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Viewing 91 to 120 of 7797
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1905
Kiran Patil, Javad Baqersad, Jennifer Bastiaan
Abstract Tires are one of the major sources of noise and vibration in vehicles. The vibration characteristic of a tire depends on its resonant frequencies and mode shapes. Hence, it is desirable to study how different parameters affect the characteristics of tires. In the current paper, experimental modal tests are performed on a tire in free-free and fixed conditions. To obtain the mode shapes and the natural frequencies, the tire is excited using a mechanical shaker and the response of the tire to the excitation is measured using three roving tri-axial accelerometers. The mode shapes and resonant frequencies of the tire are extracted using LMS PolyMax modal analysis. The obtained mode shapes in the two configurations are compared using Modal Assurance Criterion (MAC) to show how mode shapes of tires change when the tire is moved from a free-free configuration to a fixed configuration. It is shown that some modes of the tire are more sensitive to boundary conditions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1904
Tan Li, Ricardo Burdisso, Corina Sandu
Abstract Tire-pavement interaction noise (TPIN) is a dominant source for passenger cars and trucks above 40 km/h and 70 km/h, respectively. TPIN is mainly generated from the interaction between the tire and the pavement. In this paper, twenty-two passenger car radial (PCR) tires of the same size (16 in. radius) but with different tread patterns were tested on a non-porous asphalt pavement. For each tire, the noise data were collected using an on-board sound intensity (OBSI) system at five speeds in the range from 45 to 65 mph (from 72 to 105 km/h). The OBSI system used an optical sensor to record a once-per-revolution signal to monitor the vehicle speed. This signal was also used to perform order tracking analysis to break down the total tire noise into two components: tread pattern-related noise and non-tread pattern-related noise.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1907
Yang Wang, Yong Xu, Xiao Tan
Abstract The vibration isolation performance of vehicle powertrain mounting system is mostly determined by the three-directional stiffness of each mount block. Because of the manufacturing tolerance and the coupling effect, the stiffness of mounts cannot be maintained stable. The purpose of this study was to find out the way to optimize the stiffness of mounts via the design of experiments (DOE). According to the DOE process, a full factorial design was implemented. The z-direction stiffness of three mount blocks in the mounting system was selected as the three analysis factors. The maximum and the minimum stiffness of each mount block within the manufacturing tolerance were selected as the two levels. The measured vibration of vehicle body under certain loading case was selected as the response factor. After eight times of experiment, the DOE parameters were analyzed with statistical methods.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1909
Joel Bruns, Jason Dreyer
Abstract The application of hydraulic body mounts between a pickup truck frame and cab to reduce freeway hop and smooth road shake has been documented in literature and realized in production vehicles. Previous studies have demonstrated the potential benefits of these devices, often through iterative prototype evaluation. Component dynamic characterization has also shown that these devices exhibit significant dependence to preload and dynamic amplitude; however, analysis of these devices has not addressed these dependences. This paper aims to understand the amplitude and preload dependence on the spectrally-varying properties of a production hydraulic body mount. This double-pumping, three-spring mount construction has a shared compliant element between the two fluid-filled chambers.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1866
Pradeep Jawale, Nagesh Karanth
Abstract Urbanisation has led to an increased need for mobility in public transportation. Sensing the unfolding worrisome scenario, many countries have taken up different mass rapid transit solutions to alleviate the problem and restore the free flowing traffic. BRT should have been the logical choice particularly considering the lower capital costs involved and faster implementation. Comprehensibly the expectations of this class of vehicles will be high in term of quality and comfort to the passengers. Level of vibration and noise is an important indicator to evaluate vehicle's ride comfort. The challenges are to design the high powered Powertrain and Air Conditioning system nonetheless low interior noise, vibration and harshness correspondents to personal cars. This paper is an invention of, development work done in interior noise refinement of a bus. A prototype bus manufactured to meet all the requirement of BRT - premium segment urban bus.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1867
Mustafa Tosun, Mehdi Yildiz, Aytekin Ozkan
Abstract Structure borne noises can be transmitted to interior cabin via physical connections by gearbox as well as other active components. Experimental Transfer Path Analysis (TPA) Methods are utilized to investigate main paths of vibrations which are eventually perceived as noise components inside the cabin. For identifying the structure and air borne noise transfer paths in a system, Matrix Inversion (MI), Mount Stiffness (MS), Operational Transfer Path Analysis (OTPA) and Operational Path Analysis with Exogenous Inputs (OPAX) Methods exist. In this study, contribution ranking of transmission paths from active system components through the physical connections into the interior cabin are investigated by MI and OPAX Methods and finally a comparison of them is presented based on the accuracy of obtained results. The modifications are applied on dominant transfer paths which are determined by the mentioned methods above, respectively.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1864
Joshua Wheeler
Abstract The performance of a vehicle’s Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) system is dependent on the signal to noise ratio (SNR) in the cabin at the time a user voices their command. HVAC noise and environmental noise in particular (like road and wind noise), provide high amplitudes of broadband frequency content that lower the SNR within the vehicle cabin, and work to mask the user’s speech. Managing this noise is a vital key to building a vehicle that meets the customer’s expectations for ASR performance. However, a speech recognition engineer is not likely to be the same person responsible for designing the tires, suspension, air ducts and vents, sound package and exterior body shape that define the amount of noise present in the cabin.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1865
Peter Van der Linden, Frank Daenen, Masashi Komada, Hideto Ogawa
Abstract The tendency for car engines to reduce the cylinder number and increase the specific torque at low rpm has led to significantly higher levels of low frequency pulsation from the exhaust tailpipe. This is a challenge for exhaust system design, and equally for body design and vehicle integration. The low frequency panel noise contributions were identified using pressure transmissibility and operational sound pressure on the exterior. For this the body was divided into patches. For all patches the pressure transmissibility across the body panels into the interior was measured as well as the sound field over the entire surface of the vehicle body. The panel contributions, the pressure distribution and transmissibility distribution information were combined with acoustic modal analysis in the cabin, providing a better understanding of the airborne transfer.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1862
Rajesh Babu Channamaneni, P. Kannan, Karalmarx Rajamohan
Abstract New legislation’s, competition from global players and change in customer perception related to comfort parameters are key factors demanding manufactures to design and manufacture vehicles with very low saloon noise levels. The main causes for higher noise levels at passenger saloon compartment can be attributed to source noises (Powertrain, Driveline, Intake and Exhaust etc.), acoustic isolation and structural sensitivity of the body. Out of all above parameters, powertrain noise and acoustic isolation are two critical parameters effecting interior noise performance. This paper is an attempt to explain acoustic source contribution analysis through transfer function measurement in a passenger vehicle. Acoustic transfer function between engine bay and passenger ear level was measured using reciprocity technique (reciprocal method) with reference source placed at various locations inside the vehicle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1859
Filip Franek, Jungu Kang, Jeon Uk, Sunguk Choi
Abstract Structure-born vibrations are often required to be localized in a complex structure, but in such dispersive medium, the vibration wave propagates with speed dependent on frequency. This property of solid materials causes an adverse effect for localization of vibrational events. The cause behind such phenomenon is that the propagating wave envelope changes its phase delay and amplitude in time and space as it travels in dispersive medium. This problem was previously approached by filtering a signal to focus on frequencies of the wave propagating with a similar speed, with improved accuracy of cross-correlation results. However, application of this technique has not been researched for localization of vibrational sources. In this work we take advantage of filtering prior to cross-correlation calculation while using multiple sensors to indicate an approximate location of vibration sources.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1863
Bhaskar Avutapalli, Mayuresh Pathak, Shalini Solipuram, Ken Buczek, Aaron Lock
Abstract Road noise and speech intelligibility are becoming ever more important, irrespective of the vehicle size, due to vehicle refinement as well as connectivity with mobile communication equipment. With better aerodynamic designs, development of refined powertrains, and a tectonic shift from I.C. engine to electric motors, road noise and wind noise will become more apparent to the customer and hence will become a priority for automakers to refine their vehicles. This paper describes the efforts undertaken to identify the road noise paths and develop countermeasures for a compact SUV vehicle. A hybrid test/CAE approach was followed to improve road noise performance of this vehicle. This effort involved developing tire CAE models from physical hardware and creating synthesized road-load input from data taken on roads.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1858
James Haylett, Andrew Polte
Abstract Truck and construction seats offer a number of different challenges compared to automotive seats in the identification and characterization of Buzz, Squeak, and Rattle (BSR) noises. These seats typically have a separate air or mechanical suspension and usually a larger number and variety of mechanical adjustments and isolators. Associated vibration excitation tend to have lower frequencies with larger amplitudes. In order to test these seats for both BSR and vibration isolation a low-noise shaker with the ability to test to a minimum frequency of 1 Hz was employed. Slowly swept sine excitation was used to visualize the seat mode shapes and identify nonlinearities at low frequencies. A sample set of seat BSR sounds are described in terms of time and frequency characteristics, then analyzed using sound quality metrics.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1855
Ramakanta Routaray
Abstract The basic function of a motorcycle frame is somewhat similar to that of the skeleton in the human body, i.e. to hold together the different parts in one rigid structure. One of the major benefits (for a motorcycle enthusiast) of using an advanced frame design lies in the sporty handling characteristics of the bike. A well designed frame can add to the joy of riding a motorcycle as the bike would feel more stable, effortless, and confident around corners, in straight lines and while braking. A well approved modeling [2] techniques or adequate guide line principles have to be followed while designing the body and chassis in order to achieve the vibration within control. This paper depicts a methodological right approach (guide lines) while designing the body and chassis of a two wheeler in order to control noise and vibration of the body and chassis.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1856
Junji Yoshida, Koki Tanaka, Rie Nakamoto, Ken Fukasawa
Abstract In this study, we combined operational transfer path analysis (OTPA) method with CAE technique to obtain high contributing vibration modes. A rear frame model of a small construction machine was employed for the analysis. 20 vibration modes were obtained by CAE (eigenmode analysis) under 200 Hz. Subsequently, operational test, in which a sinusoidal input force was given, was carried out. For applying OTPA, acceleration signals at 15 points on the rear frame were used as the reference signals and the cab vibration positioned on the frame via rubber bushes was used as the response signal. These acceleration signals were then measured simultaneously in the operational condition. As the result of OTPA, high contributing principal component modes were calculated and high contributing vibration modes were also extracted using mode shape correlation between them. Two in the 20 calculated vibration modes remained as the important modes to the cab vibration through the analyses.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1854
John T. Anton, Jason Ley, Ikpreet S. Grover, David Stotera
Abstract Liquid applied sound deadener (LASD) is a light-weight, targeted vibration damping treatment traditionally used in the automotive market for body-in-white (BIW) panels. Water-based LASDs may cure over a wide range of conditions from room temperature to over 200°C. However, curing conditions commonly affect change in the damping characteristics. A thorough understanding of the relationship between curing conditions and subsequent damping performances will inform the material selection process and may allow pre-manufacturing designs to be adjusted with limited impact during validation. This paper aims to strengthen the quantitative understanding of the role LASD curing conditions have on damping performance by observing the effects of variations in thickness and cure temperature as measured by the Oberst method.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1852
Satyajeet P. Deshpande, Pranab Saha, Kerry Cone
Abstract Most of NVH related issues start from the vibration of structures where often the vibration near resonance frequencies radiates the energy in terms of sound. This phenomenon is more problematic at lower frequencies by structureborne excitation from powertrain or related components. This paper discusses a laboratory based case study where different visco-elastic materials were evaluated on a bench study and then carried on to a system level evaluation. A body panel with a glazing system was used to study both airborne and structureborne noise radiation. System level studies were carried out using experimental modal analysis to shift and tune the mode shapes of the structure using visco-elastic materials with appropriate damping properties to increase the sound transmission loss. This paper discusses the findings of the study where the mode shapes of the panel were shifted and resulted in an increase in sound transmission loss.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1884
Ruimeng Wu, David W. Herrin
Abstract Sound absorbing materials are commonly compressed when installed in passenger compartments or underhood applications altering the sound absorption performance of the material. However, most prior work has focused on uncompressed materials and only a few models based on poroelastic properties are available for compressed materials. Empirical models based on flow resistivity are commonly used to characterize the complex wavenumber and characteristic impedance of uncompressed sound absorbing materials from which the sound absorption can be determined. In this work, the sound absorption is measured for both uncompressed and compressed samples of fiber and foam, and the flow resistivity is curve fit using an appropriate empirical model. Following this, the flow resistivity of the material is determined as a function of the compression ratio.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1883
Arnaud Duval, Guillaume Crignon, Mickael Goret, Maxime Roux
Abstract The lightweighting research on noise treatments since years tends to prove the efficiency of the combination of good insulation with steep insulation slopes with broadband absorption, even in the context of bad passthroughs management implying strong leakages. The real issue lies more in the industrial capacity to adapt the barrier mass per unit area to the acoustic target from low to high segment or from low petrol to high diesel sources, while remaining easy to manipulate. The hybrid stiff insulator family can realize this easily with hard felts barriers backfoamed weighting from 800 g/m2 to 2000 g/m2 typically with compressions below 10 mm. Above these equivalent barrier weights and traditional compressions of 7 mm for example, the high density of the felts begins to destroy the open porosity and thus the absorption properties (insulation works anyway here, whenever vibration modes do not appear due to too high stiffness…).
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1882
Pravin P. Hujare, Anil D. Sahasrabudhe
Abstract The reduction of vibration and noise is a major requirement for performance of any vibratory system. Due to legislative pressures in terms of external pass by noise limit of vehicles and customer requirements for better noise and ride comfort in vehicle, NVH attribute has become an important parameter. Major sources for vehicle pass-by noise consist of powertrain, tire and wind. Damping treatment is important to reduce vibration and noise radiation. The passive constrained layer dampening (CLD) treatment can be used to reduce structure-borne noise of vibrating structure using viscoelastic damping material. The performance of the passive constrained layer damping treatment can further be enhanced by new segmentation technique. The concept of segmented CLD is based on edge effect. The efficiency of segmenting a constrained layer damping treatment relies on the fact that a high shear region is created in the viscoelastic layer.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1881
Charles Moritz, Satyajeet Deshpande
Abstract As part of the update process to SAE J1637, Laboratory Measurement of the Composite Vibration Damping Properties of Materials on a Supporting Steel Bar, the Acoustical Materials Committee commissioned a round robin study to determine the current laboratory-to-laboratory variation, and to better understand best practices for composite loss factor measurements. Guidance within the current standard from a previous round robin study indicates a coefficient of variation of 35% for laboratory-to-laboratory measurements. It was hoped that current instrumentation and test practices would yield lower variability. Over the course of 2 years, 8 laboratories tested 4 bars, three damped steel bars and one bare steel bar. These bars were tested at -20°C, -5°C, 10°C, 25°C, 40°C, and 55°C. The damping materials were intentionally selected to provide low damping, moderate damping, and high damping as difficulties in determining the composite loss increase with increased damping.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1880
Guojian Zhou, Xiujie Tian, Keda Zhu, Wei Huang, Richard E. Wentzel, Melvyn J. Care, Kaixuan Mao, Jiu Hui Wu
Abstract A flexible rebound-type acoustic metamaterial with high sound transmission loss (STL) at low frequency is proposed, which is composed of a flexible, light-weight membrane material and a sheet material - Ethylene Vinyl Acetate Copolymer (EVA) with uneven distributed circular holes. STL was analyzed by using both computer aided engineering (CAE) calculations and experimental verifications, which depict good results in the consistency between each other. An obvious sound insulation peak exists in the low frequency band, and the STL peak mechanism is the rebound-effect of the membrane surface, which is proved through finite element analysis (FEA) under single frequency excitation. Then the variation of the STL peak is studied by changing the structure parameters and material parameters of the metamaterial, providing a method to design the metamaterial with high sound insulation in a specified frequency range.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1879
Pranab Saha
Abstract Traditionally, the damping performance of a visco-elastic material is measured using the Oberst bar damping test, where a steel bar is excited using a non-contacting transducer. However, in an effort to reduce the weight of the vehicles, serious effort is put in to change the body panels from steel to aluminum and composite panels in many cases. These panels cannot be excited using a non-contacting transducer, although, in some cases, a very thin steel panel (shim) is glued to the vibrating bar to introduce ferrous properties to the bar so it can be excited. In the off highway vehicles, although the panels are made of steel, they are very thick and are difficult to excite using the Oberst bar test method. This paper discusses a measurement methodology based on mechanical impedance measurements and has the potential to be a viable/alternate test method to the Oberst bar testing. In the impedance method, the test bar is mounted to a shaker at the center (Center Point method).
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1878
Kevin Verdiere, Raymond Panneton, Noureddine Atalla, Saïd Elkoun
Abstract A poroelastic characterization of open-cell porous materials using an impedance tube is proposed in this paper. Commonly, porous materials are modeled using Biot’s theory. However, this theory requires several parameters which can be difficult to obtain by different methods (direct, indirect or inverse measurements). The proposed method retrieves all the Biot’s parameters with one absorption measurement in an impedance tube for isotropic poroelastic materials following the Johnson-Champoux-Allard’s model (for the fluid phase). The sample is a cylinder bonded to the rigid termination of the tube with a diameter smaller than the tube’s one. In that case, a lateral air gap is voluntary induced to prevent lateral clamping. Using this setup, the absorption curve exhibits a characteristic elastic resonance (quarter wavelength resonance) and the repeatability is ensured by controlling boundary and mounting conditions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1877
Justin Gimbal, Joy Gallagher, John Reffner
Abstract Damping materials are applied to the vehicle body during production to provide passenger comfort by reducing noise and structural vibration through energy dissipation. Noise, Vibration, and Harshness (NVH) Engineers identify critical areas of the vehicle body for material placement. Damping materials, which include liquid applied dampers, are typically applied directly on the structure, covering large areas. These film forming materials can be spray applied using automation and, after baking, result in a cured viscoelastic damping layer on the target substrate. Typical liquid applied dampers contain an aqueous dispersion of film forming polymer which functions to bind inorganic materials together in the coating and provide a composite structure that dissipates energy. Representative damping coatings were prepared from dispersions of polymers with varying viscoelastic properties and chemical compositions.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1876
Weiyun Liu, David W. Herrin, Emanuele Bianchini
Abstract Microperforated panel absorbers are best considered as the combination of the perforate and the backing cavity. They are sometimes likened to Helmholtz resonators. This analogy is true in the sense that they are most effective at the resonant frequencies of the panel-cavity combination when the particle velocity is high in the perforations. However, unlike traditional Helmholtz resonators, microperforated absorbers are broader band and the attenuation mechanism is dissipative rather than reactive. It is well known that the cavity depth governs the frequency bands of high absorption. The work presented here focuses on the development, modeling and testing of novel configurations of backing constructions and materials. These configurations are aimed at both dialing in the absorption properties at specific frequencies of interest and creating broadband sound absorbers. In this work, several backing cavity strategies are considered and evaluated.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1875
Martino Pigozzi, Flavio Faccioli, Carlo Ubertino, Davide Allegro, Daniel Zeni
Abstract Within recent years, passenger comfort has become a main focus of the automotive industry. The topic is directly connected with acoustics, since sounds and noises have a major impact on the well-being of vehicle occupants. So-called “noise control” focuses on directly optimizing acoustic comfort by implementing innovative materials or geometries for automotive components and systems. One possibility to optimize the acoustics within a vehicle is connected to the phenomenon of sloshing in Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) tanks. Sloshing is a noise which is generated during normal driving situations by the motion of the Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) in the tank. Until now, no procedure for measuring sloshing noise in SCR tanks has been defined, and neither a specific acoustic target which the SCR tanks need to fulfil.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1874
Tongyang Shi, Yangfan Liu, J Stuart Bolton, Frank Eberhardt, Warner Frazer
Abstract Wideband Acoustical Holography (WBH), which is a monopole-based, equivalent source procedure (J. Hald, “Wideband Acoustical Holography,” INTER-NOISE 2014), has proven to offer accurate noise source visualization results in experiments with a simple noise source: e.g., a loudspeaker (T. Shi, Y. Liu, J.S. Bolton, “The Use of Wideband Holography for Noise Source Visualization”, NOISE-CON 2016). From a previous study, it was found that the advantage of this procedure is the ability to optimize the solution in the case of an under-determined system: i.e., when the number of measurements is much smaller than the number of parameters that must be estimated in the model. In the present work, a diesel engine noise source was measured by using one set of measurements from a thirty-five channel combo-array placed in front of the engine.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1872
Masao Nagamatsu
Abstract The almost current sound localization methods do not have enough resolution in low frequency sound localization. To overcome this disadvantage, I am now developing the new sound localization method, Double Nearfield Acoustic Holography (DNAH) method. This method is a converted method of conventional Nearfield Acoustic Holography (NAH) method. In this proposing method, the resolution of low frequency sound localization is improved by using sound propagation information on doubled measurement planes. To prove the performance of proposing method, the basic experiments with variable conditions are conducted. In these experiments, the small speakers are used as sound sources. In this paper, to discuss the ability to apply to actual industry, the effect of measurement distance from the sound source is explained. Some experimental results with changing measurement distance are shown in this paper.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1871
Nobutaka Tsujiuchi, Masahiro Akei, Akihito Ito, Daisuke Kubota, Koichi Osamura
Abstract This paper describes new method for selecting optimal field points in Inverse-Numerical Acoustic analysis (INA), and its application to construction of a sound source model for diesel engines. INA identifies the surface vibration of a sound source by using acoustic transfer functions and actual sound pressures measured at field points located near the sound source. When measuring sound pressures with INA, it is necessary to determine the field point arrangement. Increased field points leads to longer test and analysis time. Therefore, guidelines for selecting the field point arrangement are needed to conduct INA efficiently. The authors focused on the standard deviations of distance between sound source elements and field points and proposed a new guideline for optimal field point selection in our past study. In that study, we verified the effectiveness of this guideline using a simple plate model.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1870
Saeed Siavoshani, Prasad Balkrishna Vesikar, Daniel Pentis, Rajani Ippili
Abstract The objective of this paper is to develop a robust methodology to study internal combustion (IC) engine block vibrations and to quantify the contribution of combustion pressure loads and inertial loads (mechanical loads) in overall vibration levels. An established technique for noise separation that, until recently, has not been applied to engine noise is Wiener filtering. In this paper, the harmonic part of the overall vibration response of the IC engine block is removed, resulting in a residual broadband response which is uncorrelated to the source signal. This residue of the response signal and the similarly calculated residue of the combustion pressure represent the dynamic portion of their respective raw signals for that specific operating condition (engine speed and load). The dynamic portion of the combustion pressure is assumed to be correlated only to the combustion event.
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