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2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2428
Peilin Dai, Ying Huang, Donghao Hao, Ting Zhang
Abstract: The vehicle driveline suffers low frequency torsional vibration because of the abrupt change of torque and torque fluctuation of variable frequency. This problem can be solved by model-based predictive control, so building a control oriented driveline model is extremely important. The traditional off-line identified model which does not consider driveline parameter variation such as damping of tire and suspension during vehicle operation cannot accurately reflect the true characteristics of the driveline vibrations. And usually the fixed stiffness is considered, this will cause modeling errors and worse result of vibration control, in this paper, an on-line recursive identification method is proposed and verified based on an electric car. First of all, as for the low frequency vibration, the control oriented model is simplified into a six-parameter model with double inertia.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2426
Zhiming Zhang, Weimin wang, Jiangtao Wang, Jiming Zhang, Yuanda Chen, Wenlong zhang, Guofang Yang, Fugui Fan, Wenxiang Zhang, Fengqin Huang, Xiangwang Li
Turbo-charged GDI technology is more and more widely used, which can meet the high demand of the engine performance and efficiency, but the resulting reliability and NVH issues also need to be paid attention to. Traditional NVH performance is mostly based on the experience design, repeatable test, which leads to longer development period, high cost, and also ineffective results. Along with the development of the simulation technology, NVH performance simulations play more important role in engine vibration and noise prediction. Usually The Force response analysis is used to compare the NVH performance of the engine structure, considering the standard excitation. Currently, dynamic analysis of the crank train, valve train, and piston can be carried out, and then the whole engine vibration and airborne noise can be predicted directly, considering different speed and load. In this paper, The NVH performance of a turbo-charged GDI engine is studied based on the simulation and experiment.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2283
Anand Prabu kalaivanan, Gnanasekaran sakthivel
Electronic Fuel Injection Systems have revolutionised Fuel Delivery and Ignition timing in the past two decades and have reduced the Fuel Consumption and Exhaust Emissions, ultimately enhancing the Economy and Ecological awareness of the engines. But the ignition/injection timing that commands the combustion is mapped to a fixed predefined table which is best suited during the stock test conditions. However continuous real time adjustments by monitoring the combustion characteristics prove to be highly efficient and be immune to varying fuel quality, lack of transient performance and wear related compression losses. Addressing Fuel Quality Issues: For developing countries, Automobile Manufacturers have been Tuning the Ignition/Injection timing Map assuming the worst possible fuel quality. Conventional knock control system focus on engine protection only and doesn't contribute much in improving thermal efficiency.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2137
Dnyaneshwar V. Kadam, Sangram D. Jadhav
Vibration is the most considerable factor in dynamics of machinery. Vibration causes unfavorable effects on engine components and may reduce the life of engine. The conventional fossil fuel sources are limited in the world. The dependency on diesel should be reduced by using biodiesel as an alternative fuel in next few years. The input parameters are affected on engine performance and emission. The present study mainly focuses on an optimization of vibrations, performance and emission using Taguchi and multiple regression analysis for biodiesel as a fuel. The test was performed on single cylinder, four-stroke, diesel engine with VCR. Taguchi method is used to prepare the design of experiment of L16 array for minimizing number of experiments and multiple regression analysis for finding the best relationship between the input and output parameters. The selected input parameters are: fuel fraction, compression ratio, injection pressure and injection timing.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2484
Yoshiyuki Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi Kondo
We considered the relation between disc brake’s in-plane mode noise and exciting energy which flows into pad surface for improving brake noise performance. The exciting energy is calculated by the pad’s displacement of disc rotating direction and pad thickness direction which is acquired by 3D scanning laser Doppler measurement system.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2482
Meechai Sriwiboon, Nipon Tiempan, Kritsana kaewlob, Seong K Rhee, Donald Yuhas
Disc pad physical properties are believed to be important in controlling brake friction, wear and squeal. Thus these properties are carefully measured during and after manufacturing for quality assurance. For a given formulation, disc pad porosity is reported to affect friction, wear and squeal. This investigation was undertaken to find out how porosity changes affect pad natural frequency, dynamic modulus, hardness and compressibility for a low-copper formulation and a copper-free formulation, both without underlayer. Pad natural frequency, modulus and hardness all decrease with increasing porosity. When pad compressibility is measured by compressing several times as recommended and practiced, the pad surface hardness is found to increase while pad natural frequency and modulus remain essentially unchanged. However, there is no consistent pattern in compressibility change with increasing porosity, and thus a question arises on the validity of compressibility measurement.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2488
Manuel Pürscher, Peter Fischer
Vehicle road tests are meaningful for investigations of creep groan noise. However, problems in reproducing experiments and partly subjective evaluations may lead to imprecise conclusions. This work proposes an experimental test and evaluation procedure which provides a precise and objective assessment of creep groan. It is based on systematic corner test rig experiments and an innovative characterization method. The exemplary setup under investigation consisted of a complete front wheel suspension and brake system including all relevant components. The wheel has been driven by the test rig’s drum against a brake torque. The main parameters within a test matrix were brake pressure and drum velocity. Both have been varied stepwise to scan the relevant operating range of the automobile corner system for potential creep groan noise. Additionally, the experiments were extended to high brake pressures, where creep groan cannot be observed under road test conditions.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2486
Kyung Jae Lee
Brake grinding noise is caused by the friction of the disc and pads. The friction generates vibration and it transmits to the body via the chassis system. We calle it structure-borne noise. To improve the noise in the vehicle development, the aspects of chassis or body's countermeasure occurs many problems, cost and time. In this reason many brake company try to make solution with brake system, like brake friction materials or disc surface. However the countermeasure of excitation system also have a lot of risk. It could occur side-effects of braking performance, and need to reverify brake noise like Creep-groan, Groan, Squeal, Judder and so on. In conclusion, It is very important making robust chassis system in initial vehicle development stage. This paper is about rear brake grind noise path analysis and countermeasure of chassis system. There are two steps to analysis. First step is impact hammer test like FRF, MODAL test.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2528
Seongjoo Lee, JeSung Jeon, JooSeong Jeong, Byeongkyu Park, ShinWook Kim, ShinWan Kim, Seong Kwan Rhee, Wan Gyu Lee, Young sun Cho
It is widely believed or speculated that higher pad compressibility leads to reduced brake squeal and that caliper design can affect brake squeal. After encountering anecdotalcontradictory cases, this investigation was undertaken to systematically generate basic data and clarify the beliefs or speculations. In order to adjust pad compressibility, it is common to modify molding temperatures, pressures and times, which in addition to changing the compressibility, changes the coefficient of friction at the same time. In order to separate these two effects, NAO disc pads were prepared under the same molding conditions while using different thicknesses for the underlayer to achieve different compressibilities, thus changing compressibility without changing thecoefficient of friction. Test results show brake squeal increasing with increasing compressibility, contrary to the common belief.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2487
Yasuyuki kanehira, Yusuke Aoki, Yukio Nishizawa
Brake squeal is uncomfortable noise that occurs while braking. It is an important issue for automobile quality to prevent brake products from squealing. Brake shims are widely used to reduce squeal occurrence rate. In particular, laminated shims can effectively suppress squeal via the viscoelastic damping of an adhesive layer. However, there are cases where the damping performance at low temperature and the durability performance at high temperature deteriorate. In that regard, we thought of applying frictional damping to shims instead of relying on a temperature-sensitive adhesive layer. To study the application of frictional damping as a new damping mechanism for shims, it is necessary to clarify the characteristics thereof. In order to quantify the damping performance of shims, loss factor has been generally measured with a bending mode tester. However, the influence of friction cannot be evaluated because it is measured under pressure-free condition.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2485
Tarun Teja Mallareddy, Peter Blaschke, Sarah Schneider, Daniel J. Alarcón
Brake squeal is an NVH issue experienced by brake systems and vehicle manufacturers for decades. This leads to customer dissatisfaction and the questioning of quality of the brake system. Advanced testing tools, design modification, dynamometer testing, vehicle validation etc., are performed to study, analyze and eliminate this problem. But, still it continues to exist. One of the most important reasons is the complexity of the brake pad which leads to its non-linear properties. Therefore, it is imperative to understand the behavior of the brake pad, in terms of its dynamic properties (eigenfrequencies, damping and mode shapes), under varying boundary conditions. Experimental Modal Analysis (EMA) is used to study the dynamic properties of any structure and is generally performed under free-free boundary conditions. An approach to study brake pads under pressure condition is a step towards reality, as brake pads squeal only during braking events.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0049
Matteo De Cesare, Federico Covassin, Enrico Brugnoni, Luigi Paiano
Abstract The new driving cycles require a greater focus on a wider engine operative area and especially in transient conditions where a proper air path control is a challenging task for emission and drivability. In order to achieve this goal, turbocharger speed measurement can give several benefits during boost pressure transient and for over-speed prevention, allowing the adoption of a smaller turbocharger, that can further reduce turbo-lag, also enabling engine down-speeding. So far, the use of turbocharger speed sensor was considered expensive and rarely affordable in passenger car applications, while it is used on high performance engines with the aim of maximizing engine power and torque, mainly in steady state, eroding the safe-margin for turbocharger reliability. Thanks to the availability of a new cost effective turbocharger speed technology, based on acoustic sensing, turbocharger speed measurement has become affordably also for passengers car application.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1922
S Nataraja Moorthy, Manchi Rao, Prasath Raghavendran, Sakthi Babu
Abstract NVH is becoming one of the major factor for customer selection of vehicle along with parameters like fuel economy and drivability. One of the major NVH challenges is to have a vehicle with aggressive drivability and at the same time with acceptable noise and vibration levels. This paper focuses on the compact utility vehicle where the howling noise is occurring at higher rpm of the engine. The vehicle is powered by three cylinder turbocharged diesel engine. The noise levels were higher above 2500 rpm due to the presence of structural resonance. Operational deflection shapes (ODS) and Transfer path analysis (TPA) analysis was done on entire vehicle and powertrain to find out the major reason for howling noise at higher engine rpm. It is observed that the major contribution for noise at higher rpm is due to modal coupling between powertrain, half shaft and vehicle sub frame.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1926
Jos Frank, Sohin Doshi, Manchi Rao, Prasath Raghavendran
Abstract In today’s automotive scenario, noise vibration and harshness (NVH) has become a synonym for quality perception. This paper evaluates the problem of vibration and noise experienced in M2 category 40 seat bus and suggests the counter measures. Severe vibration is experienced on the bus floor, predominantly towards rear part of the bus. Vibration along with acoustic boom occurs prominently in 4th gear wide open throttle operating condition between 1300-1600 rpm of the engine. This paper focuses on reducing NVH levels by working on the transfer path with little modifications on power-train. Preliminary torsional measurements conducted on powertrain indicated high torsional excitation in the driveline during the problematic rpm zone. Further, Operational Deflection Shape (ODS) analysis revealed that the transfer path to the cabin is rear differential unit and suspension links. The dominant frequencies were identified along the transfer path and suitable modifications were done.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1944
Asif Basha Shaik Mohammad, Ravindran Vijayakumar, Nageshwara Rao Panduranga
Abstract The vibration and acoustic behaviour of the internal combustion engine is a highly complex one, consisting of many components that are subject to loads that vary greatly in magnitude and which operate at a wide range of speeds. The interaction of these components and the excitation of resonant modes of vibration is a major problem for the powertrain engineer when optimising the noise and vibration characteristics of the engine. This paper summarises a study that has been undertaken to assess and optimise the dynamic behaviour of a current production diesel engine with the objective of reducing radiated noise from the engine. The dynamic behaviour of the diesel engine has been assessed using simulation tools. The dynamic analysis will predict the forces and displacements at each of the nodes of the model by forced response analysis. Predicted results and experimentally measured values were found to be in close agreement.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1952
Utkarsh Sharma, Simson T. Wilson, Santosh Lalasure, K. Rajakumar
Abstract Today’s automotive industry in the process of better fuel efficiency and aiming less carbon foot print is trying to incorporate energy saving and hybrid technologies in their products. One of the trends which has been followed by Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) is the usage of Electric Power Steering (EPS) system. This has been an effective option to target fuel saving as compared to hydraulically assisted power steering system. EPS has been already tested successfully, not only on system level but also on vehicle level for endurance and performance by OEMs as per their norms and standards. Over the decade, NVH (noise, vibration & harshness) have become one of the touch points for customer perception about vehicle quality. This leads us to a commonly perceived problem in EPS or manual type steering system i.e. rattle noise.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1969
Senthil Ram Nagapillai Durairaj, Thulasirajan Ganesan, Praveen Chakrapani Rao
Abstract Magnesium alloy current being used for automotive sector and are being significantly used for manufacturing engine block as offering higher power to weight ratio to the vehicle. In this context, the magnesium alloy has been used in the replacement of aluminium alloy for the starter housing which in turn increase the power to weight ratio of the motor. Considering the operation condition of starter motor in the engine of the vehicles, the starter motor is being exposed to the harsh environment, where its system is being tested for Noise, Vibration and Harshness. In this paper, the magnesium alloy housing is used to study the vibration and noise developed in the starter motor and the same is compared with the noise and vibration of the motor when it being used with Aluminium alloy Housing. First, the vibration study is carried out for the housing part alone to capture the resonant frequency of the both housing alloy say, Aluminium and Magnesium.
2017-06-17
Journal Article
2017-01-9550
David Neihguk, M. L. Munjal, Arvind Ram, Abhinav Prasad
Abstract A production muffler of a 2.2 liter compression ignition engine is analyzed using plane wave (Transfer Matrix) method. The objective is to show the usefulness of plane wave models to analyze the acoustic performance (Transmission Loss, TL) of a compact hybrid muffler (made up of reactive and dissipative elements). The muffler consists of three chambers, two of which are acoustically short in the axial direction. The chambers are separated by an impervious baffle on the upstream side and a perforated plate on the downstream side. The first chamber is a Concentric Tube Resonator (CTR). The second chamber consists of an extended inlet and a flow reversal 180-degree curved outlet duct. The acoustic cavity in the third chamber is coupled with the second chamber through the acoustic impedances of the end plate and the perforated plate.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1787
Jan Biermann, Adrien Mann, Barbara Neuhierl, Min-Suk Kim
Abstract Over the past decades, interior noise from wind noise or engine noise have been significantly reduced by leveraging improvements of both the overall vehicle design and of sound package. Consequently, noise sources originating from HVAC systems (Heat Ventilation and Air Conditioning), fans or exhaust systems are becoming more relevant for perceived quality and passenger comfort. This study focuses on HVAC systems and discusses a Flow-Induced Noise Detection Contributions (FIND Contributions) numerical method enabling the identification of the flow-induced noise sources inside and around HVAC systems. This methodology is based on the post-processing of unsteady flow results obtained using Lattice Boltzmann based Method (LBM) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations combined with LBM-simulated Acoustic Transfer Functions (ATF) between the position of the sources inside the system and the passenger’s ears.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1785
Paul Bremner, Scott Clifton, Chris Todter
Abstract Measurements of interior wind noise sound pressure level have shown that dBA and Loudness are not adequate metrics of wind noise sound quality due to non-stationary characteristics such as temporal modulation and impulse. A surface microphone array with high spatio-temporal resolution has been used to measure and analyze the corresponding non-stationary characteristics of the exterior aero-acoustic loading. Wavenumber filtering is used to observe the unsteady character of the low wavenumber aero-acoustic loading components most likely to be exciting glass vibration and transmitting sound.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1784
Guillaume Baudet
Abstract Wind noise in automobile is becoming more and more important as customer requirements increase. On the other hand great progress has been made on engine and road noises. Thus, for many vehicles, wind noise is the major acoustic source during road and motorway driving. As for other noises, automobile manufacturers must be able for a new car project to specify, calculate and measure each step of the acoustic cascading: Source Transfers, both solid and air borne In the case of automotive wind noise, the excitation source is the dynamic pressure on the vehicle’s panels. This part of the cascading is the one influenced by the exterior design. Even if many others components (panels, seals, cabin trims) have a big influence, the exterior design is a major issue for the wind noise. The wind noise level in the cabin can sometimes change significantly with only a small modification of the exterior design.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1791
David Neihguk, Shreyas Fulkar
Abstract Parametric model of a production hybrid (made up of reactive and dissipative elements) muffler for tractor engine is developed to compute the acoustic Transmission Loss (TL). The objective is to simplify complex muffler acoustic simulations without any loss of accuracy, robustness and usability so that it is accessible to all product development engineers and designers. The parametric model is a 3D Finite Element Method (FEM) based built in COMSOL model builder which is then converted into a user-friendly application (App) using COMSOL App builder. The uniqueness of the App lies in its ability to handle not only wide range of parametric variations but also variations in the physics and boundary conditions. This enables designers to explore various design options in the early design phase without the need to have deep expertise in a specific simulation tool nor in numerical acoustic modeling.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1790
Vinayak H. Patil, Ravi Kumar Sara, T. R. Milind, Rodney C. Glover
Abstract Vehicle noise emission requirements are becoming more stringent each passing year. Pass-by noise requirement for passenger vehicles is now 74 dB (A) in some parts of the world. The common focus areas for noise treatment in the vehicle are primarily on three sub-systems i.e., engine compartment, exhaust systems and power train systems. Down- sizing and down- speeding of engines, without compromising on power output, has meant use of boosting technologies that have produced challenges in order to design low-noise intake systems which minimize losses and also meet today’s vehicle emission regulations. In a boosted system, there are a variety of potential noise sources in the intake system. Thus an understanding of the noise source strength in each component of the intake system is needed. One such boosting system consists of Turbo-Super configuration with various components, including an air box, supercharger, an outlet manifold, and an intercooler.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1789
Rafael Veloso, Robert Fairbrother, Yasser Elnemr
Abstract The acoustics of automotive intake and exhaust systems is typically modeled using linear acoustics or gas-dynamics simulation. These approaches are preferred during basic sound design in the early development stages due to their computational efficiency compared to complex 3D CFD and FEM solutions. The linear acoustic method reduces the component being modelled to an equivalent acoustic two-port transfer matrix which describes the acoustic characteristic of the muffler. Recently this method was used to create more detailed and more accurate models based on a network of 3D cells. As the typical automotive muffler includes perforated elements and sound absorptive material, this paper demonstrates the extension of the 3D linear acoustic network description of a muffler to include the aforementioned elements. The proposed method was then validated against experimental results from muffler systems with perforated elements and sound absorptive material.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1795
Ahmad Abosrea, Tamer Elnady
Abstract Flow-generated noise has recently received a lot of attention within the process of designing exhaust and intake systems. Flow-generated noise can limit the amount of sound reduction a muffler can introduce inside ducts. This is more important in the modern system design where mufflers are compact and the flow speeds become higher in different sections inside the muffler. In this paper, three measurement techniques are used to measure the flow-generated noise from a duct element. The first is based on calculating the sound power levels inside a reverberation room according to ISO 3741. The radiated noise is measured from the muffler body as a source of noise, then from the tail pipe as an active one-port source. The second is based on sound power measurements inside the ducts using the active two-port theory. The third is measuring the sound pressure radiation inside an anechoic room.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1794
William Seldon, Jamie Hamilton, Jared Cromas, Daniel Schimmel
Abstract As regulations become increasingly stringent and customer expectations of vehicle refinement increase, the accurate control and prediction of induction system airborne acoustics are a critical factor in creating a vehicle that wins in the marketplace. The goal of this project was to improve the predicative accuracy of a 1-D GT-power engine and induction model and to update internal best practices for modeling. The paper will explore the details of an induction focused correlation project that was performed on a spark ignition turbocharged inline four-cylinder engine. This paper and SAE paper “Experimental GT-POWER Correlation Techniques and Best Practices” share similar abstracts and introductions; however, they were split for readability and to keep the focus on a single a single subsystem. This paper compares 1D GT-Power engine air induction system (AIS) sound predictions with chassis dyno experimental measurements during a fixed gear, full-load speed sweep.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1793
William Seldon, Amer Shoeb, Daniel Schimmel, Jared Cromas
Abstract As regulations become increasingly stringent and customer expectations of vehicle refinement increase, the accurate control and prediction of exhaust system airborne acoustics are a critical factor in creating a vehicle that wins in the marketplace. The goal of this project was to improve the predicative accuracy of the GT-power engine and exhaust model and to update internal best practices for modeling. This paper will explore the details of an exhaust focused correlation project that was performed on a naturally aspirated spark ignition eight-cylinder engine. This paper and SAE paper “Experimental GT-POWER Correlation Techniques and Best Practices Low Frequency Acoustic Modeling of the Intake System of a Turbocharged Engine” share similar abstracts and introductions; however, they were split for readability and to keep the focus on a single a single subsystem.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1799
Nagasuresh Inavolu, Jaganmohan Rao Medisetti, S. Nanda Kumar, J Lingeshkumar, Akshay Loya, Mvgprasad MV
Abstract Engine noise reduction is one of the highest priorities in vehicle development from the viewpoint of meeting stringent noise regulations. Engine noise reduction involves identification of noise sources and suppression of noise by changing the response of sources to input excitations. Noise can originate from several mechanical sources in engine. The present work focuses on systematic study of the behavior or response of engine structure and its ancillaries to engine excitation and thereby assess their contribution to overall engine noise. The approach includes engine noise and vibration measurement and component ranking using engine noise and vibration measurement in a non-anechoic environment, structural analysis of engine including experimental modal testing of engine and its components, etc. Correlation of the above obtained results is performed to identify the noise sources. Later, ranking of critical components was performed based on results of cladding exercise.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1792
Magnus Knutsson, Erik Kjellson, Rodney Glover, Hans Boden
Abstract Increased demands for reduction of fuel consumption and CO2 emissions are driven by the global warming. To meet these challenges with respect to the passenger car segment the strategy of utilizing IC-engine downsizing has shown to be effective. In order to additionally meet requirements for high power and torque output supercharging is required. This can be realized using e.g. turbo-chargers, roots blowers or a combination of several such devices for the highest specific power segment. Both turbo-chargers and roots blowers can be strong sources of sound depending on the operating conditions and extensive NVH abatements such as resonators and encapsulation might be required to achieve superior vehicle NVH. For an efficient resonator tuning process in-duct acoustic source data is required. No published studies exists that describe how the gas exchange process for roots blowers can be described by acoustic sources in the frequency domain.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1798
Jiri Navratil, Warren Seeley, Peng Wang, Shriram Siravara
Abstract The ability to accurately predict exhaust system acoustics, including transmission loss (TL) and tailpipe noise, based on CAD geometry has long been a requirement of most OEM’s and Tier 1 exhaust suppliers. Correlation to measurement data has been problematic under various operating conditions, including flow. This study was undertaken to develop robust modelling technique, ensuring sensible correlation between the 1-D models and test data. Ford use Ricardo WAVE as one of their 1-D NVH tools, which was chosen for the purpose of this benchmark study. The most commonly used metrics for evaluating the acoustical performance of mufflers are insertion loss (IL), TL, and noise reduction (NR). TL is often the first step of analysis, since it represents the inherent capability of the muffler to attenuate sound if both the source and termination are assumed to be anechoic. It can also be reliably measured and numerically simulated without having to connect to an engine.
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