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Viewing 271 to 300 of 7768
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1776
Alexander Rabofsky, Alexander Koeck, Martin Mittermaier
Abstract Lightweight vehicle design causes special demands for functional NVH design. The reduction of weight by reducing material thickness, enabled by new alloys, the combination of materials and new materials increases the sensitivity of a vehicle body to the vibrational and acoustical response of external forces like powertrain or road and wind excitation. To be able to fully raise lightweight potentials design has to be driven closer to functional boundaries, putting higher demands on the accuracy of the prediction by simulation. For a robust design a very broad view on several loadcases is needed to make sure that by optimization on one target no other target is violated. In this paper, optimization strategies for complex NVH load-cases should be investigated in detail. In reality, load-cases, excitations as well as boundary conditions are very often complex and complicated.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1772
Romualdo Ruotolo, Davide Donna, Giuseppe Credo, Michele Belluscio
Abstract Current Diesel engines development is facing challenging vibro-acoustic requirements and at the same time is struggling with the need to reduce as much as possible the cost and the weight of the engine. The latter obviously has become a key player for fuel consumption reduction. Large covers are commonly used in the base engine design and their noise contribution to total radiated noise is not negligible. Typical covers architecture shows thick cast and ribbed plates, meaning heavy and expensive covers. An interesting option is represented by using thin stamped covers either in aluminum or in steel, that have to show a low vibrational response. The current paper focuses on the structural optimization of such a peculiar design, trying to mitigate as much as possible its noise radiation with the intent to avoid any additional acoustic enabler (e.g. wrapping by means of acoustic foams) that will increase the final cost of the component.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1771
Manish Chhabra
Abstract By reducing overall noise emanating from Engine at design phase, permits to reduce both time-to-market and the cost for developing new engines. In order to reduce vibration and radiated noise in engine assembly, oil pan is one of the most critical components. This study explains the key-steps that are executed to optimize the oil pan design for 4-cylinder diesel engine by improving Normal Modes, modified Topology, reduced Forced Frequency Response and ATV analysis for reducing its noise radiation. Using Multi-body tool crankshaft forces were generated and the FE model of Base Design was analysed for its noise radiation and panel contribution was done for finding the most radiating panels using Boundary Element Method approach. A series of iterative optimization were carried out with commercial software.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1773
Shanjin Wang
Abstract Currently, new technologies in automotive industry are mainly driven by CO2 regulation and fuel economy. For most of the OEMs, the priority is to optimize internal combustion engines, make light-weighting and develop hybrid vehicles or fully electric vehicles. In this context, it is difficult and expensive trying to reach absolute silence in the cars. A good NVH strategy for non-specialist OEMs will be to keep the noise to an acceptable level and make it as homogenous as possible. This article presents several NVH guidelines for the powertrain in order to achieve homogenous noise in the cars. Firstly, master the level of powertrain vibration and maintain it at a suitable level. Secondly, eliminate abnormal noises which are unpleasant and disturbing, such as transient Diesel clatter noise. Thirdly, reduce the levels of emerging noises from powertrain components, such as turbo charger whistling so that they can be masked by background noise.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1837
Stephan Brandl, Werner Biermayer, Bernhard Graf, Thomas Resch
Abstract Due to more stringent emission regulation, especially plug-in hybrid vehicles have an increased attractiveness for OEMs to reduce OEM’s CO2 fleet emission. Generally, hybrid vehicles have a much higher complexity than conventional vehicles. This gives an additional degree of freedom for the development but also increases the number of potential NVH topics dramatically. Therefore, the role of frontloading and early prototype testing is getting even higher importance than in standard developments. Current hybrid vehicles on the market are mainly ICE vehicles with electric boosting or starting functionality only. This however will not be sufficient to fulfill the OEM’s CO2 fleet emission requirements. Future hybrid vehicles will have much higher electrical capabilities and drive much more in pure electric modes. Therefore, the more frequent change between the different driving modes and the related mode transitions will lead to a more complex interior NVH situation.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1838
Janko Slavic, Matija Javorski, Janez Luznar, Gregor Cepon, Miha Boltezar
Abstract In electric motors the working torque results from the magnetic forces (due to the magnetic field). The magnetic forces are also a direct source of structural excitation; further, the magnetic field is an indirect source of structural excitation in the form of magnetostriction. In the last decade other sources of structural excitation (e.g. mechanical imbalance, natural dynamics of the electric motor) have been widely researched and are well understood. On the other hand, the excitation due to the magnetic forces and magnetostriction is gaining interest in the last period; especially in the field of auto-mobility. Due to the broadband properties of the magnetic field (e.g. Pulse-Width-Modulation(PWM), multi-harmonic excitation), the direct structural excitation in the form of magnetic forces is also broadband.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1839
Emar Vegt
Abstract The quiet nature of hybrid and electric vehicles has triggered developments in research, vehicle manufacturing and legal requirements. Currently, three countries require fitting an Approaching Vehicle Alerting System (AVAS) to every new car capable of driving without a combustion engine. Various other geographical areas and groups are in the process of specifying new legal requirements. In this paper, the design challenges in the on-going process of designing the sound for quiet cars are discussed. A proposal is issued on how to achieve the optimum combination of safety, environmental noise, subjective sound character and technical realisation in an iterative sound design process. The proposed sound consists of two layers: the first layer contains tonal components with their pitch rising along with vehicle speed in order to ensure recognisability and an indication of speed.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1842
Ahmed Abbad
Abstract A Helmholtz resonator is a passive acoustic resonator used to control a single frequency resulting from the cavity volume and the resonator neck size. The main purpose of work in progress is to propose to investigate numerically some strategies allowing real-time tunability of the Helmholtz resonator in order to provide a wider bandwidth and hence enhance noise attenuation. Two concepts will be developed, both based on the use of electroactive polymer (EAP) membranes. These materials exhibit a change of shape when stimulated by an electric field. The first concept consists in replacing the resonator rigid back plate by an EAP material membrane, while on the second one, the membrane is located in front of the resonator. Numerical investigations are performed using several kinds of a passive EAPs material membranes in order to determine the practical potential of these concepts.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1826
Roman Gartz, Detlev Rammoser, Matthew Maunder
Abstract The transfer characteristics, location of the mounting points, where the exhaust system is attached to the vehicle structure, and the level of excitation forces have a significant contribution to the overall interior noise. The aim of this study is to define targets for the excitation forces of the exhaust line in order to identify its contribution to the overall vehicle interior cabin noise in the early vehicle concept phase when the hardware is not yet available. Furthermore, psychoacoustic parameters are calculated, e.g. the articulation index which provide a representation of the human hearing perception. Therefore a software tool was developed in MATLAB to cascade the interior noise contributions of the exhaust system using the corresponding transfer paths. This tool enables a quick prediction of different combinations (different hanger stiffness and other parameters) to evaluate the potential for improvements.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1835
Albert Albers, Fabian Schille, Matthias Behrendt
Abstract In terms of customer requirements, driving comfort is an important evaluation criterion. Regarding hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), maneuver-based measurements are necessary to analyze this comfort characteristic [1]. Such measurements can be performed on acoustic roller test benches, yielding time efficient and reproducible results. Due to full hybrid vehicles’ various operation modes, new noise and vibration phenomena can occur. The Noise Vibration Harshness (NVH) performance of such vehicles can be influenced by transient powertrain vibrations e.g. by the starting and stopping of the internal combustion engine in different driving conditions. The paper at hand shows a methodical procedure to measure and analyze the NVH of HEVs in different driving conditions.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1845
Xueji Zhang, ZhongZhe Dong, Martin Hromcik, Kristian Hengster-Movric, Cassio Faria, Herman D. Van der Auweraer, Wim Desmet
Active vibration reduction for lightweight structures has attracted more and more attention in automotive industries. In this paper, reduced-order controllers are designed based on H∞ techniques to realize vibration reduction. A finite element model of piezo-based smart structure is constructed from which a nominal model containing 5 modes and validation model containing 10 modes are extracted. A mixed-sensitivity robust H∞ controller is firstly designed based on the nominal structural model. Considering the ease of controller deployment, an order reduction for the controller is then exploited using balanced truncation method. The effectiveness of the reduced-order controller is finally verified on the validation model via system simulations.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1848
Jean-Loup Christen, Mohamed Ichchou, Olivier Bareille, Bernard Troclet
Abstract The problem of noise transmission through a structure into a cavity appears in many practical applications, especially in the automotive, aeronautic and space industries. In the mean time, there is a trend towards an increasing use of composite materials to reduce the weight of the structures. Since these materials usually offer poor sound insulation properties, it is necessary to add noise control treatments. They usually involve poroelastic materials, such as foams or mineral wools, whose behaviour depends on many parameters. Some of these parameters may vary in rather broad ranges, either because of measurement uncertainties or because their values have not been fixed yet in the design process. In order to efficiently design sound protections, performing a sensitivity analysis can be interesting to identify which parameters have the most influence on the relevant vibroacoustic indicators and concentrate the design effort on them.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1851
Arnaud Duval, Minh Tan Hoang, Valérie Marcel, Ludovic Dejaeger
Abstract The noise treatments weight reduction strategy, which consists in combining broadband absorption and insulation acoustic properties in order to reduce the weight of barriers, depends strongly on surface to volume ratio of the absorbing layers in the reception cavity. Indeed, lightweight technologies like the now classical Absorber /Barrier /Absorber layup are extremely efficient behind the Instrument Panel of a vehicle, but most of the time disappointing when applied as floor insulator behind the carpet. This work aims at showing that a minimum of 20 mm equivalent “shoddy” standard cotton felt absorption is requested for a floor carpet insulator, in order to be able to reduce the weight of barriers. This means that a pure absorbing system that would destroy completely the insulation properties and slopes can only work, if the noise sources are extremely low in this specific area, which is seldom the case even at the rear footwells location.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1850
Christian Thomas, Nouredine Atalla
In passenger aircraft the most important noise control treatment is the primary insulation attached to the fuselage. Next to its acoustic properties the primary insulation main purpose is the thermal insulation and the minimization of condensed water. In general it consists of fibrous materials like glass wool wrapped in a thin foil. Due to stringent flame, smoke and toxicity requirements the amount of available materials is limited. Furthermore the amount of material installed in aircraft per year is much smaller compared to needs in the automotive industry. Therefore the best lay-up of the available materials is needed in terms of acoustics. This paper presents a tool for numerical optimization of the sound insulation package. To find an improved insulation the simulation tool is used in interaction with a measurement database. The databank is constructed from aircraft grade materials such as fibrous materials, foams, resistive screens and impervious heavy layers.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1853
Timo Hartmann, Gregor Tanner, Gang Xie, David J. Chappell
Abstract Car floor structures typically contain a number of smaller-scale features which make them challenging for vibro-acoustic modelling beyond the low frequency regime. The floor structure considered here consists of a thin shell floor panel connected to a number of rails through spot welds leading to an interesting multi-scale modelling problem. Structures of this type are arguably best modelled using hybrid methods, where a Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) description of the larger thin shell regions is combined with a finite element model (FEM) for the stiffer rails. In this way the modal peaks from the stiff regions are included in the overall prediction, which a pure SEA treatment would not capture. However, in the SEA regions, spot welds, geometrically dependent features and directivity of the wave field are all omitted. In this work we present an SEA/FEM hybrid model of a car floor and discuss an alternative model for the SEA subsystem using Discrete Flow Mapping (DFM).
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1800
Xavier Carniel, Anne Sanon
Abstract The control of sound fields radiated by vibrating structures in a passenger compartment, (especially structures connected to different organs like the engine powertrain, the fan motor unit, seats, the steering column, electrical motors more and more, etc.) is among the functions of the automotive manufacturers. The absence of physical prototypes in the development phase systems led OEMs1 to use tests results obtained on benches following technical specifications from manufacturers. The transition "bench to vehicle" for vibro- acoustic behaviour sets many challenges that this standard intends to clear up. This standard specifies the experimental method to transpose the dynamic forces generated by the global movements of an active component between the vehicle and a test bench. The efforts are first measured on test benches and then transposed from test bench towards the vehicle. The standard is now a French standard (XP R 19-701) and is submitted to ISO process [1].
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1786
Per Alenius, Magnus Olsson, Thomas Lindbom
Abstract Highly refined NVH (Noise, Vibration and Harshness) is a key attribute for premium segment passenger cars. All noise sources such as powertrain, tires, wind, climate unit and etc. must be well balanced and at such a low level that the customer expectations are met or exceeded. However, not only are the NVH levels of importance but the character of the noise must also meet the high demands from premium car customers. This is especially true for diesel engines which historically have been more prone to have a less refined engine noise character than petrol engines. This paper will describe an investigation of what is defined as “engine presence” in four-cylinder diesel engine cars. The scope is to define a method for consistent subjective assessment of engine presence and to find the relationship and investigate the correlation between the “perceived loudness”, “perceived harshness” and the overall engine presence interior of the car.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1780
Francesca Ronzio, Theophane Courtois
Abstract In automotive acoustics, body NVH design is traditionally carried out without considering the acoustic trim parts. Nevertheless, the vibro-acoustic interaction of body structure and insulation trim cannot be neglected in the middle frequency range, where structure borne propagation might still be dominating and where classical statistical approaches are generally not able to represent the influence of local changes in stiffness and damping. This, together with the market requirement of lightweight and more efficient sound package solutions, is leading the CAE engineers to evaluate new design approaches dedicated to vehicle components such as dash or floor systems, for which the multi-physics interaction between damping, body stiffness and trim impedance is important.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1832
Ramakrishna Kamath
Intermediate shaft assembly is used to connect steering gear to the steering wheel. The primary function of the intermediate shaft is to transfer torsional loads. There is a high probability of noise propagating through the Intermediate shaft to the driver. The current standard for measuring the noise is by performing vehicle level subjective evaluations. If improperly clamped at either of the yokes, a sudden change in the direction of the torsional load on the Intermediate shaft can generate a displeasing noise. Noise can also be generated from the constant velocity joint. Intermediate shaft noise can be measured using a microphone or can be correlated to acceleration values. The benefit of measuring the acceleration over sound pressure level is the reduction of complexity of the test environment and test set up. The nature of the noise in question requires the filtering of low frequency data. This paper presents a new test procedure that has been developed by General Motors.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1849
Arnaud Caillet, Luca Alimonti, Anton Golota
Abstract The need for the industry to simulate and optimize the acoustic trim parts has increased during the last decade. There are many approaches to integrate the effect of an acoustic trim in a finite element model. These approaches can be very simple and empirical like the classical non-structural mass (NSM) combined to a high acoustic damping value in the receiver cavity to much more detailed and complex approach like the Poro-Elastic Materials (PEM) method using the Biot parameters. The objective of this paper is to identify which approach is the most appropriate in given situations. This article will first make a review of the theory behind the different methods (NSM, Impedances, Transfer Matrix Method, PEM). Each of them will be investigated for the different typical trim families used in the automotive industry: absorber, spring/mass, spring/mass/absorber.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1813
Daniela Siano, Fabio Bozza
Abstract The characteristics of the intake system affect both engine power output and gas-dynamic noise emissions. The latter is particularly true in downsized VVA engines, where a less effective attenuation of the pressure waves is realized, due to the intake line de-throttling at part-load. For this engine architecture, a refined air-box design is hence requested. In this work, the Transmission Loss (TL) of the intake air-box of a commercial VVA engine is numerically computed through a 3D FEM approach. Results are compared with experimental data, showing a very good correlation. The validated model is then coupled to an external optimizer (ModeFRONTIERTM) to increase the TL parameter in a prefixed frequency range. The improvement of the acoustic attenuation is attained through a shape deformation of the inner structure of the base device, taking into account constraints related to the device installation inside the engine bay.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1818
Raimo Kabral, Lin Du, Mats Abom, Magnus Knutsson
Abstract The concept of IC engine downsizing is a well-adapted industry standard, enabling better fuel conversion efficiency and the reduction of tailpipe emissions. This is achieved by utilizing different type of superchargers. As a consequence, the additional charger noise emission, at the IC engine inlet, can become a problem. In order to address such problem, the authors of this work have recently proposed a novel dissipative silencer for effective and robust noise control of the compressor. Essentially, it realizes an optimal flow channel impedance, referred to as the Cremer impedance. This is achieved by means of a straight flow channel with a locally reacting wall consisting of air cavities covered by an acoustic resistance, e.g., a micro-perforated panel (MPP). In this paper, an improved optimization method of this silencer is presented. The classical Cremer impedance model is modified to account for mean flow dependence of the optimal wave number.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1836
Sylvestre Lecuru, Pascal Bouvet, Jean-Louis Jouvray, Shanjin Wang
Abstract The recent use of electric motors for vehicle propulsion has stimulated the development of numerical methodologies to predict their noise and vibration behavior. These simulations generally use models based on an ideal electric motor. But sometimes acceleration and noise measurements on electric motors show unexpected harmonics that can generate acoustic issues. These harmonics are mainly due to the deviation of the manufactured parts from the nominal dimensions of the ideal machine. The rotor eccentricities are one of these deviations with an impact on acoustics of electric motors. Thus, the measurement of the rotor eccentricity becomes relevant to understand the phenomenon, quantify the deviation and then to use this data as an input in the numerical models. An innovative measurement method of rotor eccentricities using fiber optic displacement sensors is proposed.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1823
Andrea Grosso, Martin Lohrmann
Abstract Operational Transfer Path Analysis (OTPA) assess the possible ways of energy to transfer from the various sources of excitation to a given target location. Applied to vehicle engineering, the OTPA provides indication about dominant sources and path contributions. However, it can only analyze the actual system under test and cannot predict if an improvement can be achieved by applying a counter measure. A careful interpretation of the measurement results is therefore necessary in order to define an effective engineering solution strategy. In this paper the RMA (Response Modification Analysis) technique is used to facilitate a sensitivity analysis, gaining insight whether energy is likely to be rerouted. This gives additional understanding of OTPA results, indicating which counter measure is most effective. The RMA is applied to a real measurement scenario, showing the advantage of the combination of OTPA with RMA for correctly identifying the relevant sources and paths.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1830
Denis Blanchet, Luca Alimonti, Anton Golota
Abstract This paper presents new advances in predicting wind noise contribution to interior SPL in the framework of the Wind Noise German Working Group composed of Audi, Daimler, Porsche and VW. In particular, a new approach was developed that allows to fully describe the wind noise source using CFD generated surface pressure distribution and its cross-correlation function and apply this source on an SEA side glass. This new method removes the need to use a diffuse acoustic field or several plane waves with various incidence angle to approximate the correct acoustics source character to apply on the SEA side glass. This new approach results are compared with results previously published which use more deterministic methods to represent the side glass and the interior of a vehicle.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1765
Kelly Savva, Ahmed Haris, Eliot Motato, Mahdi Mohammadpour, Stephanos Theodossiades, Homer Rahnejat, Patrick Kelly, Alexander Vakakis, Lawrence Bergman, Donald McFarland
Abstract Legislation on vehicle emissions and the requirements for fuel efficiency are currently the key development driving factors in the automotive industry. Research activities to comply with these targets point to engine downsizing and new boosting technologies, which have adverse effects on the NVH performance, durability and component life. As a consequence of engine downsizing, substantial torsional oscillations are generated due to high combustion pressures. Meanwhile, to attenuate torsional vibrations, the manufacturers have implemented absorbers that are tuned to certain frequency ranges, including clutch dampers, Dual Mass Flywheel (DMF) and centrifugal pendulum dampers. These devices add mass/inertia to the system, potentially introducing negative effects on other vehicle attributes, such as weight, driving performance and gear shiftability.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1792
Aurélien Lonni, Olivier Tanneau
Abstract Nowadays, downsizing and turbochargers are more frequently used, mostly for petrol engines. It can lead to an increase of NVH issues related to the turbos, such as the hiss noise propagation in the air ducts. Hutchinson, among all its activities, supplies rubber and plastic parts for the car industry, especially in fluid management systems. The turbocharger’s airborne noise issue has now been tackled for ten years by implementing acoustic devices in the line and providing solutions to car manufacturers with our hot-side rubber ducts. In this paper, will be first presented the main HP air loop NVH issues, and then explained an approach to design technical solutions. Generally speaking, the noise propagates inside the hot side air hoses, crosses the weakest parts of the system by acoustic emissivity to reach finally the driver and passengers’ ears.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1803
Hannes Frank, Claus-Dieter Munz
Avoiding narrowband components in the acoustic spectrum is one of the most critical objectives in the automotive aeroacoustic optimization process. The underlying physical mechanisms are not completely understood. In a preceding numerical and experimental investigation, we performed large eddy simulations of an early-development stage realistic side-view mirror, where tonal noise was captured and the principle mechanisms were identified. In this contribution, we present simulations on a simplified two-dimensional geometry that is based on these findings. It is shown that the basic flow topology relevant for tonal noise generation on the original side-view mirror as well as the tonal noise source is reproduced in the 2D case. Furthermore, we present comparisons with measurements and the necessity and influence of a splitter plate downstream of the 2D body to avoid large scale vortex shedding.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1781
Matthew Maunder, Phil Grant, Duncan Mawdsley
Abstract Engine sound quality is a key attribute for sporty cars - it powerfully conveys the brand image to the driver/passengers and onlookers, and provides driver involvement by giving instant feedback about how a car is operating. Providing this has become more difficult with tighter pass-by noise regulations and the near-universal adoption of turbocharging. In the last two decades, sporty sound inside the cabin has been regained using intake sound generator systems that transfer sound more directly to the vehicle interior. The high cost of these systems is more recently driving a move towards electronic Active Sound Design with systems delivering synthetic sound through loudspeakers. However, the purist sports car market perceives this approach to be fake or artificial. An alternative approach is provided by a system for Realistic Augmented Sound by Ricardo (RAS-R) that offers a choice of two realistic engine sound sources.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1770
Insoo Jung, Jaemin Jin, Dongchul Lee, Seunghyun Lee, Seungwook Yang, Kyoungdoug Min
Abstract This paper presents two closed-loop control methods for monitoring and improving the combustion behavior and the combustion noise on two 4-cylinder diesel engines, in which an in-cylinder pressure and an accelerometer transducer are used to monitor and control them. Combustion processes are developed to satisfy the stricter and stricter regulations on emissions and fuel consumption. These combustion processes are influenced by the factors such as engine durability, driving conditions, environmental influences and fuel properties. Combustion noise could be increased by these factors and is detrimental to interior sound quality. Therefore, it is necessary to develop robust combustion behaviors and combustion noise. For this situation, we have developed two closed-loop control methods. Firstly, a method using in-cylinder pressure data was developed for monitoring and improving the combustion noise of a 1.7L engine.
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