floor panels are of key importance to the NV performance. The design of the sound packages for high-frequency airborne input is well established. However, the design for the mid-frequency range is more difficult, because of the complex inputs involved, the lack of representative performance metrics and its high computational cost. In order to make early decisions for package design, performance maps based on the different design parameters are desired for mid-frequencies. This paper presents a framework to retrieve the response surface, from a numerical design space of finite-element frequency sweeps. This response surface describes the performance of a sound package against the different design variables.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1753
Jack Hall Riddle, Ya-Juan Bemman, Tom Frei, Sihui Wu, Ishang Padalkar
Abstract Demands for engines to operate at low-frequency firing order are increasing in the automotive market. This requirement is driven by consumer and regulatory demand for vehicles which are more efficient in the use of fuel. As a result, engine and transmission technologies have been developed which permit operation of engines with fewer cylinders at increasingly low RPM’s. The resulting low frequency exhaust noise is more difficult to attenuate than in vehicles in years past. At the same time, vehicles often have less packaging space for mufflers, when larger volume would otherwise be needed to attenuate at lower frequencies. A further challenge is the demand for increasingly refined performance sounds from the exhaust systems of premium cars despite the technical obstacles involved in even maintaining sound quality. Finally, legally permissible sound levels are decreasing in some markets. These market and regulatory demands require new solutions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1752
Kapil Gupta, Arun Choudhary, Rakesh Bidre
Abstract At present, a Dual Mass Flywheel (DMF) system is widely known to provide benefits on driveline induced noise, vibration and drivability over a Single Mass Flywheel (SMF). A well-tuned DMF provides nice isolation of torsional vibrations generated in periodic combustion process of automobile IC engines. Similarly, a torsional vibration damper mounted on driveline component reduces the torsional excitation and results a lower torsional vibration at driveline components. Noise and vibration issues like boom noise and high vibrations at low engine RPM range drive are often resulted due to high engine firing order torsional excitation input to the driveline. More often, this becomes one of the most objectionable noise and vibration issues in vehicle and should be eliminated or reduced for better NVH performance. A 4 cylinder, 4 stroke small diesel engine equipped with SMF is found to have high engine firing order torsional excitation.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1754
Kyoung-Jin Chang, Seonghyeon Kim, Dong Chul Park, So Youn Moon, Sunghwan Park, Myung Hwan Yun
Abstract This paper aims to establish a systematic process of developing a brand driving sound. Firstly, principal factors of a brand sound identity are extracted from factor analysis of many sample cars. As a result, brand sound positioning map is drawn using jury test data. Also, the multiple regression analysis of subjective and objective test results is carried. As a result, the principal factors are expressed by objective test data and brand sound positioning map can be easily updated from the measurement data. In addition, what should be improved for designing a target sound is reviewed. Secondly, various technologies of target sound design are discussed to involve the brand identity and vehicle’s character in driving sound. Also, an efficient tool to implement the target sound with an active sound design (ASD) system in a vehicle is introduced. This tool enables to efficiently design, tune and simulate a target sound for ASD system in a laboratory.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1755
Frank C. Valeri, James T. Lagodzinski, Scott M. Reilly, John P. Miller
Abstract Hybrid powertrain vehicles inherently create discontinuous sounds during operation. The discontinuous noise created from the electrical motors during transition states are undesirable since they can create tones that do not correlate with the dynamics of the vehicle. The audible level of these motor whines and discontinuous tones can be reduced via common noise abatement techniques or reducing the amount of regeneration braking. One electronic solution which does not affect mass or fuel economy is Masking Sound Enhancement (MSE). MSE is an algorithm that uses the infotainment system to mask the naturally occurring discontinuous hybrid drive unit and driveline tones. MSE enables a variety of benefits, such as more aggressive regenerative braking strategies which yield higher levels of fuel economy and results in a more pleasing interior vehicle powertrain sound. This paper will discuss the techniques and signals used to implement MSE in a hybrid powertrain equipped vehicle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1757
Matthew Maunder, Benjamin Munday
Abstract Excitement, image and emotion are key attributes for cars, particularly those with higher power ratings. Engine sound has traditionally acted as the car’s voice, conveying these attributes to the driver and passengers along with the brand image. Engine sound also underpins the dynamic driving experience by giving instant feedback about how a car is operating, enhancing the connection between driver and vehicle. For decades, the automotive industry has engineered engine sound to achieve these benefits, thereby defining the ‘language’ of car sound. Electric vehicles deliver strong and responsive performance but naturally lack the acoustic feedback that internal combustion engines provide. While this gives advantages in terms of comfort and environmental noise, the benefits of engine sound are lost. Carefully controlled acoustic feedback inside the car’s cabin brings tangible and valuable benefits both for the dynamic driving experience and to convey the brand image.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1758
Seung Min Lee, Dong Chul Park, Seonghyeon Kim, Sang Kwon Lee
Abstract Recently the interior sound is actively generated by the active sound design (ASD) device in a passenger car. Therefore, the objective evaluation method for the sound quality of actively designed sounds is required. In previous research, the sound quality of interior sound has been presented with powerful and pleasant for the existing passenger car. This paper presents a novel approach method for the objective evaluation of powerfulness and pleasantness of actively designed interior sound. The powerfulness has been evaluated based on the degreed of modulation and a quantity of low frequency booming of the sound in the paper. On the other hand, the pleasantness is evaluated based on the slope ratio of harmonic orders per octave in frequency domain. These evaluation methods are successfully applied to the objective evaluation of luxury passenger car.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1760
Weimin Thor, J. Stuart Bolton
Abstract Due the increasing concern with the acoustic environment within automotive vehicles, there is an interest in measuring the acoustical properties of automotive door seals. These systems play an important role in blocking external noise sources, such as aerodynamic noise and tire noise, from entering the passenger compartment. Thus, it is important to be able to conveniently measure their acoustic performance. Previous methods of measuring the ability of seals to block sound required the use of either a reverberation chamber, or a wind tunnel with a special purpose chamber attached to it. That is, these methods required the use of large and expensive facilities. A simpler and more economical desktop procedure is thus needed to allow easy and fast acoustic measurement of automotive door seals.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1761
Daniel Fernandez Comesana, Graciano Carrillo Pousa, Emiel Tijs
Abstract The automotive industry is currently increasing the noise and vibration requirements of vehicle components. A detailed vibro-acoustic assessment of the supplied element is commonly enforced by most vehicle manufacturers. Traditional End-Of-Line (EOL) solutions often encounter difficulties adapting from controlled environments to industrial production lines due the presence of high levels of noise and vibrations generated by the surrounding machinery. In contrast, particle velocity measurements performed near a rigid radiating surface are less affected by background noise and they can potentially be used to address noise problems even in such conditions. The vector nature of particle velocity, an intrinsic dependency upon surface displacement and sensor directivity are the main advantages over conventional solutions. As a result, quantitative measurements describing the vibro-acoustic behavior of a device can be performed at the final stage of the manufacturing process.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1762
Michael Roan, M. Lucas Neurauter, Douglas Moore, Dan Glaser
Abstract Hybrid and electric vehicles (HVs and EVs) have demonstrated low noise levels relative to their Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) counterparts, particularly at low speeds. As the number of HVs/EVs on the road increases, so does the need for data quantifying auditory detectability by pedestrians; in particular, those who are vision impaired. Manufacturers have started implementing additive noise solutions designed to increase vehicle detectability while in electric mode and/or when traveling below a certain speed. A detailed description of the real-time acoustic measurement system, the corresponding vehicular data, development of an immersive noise field, and experimental methods pertaining to a recent evaluation of candidate vehicles is provided herein. Listener testing was completed by 24 legally blind test subjects for four vehicle types: an EV and HV with different additive noise approaches, an EV with no additive noise, and a traditional ICE vehicle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1763
Lisa Steinbach, Ercan Altinsoy, Robert Rosenkranz
Abstract In today's urban environment inhabitants are permanently exposed to elevated noise levels, which are dominated by traffic noise. The process of electrification of vehicles might change the traffic noise in city centers. The aim of this work was to determine the pedestrian reaction, the warning effect and the annoyance of more realistic traffic situations. For this purpose both combustion and electric vehicle noise situations and mixed scenarios of both concepts were generated. The differences in the perceived annoyance and warning effect were investigated with perception studies.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1764
Himanshu Amol Dande, Tongan Wang, John Maxon, Joffrey Bouriez
Abstract The demand for quieter interior cabin spaces among business jet customers has created an increased need for more accurate prediction tools. In this paper, the authors will discuss a collaborative effort between Jet Aviation and Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation to develop a Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) model of a large commercial business jet. To have an accurate prediction, it is critical to accurately model the structural and acoustic subsystems, critical noise transmission paths, and dominant noise sources for the aircraft. The geometry in the SEA model was developed using 3D CAD models of major airframe and interior cabin components. The noise transmission path was characterized through extensive testing of various aircraft components in the Gulfstream Acoustic Test Facility. Material definitions developed from these tests became input parameters in the SEA model.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1766
Dirk von Werne, Stefano Orlando, Anneleen Van Gils, Thierry Olbrechts, Ivan Bosmans
Abstract A methodology to secure cabin noise and vibration targets is presented. Early in the design process, typically in the Joint Definition Phase, Targets are cascaded from system to component level to comply with the overall cabin noise target in various load cases. During the Detailed Design Phase, 3D simulation models are build up to further secure and refine the vibro-acoustic performance of the cabin noise related subsystems. Noise sources are estimated for the target setting based on layer analytical and empirical expressions from literature. This includes various types of engine noise - fan, jet, and propeller noise - as well as turbulent boundary layer noise. For other noise sources, ECS and various auxiliaries, targets are set such as to ensure the overall cabin noise level. To synthesize the cabin noise, these noise sources are combined with estimates of the noise transfer through panels and the cavity effect of the cabin.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1765
Albert Allen, Noah Schiller, Jerry Rouse
Abstract Corrugated-core sandwich structures with integrated acoustic resonator arrays have been of recent interest for launch vehicle noise control applications. Previous tests and analyses have demonstrated the ability of this concept to increase sound absorption and reduce sound transmission at low frequencies. However, commercial aircraft manufacturers often require fibrous or foam blanket treatments for broadband noise control and thermal insulation. Consequently, it is of interest to further explore the noise control benefit and trade-offs of structurally integrated resonators when combined with various degrees of blanket noise treatment in an aircraft-representative cylindrical fuselage system. In this study, numerical models were developed to predict the effect of broadband and multi-tone structurally integrated resonator arrays on the interior noise level of cylindrical vibroacoustic systems.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1768
Yong Xu
Abstract The NVH performance is one of the most important concerns in vehicle development. For all-wheel drive (AWD) vehicles and rear-wheel (RWD) drive vehicles, prop shaft is a major transmission component which may cause various NVH problems. This paper focuses on the vehicle NVH problems caused by the second order excitation force of prop shaft. In order to control the NVH performance of the prop shaft efficiently and fundamentally, this work first studied the rotation kinematical characteristics of prop shaft. Then a rigid-elastic coupling model of vehicle driveline was built with the theory of multi-body dynamics. With this model, the sensitive factors that may affect the second order excitation force were investigated. This paper also describes a case study to verify the conclusions which are revealed from the theoretical calculation and the simulation.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1770
Wallace Hill, Dennis Kinchen, Mark A. Gehringer
Abstract This paper describes the development of an analytical method to assess and optimize halfshaft joint angles to avoid excessive 3rd halfshaft order vibrations during wide-open-throttle (WOT) and light drive-away events. The objective was to develop a test-correlated analytical model to assess and optimize driveline working angles during the virtual design phase of a vehicle program when packaging tradeoffs are decided. A twelve degree-of-freedom (12DOF) system model was constructed that comprehends halfshaft dynamic angle change, axle torque, powertrain (P/T) mount rate progression and axial forces generated by tripot type constant velocity (CV) joints. Note: “tripot” and “tripod” are alternate nomenclatures for the same type of joint. Simple lumped parameter models have historically been used for P/T mount optimization; however, this paper describes a method for using a lumped parameter model to also optimize driveline working angles.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1769
Onkar Gangvekar, Santosh Deshmane
Abstract In today’s automobile market, most OEMs use manual transmission for cars. Gear Shifting is a crucial customer touch point. Any issue or inconvenience caused while shifting gears can result into customer dissatisfaction and will affect the brand image. Synchronizer is a vital subsystem for precise gear shifting mechanism. Based on vehicle application selection of synchronizer for given inertia and speed difference is a key factor which decides overall shift quality of gearbox. For more demanding driver abuse conditions like skip shifting, conventional brass synchronizers have proved inadequate for required speed difference and gear inertia, which eventually results into synchronizer crashing and affects driving performance. To increase synchronizer performance of multi-cone compact brass synchronizer, a ‘Grit blasting process’ has been added. These components tested with an accelerated test plan successfully.
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