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Viewing 31 to 60 of 7808
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1799
Nagasuresh Inavolu, Jaganmohan Rao Medisetti, S. Nanda Kumar, J Lingeshkumar, Akshay Loya, Mvgprasad MV
Abstract Engine noise reduction is one of the highest priorities in vehicle development from the viewpoint of meeting stringent noise regulations. Engine noise reduction involves identification of noise sources and suppression of noise by changing the response of sources to input excitations. Noise can originate from several mechanical sources in engine. The present work focuses on systematic study of the behavior or response of engine structure and its ancillaries to engine excitation and thereby assess their contribution to overall engine noise. The approach includes engine noise and vibration measurement and component ranking using engine noise and vibration measurement in a non-anechoic environment, structural analysis of engine including experimental modal testing of engine and its components, etc. Correlation of the above obtained results is performed to identify the noise sources. Later, ranking of critical components was performed based on results of cladding exercise.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1792
Magnus Knutsson, Erik Kjellson, Rodney Glover, Hans Boden
Abstract Increased demands for reduction of fuel consumption and CO2 emissions are driven by the global warming. To meet these challenges with respect to the passenger car segment the strategy of utilizing IC-engine downsizing has shown to be effective. In order to additionally meet requirements for high power and torque output supercharging is required. This can be realized using e.g. turbo-chargers, roots blowers or a combination of several such devices for the highest specific power segment. Both turbo-chargers and roots blowers can be strong sources of sound depending on the operating conditions and extensive NVH abatements such as resonators and encapsulation might be required to achieve superior vehicle NVH. For an efficient resonator tuning process in-duct acoustic source data is required. No published studies exists that describe how the gas exchange process for roots blowers can be described by acoustic sources in the frequency domain.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1798
Jiri Navratil, Warren Seeley, Peng Wang, Shriram Siravara
Abstract The ability to accurately predict exhaust system acoustics, including transmission loss (TL) and tailpipe noise, based on CAD geometry has long been a requirement of most OEM’s and Tier 1 exhaust suppliers. Correlation to measurement data has been problematic under various operating conditions, including flow. This study was undertaken to develop robust modelling technique, ensuring sensible correlation between the 1-D models and test data. Ford use Ricardo WAVE as one of their 1-D NVH tools, which was chosen for the purpose of this benchmark study. The most commonly used metrics for evaluating the acoustical performance of mufflers are insertion loss (IL), TL, and noise reduction (NR). TL is often the first step of analysis, since it represents the inherent capability of the muffler to attenuate sound if both the source and termination are assumed to be anechoic. It can also be reliably measured and numerically simulated without having to connect to an engine.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1802
Dong chul Lee, Insoo Jung, Jaemin Jin, Stephan Brandl, Mehdi Mehrgou
Abstract In the automotive industry, various simulation-based analysis methods have been suggested and applied to reduce the time and cost required to develop the engine structure to improve the NVH performance of powertrain. This simulation is helpful to set the engine design concept in the initial phase of the powertrain development schedules. However, when using the conventional simulation method with a uniformed force, the simulation results sometimes show different results than the test results. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method for predicting the radiated noise level of a diesel engine using actual combustion excitation force. Based on the analytical radiated noise development target, we identify the major components of the engine that are beyond this development target by in the frequency range. The components of the problem found in this way are reflected in the engine design of the early development stage to shorten the development time.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1803
John Van Baren
Abstract The accumulated damage that a product experiences in the field due to the variety of vibration stresses placed upon it will eventually cause failures in the product. The failure modes resulting from these dynamic stresses can be replicated in the laboratory and correlated to end use environment to validate target reliability requirements. This presentation addresses three fundamental questions about developing accelerated random vibration stress tests.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1801
Sivasankaran Sadasivam, Aditya Palsule, Ekambaram Loganathan, Nagasuresh Inavolu, Jaganmohan Rao Medisetti
Abstract Powertrain is the major source of noise and vibration in commercial vehicles and has significant contribution on both interior and exterior noise levels. It is vital to reduce the radiated noise from powertrain to meet customer expectations of vehicle comfort and to abide by the legislative noise requirements. Sound intensity mapping technique can identify the critical components of noise radiation from the powertrain. Sound intensity mapping has revealed that oil sump as one of the major contributors for radiated noise from powertrain. Accounting the effect of dynamic coupling of oil on the sump is crucial in predicting its noise radiation performance. Through numerical methods, some amount of work done in predicting the dynamic characteristics of structures filled with fluid.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1807
Richard DeJong, Gordon Ebbitt
Abstract The SEA model of wind noise requires the quantification of both the acoustic as well as the turbulent flow contributions to the exterior pressure. The acoustic pressure is difficult to measure because it is usually much lower in amplitude than the turbulent pressure. However, the coupling of the acoustic pressure to the surface vibration is usually much stronger than the turbulent pressure, especially in the acoustic coincidence frequency range. The coupling is determined by the spatial matching between the pressure and the vibration which can be described by the wavenumber spectra. This paper uses measured vibration modes of a vehicle window to determine the coupling to both acoustic and turbulent pressure fields and compares these to the results from an SEA model. The interior acoustic intensity radiating from the window during road tests is also used to validate the results.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1804
Chulwoo Jung, Hyeon Seok Kim, Hyuckjin Oh, Kwang Hyeon Hwang, Hun Park
Abstract An efficient method to determine optimal bushing stiffness for improving noise and vibration of passenger cars is developed. In general, a passenger vehicle includes various bushings to connect body and chassis systems. These bushings control forces transferred between the systems. Noise and vibration of a vehicle are mainly caused by the forces from powertrain (engine and transmission) and road excitation. If bushings transfer less force to the body, levels of noise and vibration will be decreased. In order to manage the forces, bushing stiffness plays an important role. Therefore, it is required to properly design bushing stiffness when developing passenger vehicles. In the development process of a vehicle, bushing stiffness is decided in the early stage (before the test of an actual vehicle) and it is not validated until the test is performed.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1805
Krzysztof Prażnowski, Jaroslaw Mamala
Abstract The vibrations of the sprung mass of a passenger car, traveling along a road surface, are random. They also form its main source but there are besides other factors to consider. The resulting force ratio is overlapped by other phenomena occurring at the interface of the pneumatic tire with the road surface, such as non-uniformity of tires, shape deformations and imbalances. The resulting additional inertia force acts on the kinematic force that was previously induced on the car body. The vibrations of the sprung mass of the car body at the time can be considered as a potential source of diagnostic information, but getting insight their direct identification is difficult. Moreover, the basic identification is complicated because of the forces induced due to the random interference from road roughness. In such a case, the ratio defined as SNR assumes negative values.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1808
Francis Nardella
Abstract In a previous report, it was shown that power transmission through the camshaft reduced the first mode natural frequency of the power train and translated its convergence with dominant engine excitatory harmonics to a lower engine speed resulting in a marked reduction in torsional vibration while achieving 2/1 gear reduction for a 4-stroke 6-cylinder compression ignition (CI) engine for aviation. This report describes a sweep though 2 and 4-stroke engines with differing numbers of cylinders configured as standard gear reduction (SGRE) and with power transmission through the camshaft (CDSE) or an equivalent dedicated internal driveshaft (DISE). Four and 6-cylinder 4-stroke engines were modeled as opposed boxer engines. Four and 6-cylinder 2-stroke engines and 8, 10 and 12-cylinder 2-stroke and 4-stroke engines were modeled as 180° V-engines. All 2-stroke engines were considered to be piston ported and configured as SGRE or DISE.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1809
Dhanesh Purekar
Abstract Engine noise is one of the significant aspects of product quality for light and medium duty diesel engine market applications. Gear whine is one of those noise issues, which is considered objectionable and impacts the customer’s perception of the product quality. Gear whine could result due to defects in the gear manufacturing process and/or due to inaccurate design of the gear macro and micro geometry. The focus of this technical paper is to discuss gear whine considerations from the production plant perspective. This includes quick overview of the measurement process, test cell environment, noise acceptance criteria considerations. A gear whine case study is presented based on the data collected in the test cell at the engine plant. Gear whine data acquired on current product and next generation of prototype engines is analyzed and presented. This paper concludes by highlighting the lessons learned from the case study.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1814
Todd Tousignant, Kiran Govindswamy, Vikram Bhatia, Shivani Polasani, W Keith Fisher
Abstract The automotive industry continues to develop technologies for reducing vehicle fuel consumption. Specifically, vehicle lightweighting is expected to be a key enabler for achieving fleet CO2 reduction targets for 2025 and beyond. Hybrid glass laminates that incorporate fusion draw and ion exchange innovations are thinner and thereby, offer more than 30% weight reduction compared to conventional automotive laminates. These lightweight hybrid laminates provide additional benefits, including improved toughness and superior optics. However, glazing weight reduction leads to an increase in transmission of sound through the laminates for certain frequencies. This paper documents a study that uses a systematic test-based approach to understand the sensitivity of interior vehicle noise behavior to changes in acoustic attenuation driven by installation of lightweight glass.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1815
Pranab Saha, Satyajeet P. Deshpande
Abstract This paper discusses the importance of a dissipative sound package system in the automotive industry and how it works. Although this is not a new technique at this stage, it is still a challenge to meet the subsystem target levels that were originally developed for parts based on the barrier decoupler concept. This paper reviews the typical construction of a dissipative system and then emphasizes the importance of different layers of materials that are used in the construction, including what they can do and cannot do. The paper also discusses the importance of the proper manufacturing of a part.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1812
Steven Sorenson, Gordon Ebbitt, Scott Smith, Todd Remtema
Abstract In an effort to reduce mass, future automotive bodies will feature lower gage steel or lighter weight materials such as aluminum. An unfortunate side effect of lighter weight bodies is a reduction in sound transmission loss (TL). For barrier based systems, as the total system mass (including the sheet metal, decoupler, and barrier) goes down the transmission loss is reduced. If the reduced surface density from the sheet metal is added to the barrier, however, performance can be restored (though, of course, this eliminates the mass savings). In fact, if all of the saved mass from the sheet metal is added to the barrier, the TL performance may be improved over the original system. This is because the optimum performance for a barrier based system is achieved when the sheet metal and the barrier have equal surface densities. That is not the case for standard steel constructions where the surface density of the sheet metal is higher than the barrier.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1751
Nicolas Schaefer, Bart Bergen, Tomas Keppens, Wim Desmet
Abstract The continuous pursuit for lighter, more affordable and more silent cars, has pushed OEMs into optimizing the design of car components. The different panels surrounding the car interior cavity such as firewall, door or floor panels are of key importance to the NV performance. The design of the sound packages for high-frequency airborne input is well established. However, the design for the mid-frequency range is more difficult, because of the complex inputs involved, the lack of representative performance metrics and its high computational cost. In order to make early decisions for package design, performance maps based on the different design parameters are desired for mid-frequencies. This paper presents a framework to retrieve the response surface, from a numerical design space of finite-element frequency sweeps. This response surface describes the performance of a sound package against the different design variables.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1754
Kyoung-Jin Chang, Seonghyeon Kim, Dong Chul Park, So Youn Moon, Sunghwan Park, Myung Hwan Yun
Abstract This paper aims to establish a systematic process of developing a brand driving sound. Firstly, principal factors of a brand sound identity are extracted from factor analysis of many sample cars. As a result, brand sound positioning map is drawn using jury test data. Also, the multiple regression analysis of subjective and objective test results is carried. As a result, the principal factors are expressed by objective test data and brand sound positioning map can be easily updated from the measurement data. In addition, what should be improved for designing a target sound is reviewed. Secondly, various technologies of target sound design are discussed to involve the brand identity and vehicle’s character in driving sound. Also, an efficient tool to implement the target sound with an active sound design (ASD) system in a vehicle is introduced. This tool enables to efficiently design, tune and simulate a target sound for ASD system in a laboratory.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1753
Jack Hall Riddle, Ya-Juan Bemman, Tom Frei, Sihui Wu, Ishang Padalkar
Abstract Demands for engines to operate at low-frequency firing order are increasing in the automotive market. This requirement is driven by consumer and regulatory demand for vehicles which are more efficient in the use of fuel. As a result, engine and transmission technologies have been developed which permit operation of engines with fewer cylinders at increasingly low RPM’s. The resulting low frequency exhaust noise is more difficult to attenuate than in vehicles in years past. At the same time, vehicles often have less packaging space for mufflers, when larger volume would otherwise be needed to attenuate at lower frequencies. A further challenge is the demand for increasingly refined performance sounds from the exhaust systems of premium cars despite the technical obstacles involved in even maintaining sound quality. Finally, legally permissible sound levels are decreasing in some markets. These market and regulatory demands require new solutions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1757
Matthew Maunder, Benjamin Munday
Abstract Excitement, image and emotion are key attributes for cars, particularly those with higher power ratings. Engine sound has traditionally acted as the car’s voice, conveying these attributes to the driver and passengers along with the brand image. Engine sound also underpins the dynamic driving experience by giving instant feedback about how a car is operating, enhancing the connection between driver and vehicle. For decades, the automotive industry has engineered engine sound to achieve these benefits, thereby defining the ‘language’ of car sound. Electric vehicles deliver strong and responsive performance but naturally lack the acoustic feedback that internal combustion engines provide. While this gives advantages in terms of comfort and environmental noise, the benefits of engine sound are lost. Carefully controlled acoustic feedback inside the car’s cabin brings tangible and valuable benefits both for the dynamic driving experience and to convey the brand image.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1761
Daniel Fernandez Comesana, Graciano Carrillo Pousa, Emiel Tijs
Abstract The automotive industry is currently increasing the noise and vibration requirements of vehicle components. A detailed vibro-acoustic assessment of the supplied element is commonly enforced by most vehicle manufacturers. Traditional End-Of-Line (EOL) solutions often encounter difficulties adapting from controlled environments to industrial production lines due the presence of high levels of noise and vibrations generated by the surrounding machinery. In contrast, particle velocity measurements performed near a rigid radiating surface are less affected by background noise and they can potentially be used to address noise problems even in such conditions. The vector nature of particle velocity, an intrinsic dependency upon surface displacement and sensor directivity are the main advantages over conventional solutions. As a result, quantitative measurements describing the vibro-acoustic behavior of a device can be performed at the final stage of the manufacturing process.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1760
Weimin Thor, J. Stuart Bolton
Abstract Due the increasing concern with the acoustic environment within automotive vehicles, there is an interest in measuring the acoustical properties of automotive door seals. These systems play an important role in blocking external noise sources, such as aerodynamic noise and tire noise, from entering the passenger compartment. Thus, it is important to be able to conveniently measure their acoustic performance. Previous methods of measuring the ability of seals to block sound required the use of either a reverberation chamber, or a wind tunnel with a special purpose chamber attached to it. That is, these methods required the use of large and expensive facilities. A simpler and more economical desktop procedure is thus needed to allow easy and fast acoustic measurement of automotive door seals.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1763
Lisa Steinbach, Ercan Altinsoy, Robert Rosenkranz
Abstract In today's urban environment inhabitants are permanently exposed to elevated noise levels, which are dominated by traffic noise. The process of electrification of vehicles might change the traffic noise in city centers. The aim of this work was to determine the pedestrian reaction, the warning effect and the annoyance of more realistic traffic situations. For this purpose both combustion and electric vehicle noise situations and mixed scenarios of both concepts were generated. The differences in the perceived annoyance and warning effect were investigated with perception studies.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1764
Himanshu Amol Dande, Tongan Wang, John Maxon, Joffrey Bouriez
Abstract The demand for quieter interior cabin spaces among business jet customers has created an increased need for more accurate prediction tools. In this paper, the authors will discuss a collaborative effort between Jet Aviation and Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation to develop a Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) model of a large commercial business jet. To have an accurate prediction, it is critical to accurately model the structural and acoustic subsystems, critical noise transmission paths, and dominant noise sources for the aircraft. The geometry in the SEA model was developed using 3D CAD models of major airframe and interior cabin components. The noise transmission path was characterized through extensive testing of various aircraft components in the Gulfstream Acoustic Test Facility. Material definitions developed from these tests became input parameters in the SEA model.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1766
Dirk von Werne, Stefano Orlando, Anneleen Van Gils, Thierry Olbrechts, Ivan Bosmans
Abstract A methodology to secure cabin noise and vibration targets is presented. Early in the design process, typically in the Joint Definition Phase, Targets are cascaded from system to component level to comply with the overall cabin noise target in various load cases. During the Detailed Design Phase, 3D simulation models are build up to further secure and refine the vibro-acoustic performance of the cabin noise related subsystems. Noise sources are estimated for the target setting based on layer analytical and empirical expressions from literature. This includes various types of engine noise - fan, jet, and propeller noise - as well as turbulent boundary layer noise. For other noise sources, ECS and various auxiliaries, targets are set such as to ensure the overall cabin noise level. To synthesize the cabin noise, these noise sources are combined with estimates of the noise transfer through panels and the cavity effect of the cabin.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1769
Onkar Gangvekar, Santosh Deshmane
Abstract In today’s automobile market, most OEMs use manual transmission for cars. Gear Shifting is a crucial customer touch point. Any issue or inconvenience caused while shifting gears can result into customer dissatisfaction and will affect the brand image. Synchronizer is a vital subsystem for precise gear shifting mechanism. Based on vehicle application selection of synchronizer for given inertia and speed difference is a key factor which decides overall shift quality of gearbox. For more demanding driver abuse conditions like skip shifting, conventional brass synchronizers have proved inadequate for required speed difference and gear inertia, which eventually results into synchronizer crashing and affects driving performance. To increase synchronizer performance of multi-cone compact brass synchronizer, a ‘Grit blasting process’ has been added. These components tested with an accelerated test plan successfully.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1768
Yong Xu
Abstract The NVH performance is one of the most important concerns in vehicle development. For all-wheel drive (AWD) vehicles and rear-wheel (RWD) drive vehicles, prop shaft is a major transmission component which may cause various NVH problems. This paper focuses on the vehicle NVH problems caused by the second order excitation force of prop shaft. In order to control the NVH performance of the prop shaft efficiently and fundamentally, this work first studied the rotation kinematical characteristics of prop shaft. Then a rigid-elastic coupling model of vehicle driveline was built with the theory of multi-body dynamics. With this model, the sensitive factors that may affect the second order excitation force were investigated. This paper also describes a case study to verify the conclusions which are revealed from the theoretical calculation and the simulation.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1773
Jing Yuan
Abstract The dual phase twin synchronous drive has been developed for belt noise reduction. Two identical synchronous belts are arranged parallel side by side with one tooth staggered against other by the half pitch offset. The noise cancellation effect is achieved as one belt tooth engagement coincides with the other belt tooth dis-engagement. A center flange is used as a divider to prevent the belts contacting each other along the axial direction during their entrance and exit of the sprocket. An overall 20 [dBA] noise reduction has been achieved with the dual phase twin belt drive compared to an equal width single belt counterpart. The vibration amplitude of the hub load is also reduced which is directly correlated to the structural borne noise. Comparing to the related dual phase helical tooth belt, the dual phase twin belt is superior in torque carrying capability; and is on par with noise mitigation.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1778
Enrico Galvagno, Antonio Tota, Mauro Velardocchia, Alessandro Vigliani
Abstract This paper explores the potentiality of reducing noise and vibration of a vehicle transmission thanks to powertrain control integration with active braking. Due to external disturbances, coming from the driver, e.g. during tip-in / tip-out maneuvers, or from the road, e.g. crossing a speed bump or driving on a rough road, the torsional backlashes between transmission rotating components (gears, synchronizers, splines, CV joints), may lead to NVH issues known as clonk. This study initially focuses on the positive effect on transmission NVH performance of a concurrent application of a braking torque at the driving wheels and of an engine torque increase during these maneuvers; then a powertrain/brake integrated control strategy is proposed. The braking system is activated in advance with respect to the perturbation and it is deactivated immediately after to minimize losses.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1779
Xianwu Yang, Jian Pang, Lanjun Wang, Xiong Tian, Yu Tang
Abstract With drastically reduction of engine noise, the gear rattle noise generated by the impact between neutral gears inside transmission can be much easily perceived. It is well known that the torsional mode has a direct relationship with the transmission gear rattle noise. This paper establishes a torsional model of a front wheel drive automotive drivetrain, including clutch system, transmission box and equivalent load of a full vehicle, in AMESim software. The experimental engine speed fluctuations at different gears are used to excite the torsional model. The influences of several parameters, including flywheel inertia, clutch stiffness, clutch hysteresis and drive shaft stiffness, on the 2nd order (major engine firing order for a 4-cylinder-4-stroke engine) torsional resonant frequency and the 2nd order torsional resonant peak of the transmission input shaft are analyzed by changing them alternatively.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1780
Yong Xu
Abstract In the design or match process of vehicle powertrain system, gearbox rattle is a common NVH problem which directly affects passengers’ judgment on the quality and performance of vehicle. During the development process of a passenger car, prototype vehicles have serious gear rattle problem. In order to efficiently and fundamentally control this problem, this work first studied the characteristics and mechanisms of the gearbox rattle. The study results revealed that the torsional vibration of powertrain system was the root cause of gearbox rattle. Then a simulation model of the full vehicle was built with the aid of Simulink® toolbox, which is a graphical extension to MATLAB® for modeling and simulation of variety of systems. With this model, the sensitivity analysis and parametrical optimization were performed, and the simulation results indicated that the dual-mass flywheel (DMF) was the best measure to control the rattle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1781
Joshua Wheeler
Abstract The design and operation of a vehicle’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system has great impact on the performance of the vehicle’s Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) and Hands-Free Communication (HFC) system. HVAC noise provides high amplitudes of broadband frequency content that affects the signal to noise ratio (SNR) within the vehicle cabin, and works to mask the user’s speech. But what’s less obvious is that when the airflow from the panel vents or defroster openings can be directed toward the vehicle microphone, a mechanical “buffeting” phenomenon occurs on the microphone’s diaphragm that distresses the ASR system beyond its ability to interpret the user’s voice. The airflow velocity can be strong enough that a simple windscreen on the microphone is not enough to eliminate the problem. Minimizing this buffeting effect is a vital key to building a vehicle that meets the customer’s expectations for ASR and HFC performance.
Viewing 31 to 60 of 7808

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