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Viewing 91 to 120 of 7820
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1757
Matthew Maunder, Benjamin Munday
Abstract Excitement, image and emotion are key attributes for cars, particularly those with higher power ratings. Engine sound has traditionally acted as the car’s voice, conveying these attributes to the driver and passengers along with the brand image. Engine sound also underpins the dynamic driving experience by giving instant feedback about how a car is operating, enhancing the connection between driver and vehicle. For decades, the automotive industry has engineered engine sound to achieve these benefits, thereby defining the ‘language’ of car sound. Electric vehicles deliver strong and responsive performance but naturally lack the acoustic feedback that internal combustion engines provide. While this gives advantages in terms of comfort and environmental noise, the benefits of engine sound are lost. Carefully controlled acoustic feedback inside the car’s cabin brings tangible and valuable benefits both for the dynamic driving experience and to convey the brand image.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1761
Daniel Fernandez Comesana, Graciano Carrillo Pousa, Emiel Tijs
Abstract The automotive industry is currently increasing the noise and vibration requirements of vehicle components. A detailed vibro-acoustic assessment of the supplied element is commonly enforced by most vehicle manufacturers. Traditional End-Of-Line (EOL) solutions often encounter difficulties adapting from controlled environments to industrial production lines due the presence of high levels of noise and vibrations generated by the surrounding machinery. In contrast, particle velocity measurements performed near a rigid radiating surface are less affected by background noise and they can potentially be used to address noise problems even in such conditions. The vector nature of particle velocity, an intrinsic dependency upon surface displacement and sensor directivity are the main advantages over conventional solutions. As a result, quantitative measurements describing the vibro-acoustic behavior of a device can be performed at the final stage of the manufacturing process.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1785
Paul Bremner, Scott Clifton, Chris Todter
Abstract Measurements of interior wind noise sound pressure level have shown that dBA and Loudness are not adequate metrics of wind noise sound quality due to non-stationary characteristics such as temporal modulation and impulse. A surface microphone array with high spatio-temporal resolution has been used to measure and analyze the corresponding non-stationary characteristics of the exterior aero-acoustic loading. Wavenumber filtering is used to observe the unsteady character of the low wavenumber aero-acoustic loading components most likely to be exciting glass vibration and transmitting sound.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1787
Jan Biermann, Adrien Mann, Barbara Neuhierl, Min-Suk Kim
Abstract Over the past decades, interior noise from wind noise or engine noise have been significantly reduced by leveraging improvements of both the overall vehicle design and of sound package. Consequently, noise sources originating from HVAC systems (Heat Ventilation and Air Conditioning), fans or exhaust systems are becoming more relevant for perceived quality and passenger comfort. This study focuses on HVAC systems and discusses a Flow-Induced Noise Detection Contributions (FIND Contributions) numerical method enabling the identification of the flow-induced noise sources inside and around HVAC systems. This methodology is based on the post-processing of unsteady flow results obtained using Lattice Boltzmann based Method (LBM) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations combined with LBM-simulated Acoustic Transfer Functions (ATF) between the position of the sources inside the system and the passenger’s ears.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1783
Chris Todter, Olivier Robin, Paul Bremner, Christophe Marchetto, Alain Berry
Abstract Surface pressure measurements using microphone arrays are still challenging, especially in an automotive context with cruising speeds around Mach 0.1. The separated turbulent boundary layer excitation and the side mirror wake flow generate both acoustic and aerodynamic components, which have wavenumbers that differ by a factor of approximately 10. This calls for high spatial resolution measurements to fully resolve the wavenumber-frequency spectrum. In a previous publication [1], the authors reported a micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS) surface microphone array that successfully used wavenumber analysis to quantify acoustic versus turbulence loading. It was shown that the measured surface pressure at each microphone could be strongly influenced by self-noise induced by the microphone “packaging”, which can be attenuated with a suitable windscreen.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1781
Joshua Wheeler
Abstract The design and operation of a vehicle’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system has great impact on the performance of the vehicle’s Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) and Hands-Free Communication (HFC) system. HVAC noise provides high amplitudes of broadband frequency content that affects the signal to noise ratio (SNR) within the vehicle cabin, and works to mask the user’s speech. But what’s less obvious is that when the airflow from the panel vents or defroster openings can be directed toward the vehicle microphone, a mechanical “buffeting” phenomenon occurs on the microphone’s diaphragm that distresses the ASR system beyond its ability to interpret the user’s voice. The airflow velocity can be strong enough that a simple windscreen on the microphone is not enough to eliminate the problem. Minimizing this buffeting effect is a vital key to building a vehicle that meets the customer’s expectations for ASR and HFC performance.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1793
William Seldon, Amer Shoeb, Daniel Schimmel, Jared Cromas
Abstract As regulations become increasingly stringent and customer expectations of vehicle refinement increase, the accurate control and prediction of exhaust system airborne acoustics are a critical factor in creating a vehicle that wins in the marketplace. The goal of this project was to improve the predicative accuracy of the GT-power engine and exhaust model and to update internal best practices for modeling. This paper will explore the details of an exhaust focused correlation project that was performed on a naturally aspirated spark ignition eight-cylinder engine. This paper and SAE paper “Experimental GT-POWER Correlation Techniques and Best Practices Low Frequency Acoustic Modeling of the Intake System of a Turbocharged Engine” share similar abstracts and introductions; however, they were split for readability and to keep the focus on a single a single subsystem.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1795
Ahmad Abosrea, Tamer Elnady
Abstract Flow-generated noise has recently received a lot of attention within the process of designing exhaust and intake systems. Flow-generated noise can limit the amount of sound reduction a muffler can introduce inside ducts. This is more important in the modern system design where mufflers are compact and the flow speeds become higher in different sections inside the muffler. In this paper, three measurement techniques are used to measure the flow-generated noise from a duct element. The first is based on calculating the sound power levels inside a reverberation room according to ISO 3741. The radiated noise is measured from the muffler body as a source of noise, then from the tail pipe as an active one-port source. The second is based on sound power measurements inside the ducts using the active two-port theory. The third is measuring the sound pressure radiation inside an anechoic room.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1789
Rafael Veloso, Robert Fairbrother, Yasser Elnemr
Abstract The acoustics of automotive intake and exhaust systems is typically modeled using linear acoustics or gas-dynamics simulation. These approaches are preferred during basic sound design in the early development stages due to their computational efficiency compared to complex 3D CFD and FEM solutions. The linear acoustic method reduces the component being modelled to an equivalent acoustic two-port transfer matrix which describes the acoustic characteristic of the muffler. Recently this method was used to create more detailed and more accurate models based on a network of 3D cells. As the typical automotive muffler includes perforated elements and sound absorptive material, this paper demonstrates the extension of the 3D linear acoustic network description of a muffler to include the aforementioned elements. The proposed method was then validated against experimental results from muffler systems with perforated elements and sound absorptive material.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1771
Mohamed El morsy, Gabriela Achtenova
Abstract Gear fault diagnosis is important in the vibration monitoring of any rotating machine. When a localized fault occurs in gears, the vibration signals always display non-stationary behavior. In early stage of gear failure, the gear mesh frequency (GMF) contains very little energy and is often overwhelmed by noise and higher-level macro-structural vibrations. An effective signal processing method would be necessary to remove such corrupting noise and interference. This paper presents the value of optimal wavelet function for early detection of faulty gear. The Envelope Detection (ED) and the Energy Operator are used for gear fault diagnosis as common techniques with and without the proposed optimal wavelet to verify the effectiveness of the optimal wavelet function. Kurtosis values are determined for the previous techniques as an indicator parameter for the ability of early gear fault detection. The comparative study is applied to real vibration signals.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1770
Wallace Hill, Dennis Kinchen, Mark A. Gehringer
Abstract This paper describes the development of an analytical method to assess and optimize halfshaft joint angles to avoid excessive 3rd halfshaft order vibrations during wide-open-throttle (WOT) and light drive-away events. The objective was to develop a test-correlated analytical model to assess and optimize driveline working angles during the virtual design phase of a vehicle program when packaging tradeoffs are decided. A twelve degree-of-freedom (12DOF) system model was constructed that comprehends halfshaft dynamic angle change, axle torque, powertrain (P/T) mount rate progression and axial forces generated by tripot type constant velocity (CV) joints. Note: “tripot” and “tripod” are alternate nomenclatures for the same type of joint. Simple lumped parameter models have historically been used for P/T mount optimization; however, this paper describes a method for using a lumped parameter model to also optimize driveline working angles.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1768
Yong Xu
Abstract The NVH performance is one of the most important concerns in vehicle development. For all-wheel drive (AWD) vehicles and rear-wheel (RWD) drive vehicles, prop shaft is a major transmission component which may cause various NVH problems. This paper focuses on the vehicle NVH problems caused by the second order excitation force of prop shaft. In order to control the NVH performance of the prop shaft efficiently and fundamentally, this work first studied the rotation kinematical characteristics of prop shaft. Then a rigid-elastic coupling model of vehicle driveline was built with the theory of multi-body dynamics. With this model, the sensitive factors that may affect the second order excitation force were investigated. This paper also describes a case study to verify the conclusions which are revealed from the theoretical calculation and the simulation.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1779
Xianwu Yang, Jian Pang, Lanjun Wang, Xiong Tian, Yu Tang
Abstract With drastically reduction of engine noise, the gear rattle noise generated by the impact between neutral gears inside transmission can be much easily perceived. It is well known that the torsional mode has a direct relationship with the transmission gear rattle noise. This paper establishes a torsional model of a front wheel drive automotive drivetrain, including clutch system, transmission box and equivalent load of a full vehicle, in AMESim software. The experimental engine speed fluctuations at different gears are used to excite the torsional model. The influences of several parameters, including flywheel inertia, clutch stiffness, clutch hysteresis and drive shaft stiffness, on the 2nd order (major engine firing order for a 4-cylinder-4-stroke engine) torsional resonant frequency and the 2nd order torsional resonant peak of the transmission input shaft are analyzed by changing them alternatively.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1777
Thomas Wellmann, Kiran Govindswamy, Dean Tomazic
Abstract The automotive industry continues to develop new technologies aimed at reducing overall vehicle level fuel consumption. Powertrain and driveline related technologies will play a key role in helping OEM’s meet fleet CO2 reduction targets for 2025 and beyond. Specifically, use of technologies such as downsized engines, idle start-stop systems, aggressive torque converter lock-up schedules, wide-ratio spread transmissions, and electrified propulsion systems are vital towards meeting aggressive fuel economy targets. Judicious combinations of such powertrain and driveline technology packages in conjunction with measures such as the use of low rolling resistance tires and vehicle lightweighting will be required to meet future OEM fleet CO2 targets. Many of the technologies needed for meeting the fuel economy and CO2 targets come with unique NVH challenges. In order to ensure customer acceptance of new vehicles, it is imperative that these NVH challenges be understood and solved.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1775
Mark A. Gehringer, Robert Considine, David Schankin
Abstract This paper describes recently developed test methods and instrumentation to address the specific noise and vibration measurement challenges posed by large-diameter single-piece tubular aluminum propeller (prop) shafts with high modal density. The prop shaft application described in this paper is a light duty truck, although the methods described are applicable to any rotating shaft with similar dynamic properties. To provide a practical example of the newly developed methods and instrumentation, impact FRF data were acquired in-situ for two typical prop shafts of significantly different diameter, in both rotating and stationary conditions. The example data exhibit features that are uniquely characteristic of large diameter single-piece tubular shafts with high modal density, including the particular effect of shaft rotation on the measurements.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1773
Jing Yuan
Abstract The dual phase twin synchronous drive has been developed for belt noise reduction. Two identical synchronous belts are arranged parallel side by side with one tooth staggered against other by the half pitch offset. The noise cancellation effect is achieved as one belt tooth engagement coincides with the other belt tooth dis-engagement. A center flange is used as a divider to prevent the belts contacting each other along the axial direction during their entrance and exit of the sprocket. An overall 20 [dBA] noise reduction has been achieved with the dual phase twin belt drive compared to an equal width single belt counterpart. The vibration amplitude of the hub load is also reduced which is directly correlated to the structural borne noise. Comparing to the related dual phase helical tooth belt, the dual phase twin belt is superior in torque carrying capability; and is on par with noise mitigation.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1874
Tongyang Shi, Yangfan Liu, J Stuart Bolton, Frank Eberhardt, Warner Frazer
Abstract Wideband Acoustical Holography (WBH), which is a monopole-based, equivalent source procedure (J. Hald, “Wideband Acoustical Holography,” INTER-NOISE 2014), has proven to offer accurate noise source visualization results in experiments with a simple noise source: e.g., a loudspeaker (T. Shi, Y. Liu, J.S. Bolton, “The Use of Wideband Holography for Noise Source Visualization”, NOISE-CON 2016). From a previous study, it was found that the advantage of this procedure is the ability to optimize the solution in the case of an under-determined system: i.e., when the number of measurements is much smaller than the number of parameters that must be estimated in the model. In the present work, a diesel engine noise source was measured by using one set of measurements from a thirty-five channel combo-array placed in front of the engine.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1872
Masao Nagamatsu
Abstract The almost current sound localization methods do not have enough resolution in low frequency sound localization. To overcome this disadvantage, I am now developing the new sound localization method, Double Nearfield Acoustic Holography (DNAH) method. This method is a converted method of conventional Nearfield Acoustic Holography (NAH) method. In this proposing method, the resolution of low frequency sound localization is improved by using sound propagation information on doubled measurement planes. To prove the performance of proposing method, the basic experiments with variable conditions are conducted. In these experiments, the small speakers are used as sound sources. In this paper, to discuss the ability to apply to actual industry, the effect of measurement distance from the sound source is explained. Some experimental results with changing measurement distance are shown in this paper.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1869
Glenn Pietila, Gang Yin, Branton Dennis IV
Abstract During the development of an automotive acoustic package, valuable information can be gained by visualizing the acoustic energy flow through the Front-of-Dash (FOD) when a sound source is placed in the engine compartment. Two of the commonly used methods for generating the visual map of the acoustic field include Sound Intensity measurements and array technologies. An alternative method is to use a tracked 3-dimensional acoustic probe to scan and visualize the FOD in real-time when the sound source is injecting noise into the engine compartment. The scan is used to focus the development of the FOD acoustic package on the weakest areas by identifying acoustic leaks and locations with low Transmission Loss. This paper provides a brief discussion of the capabilities of the tracked 3-D acoustic probe, and presents examples of the implementation of the probe during the development of the FOD acoustic package for two mid-sized sedans.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1865
Peter Van der Linden, Frank Daenen, Masashi Komada, Hideto Ogawa
Abstract The tendency for car engines to reduce the cylinder number and increase the specific torque at low rpm has led to significantly higher levels of low frequency pulsation from the exhaust tailpipe. This is a challenge for exhaust system design, and equally for body design and vehicle integration. The low frequency panel noise contributions were identified using pressure transmissibility and operational sound pressure on the exterior. For this the body was divided into patches. For all patches the pressure transmissibility across the body panels into the interior was measured as well as the sound field over the entire surface of the vehicle body. The panel contributions, the pressure distribution and transmissibility distribution information were combined with acoustic modal analysis in the cabin, providing a better understanding of the airborne transfer.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1863
Bhaskar Avutapalli, Mayuresh Pathak, Shalini Solipuram, Ken Buczek, Aaron Lock
Abstract Road noise and speech intelligibility are becoming ever more important, irrespective of the vehicle size, due to vehicle refinement as well as connectivity with mobile communication equipment. With better aerodynamic designs, development of refined powertrains, and a tectonic shift from I.C. engine to electric motors, road noise and wind noise will become more apparent to the customer and hence will become a priority for automakers to refine their vehicles. This paper describes the efforts undertaken to identify the road noise paths and develop countermeasures for a compact SUV vehicle. A hybrid test/CAE approach was followed to improve road noise performance of this vehicle. This effort involved developing tire CAE models from physical hardware and creating synthesized road-load input from data taken on roads.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1859
Filip Franek, Jungu Kang, Jeon Uk, Sunguk Choi
Abstract Structure-born vibrations are often required to be localized in a complex structure, but in such dispersive medium, the vibration wave propagates with speed dependent on frequency. This property of solid materials causes an adverse effect for localization of vibrational events. The cause behind such phenomenon is that the propagating wave envelope changes its phase delay and amplitude in time and space as it travels in dispersive medium. This problem was previously approached by filtering a signal to focus on frequencies of the wave propagating with a similar speed, with improved accuracy of cross-correlation results. However, application of this technique has not been researched for localization of vibrational sources. In this work we take advantage of filtering prior to cross-correlation calculation while using multiple sensors to indicate an approximate location of vibration sources.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1889
Todd Tousignant, Kiran Govindswamy, Georg Eisele, Christoph Steffens, Dean Tomazic
Abstract The automotive industry continues to develop new powertrain and vehicle technologies aimed at reducing overall vehicle-level fuel consumption. Specifically, the use of electrified propulsion systems is expected to play an increasingly important role in helping OEM’s meet fleet CO2 reduction targets for 2025 and beyond. Electric and hybrid electric vehicles do not typically utilize IC engines for low-speed operation. Under these low-speed operating conditions, the vehicles are much quieter than conventional IC engine-powered vehicles, making their approach difficult to detect by pedestrians. To mitigate this safety concern, many manufacturers have synthesized noise (using exterior speakers) to increase detection distance. Further, the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has provided recommendations pursuant to the Pedestrian Safety Enhancement Act (PSEA) of 2010 for such exterior noise signatures to ensure detectability.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1887
Antoine Minard, Christophe Lambourg, Patrick Boussard, Olivier Cheriaux
Abstract While electric and hybrid vehicles are becoming increasingly common, the issue of engine noise is becoming less important, because it does not dominate the overall noise perceived in the passenger compartment in such vehicles anymore. However, at the same time, other sound sources such as air conditioning, start to emerge, which can also cause annoyance. The CEVAS project, involving VALEO, CETIM, University of Technology of Compiègne, ESI GROUP and GENESIS, deals with the acoustic simulation and perception of automotive air-conditioning (HVAC) and electric battery cooling (BTM) systems. While the other partners focused their work on the aeroacoustic characterization, modeling and simulation, GENESIS’ part in the project is dedicated to HVAC sound synthesis and perception. In order to do the synthesis of the acoustic spectra provided by the partners of the project, an additive model was used.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1885
Kunhee Lee, Sang Kwon Lee, Taejin Shin, Keun Young Kim
Abstract This paper presents a novel method predicting the variation of sound quality of interior noise depending on the change of the proprieties of absorption materials. At the first, the model predicting the interior noise corresponding to the change of the absorption material in engine room is proposed. Secondly the index to estimate the sound quality of the predicted sound is developed. Thirdly the experimental work has been conducted with seven different materials and validated the newly developed index. Finally, this index is applied for the optimization of absorption material to improve the sound quality of interior noise in a passenger car.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1883
Arnaud Duval, Guillaume Crignon, Mickael Goret, Maxime Roux
Abstract The lightweighting research on noise treatments since years tends to prove the efficiency of the combination of good insulation with steep insulation slopes with broadband absorption, even in the context of bad passthroughs management implying strong leakages. The real issue lies more in the industrial capacity to adapt the barrier mass per unit area to the acoustic target from low to high segment or from low petrol to high diesel sources, while remaining easy to manipulate. The hybrid stiff insulator family can realize this easily with hard felts barriers backfoamed weighting from 800 g/m2 to 2000 g/m2 typically with compressions below 10 mm. Above these equivalent barrier weights and traditional compressions of 7 mm for example, the high density of the felts begins to destroy the open porosity and thus the absorption properties (insulation works anyway here, whenever vibration modes do not appear due to too high stiffness…).
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1881
Charles Moritz, Satyajeet Deshpande
Abstract As part of the update process to SAE J1637, Laboratory Measurement of the Composite Vibration Damping Properties of Materials on a Supporting Steel Bar, the Acoustical Materials Committee commissioned a round robin study to determine the current laboratory-to-laboratory variation, and to better understand best practices for composite loss factor measurements. Guidance within the current standard from a previous round robin study indicates a coefficient of variation of 35% for laboratory-to-laboratory measurements. It was hoped that current instrumentation and test practices would yield lower variability. Over the course of 2 years, 8 laboratories tested 4 bars, three damped steel bars and one bare steel bar. These bars were tested at -20°C, -5°C, 10°C, 25°C, 40°C, and 55°C. The damping materials were intentionally selected to provide low damping, moderate damping, and high damping as difficulties in determining the composite loss increase with increased damping.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1877
Justin Gimbal, Joy Gallagher, John Reffner
Abstract Damping materials are applied to the vehicle body during production to provide passenger comfort by reducing noise and structural vibration through energy dissipation. Noise, Vibration, and Harshness (NVH) Engineers identify critical areas of the vehicle body for material placement. Damping materials, which include liquid applied dampers, are typically applied directly on the structure, covering large areas. These film forming materials can be spray applied using automation and, after baking, result in a cured viscoelastic damping layer on the target substrate. Typical liquid applied dampers contain an aqueous dispersion of film forming polymer which functions to bind inorganic materials together in the coating and provide a composite structure that dissipates energy. Representative damping coatings were prepared from dispersions of polymers with varying viscoelastic properties and chemical compositions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1879
Pranab Saha
Abstract Traditionally, the damping performance of a visco-elastic material is measured using the Oberst bar damping test, where a steel bar is excited using a non-contacting transducer. However, in an effort to reduce the weight of the vehicles, serious effort is put in to change the body panels from steel to aluminum and composite panels in many cases. These panels cannot be excited using a non-contacting transducer, although, in some cases, a very thin steel panel (shim) is glued to the vibrating bar to introduce ferrous properties to the bar so it can be excited. In the off highway vehicles, although the panels are made of steel, they are very thick and are difficult to excite using the Oberst bar test method. This paper discusses a measurement methodology based on mechanical impedance measurements and has the potential to be a viable/alternate test method to the Oberst bar testing. In the impedance method, the test bar is mounted to a shaker at the center (Center Point method).
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1875
Martino Pigozzi, Flavio Faccioli, Carlo Ubertino, Davide Allegro, Daniel Zeni
Abstract Within recent years, passenger comfort has become a main focus of the automotive industry. The topic is directly connected with acoustics, since sounds and noises have a major impact on the well-being of vehicle occupants. So-called “noise control” focuses on directly optimizing acoustic comfort by implementing innovative materials or geometries for automotive components and systems. One possibility to optimize the acoustics within a vehicle is connected to the phenomenon of sloshing in Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) tanks. Sloshing is a noise which is generated during normal driving situations by the motion of the Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) in the tank. Until now, no procedure for measuring sloshing noise in SCR tanks has been defined, and neither a specific acoustic target which the SCR tanks need to fulfil.
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