Criteria

Display:

Results

Viewing 7741 to 7770 of 7819
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530185
M. L. FAST
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530187
C.E. NELSON
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530205
W. H. CLARK
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530263
M.C. Turkish
THE author shows how the success of a valve-spring design is intrinsically related to both the cam design and the valve gear dynamics obtained at high engine speeds. Good valve gear dynamics, which is characterized by minimum vibration, he says, minimizes hydraulic lifter pump-up tendency and greatly simplifies the job of making a satisfactory spring design. He shows that the use of the smooth-acceleration curve is very helpful in producing good valve gear dynamics, and that it is to be recommended over other types. The author also discusses the use of dual springs and cyclo-pelting and presetting of springs. Discussion of this and other papers on “Valve Gear Problems in Modern Overhead-Valve Engines” starts on page 714.
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530168
E. V. Murphree, A. R. Cunningham, J. P. Haworth, A. F. Kaulakis
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520061
T. H. McNARY
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520059
James V. Bernardo
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520028
L. M. BALL
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520236
Philip O. Johnson
THIS paper outlines the reasons why a continuous static testing program of a new body design should parallel development of the model until the first road car is produced. First, major deficiencies can be eliminated from the design before the road car is constructed, resulting in a considerable saving of time and money. Second, continuous static testing leads to a structurally satisfactory road car, leaving road tests free for the solution of problems involving suspension design, ride, and noise. Third, static testing points the way to efficient design of all structural components, whereas road test results are necessarily determined by overall structure. Static tests, founded on sound engineering principles, can lead to the development of optimum designs, rather than the acceptance of given designs.
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520175
GIL F. RODDEWIG
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510001
ARTHUR S. BASSETTE
SUMMARY A short movie will be shown indicating the cars being tested for shake on the road and in the laboratory, and some of the equipment will be seen in operation. Next, eight slides will be shown and a detailed description will be made of each slide. The major context will be to show: 1. The functional arrangement of the equipment. 2. The method of interpreting the data for a single point under shake conditions. 3. The method of obtaining curves for multiple point studies. 4. The solution for a general problem.
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510040
W.F. PERKINS, W.F. Billingsley
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510207
Paul Huber
A FEW years ago traffic noise became so serious that the Traffic Noise Subcommittee of the SAE Truck and Bus Committee was organized to attack the problem in a scientific manner. Specifically, the subcommittee set itself the following objectives: 1. To determine a suitable procedure for the measurement of noise created by automotive vehicles. 2. To specify the equipment necessary to obtain comparable results. 3. To make traffic noise tests in several parts of the country. 4. To provide statistical data on the noise created by new vehicles. The results of the research work done by the subcommittee are given in the accompanying report.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500054
V. D. POLHEMUS, Suspension Engineer
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500053
CLARK A. TEA
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480061
R. N. JANEWAY
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480104
LLYOD E. MULLER
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480005
BARTRAM KELLEY
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470153
D. S. KING
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470136
JOHN M. PICTON
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470135
HAROLD L. ERICSON
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470119
L. F. HOPE
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470098
W. E. BURNHAM
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460106
L. M. Ball
ABSTRACT
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460038
Stanley Lippert
Investigators in this country and abroad have experimentally determined human response to the kinds of vibration encountered in street traffic, elevators, ships, trains, automobiles and airplanes. Each has covered a limited range of frequencies and amplitudes and employed different descriptive terms for grading their effects on the human body. In this article the findings of a number of studies on the effects of vertical vibration are reconciled graphically, making possible an easy classification of the human responses to a vertical sinusoidal motion. The range of vibrations covered by the graph - namely, for frequencies between 0.1 and 256 cps and amplitudes between 100 and 0.00003 inches, includes the regions of interest in all modes of transportation.
Viewing 7741 to 7770 of 7819

Filter