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Viewing 271 to 300 of 7797
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8143
Jerry Syms, Theresia Manns, Björn Bergqvist
Abstract The noise generated by the flow of air past a transport truck is a key design factor for the manufacturers of these vehicles as the sound levels in the cabin are a significant component of driver comfort. This paper describes a collaboration between Volvo GTT and the National Research Council Canada to measure the in-cabin aeroacoustics of a full-scale cab-over tractor in the NRC 9 m Wind Tunnel. Acoustic instrumentation was installed inside the tractor to record cabin noise levels and externally to acquire tunnel background noise data. Using a microphone mounted on the driver’s-side tunnel wall as a reference to remove variations in background noise levels between data points, differences in cabin noise levels were able to be detected when comparing the tractor with different configurations. The good repeatability of the data allowed for differences of as little as 0.5 dB to be measured.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8121
Riccardo Bianchi, Addison Alexander, Andrea Vacca
Abstract Typically, earthmoving machines do not have wheel suspensions. This lack of components often causes uncomfortable driving, and in some cases reduces machine productivity and safety. Several solutions to this problem have been proposed in the last decades, and particularly successful is the passive solution based on the introduction of accumulators in the hydraulic circuit connecting the machine boom. The extra capacitance effect created by the accumulator causes a magnification of the boom oscillations, in such a way that these oscillations counter-react the machine oscillation caused by the driving on uneven ground. This principle of counter-reacting machine oscillations through the boom motion can be achieved also with electro-hydraulic solutions, properly actuating the flow supply to the boom actuators on the basis of a feedback sensors and a proper control strategy.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2009
Natasha Barbely, Narayanan Komerath
Abstract Coaxial rotors are finding use in advanced rotorcraft concepts. Combined with lift offset rotor technology, they offer a solution to the problems of dynamic stall and reverse flow that often limit single rotor forward flight speeds. In addition, coaxial rotorcraft systems do not need a tail rotor, a major boon during operation in confined areas. However, the operation of two counter-rotating rotors in close proximity generates many possible aerodynamic interactions between rotor blades, blades and vortices, and between vortices. With two rotors, the parameter design space is very large, and requires efficient computations as well as basic experiments to explore aerodynamics of a coaxial rotor and the effects on performance, loads, and acoustics.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1939
Toshikazu Okamura
Abstract Brake judder is one of the most serious problems in automotive-brake systems. It is basically a forced vibration caused by the friction-surface geometry of a brake disc, and therefore, disc rotors play a significant role in judder. There are two types of judder: cold and hot. Hot judder is caused by the thermo-mechanical deformation of a brake disc due to high-speed braking. There are several shapes of deformation, e.g., coning and circumferential waviness. Circumferential waviness is caused by thermo-mechanical buckling and typically found as a butterfly shape in a 2nd rotational-order and hot-spotting. In a previous paper, two groups of disc castings with different material homogeneity were machined intentionally to have two kinds of dimensional variations.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1933
Mingzhuo Li, Dejian Meng, Lijun Zhang
Abstract Brake judder severely affects the riding comfort and safety of vehicle. For the brake corner system, a rigid-flexible coupling model is established based on ADAMS. In the model, brake pads, caliper, anchor and knuckle are flexible bodies, and the contacts between pads and disc and the contacts between pads and caliper are defined in detail. Meanwhile, the vibration acceleration of the brake corner components and the contact forces between disc and pads are used as evaluation index and the evaluation system of brake judder are improved. The analysis results show that the novel model and evaluation system can be used to predict brake judder effectively.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1931
Aaron Völpel, Georg Peter Ostermeyer
Abstract In today’s research and development of brake systems the model-based prediction of complex vibrations and NVH phenomena plays an important role. Despite the efforts, the high dimensional computational simulation models only provide a limited part of the results gained through experimental measurements. Several reasons are discussed by the industry and academic research. One potential source of these inadequacies is the very simple formulation of the friction forces in the simulation models. Due to a significant shorter computation time (by orders of magnitude), the complex eigenvalue analysis has been established, in comparison to the transient analysis, as the standard method in the case of industrial research, where systems with more than one million degrees of freedom are simulated.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1944
Seongjoo Lee, JeSung Jeon, ShinWook Kim, ShinWan Kim, Seong Rhee, Wan Gyu Lee, Young Sun Cho, Jeongkyu Kim
When two identical brakes are simultaneously tested on a vehicle chassis dynamometer, very often the left hand brake is found to squeal more or less than the right hand brake, all at different frequencies. This study was performed to develop some understanding of this puzzling phenomenon. It is found that as the wear rate difference between the inner pad and the outer pad increases, low frequency (caliper and knuckle) squeals occur more and more, and as the differential wear becomes larger and larger, high frequency (disc) squeals occur less and less, finally disappearing all together. Discs and calipers are found to affect the differential pad wear, in turn affecting brake squeal generation.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1917
Bongho Kim, Jeongkyu Kim, Kwang Yun Kim, Jung Hoon Woo
Abstract Creep groan noise occurs in a just moving vehicle by the simultaneous application of torque to the wheel and the gradual release of brake pressure in-vehicle. It is the low frequency noise giving the driver a very uncomfortable feeling. Recently, the field claims regarding the creep groan noise are increasing. So far, creep groan noise has been improved by means of chassis modification the transfer system. But vehicle body the response system does not. In this paper, the effect between vibration characteristics of vehicle body, creep groan noise was analyzed. Then presented analysis method for vehicle body effect regarding creep groan noise.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1915
Meechai Sriwiboon, Seong Rhee, Kritsana Kaewlob, Nipon Tiempan, Rungrod Samankitesakul
Abstract As some brake engineers believe that brake squeal can be related to pad hardness, friction coefficient or compressibility while others disagree, a study has been undertaken to develop further insights. Two commercial formulas, one low-copper NAO and the other copper-free NAO, were made into disc pads of varying porosity without an underlayer and they were checked for specific gravity, porosity, hardness (HRS and HRR), natural frequencies, compressibility, friction, wear and squeal. With increasing porosity, the hardness and natural frequencies continue to decrease. The compressibility definitely does not increase, but rather slightly decrease or stays the same. The coefficient of friction decreases for the low-copper along with pad and disc wear reduction, and increases for the copper-free along with pad wear increase with no change in disc wear. No obvious correlation emerges between brake squeal and pad hardness, friction coefficient or compressibility.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1911
Philippe Dufrenoy, Vincent Magnier, Yassine WADDAD, Jean-Francois Brunel, Gery DE SAXCE
Abstract During friction it is well known that the real contact area is much lower to the theoretical one and that it evolves constantly during braking. It influences drastically the system’s performance. Conversely the system behavior modifies the loading conditions and consequently the contact surface area. This interaction between scales is well-known for the problematic of vibrations induced by friction but also for the thermomechanical behavior. Indeed, it is necessary to develop models combining a fine description of the contact interface and a model of the whole brake system. This is the aim of the present work. A multiscale strategy is propose to integrate the microscopic behavior of the interface in a macroscopic numerical model. Semi-analytical resolution is done on patches at the contact scale while FEM solution with contact parameters embedded the solution at the microscale is used. Asperities and plateaus are considered at the contact interface.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1922
Yongchang Du, Yujian Wang
Abstract Modelling of disc is crucial in analyzing brake squeal since the disc rotates past the non-rotating pads and the pads are coupled with different areas of the disc at different times. However, in most of the complex eigenvalue analysis of brake squeal, the effect of disc rotation was ignored. This paper proposes a closed-loop coupling model for brake squeal analysis. A modal parameter-based rotating disc model, whose dynamic behavior is represented by rotation speed-dependent equivalent modal parameters, is built through space and time-frequency transformation between reference and moving coordinate systems. The orthogonality of the equivalent modal parameters in state-space is derived. By performing modal synthesis in state-space, the rotating disc is incorporated into brake squeal closed-loop coupling model with other stationary components. Dynamic instability of the system is solved through complex eigenvalue analysis in state-space.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1920
Deaglan O'Meachair, Stamatis Angelinas, Matthew Crumpton, Antonio Rubio Flores, Juan Garcia, Pablo Barles
Abstract Bentley Motors Ltd. has developed a Carbon Silicon Carbide (CSiC) brake system for its Mulsanne product, introduced at 17MY. The CSiC brake system is conceived as a performance brake system, and as such offers notable improvements in brake performance. In developing the brake system, particular focus was placed on meeting the refinement levels required for a premium product, and indeed as the flagship model for Bentley Motors, NVH refinement of the brake system was of particular concern. This paper intends to discuss the technical performance of the brake system and review the NVH performance of the brakes. Particular attention is given to the methodology employed by Bentley Motors Ltd. and IDIADA Automotive Technology S.A. in identifying NVH concerns, and proposing and validating solutions in the field, through extensive NVH endurance runs. The performance of the system is benchmarked against similar systems offered by Bentley Motors.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1921
Yusuke Sunagawa, Tsuyoshi Kondo
Abstract Brake squeal noise is generally classified into two vibration modes of disc. One is called “out-of plane mode” which vibrates in disc’s out-of-plane direction. The other is “In-plane mode” which vibrates in disc’s in-plane direction, it means the disc is contracted partially or is extended. There are few “In-plane noise” analysis reports from Disc pad standpoint, so it has been unclear how disc pad contributes to “In-plane mode” until now. This paper confirms that we successfully analyzed direct pad vibration mode by laser scanning under in-plane mode condition. Based on these results, we assume that pad stiffness affected in-plane mode and carried out validation tests.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1918
Yusuke Aoki, Yasuyuki Kanehira, Yukio Nishizawa
Abstract Brake squeal is an uncomfortable noise that occurs while braking. It is an important issue in automobile quality to prevent brake products from squealing. Brake shims are widely used to reduce squeal occurrence rate. The anti-squeal effect of shims is quantified as damping properties measured with a bending mode tester, instead of repeating many dynamometer tests. However, there are cases where measurement results have less correlation to actual squeal suppression rate. Therefore, the evaluation of the anti-squeal effect with a dynamometer or on an actual car is needed until the best shim can be selected. To improve the predicted accuracy of the anti-squeal effect, the difference between measurement conditions and actual braking conditions of shims, was focused on. The bending mode tester measures loss factor under pressure-free conditions, even though shims are compressed by pistons or cylinders towards the backplate of the pad.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1919
Joo Sang Park, Min Gyu Han, Seon Yeol Oh
Abstract This paper introduces the experimental test results of an investigation to understand the relationship between the leading offset and squeal propensity. In addition Transient Analysis (TA) and Complex Eigenvalue Analysis (CEA) are used simultaneously as a means to compare the experimental approach to two different numerical tools, so evaluating the validity of each theoretical approach. To confirm the CAE results. An ODS was recorded of the brake using a 3D laser scanning vibrometer. Even though the CEA approach is very popular in the study of brake squeal noise, there are some limitations and difficulties in replicating the real phenomenon especially containing unstable behavior. The differences are due to weak pad contact stiffness and friction characteristics which are dependent on the relative interface velocity between pad and rotor. It is necessary to consider stick-slip vibration and time domain analysis in addition.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1814
Maxime Legros, Jean Michel Ville, Solène Moreau, Xavier Carniel, Christophe Lambourg, Guillaume Stempfel
Abstract The new requirements during the first stages of the conception of a HVAC prompt the designer to integrate the acoustic problematic increasingly upstream. The designer needs to select a coherent components’ choice in order to comply with the specifications in terms of aeraulic and acoustic performances. A tool has been created to guide the designer’s choices based on an acoustic synthesis which is a design and/or diagnosis approach used to analyze and predict the acoustic behavior of a complex system. The synthesis is developed in order to propose an approach which considers the integration effects and some interaction effects. The acoustic synthesis results are the starting point of a psycho-acoustic study providing audio samples of the prediction and indications of the HVAC acceptance by the prospective user. Also, one may compare the results of different acoustic synthesis projects to study the influence of the parameters on the acoustic prediction.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1815
Augusto Della Torre, Gianluca Montenegro, Angelo Onorati
Abstract In the last decades numerical simulations have become reliable tools for the design and the optimization of silencers for internal combustion engines. Different approaches, ranging from simple 1D models to detailed 3D models, are nowadays commonly applied in the engine development process, with the aim to predict the acoustic behavior of intake and exhaust systems. However, the acoustic analysis is usually performed under the hypothesis of infinite stiffness of the silencer walls. This assumption, which can be regarded as reasonable for most of the applications, can lose validity if low wall thickness are considered. This consideration is even more significant if the recent trends in the automotive industry are taken into account: in fact, the increasing attention to the weight of the vehicle has lead to a general reduction of the thickness of the metal sheets, due also to the adoption of high-strength steels, making the vibration of the components a non negligible issue.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1812
Saad Bennouna, Solène Moreau, Jean Michel Ville, Olivier Cheriaux
Abstract The noise radiated inside the car cabin depends on many sources such as the embedded equipments like the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) module. An HVAC is a compact and complex system composed of several elements: blower, flaps, thermal exchangers, ducts… Air provided by an HVAC is blown by a blower passing through different components and then distributed to car cabin areas. Interactions between airflow and the HVAC fixed components generate noises that emerge in the car cabin. CEVAS project, managed by the automotive equipment manufacturer Valeo, is aiming to develop a prediction tool which will provide HVAC noise spectrum and sound quality data. The tool is based, in particular, on aeroacoustic characterization of individual elements and associations of elements.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1818
Raimo Kabral, Lin Du, Mats Abom, Magnus Knutsson
Abstract The concept of IC engine downsizing is a well-adapted industry standard, enabling better fuel conversion efficiency and the reduction of tailpipe emissions. This is achieved by utilizing different type of superchargers. As a consequence, the additional charger noise emission, at the IC engine inlet, can become a problem. In order to address such problem, the authors of this work have recently proposed a novel dissipative silencer for effective and robust noise control of the compressor. Essentially, it realizes an optimal flow channel impedance, referred to as the Cremer impedance. This is achieved by means of a straight flow channel with a locally reacting wall consisting of air cavities covered by an acoustic resistance, e.g., a micro-perforated panel (MPP). In this paper, an improved optimization method of this silencer is presented. The classical Cremer impedance model is modified to account for mean flow dependence of the optimal wave number.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1813
Daniela Siano, Fabio Bozza
Abstract The characteristics of the intake system affect both engine power output and gas-dynamic noise emissions. The latter is particularly true in downsized VVA engines, where a less effective attenuation of the pressure waves is realized, due to the intake line de-throttling at part-load. For this engine architecture, a refined air-box design is hence requested. In this work, the Transmission Loss (TL) of the intake air-box of a commercial VVA engine is numerically computed through a 3D FEM approach. Results are compared with experimental data, showing a very good correlation. The validated model is then coupled to an external optimizer (ModeFRONTIERTM) to increase the TL parameter in a prefixed frequency range. The improvement of the acoustic attenuation is attained through a shape deformation of the inner structure of the base device, taking into account constraints related to the device installation inside the engine bay.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1819
Antonio J. Torregrosa, Alberto Broatch, Vincent Raimbault, Jerome Migaud
Abstract Intake noise has become one the main concerns in the design of highly-supercharged downsized engines, which are expected to play a significant role in the upcoming years. Apart from the low frequencies associated with engine breathing, in these engines other frequency bands are also relevant which are related to the turbocharger operation, and which may radiate from the high-pressure side from the compressor outlet to the charge air cooler. Medium frequencies may be controlled with the use of different typologies of resonators, but these are not so effective for relatively high frequencies. In this paper, the potential of the use of multi-layer porous materials to control those high frequencies is explored. The material sheets are located in the side chamber of an otherwise conventional resonator, thus providing a compact, lightweight and convenient arrangement.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1816
Heiki Tiikoja, Fabio Auriemma, Jüri Lavrentjev
Abstract In this paper the propagation of acoustic plane waves in turbulent, fully developed flow is studied by means of an experimental investigation carried out in a straight, smooth-walled duct. The presence of a coherent perturbation, such as an acoustic wave in a turbulent confined flow, generates the oscillation of the wall shear stress. In this circumstance a shear wave is excited and superimposed on the sound wave. The turbulent shear stress is modulated by the shear wave and the wall shear stress is strongly affected by the turbulence. From the experimental point of view, it results in a measured damping strictly connected to the ratio between the thickness of the acoustic sublayer, which is frequency dependent, and the thickness of the viscous sublayer of the turbulent mean flow, the last one being dependent on the Mach number. By reducing the turbulence, the viscous sublayer thickness increases and the wave propagation is mainly dominated by convective effects.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1817
Juergen Veit, Paco Langjahr, Stephan Brandl, Bernhard Graf
Abstract Due to more challenging future emission legislations and the trend towards downsizing, the number of turbocharged (TC) engines, especially petrol engines, is steadily increasing. The usage of TC has high risk to cause different noise phenomena apparent in the vehicle interior which are often perceived as annoying for the passengers. In order to further improve consideration of TC topics in the development, objective judgment and monitoring of TC noise issues is of high importance. Therefore, objective parameters and corresponding tools that are especially focusing on TC noise phenomena have to be developed. One main target of these tools is to deliver an objective TC assessment in an efficient way and with minimum additional effort. Application of the criteria presented in this publication therefore allows acoustic engineers to judge the NVH behavior and annoyance of the TC with respect to its vehicle interior noise contribution.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1822
Drasko Masovic, Franz Zotter, Eugene Nijman, Jan Rejlek, Robert Höldrich
Abstract Radiation of sound from an open pipe with a hot mean flow presents one of the classic problems of acoustics in inhomogeneous media. The problem has been especially brought into focus in the last several decades, in the context of noise control of vehicle exhaust systems and jet engines. However, the reports on the measurements of the radiated sound field are still rare and scattered over different values of subsonic and supersonic flow speeds, cold and hot jets, as well as different sound frequency ranges. This paper focuses on low Mach number values of the mean flow speed and low frequencies of the incident (plane) sound waves inside an unflanged cylindrical pipe with a straight cut. It presents the results of the far-field radiation pattern measurements and compares them with an existing analytical model from the literature. The mean flow inside the pipe reached Mach number values up to 0.25 and temperature up to 300°C.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1823
Andrea Grosso, Martin Lohrmann
Abstract Operational Transfer Path Analysis (OTPA) assess the possible ways of energy to transfer from the various sources of excitation to a given target location. Applied to vehicle engineering, the OTPA provides indication about dominant sources and path contributions. However, it can only analyze the actual system under test and cannot predict if an improvement can be achieved by applying a counter measure. A careful interpretation of the measurement results is therefore necessary in order to define an effective engineering solution strategy. In this paper the RMA (Response Modification Analysis) technique is used to facilitate a sensitivity analysis, gaining insight whether energy is likely to be rerouted. This gives additional understanding of OTPA results, indicating which counter measure is most effective. The RMA is applied to a real measurement scenario, showing the advantage of the combination of OTPA with RMA for correctly identifying the relevant sources and paths.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1820
Mikael Karlsson, Magnus Knutsson, Mats Abom
Abstract This work explores how fluid driven whistles in complex automotive intake and exhaust systems can be predicted using computationally affordable tools. Whistles associated with unsteady shear layers (created over for example side branches or perforates in resonators) are studied using vortex sound theory; vorticity in the shear layer interacts with the acoustic field while being convected across the orifice. If the travel time of a hydrodynamic disturbance over the orifice reasonably matches a multiple of the acoustic period of an acoustic feedback system, energy is transferred from the flow field to the acoustic field resulting in a whistle. The actual amplitude of the whistle is set by non-linear saturation phenomena and cannot be predicted here, but the frequency and relative strength can be found. For this not only the mean flow and acoustic fields needs to be characterized separately, but also the interaction of the two.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1821
Lin Du, Mats Abom, Mikael Karlsson, Magnus Knutsson
Abstract To tune the acoustics of intake systems resonators are often used. A problem with this solution is that the performance of these resonators can be affected a lot by flow. First, for low frequencies (Strouhal-numbers) the acoustic induced vorticity across a resonator inlet opening will create damping, which can reduce the efficiency. Secondly, the vorticity across the opening can also change the end-correction (added mass) for the resonator, which can modify the resonance frequency. However, the largest problem that can occur is whistling. This happens since the vortex-sound interaction across a resonator opening for certain Strouhal-numbers will amplify incoming sound waves. A whistling can then be created if this amplified sound forms a feedback loop, e.g., via reflections from system boundaries or the resonator. To analyse this kind of problem it is necessary to have a model that allows for both sound and vorticity and their interaction.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1830
Denis Blanchet, Luca Alimonti, Anton Golota
Abstract This paper presents new advances in predicting wind noise contribution to interior SPL in the framework of the Wind Noise German Working Group composed of Audi, Daimler, Porsche and VW. In particular, a new approach was developed that allows to fully describe the wind noise source using CFD generated surface pressure distribution and its cross-correlation function and apply this source on an SEA side glass. This new method removes the need to use a diffuse acoustic field or several plane waves with various incidence angle to approximate the correct acoustics source character to apply on the SEA side glass. This new approach results are compared with results previously published which use more deterministic methods to represent the side glass and the interior of a vehicle.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1827
Giorgio Bartolozzi, Marco Danti, Andrea Camia, Davide Vige
Abstract The time to market in the automotive industry is constantly decreasing pushing the carmaker companies to increase the efforts in numerical simulations and to decrease the number of prototypes. In the NVH field, this time constraint reflects in moving the well-established finite element simulations towards the so called “full-vehicle simulations”. Specifically, the CAE techniques should be able to predict the complete behavior of the vehicles in mission conditions, so to reproduce some usual tests, such as the “coast down” test on different roads. The aim of this paper is to present a methodology to improve rolling noise simulations exploiting an integrated full-vehicle approach. An accurate modeling of all the subsystems is needed, with particular attention to the wheels and the suspension systems. Therefore, the paper firstly covers the modeling approach used to obtain the FE models of tires and suspension system.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1825
Jung-Han Woo, Da-Young Kim, Jeong-Guon Ih
Abstract To hear the powerful and spectrally rich sound in a car is costly, because the usual car audio system adopts small loudspeakers. Also, the available positions of the loudspeakers are limited, that may cause the reactive effect from the backing cavity and the sound distortion. In this work, a part of the roof panel of a passenger car is controlled by array actuators to convert the specified large area to be a woofer. An analogous concept of the acoustic holography is employed to be projected as the basic concept of an inverse rendering for achieving a desired vibration field. The vibration of the radiating zone is controlled to be in a uniform phase, and the other parts outside it are to be made a no-change zone in vibration. The latter becomes a baffle for the woofer, and the backing cavity is virtually infinite if the sound radiation into the passenger cabin is only of concern.
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