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Viewing 151 to 180 of 7837
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1778
Enrico Galvagno, Antonio Tota, Mauro Velardocchia, Alessandro Vigliani
Abstract This paper explores the potentiality of reducing noise and vibration of a vehicle transmission thanks to powertrain control integration with active braking. Due to external disturbances, coming from the driver, e.g. during tip-in / tip-out maneuvers, or from the road, e.g. crossing a speed bump or driving on a rough road, the torsional backlashes between transmission rotating components (gears, synchronizers, splines, CV joints), may lead to NVH issues known as clonk. This study initially focuses on the positive effect on transmission NVH performance of a concurrent application of a braking torque at the driving wheels and of an engine torque increase during these maneuvers; then a powertrain/brake integrated control strategy is proposed. The braking system is activated in advance with respect to the perturbation and it is deactivated immediately after to minimize losses.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1783
Chris Todter, Olivier Robin, Paul Bremner, Christophe Marchetto, Alain Berry
Abstract Surface pressure measurements using microphone arrays are still challenging, especially in an automotive context with cruising speeds around Mach 0.1. The separated turbulent boundary layer excitation and the side mirror wake flow generate both acoustic and aerodynamic components, which have wavenumbers that differ by a factor of approximately 10. This calls for high spatial resolution measurements to fully resolve the wavenumber-frequency spectrum. In a previous publication [1], the authors reported a micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS) surface microphone array that successfully used wavenumber analysis to quantify acoustic versus turbulence loading. It was shown that the measured surface pressure at each microphone could be strongly influenced by self-noise induced by the microphone “packaging”, which can be attenuated with a suitable windscreen.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1781
Joshua Wheeler
Abstract The design and operation of a vehicle’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system has great impact on the performance of the vehicle’s Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) and Hands-Free Communication (HFC) system. HVAC noise provides high amplitudes of broadband frequency content that affects the signal to noise ratio (SNR) within the vehicle cabin, and works to mask the user’s speech. But what’s less obvious is that when the airflow from the panel vents or defroster openings can be directed toward the vehicle microphone, a mechanical “buffeting” phenomenon occurs on the microphone’s diaphragm that distresses the ASR system beyond its ability to interpret the user’s voice. The airflow velocity can be strong enough that a simple windscreen on the microphone is not enough to eliminate the problem. Minimizing this buffeting effect is a vital key to building a vehicle that meets the customer’s expectations for ASR and HFC performance.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1784
Guillaume Baudet
Abstract Wind noise in automobile is becoming more and more important as customer requirements increase. On the other hand great progress has been made on engine and road noises. Thus, for many vehicles, wind noise is the major acoustic source during road and motorway driving. As for other noises, automobile manufacturers must be able for a new car project to specify, calculate and measure each step of the acoustic cascading: Source Transfers, both solid and air borne In the case of automotive wind noise, the excitation source is the dynamic pressure on the vehicle’s panels. This part of the cascading is the one influenced by the exterior design. Even if many others components (panels, seals, cabin trims) have a big influence, the exterior design is a major issue for the wind noise. The wind noise level in the cabin can sometimes change significantly with only a small modification of the exterior design.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1782
Jobin Puthuparampil, Henry Pong, Pierre Sullivan
Abstract Large-scale emergency or off-grid power generation is typically achieved through diesel or natural gas generators. To meet governmental emission requirements, emission control systems (ECS) are required. In operation, effective control over the generator’s acoustic emission is also necessary, and can be accomplished within the ECS system. Plug flow mufflers are commonly used, as they provide a sufficient level of noise attenuation in a compact structure. The key design parameter is the transmission loss of the muffler, as this dictates the level of attenuation at a given frequency. This work implements an analytically decoupled solution, using multiple perforate impedance models, through the transfer matrix method (TMM) to predict the transmission loss based on the muffler geometry. An equivalent finite element model is implemented for numerical simulation. The analytical results and numerical results are then evaluated against experimental data from literature.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1787
Jan Biermann, Adrien Mann, Barbara Neuhierl, Min-Suk Kim
Abstract Over the past decades, interior noise from wind noise or engine noise have been significantly reduced by leveraging improvements of both the overall vehicle design and of sound package. Consequently, noise sources originating from HVAC systems (Heat Ventilation and Air Conditioning), fans or exhaust systems are becoming more relevant for perceived quality and passenger comfort. This study focuses on HVAC systems and discusses a Flow-Induced Noise Detection Contributions (FIND Contributions) numerical method enabling the identification of the flow-induced noise sources inside and around HVAC systems. This methodology is based on the post-processing of unsteady flow results obtained using Lattice Boltzmann based Method (LBM) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations combined with LBM-simulated Acoustic Transfer Functions (ATF) between the position of the sources inside the system and the passenger’s ears.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1785
Paul Bremner, Scott Clifton, Chris Todter
Abstract Measurements of interior wind noise sound pressure level have shown that dBA and Loudness are not adequate metrics of wind noise sound quality due to non-stationary characteristics such as temporal modulation and impulse. A surface microphone array with high spatio-temporal resolution has been used to measure and analyze the corresponding non-stationary characteristics of the exterior aero-acoustic loading. Wavenumber filtering is used to observe the unsteady character of the low wavenumber aero-acoustic loading components most likely to be exciting glass vibration and transmitting sound.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1788
Kishore Chand Ulli, Upender Rao Gade
Abstract Automotive window buffeting is a source of vehicle occupant’s discomfort and annoyance. Original equipment manufacturers (OEM) are using both experimental and numerical methods to address this issue. With major advances in computational power and numerical modelling, it is now possible to model complex aero acoustic problems using numerical tools like CFD. Although the direct turbulence model LES is preferred to simulate aero-acoustic problems, it is computationally expensive for many industrial applications. Hybrid turbulence models can be used to model aero acoustic problems for industrial applications. In this paper, the numerical modelling of side window buffeting in a generic passenger car is presented. The numerical modelling is performed with the hybrid turbulence model Scale Adaptive Simulation (SAS) using a commercial CFD code.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1791
David Neihguk, Shreyas Fulkar
Abstract Parametric model of a production hybrid (made up of reactive and dissipative elements) muffler for tractor engine is developed to compute the acoustic Transmission Loss (TL). The objective is to simplify complex muffler acoustic simulations without any loss of accuracy, robustness and usability so that it is accessible to all product development engineers and designers. The parametric model is a 3D Finite Element Method (FEM) based built in COMSOL model builder which is then converted into a user-friendly application (App) using COMSOL App builder. The uniqueness of the App lies in its ability to handle not only wide range of parametric variations but also variations in the physics and boundary conditions. This enables designers to explore various design options in the early design phase without the need to have deep expertise in a specific simulation tool nor in numerical acoustic modeling.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1786
Hiroshi Yokoyama, Ryo Adachi, Taiki Minato, Akiyoshi Iida
Abstract The objective of this paper is to clarify the mechanism for the reduction of cavity tone with blowing jets aligned in the spanwise direction in the upstream boundary layer. Also, the effects of spacing of the jets on the reduction are focused. To achieve these objectives, direct aeroacoustic simulations were conducted along with wind tunnel experiments. The depth-to-length ratio of cavity was D/L = 0.5. The incoming boundary layer was laminar, where the boundary layer thickness was δ/L = 0.055. The predicted flow fields without control show that two-dimensional large-scale vortices are shed and become acoustic sources in the cavity. The effects of spanwise spacing of spanwise-aligned jets on the cavity flow and tone were clarified with computations and experiments with the different pitches of s/L = 0.1 - 1.0 (s/δ = 1.8-18.2). As a result, the largest reduction level was obtained for s/L = 0.5.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1792
Magnus Knutsson, Erik Kjellson, Rodney Glover, Hans Boden
Abstract Increased demands for reduction of fuel consumption and CO2 emissions are driven by the global warming. To meet these challenges with respect to the passenger car segment the strategy of utilizing IC-engine downsizing has shown to be effective. In order to additionally meet requirements for high power and torque output supercharging is required. This can be realized using e.g. turbo-chargers, roots blowers or a combination of several such devices for the highest specific power segment. Both turbo-chargers and roots blowers can be strong sources of sound depending on the operating conditions and extensive NVH abatements such as resonators and encapsulation might be required to achieve superior vehicle NVH. For an efficient resonator tuning process in-duct acoustic source data is required. No published studies exists that describe how the gas exchange process for roots blowers can be described by acoustic sources in the frequency domain.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1790
Vinayak H. Patil, Ravi Kumar Sara, T. R. Milind, Rodney C. Glover
Abstract Vehicle noise emission requirements are becoming more stringent each passing year. Pass-by noise requirement for passenger vehicles is now 74 dB (A) in some parts of the world. The common focus areas for noise treatment in the vehicle are primarily on three sub-systems i.e., engine compartment, exhaust systems and power train systems. Down- sizing and down- speeding of engines, without compromising on power output, has meant use of boosting technologies that have produced challenges in order to design low-noise intake systems which minimize losses and also meet today’s vehicle emission regulations. In a boosted system, there are a variety of potential noise sources in the intake system. Thus an understanding of the noise source strength in each component of the intake system is needed. One such boosting system consists of Turbo-Super configuration with various components, including an air box, supercharger, an outlet manifold, and an intercooler.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1789
Rafael Veloso, Robert Fairbrother, Yasser Elnemr
Abstract The acoustics of automotive intake and exhaust systems is typically modeled using linear acoustics or gas-dynamics simulation. These approaches are preferred during basic sound design in the early development stages due to their computational efficiency compared to complex 3D CFD and FEM solutions. The linear acoustic method reduces the component being modelled to an equivalent acoustic two-port transfer matrix which describes the acoustic characteristic of the muffler. Recently this method was used to create more detailed and more accurate models based on a network of 3D cells. As the typical automotive muffler includes perforated elements and sound absorptive material, this paper demonstrates the extension of the 3D linear acoustic network description of a muffler to include the aforementioned elements. The proposed method was then validated against experimental results from muffler systems with perforated elements and sound absorptive material.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1751
Nicolas Schaefer, Bart Bergen, Tomas Keppens, Wim Desmet
Abstract The continuous pursuit for lighter, more affordable and more silent cars, has pushed OEMs into optimizing the design of car components. The different panels surrounding the car interior cavity such as firewall, door or floor panels are of key importance to the NV performance. The design of the sound packages for high-frequency airborne input is well established. However, the design for the mid-frequency range is more difficult, because of the complex inputs involved, the lack of representative performance metrics and its high computational cost. In order to make early decisions for package design, performance maps based on the different design parameters are desired for mid-frequencies. This paper presents a framework to retrieve the response surface, from a numerical design space of finite-element frequency sweeps. This response surface describes the performance of a sound package against the different design variables.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1752
Kapil Gupta, Arun Choudhary, Rakesh Bidre
Abstract At present, a Dual Mass Flywheel (DMF) system is widely known to provide benefits on driveline induced noise, vibration and drivability over a Single Mass Flywheel (SMF). A well-tuned DMF provides nice isolation of torsional vibrations generated in periodic combustion process of automobile IC engines. Similarly, a torsional vibration damper mounted on driveline component reduces the torsional excitation and results a lower torsional vibration at driveline components. Noise and vibration issues like boom noise and high vibrations at low engine RPM range drive are often resulted due to high engine firing order torsional excitation input to the driveline. More often, this becomes one of the most objectionable noise and vibration issues in vehicle and should be eliminated or reduced for better NVH performance. A 4 cylinder, 4 stroke small diesel engine equipped with SMF is found to have high engine firing order torsional excitation.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1753
Jack Hall Riddle, Ya-Juan Bemman, Tom Frei, Sihui Wu, Ishang Padalkar
Abstract Demands for engines to operate at low-frequency firing order are increasing in the automotive market. This requirement is driven by consumer and regulatory demand for vehicles which are more efficient in the use of fuel. As a result, engine and transmission technologies have been developed which permit operation of engines with fewer cylinders at increasingly low RPM’s. The resulting low frequency exhaust noise is more difficult to attenuate than in vehicles in years past. At the same time, vehicles often have less packaging space for mufflers, when larger volume would otherwise be needed to attenuate at lower frequencies. A further challenge is the demand for increasingly refined performance sounds from the exhaust systems of premium cars despite the technical obstacles involved in even maintaining sound quality. Finally, legally permissible sound levels are decreasing in some markets. These market and regulatory demands require new solutions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1754
Kyoung-Jin Chang, Seonghyeon Kim, Dong Chul Park, So Youn Moon, Sunghwan Park, Myung Hwan Yun
Abstract This paper aims to establish a systematic process of developing a brand driving sound. Firstly, principal factors of a brand sound identity are extracted from factor analysis of many sample cars. As a result, brand sound positioning map is drawn using jury test data. Also, the multiple regression analysis of subjective and objective test results is carried. As a result, the principal factors are expressed by objective test data and brand sound positioning map can be easily updated from the measurement data. In addition, what should be improved for designing a target sound is reviewed. Secondly, various technologies of target sound design are discussed to involve the brand identity and vehicle’s character in driving sound. Also, an efficient tool to implement the target sound with an active sound design (ASD) system in a vehicle is introduced. This tool enables to efficiently design, tune and simulate a target sound for ASD system in a laboratory.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1755
Frank C. Valeri, James T. Lagodzinski, Scott M. Reilly, John P. Miller
Abstract Hybrid powertrain vehicles inherently create discontinuous sounds during operation. The discontinuous noise created from the electrical motors during transition states are undesirable since they can create tones that do not correlate with the dynamics of the vehicle. The audible level of these motor whines and discontinuous tones can be reduced via common noise abatement techniques or reducing the amount of regeneration braking. One electronic solution which does not affect mass or fuel economy is Masking Sound Enhancement (MSE). MSE is an algorithm that uses the infotainment system to mask the naturally occurring discontinuous hybrid drive unit and driveline tones. MSE enables a variety of benefits, such as more aggressive regenerative braking strategies which yield higher levels of fuel economy and results in a more pleasing interior vehicle powertrain sound. This paper will discuss the techniques and signals used to implement MSE in a hybrid powertrain equipped vehicle.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1756
Seonghyeon Kim, Kyoung-Jin Chang, Dong Chul Park, Seung Min Lee, Sang Kwon Lee
Abstract This paper presents a systematic approach to interior engine sound design for enhancing sound character of car interior sound effectively. Nowadays an active noise control technology is widely used in vehicle industry. Particularly, an active sound design (ASD) technique using vehicle’s audio system for controlling interior sound due to powertrain has become a general method to improve sound quality or character. The ASD system using speakers has the advantage of creating various sounds relatively easy. In this study, the novel systematic approach is proposed to guide the efficient design of powerful and pleasant acceleration sound by order spectrum analysis. At first, primary attributes of powerful and pleasant sound were analyzed and sound concept was derived. Secondly, the optimal linearity and the level envelope of firing order were derived by subjective evaluation.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1758
Seung Min Lee, Dong Chul Park, Seonghyeon Kim, Sang Kwon Lee
Abstract Recently the interior sound is actively generated by the active sound design (ASD) device in a passenger car. Therefore, the objective evaluation method for the sound quality of actively designed sounds is required. In previous research, the sound quality of interior sound has been presented with powerful and pleasant for the existing passenger car. This paper presents a novel approach method for the objective evaluation of powerfulness and pleasantness of actively designed interior sound. The powerfulness has been evaluated based on the degreed of modulation and a quantity of low frequency booming of the sound in the paper. On the other hand, the pleasantness is evaluated based on the slope ratio of harmonic orders per octave in frequency domain. These evaluation methods are successfully applied to the objective evaluation of luxury passenger car.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1757
Matthew Maunder, Benjamin Munday
Abstract Excitement, image and emotion are key attributes for cars, particularly those with higher power ratings. Engine sound has traditionally acted as the car’s voice, conveying these attributes to the driver and passengers along with the brand image. Engine sound also underpins the dynamic driving experience by giving instant feedback about how a car is operating, enhancing the connection between driver and vehicle. For decades, the automotive industry has engineered engine sound to achieve these benefits, thereby defining the ‘language’ of car sound. Electric vehicles deliver strong and responsive performance but naturally lack the acoustic feedback that internal combustion engines provide. While this gives advantages in terms of comfort and environmental noise, the benefits of engine sound are lost. Carefully controlled acoustic feedback inside the car’s cabin brings tangible and valuable benefits both for the dynamic driving experience and to convey the brand image.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1760
Weimin Thor, J. Stuart Bolton
Abstract Due the increasing concern with the acoustic environment within automotive vehicles, there is an interest in measuring the acoustical properties of automotive door seals. These systems play an important role in blocking external noise sources, such as aerodynamic noise and tire noise, from entering the passenger compartment. Thus, it is important to be able to conveniently measure their acoustic performance. Previous methods of measuring the ability of seals to block sound required the use of either a reverberation chamber, or a wind tunnel with a special purpose chamber attached to it. That is, these methods required the use of large and expensive facilities. A simpler and more economical desktop procedure is thus needed to allow easy and fast acoustic measurement of automotive door seals.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1764
Himanshu Amol Dande, Tongan Wang, John Maxon, Joffrey Bouriez
Abstract The demand for quieter interior cabin spaces among business jet customers has created an increased need for more accurate prediction tools. In this paper, the authors will discuss a collaborative effort between Jet Aviation and Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation to develop a Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) model of a large commercial business jet. To have an accurate prediction, it is critical to accurately model the structural and acoustic subsystems, critical noise transmission paths, and dominant noise sources for the aircraft. The geometry in the SEA model was developed using 3D CAD models of major airframe and interior cabin components. The noise transmission path was characterized through extensive testing of various aircraft components in the Gulfstream Acoustic Test Facility. Material definitions developed from these tests became input parameters in the SEA model.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1793
William Seldon, Amer Shoeb, Daniel Schimmel, Jared Cromas
Abstract As regulations become increasingly stringent and customer expectations of vehicle refinement increase, the accurate control and prediction of exhaust system airborne acoustics are a critical factor in creating a vehicle that wins in the marketplace. The goal of this project was to improve the predicative accuracy of the GT-power engine and exhaust model and to update internal best practices for modeling. This paper will explore the details of an exhaust focused correlation project that was performed on a naturally aspirated spark ignition eight-cylinder engine. This paper and SAE paper “Experimental GT-POWER Correlation Techniques and Best Practices Low Frequency Acoustic Modeling of the Intake System of a Turbocharged Engine” share similar abstracts and introductions; however, they were split for readability and to keep the focus on a single a single subsystem.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1763
Lisa Steinbach, Ercan Altinsoy, Robert Rosenkranz
Abstract In today's urban environment inhabitants are permanently exposed to elevated noise levels, which are dominated by traffic noise. The process of electrification of vehicles might change the traffic noise in city centers. The aim of this work was to determine the pedestrian reaction, the warning effect and the annoyance of more realistic traffic situations. For this purpose both combustion and electric vehicle noise situations and mixed scenarios of both concepts were generated. The differences in the perceived annoyance and warning effect were investigated with perception studies.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1762
Michael Roan, M. Lucas Neurauter, Douglas Moore, Dan Glaser
Abstract Hybrid and electric vehicles (HVs and EVs) have demonstrated low noise levels relative to their Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) counterparts, particularly at low speeds. As the number of HVs/EVs on the road increases, so does the need for data quantifying auditory detectability by pedestrians; in particular, those who are vision impaired. Manufacturers have started implementing additive noise solutions designed to increase vehicle detectability while in electric mode and/or when traveling below a certain speed. A detailed description of the real-time acoustic measurement system, the corresponding vehicular data, development of an immersive noise field, and experimental methods pertaining to a recent evaluation of candidate vehicles is provided herein. Listener testing was completed by 24 legally blind test subjects for four vehicle types: an EV and HV with different additive noise approaches, an EV with no additive noise, and a traditional ICE vehicle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1761
Daniel Fernandez Comesana, Graciano Carrillo Pousa, Emiel Tijs
Abstract The automotive industry is currently increasing the noise and vibration requirements of vehicle components. A detailed vibro-acoustic assessment of the supplied element is commonly enforced by most vehicle manufacturers. Traditional End-Of-Line (EOL) solutions often encounter difficulties adapting from controlled environments to industrial production lines due the presence of high levels of noise and vibrations generated by the surrounding machinery. In contrast, particle velocity measurements performed near a rigid radiating surface are less affected by background noise and they can potentially be used to address noise problems even in such conditions. The vector nature of particle velocity, an intrinsic dependency upon surface displacement and sensor directivity are the main advantages over conventional solutions. As a result, quantitative measurements describing the vibro-acoustic behavior of a device can be performed at the final stage of the manufacturing process.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1807
Richard DeJong, Gordon Ebbitt
Abstract The SEA model of wind noise requires the quantification of both the acoustic as well as the turbulent flow contributions to the exterior pressure. The acoustic pressure is difficult to measure because it is usually much lower in amplitude than the turbulent pressure. However, the coupling of the acoustic pressure to the surface vibration is usually much stronger than the turbulent pressure, especially in the acoustic coincidence frequency range. The coupling is determined by the spatial matching between the pressure and the vibration which can be described by the wavenumber spectra. This paper uses measured vibration modes of a vehicle window to determine the coupling to both acoustic and turbulent pressure fields and compares these to the results from an SEA model. The interior acoustic intensity radiating from the window during road tests is also used to validate the results.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1817
Steven M. Gasworth, Vasudev Nilajkar, Matteo Terragni
Abstract Polycarbonate (PC) glazing as a one-for-one glass replacement offers a 50% weight reduction, but exhibits several dB lower sound transmission loss (STL) in the low frequency range where tire and engine noise are dominant. In the high frequency range where wind noise is dominant, PC glazing offers an STL at least comparable to its glass counterpart, and an STL exceeding glass when this frequency range encompasses the glass coincidence frequency. However, a key value proposition of PC glazing is the opportunity for feature integration afforded by the injection molding process generally used for forming such glazing. Two-component (2K) molding fuses a second shot of plastic material behind, and along the perimeter of, the transparent PC first shot. This second shot can incorporate features and implement functions that require additional components attached or peripheral to a glass version.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1814
Todd Tousignant, Kiran Govindswamy, Vikram Bhatia, Shivani Polasani, W Keith Fisher
Abstract The automotive industry continues to develop technologies for reducing vehicle fuel consumption. Specifically, vehicle lightweighting is expected to be a key enabler for achieving fleet CO2 reduction targets for 2025 and beyond. Hybrid glass laminates that incorporate fusion draw and ion exchange innovations are thinner and thereby, offer more than 30% weight reduction compared to conventional automotive laminates. These lightweight hybrid laminates provide additional benefits, including improved toughness and superior optics. However, glazing weight reduction leads to an increase in transmission of sound through the laminates for certain frequencies. This paper documents a study that uses a systematic test-based approach to understand the sensitivity of interior vehicle noise behavior to changes in acoustic attenuation driven by installation of lightweight glass.
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