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Viewing 91 to 120 of 7768
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1852
Satyajeet P. Deshpande, Pranab Saha, Kerry Cone
Most of NVH related issues start from the vibration of structures where often the vibrations at resonance radiates the energy in terms of sound. This phenomenon is more pragmatic at low frequencies. This paper discusses a case study where different viscoelastic materials were evaluated on a bench study and then carried on to system level evaluation. A steel panel with a glazing system was used to study both airborne and structureborne noise radiation. System level studies were carried out using experimental modal analysis to shift and tune the mode shapes of the structure using visco-elastic materials with appropriate damping properties to increase the sound transmission loss. The paper discusses the findings of the study where the mode shapes of the panel were shifted and resulted in an increase in sound transmission loss and eventually resulted in reduced sound level in the cabin interior.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1855
Ramakanta Routaray
The basic function of a motorcycle frame is somewhat similar to that of the skeleton in the human body, i.e. to hold together the different parts in one rigid structure. One of the major benefits (for a motorcycle enthusiast) of using an advanced frame design lies in the sporty handling characteristics of the bike. A well designed frame can add to the joy of riding a motorcycle as the bike would feel more stable, effortless, and confident around corners, in straight lines and while braking. A well approved modeling techniques or adequate guide line principles have to be followed while designing the body and chassis in order to achieve the vibration within control. This paper depicts a methodological right approach to model the body and chassis of a two wheeler in order to control noise and vibration of the body and chassis.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1884
Ruimeng Wu, David W. Herrin
Sound absorbing materials are commonly compressed when installed in passenger compartments or underhood applications altering the sound absorption performance of the material. However, most prior work has focused on uncompressed materials and only a few models based on poroelastic properties are available for compressed materials. Empirical models based on flow resistivity are commonly used to characterize the complex wavenumber and characteristic impedance of uncompressed sound absorbing materials from which the sound absorption can be determined. In this work, the sound absorption is measured for both uncompressed and compressed samples of fiber and foam, and the flow resistivity is curve fit using an appropriate empirical model. Following this, the flow resistivity of the material is determined as a function of the compression ratio. The procedure outlined in the paper is a simple approach for characterizing compressed materials that only.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1908
Rong Guo, Jun Gao, Xiao-kang Wei, Zhao-ming Wu, Shao-kang Zhang
This work aims to provide theoretical basis for improving engine shake performance based on full vehicle model by optimizing the design parameters of hydraulic engine mounts (HEMs). The definition of the engine shake problem is presented through comparing the quarter vehicle models with the rigid-connected and flexible-connected powertrain which is supported by a rubber mount. Then the model is extended by replacing the rubber mount as a HEM with regard to the inertia and resistance of the fluid within the inertia track. Based on these, a full vehicle model with 14 degree of freedoms (DOFs) is proposed to calculate the engine shake, which consists of 6 of the powertrain, 1 of the fluid within the inertia track of the HEM, 3 of the car body and 4 of the unsprung mass. Parameter study is performed to determine the most effective parameters of the HEM influencing engine shake and then the HEM is optimized through the genetic algorithm (GA).
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1907
Yang Wang, Yong Xu, Xiao Tan
OPTIMIZATION OF THE POWERTRAIN MOUNTING SYSTEM VIA DOE METHOD Authors: Wang Yang*, Wang Hui*, Xu Yong* * NVH Section, Brilliance-Auto Engineering Research Institute, Shenyang, China, 110141 Key Words: NVH; DOE; Powertrain Mounting System; Analysis of Variance Research and/or Engineering Questions/Objective The vibration isolation performance of vehicle powertrain mounting system is mostly determined by the three-directional stiffnesses of each mount block. Because of the manufacturing tolerance and the coupling effect, the stiffnesses of mounts cannot be maintained stable. The purpose of this study was to find out the way to optimize the stiffnesses of mounts via the design of experiments (DOE). Methodology According to the DOE process, a full factorial design was implemented. The z-direction stiffnesses of three mount blocks in the mounting system were selected as the three analysis factors.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1875
Martino Pigozzi, Flavio Faccioli, Carlo Ubertino, Davide Allegro, Daniel Zeni
Within recent years, passenger comfort has become a main focus for the automotive industry. The topic is directly connected to acoustics, since sounds and noises have a major impact on the well-being of vehicle occupants. The so-called “noise control” focuses on directly optimizing acoustic comfort by implementing innovative materials or geometries for automotive components and systems. One possibility to optimize the acoustics within a vehicle is connected to the phenomenon of sloshing in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) tanks. Sloshing is a noise which is generated during normal driving situations by the motion of the liquid in the tank. Until now, no valid procedure for measuring the sloshing noise in SCR tanks, or a specific acoustic target which the SCR tanks need to fulfill has been defined. For this reason, It's been developed a reproducible laboratory-based methodology to measure the sound generated by the tank to compare it with a defined sound pressure level target.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1825
Takenori Miyamoto, Hiroshi Yokoyama, Akiyoshi Iida
Intense tonal noise often radiates from flows around a trailing edge with an upstream kink shape such as found in an automobile bonnet, where fluid-acoustic interactions occur. It was clarified that the tonal sound became intense at a specific angle of the kink. Moreover, in order to reduce this noise, the flow was controlled by a dielectric barrier discharged plasma actuator (PA), which was attached around the kink shape. The flow and sound pressure were measured by a hot-wire anemometer and a microphone in a low-noise wind tunnel. In the flow around the model without control by the PA, vortices are shed in a separated flow between the kink and the trailing edge, and acoustic waves are radiating due to the interference of vortices with the wall. Measured coherent output power (COP) based on the simultaneous measurement of velocity fluctuations and far-field sound pressure shows that the velocity fluctuations near the trailing edge are related with the tonal acoustic radiation.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1756
Seonghyeon Kim, Kyoung-Jin Chang, Dong Chul Park, Seung Min Lee, Sang Kwon Lee
This paper presents a systematic approach to interior engine sound design for enhancing sound character of car interior sound effectively. Nowadays an active noise control technology is widely used in vehicle industry. Particularly, an active sound design (ASD) technique using vehicle’s audio system for controlling interior sound due to powertrain has become a general method to improve sound quality or character. The ASD system using speakers has the advantage of creating various sounds relatively easy. In this study, the novel systematic approach is proposed to guide the efficient design of powerful and pleasant acceleration sound by order spectrum analysis. At first, primary attributes of powerful and pleasant sound were analyzed and sound concept was derived. Secondly, the optimal linearity and the level envelope of firing order were derived by subjective evaluation.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1786
Hiroshi Yokoyama, Ryo Adachi, Taiki Minato, Akiyoshi Iida
Intense tonal sound often radiates from flows around a cavity such as a sunroof or various gaps between parts of automobiles, and this sound is referred to as cavity tone. This cavity tone is due to fluid-acoustic interactions in cavity flows, where a vortex impinging at the downstream wall generates an acoustic wave and the acoustic wave propagating in the upstream direction induces another vortex near the upstream edge. The control of the cavity tone by blowing jets into the oncoming boundary layer is focused on. Moreover, the effects of the spanwise pitch of the jets on the flow and acoustic fields were investigated. To clarify the control effects on the cavity flow and tone, both low-noise wind tunnel experiments and direct aeroacoustic simulations based on the compressible Navier-Stokes equations were performed. Main experiments and computations were performed at the freestream Mach number of 0.09, where the oncoming boundary layer is laminar.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1816
Mahsa Asgarisabet, Andrew Barnard
Carbon Nanotube (CNT) thin film transducers produce sound with the thermoacoustic effect. Alternating current passes through the low heat capacity CNT thin film changing the surface temperature rapidly. CNT thin film does not vibrate, instead it heats and cools the air adjacent to the film, creating sound pressure waves. These transducers are inexpensive, transparent, stretchable, flexible, magnet-free and lightweight. Because of their novelty, developing a model and better understanding the performance of CNT transducers is useful in technology development in applications that require ultra-lightweight sub-systems. The automotive industry is a prime example of where these transducers can be enabling technology for innovative new component design. Developing a multi-physics (Electrical-Thermal-Acoustical) FEA model, for planar CNT transducers is studied in this paper.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1757
Matthew Maunder, Benjamin Munday
Excitement, image and emotion are key attributes for cars, particularly those with higher power ratings. Engine sound has traditionally acted as the car’s voice, conveying these attributes to the driver and passengers along with the brand image. Engine sound also underpins the dynamic driving experience by giving instant feedback about how a car is operating, enhancing the connection between driver and vehicle. For decades, the automotive industry has engineered engine sound to achieve these benefits, thereby defining the ‘language’ of car sound. Electric vehicles deliver strong and responsive performance but naturally lack the acoustic feedback that internal combustion engines provide. While this gives advantages in terms of comfort and environmental noise, the benefits of engine sound are lost. Carefully controlled acoustic feedback brings tangible and valuable benefits both for the dynamic driving experience and to convey the brand image.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1814
Todd Tousignant, Kiran Govindswamy, Vikram Bhatia, Shivani Polasani, W Keith Fisher
The automotive industry continues to develop new powertrain and vehicle technologies aimed at reducing overall vehicle level fuel consumption. Specifically, vehicle light weighting is expected to play a key role in helping OEM’s meet fleet CO2 reduction targets for 2025 and beyond. Corning’s Gorilla® Glass Hybrid laminate solution offers more than 30% weight reduction compared to conventional automotive laminate. Additionally, Gorilla Glass Hybrid laminates provide improved toughness, better optics, and enables better vehicle dynamics by lowering the vehicle center of gravity. Although thin glazing offers multiple advantages, glazing weight reduction leads to an increase in transmission of sound through the laminates for certain frequencies. This paper documents a study that uses a systematic test-based approach to understand the sensitivity of interior vehicle noise behavior to changes in acoustic attenuation driven by installation of lightweight glass.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1783
Chris Todter, Olivier Robin, Paul Bremner, Christophe Marchetto, Alain Berry
Fluctuating surface pressure measurements using microphone arrays are still challenging, especially in an automotive context with cruising speeds around Mach 0.1. The separated turbulent boundary layer excitation and the side mirror wake flow generate both acoustic and aerodynamic components, which have wavenumbers that differ by a factor of approximately 10. This calls for high spatial resolution measurements to fully resolve the wavenumber-frequency spectrum. In SAE paper 2015-01-2325, the authors reported a micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS) surface microphone array that successfully used wavenumber analysis to quantify acoustic versus turbulence loading. It was shown that the measured surface pressure at each microphone could be strongly influenced by self noise induced by the microphone ”packaging”, which can be attenuated with a suitable windscreen.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1843
Taejin Shin, Jaemin Jin, Sang Kwon Lee, Insoo Jung
This paper presents the influence of radiated noise from engine surface depending on assembly condition between engine block and oil pan. At the first, force at the crank bearing is obtained from multi-body dynamics model. Secondly, modal analysis is operated to define mode contribution and modal participation factors at the Structure – FEM model for virtual cylinder block. Thirdly, the radiated noise is calculated by Acoustic-FEM. Above procedure is applied at rigid connection model and sandwich panel connection model. Connection properties are applied between engine block and oil pan. Finally, the sound quality of the radiated noise at each condition are compared.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1822
Kopal Agarwal, Sandip Hazra
Vehicle Drive away shudder is a vibration felt by customers at the time of marching off. The vibration is significantly felt at the time of Clutch Engagement as a shiver in vehicle. While the known reason of Shudder is clutch friction & engagement, in this study we have provided a solution to reduce the shudder by optimizing the power train mounting system. The shake occurs at approximately 10-20kmph in a medium sized car. The design of powertrain mounting system has been modified to achieve the reduction in shake. The pros & cons of the said change in mounting system on the overall NVH performance is also discussed.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1903
Masami Matsubara, Nobutaka Tsujiuchi, Tomohiko Ise, Shozo Kawamura
The tire is one of the most important parts, which influence the noise, vibration, and harshness of the passenger cars. It is well known that effect of rotation influences tire vibration characteristics, and earlier studies presented formulas of tire vibration behavior. However, there is no studies of tire vibration including lateral vibration on effect of rotation. In this paper, we present new formulas of tire vibration on effect of rotation using a three-dimensional flexible ring model. The model consists of the cylindrical ring represents the tread and the springs represent the sidewall stiffness. The equation of motion of lateral, longitudinal, and radial vibration on the tread are derived based on the assumption of inextensional deformation. Many of the associated numerical parameters are identified from experimental tests.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1849
Laurent Gagliardini, Romain Leneveu, Aurélien Cloix, Alexandre Durr
The door response to audio excitation contributes to the overall performance of the audio system on several items. First, acting as a cabinet, it influences the loudspeaker response. Second, due to the door inner panel radiation, the radiated power is disturbed. A third effect is the regular occurrence of squeak and rattle, that will not be considered at this stage. Design issues regarding these attributes are numerous, from the loudspeaker design to door structure and trim definition. Modeling then appears as an unavoidable tool to handle the acoustic response of the loudspeaker in its actual surrounding.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1905
Kiran Patil, Javad Baqersad, Jennifer Bastiaan
Tires are one of the major sources of noise and vibrations in vehicles. The vibration characteristic of a tire depends on its resonant frequencies and mode shapes. Hence, it is desirable to study how different parameters affect the characteristics of tires. In the current paper, experimental modal tests are performed on a tire in free-free and fixed conditions. To obtain the mode shapes and the natural frequencies, the tire is excited using a mechanical shaker and the response is measured using three roving tri-axial accelerometers. The mode shapes and resonant frequencies of the tire are extracted using LMS POLYMAX modal analysis. The extracted mode shapes in the two configurations are compared using Modal Assurance Criterion (MAC) to show how mode shapes of tires change when the tire is moved from a free-free configuration to a fixed configuration.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1818
Ramya Teja, T. R. Milind, Rodney C. Glover, Sunil Sonawane
Helical gears are used more commonly than spur gears due to their higher load carrying capacity, efficiency and lower noise. Helical gear pairs consist of base and axial planes in the plane of action. Transmission Error (TE) is considered as a dominant source of gear whine noise so gears pairs are analyzed and designed for lower TE. In process of designing helical gears for lower TE, the shuttling moment can be a significant excitation source. A shuttling moment is caused by the shifting of the centroid of the tooth normal force back and forth across the lead. Shuttling force is produced by a combination of design parameters, misalignment and manufacturing errors. Limited details are available on this excitation and its effect on overall noise radiated from the gear box or transmission at is gear mesh frequency and harmonics. LDP provides shuttling force as a bearing force in the base plane direction at one edge of the face width only.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1765
Albert Allen, Noah Schiller, Jerry Rouse
Corrugated-core sandwich structures with integrated acoustic resonator arrays have been of recent interest for launch vehicle noise control applications. Previous tests and analyses have demonstrated the ability of this concept to increase sound absorption and reduce sound transmission at low frequencies. However, commercial aircraft manufacturers often require fibrous or foam blanket treatments for broadband noise control and thermal insulation. Consequently, it is of interest to further explore the noise control benefit and trade-offs of structurally integrated resonators when combined with various degrees of blanket noise treatment in an aircraft-representative cylindrical fuselage system. In this study, numerical models were developed to predict the effect of broadband and multi-tone structurally integrated resonator arrays on the interior noise level of cylindrical vibroacoustic systems.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1762
Michael Roan, M. Lucas Neurauter, Douglas Moore, Dan Glaser
Hybrid and electric vehicles (HVs and EVs) have demonstrated low noise levels relative to their Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) counterparts, particularly at low speeds. As the number of HVs/EVs on the road increases, so does the need for data quantifying auditory detectability by pedestrians; in particular, those who are vision impaired. Manufacturers have begun to implement additive noise solutions designed to increase vehicle detectability while in electric mode and/or when traveling below a certain speed. A detailed description of the real-time acoustic measurement system, the corresponding vehicular data, development of an immersive noise field, and experimental methods pertaining to a recent evaluation of candidate vehicles is provided herein. Listener testing was completed by 24 legally blind test subjects for four vehicle types: an EV and HV with different additive noise approaches, an EV with no additive noise, and a traditional ICE vehicle.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1776
Mohsen Kolivand, Glen Steyer, Clifford Krieger, Max-Ferdinand Stroh
Hypoid gears transmission error (TE) is a metric that is usually used to evaluate their NVH performance in component level. The test is usually done at nominal position as well as out of positions where the pinion and gear are moved along their own axis and also along offset direction to evaluate sensitivity of the measured TE to positional errors. Such practice is crucial in practical applications where the gear sets are inevitably exposed to off position conditions due to a) housing machining and building errors, b) deflections of housing, bearings, etc under load and c) thermal expansions or contractions of housing due to ambient temperature variations. From initial design to development stage, efforts should be made to design the gear sets to be robust enough to all combinations of misalignments emanated from all three mentioned categories.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1806
Laurent Gagliardini
The input mobility is a crucial structural parameters regarding vibro-acoustic design of industrial objects. Whatever the frequency range, the vibrational power input into a structure –and consequently the average structural-acoustic response- is governed by the input mobility. When packaging structure-borne noise sources, the knowledge of the input mobility at the source connection points is mandatory for noise control. The input mobility is classically computed at the required points as a specific Frequency Response Function. During an industrial design process, the choice of connection points requires an a priori knowledge of the input mobility at every possible location of the studied structure-borne source, ie a mapping of the input mobility. The classical FRF computation at every Degree Of Freedom (DOF) of the considered structure would lead to consider millions of load cases which is beyond current computational limits.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1777
Thomas Wellmann, Kiran Govindswamy, Dean Tomazic
The automotive industry continues to develop new technologies aimed at reducing overall vehi-cle level fuel consumption. Powertrain and driveline related technologies will play a key role in helping OEM’s meet fleet CO2 reduction targets for 2025 and beyond. Specifically, use of tech-nologies such as downsized engines, idle start-stop systems, aggressive torque converter lock-up schedules, wide-ratio spread transmissions, and electrified propulsion systems are vital to-wards meeting aggressive fuel economy targets. Judicious combinations of such powertrain and driveline technology packages in conjunction with measures such as the use of low rolling resistance tires and vehicle lightweighting will be required to meet future OEM fleet CO2 targets. Many of the technologies needed for meeting the fuel economy and CO2 targets come with unique NVH challenges. In order to ensure customer acceptance of new vehicles, it is impera-tive that these NVH challenges be understood and solved.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1813
James M. Jonza, Thomas Herdtle, Jeffrey Kalish, Ronald Gerdes, Taewook Yoo, Georg Eichhorn
The aerospace industry has employed sandwich composite panels (stiff skins and lightweight cores) for over fifty years. It is a very efficient structure for rigidity per unit weight. 3M has developed novel thermoplastic composite panels that may be heated and shaped by compression molding or thermoforming with cycle time commensurate with automotive manufacturing lines build rates. These panels are also readily recycled at the end of their service life. As vehicles become lighter to meet carbon dioxide emission targets, it becomes more challenging to maintain the same level of quietness in the vehicle interior. Panels with interconnected honeycomb cells and perforations in one skin have been developed to absorb specific noise frequencies. The absorption results from a combination of Helmholtz resonators and quarter wave destruction interference effects.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1770
Wallace Hill, Dennis Kinchen, Mark A. Gehringer
This paper describes a method used to assess and optimize half shaft joint angles to avoid excessive 3rd order vibrations during WOT and light drive away events. The objective was to develop a test based analytical model used to assess and optimize driveline-working angles during the early planning phases of a new program when packaging tradeoffs are decided. The 12 degree of freedom system model comprehends half shaft dynamic angle change, axle torque, P/T mount rate progression and axial forces in the tripot joints. The analytical model results enable fact-based decisions during architectural planning phases for driveline working angles, powertrain mount designs and locations relative to P/T center of gravity. There were several challenges encountered and addressed during the correlation process including half shaft dynamic angle, P/T lateral rigid body mode frequency and subjective rating predictions.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1772
Yawen Wang, Xuan Li, Guan Qiao, Teik Lim
The prediction and control of gear vibration and noise has become very important in the design of a quiet, high-quality gearbox systems. The vibratory energy of the gear pair caused by transmission error excitation is transmitted structurally through shaft-bearing-housing assembly and radiates off from exterior housing surface. Most of the previous studies ignore the contribution of components flexibility to the transmission error. In this study, a system level model of axle system with hypoid gear pair is developed, aiming at investigating the effect of the elasticity of the shafts, bearings and housing. The load distribution results and gear transmission errors are calculated and compared between different assumptions on the boundary conditions. A series of parametric studies are also performed to analyze the effects of various shaft-bearing configurations and properties on the dynamic responses of the geared system.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1771
Mohamed El morsy, Gabriela Achtenova
Gear fault diagnosis is important in the vibration monitoring of any rotating machine. When a localized fault occurs in gears, the vibration signals always display non-stationary behavior. In early stage of gear failure, the gear mesh frequency (GMF) contains very little energy and is often overwhelmed by noise and higher-level macro-structural vibrations. An effective signal processing method would be necessary to remove such corrupting noise and interference. This paper presents the value of optimal wavelet function for early detection of faulty gear. The Envelope Detection (ED) and the Energy Operator are used for gear fault diagnosis as common techniques with and without the proposed optimal wavelet to verify the effectiveness of the optimal wavelet function. Kurtosis values are determined for the previous techniques as an indicator parameter for the ability of early gear fault detection. The comparative study is applied to real vibration signals.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1774
Fabio Luis Marques dos Santos, Tristan Enault, Jan Deleener, Tom Van Houcke
The increasing pressure on fuel economy has brought car manufacturers to implement solutions that improve vehicle efficiency, such as downsized engines, cylinder deactivation and advanced torque lock-up strategies. However, these solutions have a major drawback in terms of noise and vibration comfort. Downsized engines and lock-up strategies lead to the use of the engine at lower RPMs, and the reduced number of cylinders generates higher torque irregularities. Since the torque generated by the engine is transferred through flexible elements (clutch, torsional damper, gearbox, transmission, tire), these also impact the energy that is transferred to the vehicle body and perceived by the driver. This phenomenon leads to low frequency behavior, for instance booming noise and vibration. This paper presents a combined test and CAE modelling approach (1D/3D) to reverse engineer a vehicle equipped with a CPVA (centrifugal pendulum vibration absorber).
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1830
Thomas Haase, Henning Bühmann, Martin Radestock, Hans Peter Monner
Due to the strengthened CO2 and NOX regulations future vehicles has to be lightweight and efficient. But, lightweight structures are prone to vibrations and radiate sound efficiently. Therefore, an active approach for reducing sound radiation from structures is the active structural acoustic control (ASAC). Since the early 90’s, several theoretical studies regarding ASAC systems were presented, but only very little experimental investigations can be found for this alternative to passive damping solutions. The theoretical simulations show promising results of ASAC systems compared to active vibration control approaches. So, for that reason in this paper an experiment is conducted to investigate the performance of an ASAC system in the frequency range up to 600 Hz. A regular sensor grid of 24 accelerometers that are interconnected to establish six radiation signals is applied to an aluminum plate.
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