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Viewing 1 to 30 of 4656
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1645
Marjorie Myers
Harness and terminal manufacturers are working to support the Automotive industry’s need to reduce energy consumption (and costs) via weight savings initiatives by converting from Cu to Al electrical cables within the traditional open style cable harness termination manufacturing environment. As the Automotive industry is fully aware, terminating nominally same sized Al cable to existing Cu cable designed terminals is neither a functional, nor a reliable, equivalent option – termination design changes are required to be able successfully qualify any such Al cable to Cu terminal connections for Automotive applications. In addition, the harness industry are looking for any new Al ‘open’ crimp termination designs to work well within the existing manufacturing and connector/harness design environment; e.g., ‘open’ crimp termination, on par termination process speed, no post-treatment, etc.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0396
Guobiao Yang, Changqing Du, Dajun Zhou, Hao Wang, Elizabeth Lekarczyk, Lianxiang Yang
Abstract Vehicle weight reduction is a significant challenge for the modern automotive industry. In recent years, the amount of vehicular components constructed from aluminum alloy has increased due to its light weighting capabilities. Automotive manufacturing processes, predominantly those utilizing various stamping applications, require a thorough understanding of aluminum fracture predictions methods, in order to accurately simulate the process using Finite Element Method (FEM) software or use it in automotive engineering manufacture. This paper presents the strain distribution of A5182 aluminum samples after punch impact under various conditions by Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system, its software also measured the complete strain history, in addition to sample curvature after it was impacted; therefore obtaining the data required to determine the amount of side-wall-curl (Aluminum sheet springback) present after formation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0467
Wei Yuan, Brian Jordon, Bita Ghaffari, Harish Rao, Shengyi Li, Min Fan
Abstract Lightweight metals such as Al and Mg alloys have been increasingly used for reducing mass in both structural and non-structural applications in transportation industries. Joining these lightweight materials using traditional fusion welding techniques is a critical challenge for achieving optimum mechanical performance, due to degradation of the constituent materials properties during the process. Friction stir welding (FSW), a solid-state joining technique, has emerged as a promising method for joining these lightweight materials. In particular, high joining efficiency has been achieved for FSW of various Al alloys and Mg alloys separately. Recent work on FSW of dissimilar lightweight materials also show encouraging results based on quasi-static shear performance. However, coach-peel performance of such joints has not been sufficiently examined.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0472
Gyoko Oh
Abstract To prevent corrosion of the inlet part with aqueous ammonia injection, high chromium corrosion-resistant materials have been applied for welded joints of mufflers. Bending fatigue strength of welded joint samples of flange pipes was defined through fatigue experiments, modeling that high fluctuating stresses exist in the inlet and outlet flange pipes of a muffler caused by the vibration of a moving vehicle. Factors that caused fatigue to failure such as welding bead shape and metallographic structure were identified through local stress measurements, FEM stress simulations, microscopic observations, and SEM-EDS composition analyses. By comparing with sample A having a smaller flank angle and sample B having a larger flank angle, the results suggested that the difference of bending fatigue strengths at 200,000 cycles was 24% when based on nominal stress, and the difference was 10% when based on measured maximum stress.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0474
Chady Khalil, Yannick Amosse, Guillaume Racineux
Abstract In this study, a proposed new 3-in-1 process using the magnetic pulse welding (MPW) for welding similar and dissimilar metals and for hybrid joining between FRC and metals is developed. Welding between (a) AA1199 sheets and XES, (b) AA1199 and XSG which is zinc coated steel, (c) 5754-aluminum alloy and XES were performed and (d) hybrid joint between PA66-glass-FRC and 5754-aluminum was achieved. SEM observations and EDX analysis for the weld interface between aluminum and steel showed where detectable very thin layers of intermetallics and the wavy interface pattern typical for impact welding was identified. X-Ray microtomography observation for the joining region in the FRC showed the good state of the composite structure after joining. 3D numerical simulation using LS-Dyna was used for the selection of the welding parameters. Quasi-static lap shear testing for the welds revealed a failure in the weak metal sheet and not in the weld.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0471
Yasuo Kadoya, Yuki Oshino
Abstract By implementation of the core technology of capacitor-resistance welding, RingMash technology, metallic bonding, is developed to manufacture various components. It is the best suited for powertrain components such as transmission gears at low cost. Components made by RingMash are attributed to smaller and lighter transmission. The technology is recommended to manufacture co-axle male-female work pieces bonding, male side diameter is slightly larger than female side hole. RingMashing is a solid state bonding without melting work pieces. The actual RingMashing process is done in ambient atmosphere and does not use filler. RingMashing process itself takes only 100 milliseconds, results very minimum Heat-Affected Zone (HAZ), normally no more than 1 mm. The minimum HAZ achieves excellent structural integration for better performance of transmission. If two work pieces are same metals, spattering free bonding is possible.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0506
Xueyuan Nie, Jimi Tjong
Abstract Ultra-high strength steel (UHSS) and magnesium (Mg) alloy have found their importance in response to automotive strategy of light weighting. UHSS to be metal-formed by hot stamping usually has a hot-dipped aluminum-silicon alloy layer on its surface to prevent the high temperature scaling during the hot stamping and corrosion during applications. In this paper, a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process was used to produce ceramic oxide coatings on aluminized UHSS and Mg with intention to further improve their corrosion resistances. A potentiodynamic polarization corrosion test was employed to evaluate general corrosion properties of the individual alloys. Galvanic corrosion of the aluminized UHSS and magnesium alloy coupling with and without PEO coatings was studied by a zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) test. It was found that the heating-cooling process simulating the hot stamping would reduce anti-corrosion properties of aluminized UHSS due to the outward iron diffusion.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1663
Alan Druschitz, Christopher Williams, Erin Connelly, Bob Wood
Abstract Binder jetting of sand molds and cores for metal casting provides a scalable and efficient means of producing metal components with complex geometric features made possible only by Additive Manufacturing. Topology optimization software that can mathematically determine the optimum placement of material for a given set of design requirements has been available for quite some time. However, the optimized designs are often not manufacturable using standard metal casting processes due to undercuts, backdraft and other issues. With the advent of binder-based 3D printing technology, sand molds and cores can be produced to make these optimized designs as metal castings.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1666
David Weiss, Orlando Rios
Abstract Aluminum alloys containing cerium have excellent castability and retain a substantial fraction of their room temperature strength at temperatures of 200°C and above. High temperature strength is maintained through a thermodynamically trapped, high surface energy intermetallic. Dynamic load partitioning between the aluminum and the intermetallic increases mechanical response. Complex castings have been produced in both permanent mold and sand castings. This versatile alloy system, using an abundant and inexpensive co-product of rare earth mining, is suitable for parts that need to maintain good properties when exposed to temperatures between 200 and 315°C.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1706
Sandeep Bhattacharya, Daniel Green, Raj Sohmshetty, Ahmet Alpas
Abstract Automobile body panels made from advanced high strength steel (AHSS) provide high strength-to-mass ratio and thus AHSS are important for automotive light-weighting strategy. However, in order to increase their use, the significant wear damage that AHSS sheets cause to the trim dies should be reduced. The wear of dies has undesirable consequences including deterioration of trimmed parts' edges. In this research, die wear measurement techniques that consisted of white-light optical interferometry methods supported by large depth-of-field optical microscopy were developed. 1.4 mm-thick DP980-type AHSS sheets were trimmed using dies made from AISI D2 steel. A clearance of 10% of the thickness of the sheets was maintained between the upper and lower dies. The wear of the upper and lower dies was evaluated and material abrasion and chipping were identified as the main damage features at the trim edges.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1708
Saeid Nasheralahkami, Sergey Golovashchenko, Collin Malek, Erika Rugh, Daniel Kowalsky, Weitian Zhou
Abstract In recent years, dual phase (DP) Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) and Ultra High Strength Steels (UHSS) are considered as prominent materials in the automotive industry due to superior structural performance and vehicle weight reduction capabilities. However, these materials are often sensitive to trimmed edge cracking if stretching along sheared edge occurs in such processes as stretch flanging. Another major issue in the trimming of UHSS is tool wear because of higher contact pressures at the interface between cutting tools and sheet metal blank caused by UHSS’s higher flow stresses and the presence of a hard martensitic phase in the microstructure. The objective of the current paper is to study the influence of trimming conditions and tool wear on quality and stretchability of trimmed edge of DP980 steel sheet. For this purpose, mechanically trimmed edges were characterized for DP980 steel and compared with other steels such as HSLA 350 and BH210.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1704
D.J. Branagan, A.E. Frerichs, B.E. Meacham, S. Cheng, A.V. Sergueeva
Abstract Automotive OEMs are compelled by increasingly stringent global emissions standards to find economic solutions for building higher efficiency vehicles without compromising safety and ride quality. This challenge requires new advanced high strength steels (AHSS) that will significantly reduce vehicle weight and improve fuel economy. In addition to providing higher strength, these automotive sheet steels must have exceptional formability to produce reduced gauge parts with increasingly complex geometries. Formability is comprised of two components, global and local. Global formability represents the ability of a sheet material to be deformed under various stress conditions and to be formed into a part without failure. It can be estimated using forming-limit diagrams or ductility measurements from conventional uniaxial tensile tests. However, these tests cannot reliably assess the local formability at the edges or at the internal holes of the blanks during stamping.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1265
Nia R. Harrison, S. George Luckey, Breana Cappuccilli, Ghassan Kridli
Abstract The typical paint bake cycle includes multiple ramps and dwells of temperature through e-coat, paint, and clear coat with exposure equivalent to approximately 190°C for up to 60 minutes. 7xxx-series aluminum alloys are heat treatable, additional thermal exposure such as a paint bake cycle could alter the material properties. Therefore, this study investigates the response of three 7xxx-series aluminum alloys with respect to conductivity, hardness, and yield strength when exposed to three oven curing cycles of a typical automotive paint operation. The results have indicated that alloy composition and artificial aging practice influence the material response to the various paint bake cycles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1272
Nick Parson, Jerome Fourmann, Jean-Francois Beland
Abstract One of the main applications for aluminum extrusions in the automotive sector is crash structures including crash rails, crash cans, bumpers and structural body components. The objective is usually to optimize the energy absorption capability for a given structure weight. The ability to extrude thin wall multi-void extrusions contributes to this goal. However, the alloy used also plays a significant role in terms of the ability to produce the required geometry, strength - which to a large extent controls the energy absorption capability and the “ductility” or fracture behavior which controls the strain that can be applied locally during crush deformation before cracking. This paper describes results of a test program to examine the crush behavior of a range of alloys typically supplied for automotive applications as a function of processing parameters including artificial ageing and quench rate.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1461
Sanketh Gowda, Anindya Deb, Goutham Kurnool, Clifford Chou
Abstract Adhesively bonded steel hat section components have been experimentally studied in the past as a potential alternative to traditional hat section components with spot-welded flanges. One of the concerns with such components has been their performance under axial impact loading as adhesive is far more brittle as compared to a spot weld. However, recent drop-weight impact tests have shown that the energy absorption capabilities of adhesively bonded steel hat sections are competitive with respect to geometrically similar spot-welded specimens. Although flange separation may take place in the case of a specimen employing a rubber toughened epoxy adhesive, the failure would have taken place post progressive buckling and absorption of impact energy.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1271
David Wright, John Henshaw, Nia R. Harrison, S. George Luckey
Abstract High-strength aluminum alloys such as 7075 can be formed using advanced manufacturing methods such as hot stamping. Hot stamping utilizes an elevated temperature blank and the high pressure stamping contact of the forming die to simultaneously quench and form the sheet. However, changes in the thermal history induced by hot stamping may increase this alloy’s stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility, a common corrosion concern of 7000 series alloys. This work applied the breaking load method for SCC evaluation of hot stamped AA7075-T6 B-pillar panels that had been artificially aged by two different artificial aging practices (one-step and two-step). The breaking load strength of the specimens provided quantitative data that was used to compare the effects of tensile load, duration, alloy, and heat treatment on SCC behavior.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1646
David B. Sarraf, Helge Schmidt
Abstract Aluminum wire is receiving increased attention for automotive applications due to the potential for cost and weight savings. Termination of aluminum wire is problematic due to the tenacious surface oxide on the strands. The oxide is an electrical insulator and is difficult to displace during termination. Consequently, many of the strands within a crimped wire bundle can be electrically isolated from the terminal, which can result in higher than expected crimp resistance, less stable crimp resistance, and the potential for excess heating of the termination. Prior solutions employed additives such as brass powder to puncture the oxide film and form a diffusion bond between strands, or features such as screens or serrations that increase wire deformation and displace the oxide mechanically to promote strand-strand bonding. Both solutions have drawbacks. Additives increase cost and process complexity and can serve as contaminants to adjacent processes.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1644
Kinji Taguchi, Misato kusakari, Yasuhiro Akasofu, Jun Yoshimoto
Abstract The weight of wire harnesses increases with the growing number of systems used in the vehicle in recent years. For the purpose of reducing the weight of wire harnesses, aluminum instead of the conventional copper is getting popular as a wire conductor. The conventional Al wire, however, is not able to be used for small gauge wires such as the sizes of 0.35mm2 and 0.5mm2 and wires used in the engine compartment due to its insufficient conductor strength. For this reason, we tried to develop a stronger aluminum alloy that has conductor strength equivalent to or stronger than that of copper. For the first time in the industry, we have successfully developed a high-strength aluminum alloy wire. Starting with the application of 0.35mm2 wire for engine wire harnesses, we began mass production in April 2015. This paper reports the development of high-strength aluminum alloy that can be used for small gauge wires and wires used in the engine compartment.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1705
Hua-Chu Shih, Dajun Zhou, Bruce Konopinski
Abstract The hole piercing process is a simple but important task in manufacturing processes. The quality requirement of the pierced hole varies between different applications. It can be either the size or the edge quality of the hole. Furthermore, the pierced hole is often subject to a secondary forming process, in which the edge stretchability is of a main concern. The recently developed advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and ultra high strength steels (UHSS) have been widely used for vehicle weight reduction and safety performance improvements. Due to the higher strength nature of these specially developed sheet steels, the hole piercing conditions are more extreme and challenging, and the quality of the pierced hole can be critical due to their relatively lower edge stretching limits than those for the conventional low and medium strength steels.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1703
Ryan A. Howell, Richard Gerth
Abstract Fe-Mn-Al-C steel alloys have been previously studied for their potential as an alternative steel alloy for Rolled Homogeneous Armor (RHA). Prior examination of the material system has shown promise in this capacity due to the high strength and reduced density of Mn steels as compared to RHA. The prior tested materials were both wrought and cast versions but were all less than an inch in thickness. The alloy is once again being examined, but this time in thicker wrought plate. The aim of the current body of work is to develop a Military Specification (MIL-SPEC) for this new class of ballistically capable material. For industry and communities interested in such material development, the purpose of this paper, then, is to provide a summary of the processing parameters, the prior ballistic and dynamic material testing, cutting and welding approaches, and the extent of progress on industrial sized thick plate development.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0310
Wei Wu, Dajun Zhou, Donald Adamski, Darryl Young, Yu-Wei Wang
Abstract The die wear up to 80,800 hits on a prog-die setup for bare DP1180 steel was investigated in real production condition. In total, 31 die inserts with the combination of 11 die materials and 9 coatings were evaluated. The analytical results of die service life for each insert were provided by examining the evolution of surface wear on inserts and formed parts. The moments of appearance of die defects, propagation of die defects, and catastrophic failure were determined. Moreover, the surface roughness of the formed parts for each die insert was characterized using Wyko NT110 machine. The objectives of the current study are to evaluate the die durability of various tooling materials and coatings for flange operations on bare DP 1180 steel and update OEM tooling standards based on the experimental results. The current study provides the guidance for the die material and coating selections in large volume production for next generation AHSSs.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0353
Matilde Scurria, Sinem Emre, Benjamin Möller, Rainer Wagener, Tobias Melz
Abstract Manganese sulfides (MnS) are nonmetallic, ductile inclusions with high melting temperature (1610 °C) which improve the machinability and retard the grain growth in steels, in addition of contributing to avoid cracking during hot working. In this paper, the effect of manganese sulfides on the fatigue life of the vanadium micro-alloyed forging steel 38MnVS6 is discussed. Force-controlled fatigue tests are performed on small sized specimens until the crack occurs. The fatigue life of the forged material, presented by Wöhler curves, is considerably reduced at high levels of the nominal stress amplitude compared to the wrought material. Moreover, it is evident that the presence of longer and thinner particles of MnS reduces the scatter band of Wöhler curves and decreases the fatigue strength of the material. This paper presents a first attempt to find a relation between the shape and content of manganese sulfides due to the forging process and the fatigue life of the material.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0342
Benjamin Möller, Alessio Tomasella, Rainer Wagener, Tobias Melz
Abstract The cyclic material behavior is investigated, by strain-controlled testing, of 8 mm thick sheet metal specimens and butt joints, manufactured by manual gas metal arc welding (GMAW). The materials used in this investigation are the high-strength structural steels S960QL, S960M and S1100QL. Trilinear strain-life curves and cyclic stress-strain curves have been derived for the base material and the as-welded state of each steel grade. Due to the cyclic softening in combination with a high load level at the initial load cycle, the cyclic stress-strain curve cannot be applied directly for a fatigue assessment of welded structures. Therefore, the transient effects have been analyzed in order to describe the time-variant material behavior in a more detailed manner. This should be the basis for the enhancement of the fatigue life estimation.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0346
Radwan Hazime, Thomas Seifert, Jeremy Kessens, Frank Ju
Abstract A complete thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) life prediction methodology is developed for predicting the TMF life of cast iron cylinder heads for efficient heavy duty internal combustion engines. The methodology uses transient temperature fields as thermal loads for the non-linear structural finite-element analysis (FEA). To obtain reliable stress and strain histories in the FEA for cast iron materials, a time and temperature dependent plasticity model which accounts for viscous effects, non-linear kinematic hardening and tension-compression asymmetry is required. For this purpose a unified elasto-viscoplastic Chaboche model coupled with damage is developed and implemented as a user material model (USERMAT) in the general purpose FEA program ANSYS. In addition, the mechanism-based DTMF model for TMF life prediction developed in Part I of the paper is extended to three-dimensional stress states under transient non-proportional loading conditions.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0349
Thomas Seifert, Philipp von Hartrott, Kristopher Boss, Paul Wynthein
Abstract Cast iron materials are used as materials for cylinder heads for heavy duty internal combustion engines. These components must withstand severe cyclic mechanical and thermal loads throughout their service life. While high-cycle fatigue (HCF) is dominant for the material in the water jacket region, the combination of thermal transients with mechanical load cycles results in thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) of the material in the fire deck region, even including superimposed TMF and HCF loads. Increasing the efficiency of the engines directly leads to increasing combustion pressure and temperature and, thus, lower safety margins for the currently used cast iron materials or alternatively the need for superior cast iron materials. In this paper (Part I), the TMF properties of the lamellar graphite cast iron GJL250 and the vermicular graphite cast iron GJV450 are characterized in uniaxial tests and a mechanism-based model for TMF life prediction is developed for both materials.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0390
Muhamamd Yasir, Helmut Wieser, Daniel Knoll, Simon Burger
Abstract The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of material and design selection for future light weight exhaust systems. Material validation for new components usually requires various types of tests on different types of test coupons. There are varieties of corrosion test methods which are in practice since years now. Majority of these testing approaches are used to make relative ranking among different materials. In most of these tests a correlation between testing and field behavior is missing. There is also no test available in which both external as well as internal corrosion can be realized simultaneously. Additionally, none of these corrosion tests cover the design aspects of the components. To combat this challenge Faurecia has built and validated a corrosion test setup where complete exhaust silencer can be tested near to real conditions. A comparative study was performed between field parts and test parts to validate the test cycle.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0399
Mohammed Yusuf Ali, Wei-Jen Lai, Nikhil Kotasthane, Jagadish Sorab, Chari Sever, Jwo Pan
Abstract In this paper, the results of finite element analyses for nodular cast irons with different volume fractions of graphite particles based on an axisymmetric unit cell model under uniaxial compression and tension are presented. The experimental compressive stress-strain data for a nodular cast iron with the volume fraction of graphite particles of 4.5% are available for use as the baseline material data. The elastic-plastic stress-strain relation for the matrix of the cast iron is estimated based on the experimental compressive stress-strain curve of the cast iron with the rule of mixture. The elastic-plastic stress-strain relation for graphite particles is obtained from the literature. The compressive stress-strain curve for the cast iron based on the axisymmetric unit cell model with the use of the von Mises yield function was then obtained computationally and compared well with the compressive stress-strain relation obtained from the experiment.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0372
Guang Cheng, Kyoo Sil Choi, Xiaohua Hu, Xin Sun
Abstract For multiphase advanced high strength steels (AHSS), the constituent phase properties play a crucial role in determining the overall mechanical behaviors. Therefore, it is important to accurately measure/estimate the constituent phase properties in the research of AHSS. In this study, a new nanoindentation-based inverse method that we developed was adopted in estimating the phase properties of a low alloy Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P) steel. A microstructure-based Finite Element (FE) model was also generated based on the Electron BackScatter Diffraction (EBSD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of the Q&P steel. The phase properties estimated from nanoindentation were first compared with those estimated from in-situ High Energy X-Ray Diffraction (HEXRD) test and, then, employed in the generated FE model to examine whether they can be appropriately used as the input properties for the model.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0478
Pai-Chen Lin, WeiNing Chen
Abstract Fatigue analysis of swept friction stir clinch (Swept-FSC) joints between 6061-T6 aluminum (Al) and S45C steel (Fe) sheets was conducted through experimental approaches. Before fatigue tests, a parametric study for the probe geometry of FSC tools was conducted in order to eliminate the hook structure inside the joint and improve the mechanical performance of the joint. Then a series of quasi-static and fatigue tests for Al/Fe Swept-FSC joints in lap-shear (LP) and cross-tension (CT) specimens were conducted. The fatigue data were recorded. The fatigue behavior of Al/Fe Swept-FSC joints in LP and CT specimens were examined through optical and scanning electron microscopes. Experimental results indicated that LP specimens have two failure modes, while CT specimens have only one failure mode. The dominant fatigue crack of each failure mode was identified.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1665
Qigui Wang, Peggy Jones, Yucong Wang, Dale Gerard
Abstract With the increasing use of aluminum shape castings in structural applications in automobiles, assurance of cast product integrity and performance has become critical in both design and manufacturing. In this paper, the latest understanding of the relationship between casting quality and mechanical properties of aluminum castings is summarized. Examples of newly developed technologies for alloy design, melting and melt treatment, casting and heat treatment processes in aluminum casting are reviewed. Robust design and development of high integrity aluminum castings through an Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) approach is also discussed.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 4656