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Viewing 61 to 90 of 7837
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1891
Todd Freeman, Kelby Weilnau
Abstract Similar to the automotive industry, the expectations from customers for the noise and vibration performance of personal vehicles such as golf carts, ATV’s, and side-by-side vehicles has continued to evolve. Not only do customers expect these types of vehicles to be more refined and to have acoustic signatures that match the overall performance capabilities of the vehicle, but marketing efforts continue to focus on product differentiators which can include the acoustic and vibration performance. Due to this increased demand for acoustic and vibration performance, additional NVH efforts are often required to meet these expectations. This paper provides a sample of some of the efforts that have occurred to further refine and develop the noise and vibration signature for golf carts.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1890
Xingyu Zhang, Bo Yang, Manchuang Zhang, Sanbao Hu
Abstract H-Bahn ("hanging railway") refers to the suspended, unmanned urban railway transportation system. Through the reasonable platform layout, H-Bahn can be easily integrated into the existing urban transit system. With the development of urban roads, the associated rail facilities can be conveniently disassembled, moved and expanded. The track beam, circuits, communication equipment, and sound insulation screen are all installed in a box-type track beam so that the system can achieve a high level of integration and intelligence. The carriage of the modern H-banh vehicle is connected with the bogies by two hanging devices. The vehicle is always running in the box-type track beam; therefore there are less possibilities of derailment. Consequently, the key work focuses on the running stability evaluation and curve negotiation performance analysis.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1892
Yosuke Tanabe, Masanori Watanabe, Takafumi Hara, Katsuhiro Hoshino, Akira Inoue, Masaru Yamasaki
Abstract Predicting the vibration of a motor gearbox assembly driven by a PWM inverter in the early stages of development is demanding because the assembly is one of the dominant noise sources of electric vehicles (EVs). In this paper, we propose a simulation model that can predict the transient vibration excited by gear meshing, reaction force from the mount, and electromagnetic forces including the carrier frequency component of the inverter up to 10 kHz. By utilizing the techniques of structural model reduction and state space modeling, the proposed model can predict the vibration of assembly in the operating condition with a system level EV simulator. A verification test was conducted to compare the simulation results with the running test results of the EV.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1893
Douglas Moore
Abstract This paper will examine the regulatory development process, discuss the technical principles of the Economic Commission for Europe (ECE), R51.03 test, and discuss the overall objectives of the ECE R51.03 noise emission regulation. The development of this global noise emission regulation was a multi-stakeholder process which has resulted in new test procedures and new noise emission regulation principles. New test procedures based on ISO 362-1:2015 move the test basis to representative in-use noise emission, independent of vehicle propulsion technology. As part of the regulatory development, a monitoring program was conducted by the European Union to assess the applicability of the proposed test to provide representative vehicle noise emission results. The monitoring results also provided the basis to determine equivalent stringency between the test procedures of ECE R51.02 and R51.03.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1878
Kevin Verdiere, Raymond Panneton, Noureddine Atalla, Saïd Elkoun
Abstract A poroelastic characterization of open-cell porous materials using an impedance tube is proposed in this paper. Commonly, porous materials are modeled using Biot’s theory. However, this theory requires several parameters which can be difficult to obtain by different methods (direct, indirect or inverse measurements). The proposed method retrieves all the Biot’s parameters with one absorption measurement in an impedance tube for isotropic poroelastic materials following the Johnson-Champoux-Allard’s model (for the fluid phase). The sample is a cylinder bonded to the rigid termination of the tube with a diameter smaller than the tube’s one. In that case, a lateral air gap is voluntary induced to prevent lateral clamping. Using this setup, the absorption curve exhibits a characteristic elastic resonance (quarter wavelength resonance) and the repeatability is ensured by controlling boundary and mounting conditions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1879
Pranab Saha
Abstract Traditionally, the damping performance of a visco-elastic material is measured using the Oberst bar damping test, where a steel bar is excited using a non-contacting transducer. However, in an effort to reduce the weight of the vehicles, serious effort is put in to change the body panels from steel to aluminum and composite panels in many cases. These panels cannot be excited using a non-contacting transducer, although, in some cases, a very thin steel panel (shim) is glued to the vibrating bar to introduce ferrous properties to the bar so it can be excited. In the off highway vehicles, although the panels are made of steel, they are very thick and are difficult to excite using the Oberst bar test method. This paper discusses a measurement methodology based on mechanical impedance measurements and has the potential to be a viable/alternate test method to the Oberst bar testing. In the impedance method, the test bar is mounted to a shaker at the center (Center Point method).
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1881
Charles Moritz, Satyajeet Deshpande
Abstract As part of the update process to SAE J1637, Laboratory Measurement of the Composite Vibration Damping Properties of Materials on a Supporting Steel Bar, the Acoustical Materials Committee commissioned a round robin study to determine the current laboratory-to-laboratory variation, and to better understand best practices for composite loss factor measurements. Guidance within the current standard from a previous round robin study indicates a coefficient of variation of 35% for laboratory-to-laboratory measurements. It was hoped that current instrumentation and test practices would yield lower variability. Over the course of 2 years, 8 laboratories tested 4 bars, three damped steel bars and one bare steel bar. These bars were tested at -20°C, -5°C, 10°C, 25°C, 40°C, and 55°C. The damping materials were intentionally selected to provide low damping, moderate damping, and high damping as difficulties in determining the composite loss increase with increased damping.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1883
Arnaud Duval, Guillaume Crignon, Mickael Goret, Maxime Roux
Abstract The lightweighting research on noise treatments since years tends to prove the efficiency of the combination of good insulation with steep insulation slopes with broadband absorption, even in the context of bad passthroughs management implying strong leakages. The real issue lies more in the industrial capacity to adapt the barrier mass per unit area to the acoustic target from low to high segment or from low petrol to high diesel sources, while remaining easy to manipulate. The hybrid stiff insulator family can realize this easily with hard felts barriers backfoamed weighting from 800 g/m2 to 2000 g/m2 typically with compressions below 10 mm. Above these equivalent barrier weights and traditional compressions of 7 mm for example, the high density of the felts begins to destroy the open porosity and thus the absorption properties (insulation works anyway here, whenever vibration modes do not appear due to too high stiffness…).
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1882
Pravin P. Hujare, Anil D. Sahasrabudhe
Abstract The reduction of vibration and noise is a major requirement for performance of any vibratory system. Due to legislative pressures in terms of external pass by noise limit of vehicles and customer requirements for better noise and ride comfort in vehicle, NVH attribute has become an important parameter. Major sources for vehicle pass-by noise consist of powertrain, tire and wind. Damping treatment is important to reduce vibration and noise radiation. The passive constrained layer dampening (CLD) treatment can be used to reduce structure-borne noise of vibrating structure using viscoelastic damping material. The performance of the passive constrained layer damping treatment can further be enhanced by new segmentation technique. The concept of segmented CLD is based on edge effect. The efficiency of segmenting a constrained layer damping treatment relies on the fact that a high shear region is created in the viscoelastic layer.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1885
Kunhee Lee, Sang Kwon Lee, Taejin Shin, Keun Young Kim
Abstract This paper presents a novel method predicting the variation of sound quality of interior noise depending on the change of the proprieties of absorption materials. At the first, the model predicting the interior noise corresponding to the change of the absorption material in engine room is proposed. Secondly the index to estimate the sound quality of the predicted sound is developed. Thirdly the experimental work has been conducted with seven different materials and validated the newly developed index. Finally, this index is applied for the optimization of absorption material to improve the sound quality of interior noise in a passenger car.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1884
Ruimeng Wu, David W. Herrin
Abstract Sound absorbing materials are commonly compressed when installed in passenger compartments or underhood applications altering the sound absorption performance of the material. However, most prior work has focused on uncompressed materials and only a few models based on poroelastic properties are available for compressed materials. Empirical models based on flow resistivity are commonly used to characterize the complex wavenumber and characteristic impedance of uncompressed sound absorbing materials from which the sound absorption can be determined. In this work, the sound absorption is measured for both uncompressed and compressed samples of fiber and foam, and the flow resistivity is curve fit using an appropriate empirical model. Following this, the flow resistivity of the material is determined as a function of the compression ratio.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1842
Akin Oktav, Cetin Yilmaz, Gunay Anlas
Abstract To prevent trunk lid slam noise, reactive openings are used in the trunk cavities of passenger vehicles. In sedans, the trunk cavity and the cabin cavity are coupled acoustically through the discontinuities on the parcel shelf and/or the rear seat. In such a case, these openings behave as necks of a Helmholtz resonator, which in turn change the acoustic response of the system. In this study, the Helmholtz resonator effect of the trunk cavity is discussed analytically through a simplified cavity model. A case study, where the acoustic response of a sedan is analyzed through a computational model considering the resonator effect is also given. Sound pressure levels show that instant pressure drops and damping effects observed in the acoustic response can be explained with the resonator effect. Results obtained from the computational model of the sedan are verified with the track test measurements.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1843
Taejin Shin, Jaemin Jin, Sang Kwon Lee, Insoo Jung
Abstract This paper presents the influence of radiated noise from engine surface according to assembly condition between the engine block and oil pan. At the first, the force exciting the main bearing of cylinder block is calculated by using a multi-body dynamics model of the engine crankshaft. Secondly, the modal analysis is processed to obtain the mode contribution and modal participation factors for the FEM of a virtual cylinder block. Thirdly, the radiated noise from a structure is calculated by acoustic-FEM analysis. This structure is assembled by the virtual oil pan with a rigid connection method and a soft connection method. The sandwich panel connection model is used for the soft connection method. The sound radiated from this assemble structure is calculated according to two different connection properties respectively. The sound matrices for two results are compared using an objective method.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1839
Edward T. Lee
Abstract It is common for automotive manufacturers and off-highway machinery manufacturers to gain insight into the system’s structural dynamics by evaluating the system inertance functions near the mount locations. The acoustic response of the operator’s ears is a function of the vibro-acoustic characteristics of the system structural dynamics interacting with the cavity, with the actual load applied at the mount locations. The overall vibro-acoustic characteristics can be influenced by a change in local stiffness. To analyze the response of a system, it is necessary to go beyond analyzing its transfer functions. The actual load needs to be understood and applied to the transfer function set. Finite element (FE) based analysis provides a good foundation for deterministic solutions. However the finite element method decreases in accuracy as frequency increases.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1840
Thierry Bourdon, Rainer Weber, Johann Massinger
Abstract Virtual NVH Engineering is going to be reviewed in this paper for the development of FIE (fuel injection equipment) components. Some examples based on high pressure pumps and SCR air cooling injectors will illustrate the explanation. The use of a 3D FEM vibro-acoustic model is essential to support virtual NVH Engineering. Therefore, a review of techniques to study components is done first. Model correlation is also an important topic which will be discussed and which makes any NVH engineer confident in using a model instead of real HW. It is quite challenging to establish these models, as they must mimic the entire physical phenomenon of real structure borne hardware sound in the whole audible frequency range. Limitations of models are also identified and allow answering one true question: Should we stay considering only each component separately or as an assembly of parts of a larger system in the development process?
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1836
Fangfang Wang, Peter Johnson, Hugh Davies, Bronson Du
Abstract Whole-body vibration (WBV) is associated with several adverse health and safety outcomes including low-back pain (LBP) and driver fatigue. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three commercially-available air-suspension truck seats for reducing truck drivers’ exposures to WBV. Seventeen truck drivers operating over a standardized route were recruited for this study and three commercially-available air suspension seats were evaluated. The predominant, z-axis average weighted vibration (Aw) and Vibration Dose Values (VDV) were calculated and normalized to represent eight hours of truck operation. In addition, the Seat Effective Amplitude Transmissibility (SEAT), the ratio of the seat-measured vibration divided by the floor-measured vibration, was compared across the three seats. One seat had significantly higher on-road WBV exposures whereas there were no differences across seats in off-road WBV exposures.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1834
Dirk von Werne, Prasanna Chaduvula, Patrick Stahl, Michael Jordan, Jamison Huber, Korcan Kucukcoskun, Mircea Niculescu
Abstract Fan noise can form a significant part of the vehicle noise signature and needs hence to be optimized in view of exterior noise and operator exposure. Putting together unsteady CFD simulation with acoustic FEM modeling, tonal and broadband fan noise can be accurately predicted, accounting for the sound propagation through engine compartment and vehicle frame structure. This paper focuses on method development and validation in view of the practical vehicle design process. In a step by-step approach, the model has been validated against a dedicated test-set-up, so that good accuracy of operational fan noise prediction could be achieved. Main focus was on the acoustic transfer through the engine compartment. The equivalent acoustic transfer through radiators/heat exchangers is modeled based on separate detailed acoustic models. The updating process revealed the sensitivity of various components in the engine compartment.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1837
Paul R. Donavan, Carrie Janello
Abstract Acoustic beamforming was used to localize noise sources on heavy trucks operating on highways in California and North Carolina at a total of 20 sites. Over 1,200 trucks were measured under a variety of operating conditions, including cruise on level highways, on upgrades, down degrades, low speed acceleration, and for various speeds and pavements. The contours produced by the beamforming measurements were used to identify specific source contributions under these conditions and for a variety of heavy trucks. Consistently, the highest noise levels were seen at the tire-pavement interface, with lesser additional noise radiated from the engine compartment. Noise from elevated exhaust stacks was only documented for less than 5% of the trucks measured. The results were further reduced to produce vertical profiles of noise levels versus height above the roadway. The profiles were normalized to the highest noise level at ground level.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1832
Giovanni Rinaldi, Jason Edgington, Brian Thom
Abstract Typical approaches to regulating sound performance of vehicles and products rely upon A-weighted sound pressure level or sound power level. It is well known that these parameters do not provide a complete picture of the customer’s perception of the product and may mislead engineering efforts for product improvement. A leading manufacturer of agricultural equipment set out to implement a process to include sound quality targets in its product engineering cycle. First, meaningful vehicle level targets were set for a tractor by conducting extensive jury evaluation testing and by using objective metrics that represent the customer’s subjective preference for sound. Sensitivity studies (“what-if” games) were then conducted, using the predicted sound quality (SQ) index as validation metric, to define the impact on the SQ performance of different noise components (frequency ranges, tones, transients).
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1830
Thomas Haase, Henning Bühmann, Martin Radestock, Hans Peter Monner
Abstract Due to the strengthened CO2 and NOx regulations, future vehicles have to be lightweight and efficient. But, lightweight structures are prone to vibrations and radiate sound efficiently. Therefore, many active control approaches are studied to lower noise radiation besides the passive methods. One active approach for reducing sound radiation from structures is the active structural acoustic control (ASAC). Since the early 90’s, several theoretical studies regarding ASAC systems were presented, but only very little experimental investigations can be found for this alternative to passive damping solutions. The theoretical simulations show promising results of ASAC systems compared to active vibration control approaches. So, for that reason in this paper an experiment is conducted to investigate the performance of an ASAC system in the frequency range up to 600 Hz.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1831
Longchen Li, Wei Huang, Hailin Ruan, Xiujie Tian, Keda Zhu, Melvyn Care, Richard Wentzel, Xiaojun Chen, Changwei Zheng
Abstract The control strategy design of vehicle active noise control (ANC) relies too much on experiment experience, which costs a lot to gather mass data and the experimental results lack representation. To solve these problems, a new control strategy optimization method based on the genetic algorithm is proposed. First, a vehicle cabin sound field simulation model is built by sound transfer function. Based on the filtered-X Least Mean Squares (FX-LMS) algorithm and the vehicle cabin sound field simulation model, a vehicle ANC simulation model is proposed and verified by a vehicle field test. Furthermore, the genetic algorithm is used as a strategy optimization tool to optimize an ANC control strategy parameter set based on the vehicle ANC simulation model. The optimized results provide a reference for the ANC control strategy design of the vehicle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1828
Jonathan Christian, Dylan Stafford
Abstract The use of active noise control (ANC) systems in automotive applications has been common practice for well over a decade. Many of these systems utilize at least one error microphone that is placed inside the vehicle cabin and provides feedback to the algorithm in order to assess the effectiveness of the anti-noise signal as it attempts to cancel primary noise. Prior work pertaining to optimal error microphone placement has not provided any objective metrics that correlate to the noise reduction experienced inside the vehicle cabin. The goal of this paper is to establish empirically-based metrics which can be used to quantitatively describe why one microphone position in the vehicle is superior or less favorable when compared to another. These metrics are used when considering concurrent multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) ANC systems that utilize the same error microphones but are trying to attenuate both broadband and narrowband noise.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1829
Guillaume Loussert
Abstract The new fuel efficiency and emission standards have forced OEMs to put emphasis on different strategies such as engine downsizing, cylinder deactivation… Unfortunately these new technologies may lead to increased powertrain vibrations generated by the engine and transmitted to the chassis and the car cabin, such that their reduction or elimination has become a key topic for the automotive industry. The use of active engine mounts, acting directly on the fluid of an hydromount, or active vibration dampers, acting as an inertial mass-spring system, are very effective solutions, particularly when using electromagnetic based actuators. Nevertheless, all electromagnetic actuators technologies are not equals and the choice of such actuators must be considered carefully by taking into account the full performances and the overall cost of the solutions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1826
Sagar Deshmukh, Sandip Hazra
Abstract Engine mounting system maintains the position of powertrain in the vehicle with respect to chassis and other accessories during inertia, torque reaction loads and roadway disturbances. The mounting system also plays a role in terms of isolation of the rest of the vehicle and its occupants from powertrain and helps in maintaining vehicle ride and handling condition. This paper investigates the performance comparison between hydromount and switchable hydromount during idle and ride performance. The optimization scheme aims to improve the performance of the mounting system in order to achieve overall powertrain performance and NVH attribute balancing through switchable mount technology.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1859
Filip Franek, Jungu Kang, Jeon Uk, Sunguk Choi
Abstract Structure-born vibrations are often required to be localized in a complex structure, but in such dispersive medium, the vibration wave propagates with speed dependent on frequency. This property of solid materials causes an adverse effect for localization of vibrational events. The cause behind such phenomenon is that the propagating wave envelope changes its phase delay and amplitude in time and space as it travels in dispersive medium. This problem was previously approached by filtering a signal to focus on frequencies of the wave propagating with a similar speed, with improved accuracy of cross-correlation results. However, application of this technique has not been researched for localization of vibrational sources. In this work we take advantage of filtering prior to cross-correlation calculation while using multiple sensors to indicate an approximate location of vibration sources.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1827
Michael J. Santora, Cyril Gbenga Ige, Jeff Otto, David Egolf
Abstract A muffler attached to an engine attenuates sound over a dedicated frequency range. This research involves the development of an active muffler that is keyed to the revolutions per minute (rpm) of the engine and suppresses the fundamental frequency being exhausted through the tailpipe. The active muffler consists of a tracking side-branch resonator terminated with a composite piezoelectric transducer. The use of an exponential horn as a resonating cavity and terminated with a composite piezoelectric transducer is presented. This would create Electromechanical Active Helmholtz Resonator (EMAHR) creates a notch that can be moved between 200-1000 Hz. The use of acoustical-to-mechanical, mechanical-to-electrical, and analog-to-digital transformations to develop a system model for the active muffler are presented. These transforms will be presented as two-port network parameters. The use of two-port networks to model the electroacoustic system are a defining factor in the analysis.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1858
James Haylett, Andrew Polte
Abstract Truck and construction seats offer a number of different challenges compared to automotive seats in the identification and characterization of Buzz, Squeak, and Rattle (BSR) noises. These seats typically have a separate air or mechanical suspension and usually a larger number and variety of mechanical adjustments and isolators. Associated vibration excitation tend to have lower frequencies with larger amplitudes. In order to test these seats for both BSR and vibration isolation a low-noise shaker with the ability to test to a minimum frequency of 1 Hz was employed. Slowly swept sine excitation was used to visualize the seat mode shapes and identify nonlinearities at low frequencies. A sample set of seat BSR sounds are described in terms of time and frequency characteristics, then analyzed using sound quality metrics.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1855
Ramakanta Routaray
Abstract The basic function of a motorcycle frame is somewhat similar to that of the skeleton in the human body, i.e. to hold together the different parts in one rigid structure. One of the major benefits (for a motorcycle enthusiast) of using an advanced frame design lies in the sporty handling characteristics of the bike. A well designed frame can add to the joy of riding a motorcycle as the bike would feel more stable, effortless, and confident around corners, in straight lines and while braking. A well approved modeling [2] techniques or adequate guide line principles have to be followed while designing the body and chassis in order to achieve the vibration within control. This paper depicts a methodological right approach (guide lines) while designing the body and chassis of a two wheeler in order to control noise and vibration of the body and chassis.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1856
Junji Yoshida, Koki Tanaka, Rie Nakamoto, Ken Fukasawa
Abstract In this study, we combined operational transfer path analysis (OTPA) method with CAE technique to obtain high contributing vibration modes. A rear frame model of a small construction machine was employed for the analysis. 20 vibration modes were obtained by CAE (eigenmode analysis) under 200 Hz. Subsequently, operational test, in which a sinusoidal input force was given, was carried out. For applying OTPA, acceleration signals at 15 points on the rear frame were used as the reference signals and the cab vibration positioned on the frame via rubber bushes was used as the response signal. These acceleration signals were then measured simultaneously in the operational condition. As the result of OTPA, high contributing principal component modes were calculated and high contributing vibration modes were also extracted using mode shape correlation between them. Two in the 20 calculated vibration modes remained as the important modes to the cab vibration through the analyses.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1854
John T. Anton, Jason Ley, Ikpreet S. Grover, David Stotera
Abstract Liquid applied sound deadener (LASD) is a light-weight, targeted vibration damping treatment traditionally used in the automotive market for body-in-white (BIW) panels. Water-based LASDs may cure over a wide range of conditions from room temperature to over 200°C. However, curing conditions commonly affect change in the damping characteristics. A thorough understanding of the relationship between curing conditions and subsequent damping performances will inform the material selection process and may allow pre-manufacturing designs to be adjusted with limited impact during validation. This paper aims to strengthen the quantitative understanding of the role LASD curing conditions have on damping performance by observing the effects of variations in thickness and cure temperature as measured by the Oberst method.
Viewing 61 to 90 of 7837

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