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Viewing 241 to 270 of 7768
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2097
Sylvain Laporte, Cosme De Castelbajac, Mathieu Ladonne
Abstract The Vibration Assisted Drilling (VAD) process has been implemented in Automated Drilling Equipment (ADE) on an industrial scale since 2011. Today more than 11000 ADEs are currently used on aircraft assembly lines. As well as drawing up a short report on the use of this new process, the authors make an assessment on new challenges that VAD has to face up. Indeed production rates are increasing and ADE manufacturers improve their technologies, one of the most recent and major development concerning the electrical motorization of the machines. These evolutions are as many opportunities for the VAD provided you have a clever understanding as well as an expert knowledge of the process. Thus the authors propose a new dynamic model of the whole VAD system which integrates the behavior of the part, cutting tool/material pair and the machine. The confrontation of model results and experimental validation tests demonstrates the relevance of the works.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2136
Oliver Pecat, Tebbe Paulsen, Philipp Katthöfer, Ekkard Brinksmeier, Sascha Fangmann
Abstract Insufficient chip extraction often leads to disruptions of automated drilling processes and will have a negative impact on the surface qualities. One opportunity to avoid chip accumulation is based on a kinematically enforced chip breakage caused by sinusoidal axial oscillations of the drilling tool. Recent investigations have shown that the quality of chip extraction is, amongst others, considerably depending on the chip shape and mass which are defined by the cutting parameters feed, amplitude and frequency. So far only mechanical systems in the form of tool holders have been available on the market, which are restricted to a fixed frequency (oscillation frequency is coupled to the spindle speed). In the present study a spindle with magnetic bearings was used which allows to adjust the oscillation frequency independent of the spindle speed and therefore enables all opportunities to affect the generated chip shapes.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8121
Riccardo Bianchi, Addison Alexander, Andrea Vacca
Abstract Typically, earthmoving machines do not have wheel suspensions. This lack of components often causes uncomfortable driving, and in some cases reduces machine productivity and safety. Several solutions to this problem have been proposed in the last decades, and particularly successful is the passive solution based on the introduction of accumulators in the hydraulic circuit connecting the machine boom. The extra capacitance effect created by the accumulator causes a magnification of the boom oscillations, in such a way that these oscillations counter-react the machine oscillation caused by the driving on uneven ground. This principle of counter-reacting machine oscillations through the boom motion can be achieved also with electro-hydraulic solutions, properly actuating the flow supply to the boom actuators on the basis of a feedback sensors and a proper control strategy.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2009
Natasha Barbely, Narayanan Komerath
Abstract Coaxial rotors are finding use in advanced rotorcraft concepts. Combined with lift offset rotor technology, they offer a solution to the problems of dynamic stall and reverse flow that often limit single rotor forward flight speeds. In addition, coaxial rotorcraft systems do not need a tail rotor, a major boon during operation in confined areas. However, the operation of two counter-rotating rotors in close proximity generates many possible aerodynamic interactions between rotor blades, blades and vortices, and between vortices. With two rotors, the parameter design space is very large, and requires efficient computations as well as basic experiments to explore aerodynamics of a coaxial rotor and the effects on performance, loads, and acoustics.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1917
Bongho Kim, Jeongkyu Kim, Kwang Yun Kim, Jung Hoon Woo
Abstract Creep groan noise occurs in a just moving vehicle by the simultaneous application of torque to the wheel and the gradual release of brake pressure in-vehicle. It is the low frequency noise giving the driver a very uncomfortable feeling. Recently, the field claims regarding the creep groan noise are increasing. So far, creep groan noise has been improved by means of chassis modification the transfer system. But vehicle body the response system does not. In this paper, the effect between vibration characteristics of vehicle body, creep groan noise was analyzed. Then presented analysis method for vehicle body effect regarding creep groan noise.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1918
Yusuke Aoki, Yasuyuki Kanehira, Yukio Nishizawa
Abstract Brake squeal is an uncomfortable noise that occurs while braking. It is an important issue in automobile quality to prevent brake products from squealing. Brake shims are widely used to reduce squeal occurrence rate. The anti-squeal effect of shims is quantified as damping properties measured with a bending mode tester, instead of repeating many dynamometer tests. However, there are cases where measurement results have less correlation to actual squeal suppression rate. Therefore, the evaluation of the anti-squeal effect with a dynamometer or on an actual car is needed until the best shim can be selected. To improve the predicted accuracy of the anti-squeal effect, the difference between measurement conditions and actual braking conditions of shims, was focused on. The bending mode tester measures loss factor under pressure-free conditions, even though shims are compressed by pistons or cylinders towards the backplate of the pad.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1922
Yongchang Du, Yujian Wang
Abstract Modelling of disc is crucial in analyzing brake squeal since the disc rotates past the non-rotating pads and the pads are coupled with different areas of the disc at different times. However, in most of the complex eigenvalue analysis of brake squeal, the effect of disc rotation was ignored. This paper proposes a closed-loop coupling model for brake squeal analysis. A modal parameter-based rotating disc model, whose dynamic behavior is represented by rotation speed-dependent equivalent modal parameters, is built through space and time-frequency transformation between reference and moving coordinate systems. The orthogonality of the equivalent modal parameters in state-space is derived. By performing modal synthesis in state-space, the rotating disc is incorporated into brake squeal closed-loop coupling model with other stationary components. Dynamic instability of the system is solved through complex eigenvalue analysis in state-space.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1920
Deaglan O'Meachair, Stamatis Angelinas, Matthew Crumpton, Antonio Rubio Flores, Juan Garcia, Pablo Barles
Abstract Bentley Motors Ltd. has developed a Carbon Silicon Carbide (CSiC) brake system for its Mulsanne product, introduced at 17MY. The CSiC brake system is conceived as a performance brake system, and as such offers notable improvements in brake performance. In developing the brake system, particular focus was placed on meeting the refinement levels required for a premium product, and indeed as the flagship model for Bentley Motors, NVH refinement of the brake system was of particular concern. This paper intends to discuss the technical performance of the brake system and review the NVH performance of the brakes. Particular attention is given to the methodology employed by Bentley Motors Ltd. and IDIADA Automotive Technology S.A. in identifying NVH concerns, and proposing and validating solutions in the field, through extensive NVH endurance runs. The performance of the system is benchmarked against similar systems offered by Bentley Motors.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1933
Mingzhuo Li, Dejian Meng, Lijun Zhang
Abstract Brake judder severely affects the riding comfort and safety of vehicle. For the brake corner system, a rigid-flexible coupling model is established based on ADAMS. In the model, brake pads, caliper, anchor and knuckle are flexible bodies, and the contacts between pads and disc and the contacts between pads and caliper are defined in detail. Meanwhile, the vibration acceleration of the brake corner components and the contact forces between disc and pads are used as evaluation index and the evaluation system of brake judder are improved. The analysis results show that the novel model and evaluation system can be used to predict brake judder effectively.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1921
Yusuke Sunagawa, Tsuyoshi Kondo
Abstract Brake squeal noise is generally classified into two vibration modes of disc. One is called “out-of plane mode” which vibrates in disc’s out-of-plane direction. The other is “In-plane mode” which vibrates in disc’s in-plane direction, it means the disc is contracted partially or is extended. There are few “In-plane noise” analysis reports from Disc pad standpoint, so it has been unclear how disc pad contributes to “In-plane mode” until now. This paper confirms that we successfully analyzed direct pad vibration mode by laser scanning under in-plane mode condition. Based on these results, we assume that pad stiffness affected in-plane mode and carried out validation tests.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1919
Joo Sang Park, Min Gyu Han, Seon Yeol Oh
Abstract This paper introduces the experimental test results of an investigation to understand the relationship between the leading offset and squeal propensity. In addition Transient Analysis (TA) and Complex Eigenvalue Analysis (CEA) are used simultaneously as a means to compare the experimental approach to two different numerical tools, so evaluating the validity of each theoretical approach. To confirm the CAE results. An ODS was recorded of the brake using a 3D laser scanning vibrometer. Even though the CEA approach is very popular in the study of brake squeal noise, there are some limitations and difficulties in replicating the real phenomenon especially containing unstable behavior. The differences are due to weak pad contact stiffness and friction characteristics which are dependent on the relative interface velocity between pad and rotor. It is necessary to consider stick-slip vibration and time domain analysis in addition.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1911
Philippe Dufrenoy, Vincent Magnier, Yassine WADDAD, Jean-Francois Brunel, Gery DE SAXCE
Abstract During friction it is well known that the real contact area is much lower to the theoretical one and that it evolves constantly during braking. It influences drastically the system’s performance. Conversely the system behavior modifies the loading conditions and consequently the contact surface area. This interaction between scales is well-known for the problematic of vibrations induced by friction but also for the thermomechanical behavior. Indeed, it is necessary to develop models combining a fine description of the contact interface and a model of the whole brake system. This is the aim of the present work. A multiscale strategy is propose to integrate the microscopic behavior of the interface in a macroscopic numerical model. Semi-analytical resolution is done on patches at the contact scale while FEM solution with contact parameters embedded the solution at the microscale is used. Asperities and plateaus are considered at the contact interface.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1931
Aaron Völpel, Georg Peter Ostermeyer
Abstract In today’s research and development of brake systems the model-based prediction of complex vibrations and NVH phenomena plays an important role. Despite the efforts, the high dimensional computational simulation models only provide a limited part of the results gained through experimental measurements. Several reasons are discussed by the industry and academic research. One potential source of these inadequacies is the very simple formulation of the friction forces in the simulation models. Due to a significant shorter computation time (by orders of magnitude), the complex eigenvalue analysis has been established, in comparison to the transient analysis, as the standard method in the case of industrial research, where systems with more than one million degrees of freedom are simulated.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1939
Toshikazu Okamura
Abstract Brake judder is one of the most serious problems in automotive-brake systems. It is basically a forced vibration caused by the friction-surface geometry of a brake disc, and therefore, disc rotors play a significant role in judder. There are two types of judder: cold and hot. Hot judder is caused by the thermo-mechanical deformation of a brake disc due to high-speed braking. There are several shapes of deformation, e.g., coning and circumferential waviness. Circumferential waviness is caused by thermo-mechanical buckling and typically found as a butterfly shape in a 2nd rotational-order and hot-spotting. In a previous paper, two groups of disc castings with different material homogeneity were machined intentionally to have two kinds of dimensional variations.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1944
Seongjoo Lee, JeSung Jeon, ShinWook Kim, ShinWan Kim, Seong Rhee, Wan Gyu Lee, Young Sun Cho, Jeongkyu Kim
When two identical brakes are simultaneously tested on a vehicle chassis dynamometer, very often the left hand brake is found to squeal more or less than the right hand brake, all at different frequencies. This study was performed to develop some understanding of this puzzling phenomenon. It is found that as the wear rate difference between the inner pad and the outer pad increases, low frequency (caliper and knuckle) squeals occur more and more, and as the differential wear becomes larger and larger, high frequency (disc) squeals occur less and less, finally disappearing all together. Discs and calipers are found to affect the differential pad wear, in turn affecting brake squeal generation.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1915
Meechai Sriwiboon, Seong Rhee, Kritsana Kaewlob, Nipon Tiempan, Rungrod Samankitesakul
Abstract As some brake engineers believe that brake squeal can be related to pad hardness, friction coefficient or compressibility while others disagree, a study has been undertaken to develop further insights. Two commercial formulas, one low-copper NAO and the other copper-free NAO, were made into disc pads of varying porosity without an underlayer and they were checked for specific gravity, porosity, hardness (HRS and HRR), natural frequencies, compressibility, friction, wear and squeal. With increasing porosity, the hardness and natural frequencies continue to decrease. The compressibility definitely does not increase, but rather slightly decrease or stays the same. The coefficient of friction decreases for the low-copper along with pad and disc wear reduction, and increases for the copper-free along with pad wear increase with no change in disc wear. No obvious correlation emerges between brake squeal and pad hardness, friction coefficient or compressibility.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1806
Sumon Sinha, Farokh Kavarana, Dan Williams, Kazuya Asao
Abstract A high performance rigid airfoil profile sunroof wind deflector has been developed for high speed freeway driving with the sunroof open. This deflector is clearly superior to the conventional bar type deflector and less expensive compared to tall flexible fabric mesh deflectors applied on high end vehicles today. It provides superior speech intelligibility under high speed driving with sunroof open. The criterion for designing this deflector was to get the highest airspeed possible to span the sunroof opening under all conditions. The customized shape also utilizes flow unsteadiness, including those at the onset of buffeting, in order to condition the shear layer. The airfoil profiled deflector yielded superior mid and high frequency acoustic performance with acceptable low frequency performance. A shorter airfoil deflector was sufficient to keep the external airflow from entering the forward tilted sunroof opening on a mid-size SUV under test.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1802
Mehdi Mehrgou, Franz Zieher, Christoph Priestner
Abstract Recently, hybrid and fully electric drives have been developing widely in variety, power and range. The new reliable simulation approaches are needed, in order to meet the defined NVH targets of these systems and implementing CAE methods for front loading, Design Validation Process (DVP). This paper introduces the application of a novel NVH analysis workflow on an electric vehicle driveline including both electromagnetic and mechanical excitations for an absolute evaluation of the NVH performance. At first, the electromagnetic field is simulated using FEM method to extract the excitations on the stator, rotor bearings as well as the drive torque. Then, the multibody dynamic model of the driveline is built-up, driven by this torque. The effect of eccentricity and skew angle of rotor in electromagnetic excitations are shown.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1796
Aurélien Cloix, Jean-Luc Wojtowicki
Abstract The current paper is based on the French research program TESSA (“Transfert des Efforts des Sources Solidiennes Actives”). A specific task within TESSA project consists in the characterization of the measurements variability between several laboratories, of the blocked forces on a water pump of a heat engine. This paper focuses only on the measurements carried out at Vibratec laboratory. Two kinds of measurements have been carried out: direct measurements, using force sensors, which is the target of the inter-laboratory measurements, and an inverse method without force sensor requirements. Reproducibility and repeatability tests have been done in order to quantify the measurement variability within the same laboratory, in preparation for the inter-laboratory disparity analysis.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1798
Quentin Buisson, Jean-Louis Guyader, Serge Puvilland, Xavier Carniel, Maximilien Soenen
Abstract The goal of the present study is to provide a simple method to compare structure borne noise sources in order to choose the most efficient one, considering the transmission of dynamic forces. It is well known that mechanical sources are not only dependent of the source itself but also of the receiving structure, in addition real sources cannot be reduced to a transverse force acting on the structure but more complicated effect like moment excitation must be taken into account. The advantage of the reception plate method is to characterize the source globally by the level of vibration of the reception plate whatever the type of excitation, the idea is basically to characterize mechanical sources as it is done for acoustical sources in reverberant rooms. A reception plate test bench has been developed to determine the power injected by mechanical sources. Two prototype plates have been designed in order to have different receiving mobilities.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1794
Jonathan Caprile, Claire Chaufour, Pierre Emile Chartrain
Abstract In automotive NVH, the noise generated by a powertrain is still one of the major noise sources especially at low and mid vehicle velocity. For this reason automotive OEMs are continuously focusing on methods to efficiently analyze this noise source. For this purpose, a well-established simulation methodology can provide results thoroughly, within a limited amount of time and with a reduced cost contrary to experiments which are involved in late design phases and are more expensive. This paper aims at presenting an approach to simulate efficiently the acoustic radiation from automotive components. With this aim in mind, the acoustic response of a realistic powertrain unit subjected to working conditions ranging from 1000 RPM to 4500 RPM is studied until 3000 Hz. Several radiating boundary conditions will be assessed in order to detect the most efficient set-up for this kind of problem and to extract the optimized modeling guidelines.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1793
Sandra Forget, Nicolas Totaro, Jean-Louis Guyader, Michel Schaeffer
Abstract The constant evolution in the automotive sector to achieve more eco-friendly vehicles has induced the development of more efficient systems with new components and innovative materials. To evaluate the impact of these technologies or to improve them in terms of NVH performances, acoustic engineers rely on experimental tests and numerical computations. In this context, the use of experimental noise sources identification and characterization methods can provide interesting approaches. However, classical methods usually used in industry like the Nearfield Acoustical Holography (NAH) or the Beamforming techniques are quickly limited, in particular in terms of precision in localization, for such analysis support. The presented method, named M-iPTF for Mixed inverse Patch Transfer Functions, is more suitable as it is able to localize and quantify all acoustic source fields directly on the real geometry of a complex structure.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1821
Lin Du, Mats Abom, Mikael Karlsson, Magnus Knutsson
Abstract To tune the acoustics of intake systems resonators are often used. A problem with this solution is that the performance of these resonators can be affected a lot by flow. First, for low frequencies (Strouhal-numbers) the acoustic induced vorticity across a resonator inlet opening will create damping, which can reduce the efficiency. Secondly, the vorticity across the opening can also change the end-correction (added mass) for the resonator, which can modify the resonance frequency. However, the largest problem that can occur is whistling. This happens since the vortex-sound interaction across a resonator opening for certain Strouhal-numbers will amplify incoming sound waves. A whistling can then be created if this amplified sound forms a feedback loop, e.g., via reflections from system boundaries or the resonator. To analyse this kind of problem it is necessary to have a model that allows for both sound and vorticity and their interaction.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1822
Drasko Masovic, Franz Zotter, Eugene Nijman, Jan Rejlek, Robert Höldrich
Abstract Radiation of sound from an open pipe with a hot mean flow presents one of the classic problems of acoustics in inhomogeneous media. The problem has been especially brought into focus in the last several decades, in the context of noise control of vehicle exhaust systems and jet engines. However, the reports on the measurements of the radiated sound field are still rare and scattered over different values of subsonic and supersonic flow speeds, cold and hot jets, as well as different sound frequency ranges. This paper focuses on low Mach number values of the mean flow speed and low frequencies of the incident (plane) sound waves inside an unflanged cylindrical pipe with a straight cut. It presents the results of the far-field radiation pattern measurements and compares them with an existing analytical model from the literature. The mean flow inside the pipe reached Mach number values up to 0.25 and temperature up to 300°C.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1820
Mikael Karlsson, Magnus Knutsson, Mats Abom
Abstract This work explores how fluid driven whistles in complex automotive intake and exhaust systems can be predicted using computationally affordable tools. Whistles associated with unsteady shear layers (created over for example side branches or perforates in resonators) are studied using vortex sound theory; vorticity in the shear layer interacts with the acoustic field while being convected across the orifice. If the travel time of a hydrodynamic disturbance over the orifice reasonably matches a multiple of the acoustic period of an acoustic feedback system, energy is transferred from the flow field to the acoustic field resulting in a whistle. The actual amplitude of the whistle is set by non-linear saturation phenomena and cannot be predicted here, but the frequency and relative strength can be found. For this not only the mean flow and acoustic fields needs to be characterized separately, but also the interaction of the two.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1814
Maxime Legros, Jean Michel Ville, Solène Moreau, Xavier Carniel, Christophe Lambourg, Guillaume Stempfel
Abstract The new requirements during the first stages of the conception of a HVAC prompt the designer to integrate the acoustic problematic increasingly upstream. The designer needs to select a coherent components’ choice in order to comply with the specifications in terms of aeraulic and acoustic performances. A tool has been created to guide the designer’s choices based on an acoustic synthesis which is a design and/or diagnosis approach used to analyze and predict the acoustic behavior of a complex system. The synthesis is developed in order to propose an approach which considers the integration effects and some interaction effects. The acoustic synthesis results are the starting point of a psycho-acoustic study providing audio samples of the prediction and indications of the HVAC acceptance by the prospective user. Also, one may compare the results of different acoustic synthesis projects to study the influence of the parameters on the acoustic prediction.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1768
He Changming, Xu Sichuan
For an in-line diesel engine with four cylinder operating in four-stroke mode, the second-order reciprocating inertia forces generally cannot be well balanced with direct approach. The unbalanced second-order inertia forces are the main reason to cause vibration and noise in a diesel engine within low frequency range. The more superior tone quality for modern diesel engine has been expected even for bus application all the time, and there are tougher requirements for truck noise in developed countries, i.e. in Europe and USA. In present research a unique crankshaft system configuration was proposed, which including opposed piston, inner and outer connecting rod, and crankshaft but running in two-stroke mode, to eliminate the second-order inertia force considerably rather than by adding an extra balance shaft mechanism.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1761
Antonio Acri, Guenter Offner, Thomas Resch, Eugene Nijman, Roberto Corradi
Abstract For vibration and acoustics vehicle development, one of the main challenges is the identification and the analysis of the noise sources, which is required in order to increase the driving comfort and to meet the stringent legislative requirements for the vehicle noise emission. Transfer Path Analysis (TPA) is a fairly well established technique for estimating and ranking individual low-frequency noise or vibration contributions via the different transmission paths. This technique is commonly applied on test measurements, based on prototypes, at the end of the design process. In order to apply such methodology already within the design process, a contribution analysis method based on dynamic substructuring of a multibody system is proposed with the aim of improving the quality of the design process for vehicle NVH assessment and to shorten development time and cost.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1779
Sergio Carvajal, Daniel Wallner, Reinhard Helfrich, Michael Klein
Abstract Numerical methods for brake squeal analysis are widely accepted in industry. The use of complex eigenvalue analysis is a successful approach to predict the appearance of squeal noise. Using simulation in an early design stage reduces time to market, saves costs, and improves the physical behavior and robustness of the brake system. State of the art of brake simulation comprises sampling for many parameter sets in a wide range of interesting values. Based on high performance, stability maps can be created in short time containing many results, which gives a deep insight into the brake behavior under varying parameters. An additional benefit of sampling is the possibility to detect parts with high potential for improving the NHV comfort. In the sequel, mathematical optimization methods like topology optimization or shape optimization are used for systematic improvements.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1782
Kyoung-Jin Chang, Dong Chul Park
Abstract This paper discusses approaches to emotionally improve the driving sound based on Active Sound Design (ASD). In the first step, target sound design methods are suggested in order to represent the vehicle’s concept and brand image via a driving sound. In this method, formant filter and musical chords are applied to the target sound synthesis. In the second step, a technique to make a target sound realistic in ASD system is discussed, which enables to stimulate the customers' emotion. In this technique, the process to simulate a musical instrument sound for a vivid driving sound and synthesize the sound with FIR filter is studied. Finally, the improved driving sound is demonstrated in ASD system.
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