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Viewing 1 to 30 of 2475
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2139
Guy Fortin
Abstract This paper reviews the current knowledge on super-hydrophobic coatings (SHC). Using an ideal super-hydrophobic surface patterned with identical cylindrical flathead posts forming a square network with constant periodicity, models are proposed to explain SHC, wear and ice adherence on SHC. The models demonstrate that SHC based on Cassie-Baxter state improve the bead mobility compared to SHC based on Wenzel state and more suitable for aircraft application. Their erosion resistance can be improved by increasing the post height and the hydrophobic material thickness. Their ice adhesion reduction factor (IARF) is better but SHC based on Cassie-Baxter state have a limitation to reduce ice adherence dependence on the surface pattern and IARF of the hydrophobic material. The bead mobility is calculated from advancing and receding water contact angles (WCA).
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2151
Hong huang, Qingyun Zhao, Fenglei Liu, Huadong Liu
Abstract:Split-sleeve cold expansion processing was employed on the 2024-T3 aluminum alloy plate. Fatigue lives were compared according different expansion, then the relationship of fatigue life and expansion was analyzed. Residual stresses were measured with different expension,and the fatigue fractograph was analyzed by SEM. The results show that the split-sleeve cold expansion can obtain longer life compared with the non strengthened hole. The maximum fatigue life increased to 12 times with 6% expansion. When over 6% expansion, fatigue life began to decrease. The split-sleeve cold expansion can form beneficial rasidual compressive stress,and deferred the fatigue crack initiation. The fatigue fractograph shows mixed transgranular fracture.
2017-09-19
Journal Article
2017-01-2152
Sean Taklimi, Ali Ghazinezami, Kim Cluff PhD, Davood Askari
Abstract The use of nanomaterials and nanostructures have been revolutionizing the advancements of science and technology in various engineering and medical fields. As an example, Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) have been extensively used for the improvement of mechanical, thermal, electrical, magnetic, and deteriorative properties of traditional composite materials for applications in high-performance structures. The exceptional materials properties of CNTs (i.e., mechanical, magnetic, thermal, and electrical) have introduced them as promising candidates for reinforcement of traditional composites. Most structural configurations of CNTs provide superior material properties; however, their geometrical shapes can deliver different features and characteristics. As one of the unique geometrical configurations, helical CNTs have a great potential for improvement of mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymeric resin composites.
2017-09-19
Journal Article
2017-01-2153
Patrick Land, Petros Stavroulakis, Richard Crossley, Patrick Bointon, Harvey Brookes, Jon Wright, Svetan Ratchev, David Branson
Abstract Inspection of Composite panels is vital to the assessment of their ability to be fit for purpose. Conventional methods such as X-ray CT and Ultrasonic scanning can be used, however, these are often expensive and time consuming processes. In this paper we investigate the use of off-the-shelf Non-Destructive Test, NDT, equipment utilizing Fringe projection hardware and open source software to rapidly evaluate a series of composite panels. These results are then verified using destructive analysis of the panels to prove the reliability of the rapid NDT methods for use with carbon composite panels. This process allows us to quickly identify regions of geometric intolerance or formed defects without the use of expensive sub-surface scanning systems, enabling a fast and cost effective initial part evaluation system. The focus of this testing series is on 6mm thick pre-preg carbon-epoxy composite laminates that have been laid up using AFP and formed using TRF.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2148
Ho-Sung Lee
In this paper, manufacturing of launcher structural components with superplastic forming (SPF) and solid state welding technologies is presented with several examples. Some of high strength aerospace alloys, like aluminum, titanium and superalloys, are known to have superplasticity so that complex shapes of aerospace components can be produced with this technology. A combination of superplastic forming and solid state welding processes produces lighter and stiffer components than one manufactured with conventional machining and welding. Solid state welding is an attractive method to weld materials without melting where mechanical properties are important since the welding interface is homogeneous without liquid phases.
2017-09-19
Journal Article
2017-01-2142
Brandon Mahoney, Jamie Marshall, Thomas Black, Dennis Moxley
The supersession of metallic alloys with lightweight, high-strength composites is popular in the aircraft industry. However, aviation electronic enclosures for large format batteries and high power conversion electronics are still primarily made of aluminum alloys. These aluminum enclosures have attractive properties regrading structural integrity for the heavy internal parts, electromagnetic interference (EMI) suppression, electrical bonding for the internal cells, and/or electronics and failure containment. This paper details a lightweight carbon fiber composite chassis developed at Meggitt Sensing Systems (MSS) Securaplane, with a copper metallic mesh co-cured onto the internal surfaces resulting in a 50% reduction in weight when compared to its aluminum counterpart. In addition to significant weight reduction, it provides equal or improved performance with respect to EMI, structural and flammability performance.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2029
Thibaut BILLARD, Cedric Abadie, Bouazza Taghia
Abstract The present paper reports non-electrically intrusive partial discharge investigations on aeronautic and electric vehicle motors fed by SiC inverter drive under variable environmental conditions. A representative test procedure and experimental set-up based on operating aeronautic conditions are essential to ensure the accuracy and reliability of partial discharge test on aircraft systems to make informed decisions on insulation system design choice. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of partial discharge test of the insulation system on a different type of motor under such conditions, both electrically and environmentally. To do so, the paper will start by detailing the innovative experimental set-up to be used in the study. It mainly consists in a high-voltage (1000V) inverter drive using SiC components to provide fast rise time surges.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2053
Jim Stabile
Since oxygen has been a part of the aircraft system it has always been managed using a difficult metric to understand.......PSI. Today's technology has allowed us to efficiently and inexpensively convert PSI into a timed based metric which allows for improved oxygen management and a method which provides an interface between two important energy aircraft resources (fuel and oxygen). These resources have inverse consumption rates tied directly to the altitude of the aircraft. Using time as the management metric, the pilot can balance these 2 resources during any oxygen contingency by varying the altitude of the aircraft.. This allows for regulatory fuel savings and an increase in operational safety This program diverges from traditional thinking in that it applies an information and skill based solution to a system that has otherwise been viewed as a hardware problem.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2058
Francesco Noziglia, Paolo Rigato, Enrico Cestino, Giacomo Frulla, Alfredo Arias-Montano
Abstract Innovative aircraft design studies have noted that uncertainty effects could become significant and greatly emphasized during the conceptual design phases due to the scarcity of information about the new aero-structure being designed. The introduction of these effects in design methodologies are strongly recommended in order to perform a consistent evaluation of structural integrity. The benefit to run a Robust Optimization is the opportunity to take into account uncertainties inside the optimization process obtaining a set of robust solutions. A major drawback of performing Robust Multi-Objective Optimization is the computational time required. The proposed research focus on the reduction of the computational time using mathematic and computational techniques. In the paper, a generalized approach to operate a Robust Multi-Objective Optimization (RMOO) for Aerospace structure using MSC software Patran/Nastran to evaluate the Objectives Function, is proposed.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2077
John McClelland, Michael Morgan, Caroline McClory, Colm Higgins, Rory Collins, Adrian Murphy, Yan Jin
The need to drill several million holes per aircraft through composite and hybrid material stacks is a large challenge for the aerospace assembly process. The ability to produce high quality holes for the lowest tooling costs is at the forefront of requirements for aircraft assembly factories worldwide. Consequently, much research has been conducted into tool design and development, however, the effect of drilling platform characteristics has not been well covered in literature. Respectively, this research has compared the drilling abilities of a 5-axis precision CNC platform, a hybrid parallel kinematic machine and an articulated robotic arm fitted with a drilling module. In-process force measurement and post process hole and tool analysis methods were used to better understand the effect of static and dynamic platform characteristics on the achievable hole quality, cycle time and tool wear when drilling aerospace metal alloy stacks.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2124
Violet Leavers
Abstract Within the aviation industry analysis of wear debris particles recovered from magnetic plugs and lubricating fluids is an essential condition monitoring tool. However, in large organisations, high staff turnover in remote work environments often leaves dangerous gaps in on-site support and background knowledge. The current work develops interactive software for wear debris particle classification, root cause diagnosis and serviceability prognostics. During the research several hundred wear debris particle images were collected, analysed and classified by a number of experts. At each stage of the analysis the experts were questioned about the knowledge and experience used to make their diagnoses and prognoses. The end result is an extensive knowledge base representing the combined expertise of a number of highly trained engineers, each with decades of hands-on experience.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2123
Violet Leavers
Abstract The need to maintain aircraft in remote, harsh environments poses significant challenges. For example, in desert assignments or on-board carrier vessels where frequent rotation of staff with variable levels of skill and experience requires condition monitoring equipment that is not only robust and portable but also user friendly and requiring a minimum of training and skill to set up and use correctly. The mainstays of any on-site aircraft maintenance program are various fluid and particulate condition monitoring tests that convey information about the current mechanical state of the system. In the front line of these is the collection and analysis of wear debris particles retrieved from a component’s lubricating or power transmission fluid or from magnetic plugs. It is standard practice within the specialist laboratory environment to view and image wear debris using a microscope.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2050
Piotr Synaszko, Michal Salacinski, Patryk Ciezak
Abstract The work concerns the selection of measurement parameters for selected non-destructive testing methods of Mi helicopter rotor blades after repair. Considered repair cases involve metal cracks in the sandwich skin and repair damage of honeycomb structure (puncture, dent). In the event of a crack, repair is performed by applying a composite-metal repair package. In case of damage of the core, its broken piece is replaced by a new one and then applied the same metal-composite package as in the case of crack repair. The present work focuses on detecting disbond between skin and core below repair patch and cracks under the repair package. Detecting cracks and assessing their length is important because the repair technology provides the repair package without removing of cracked part of skin. Authors have used laser shearography and C-scan methods for MIA and ET.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2060
Joseph Dygert, Patrick Browning, Magdalena Krasny
Abstract The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has seen significantly increased levels of interest for its applications to various aerodynamic problems. The DBD produces stable atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma with highly energetic electrons and a variety of ions and neutral species. The resulting plasma often degrades the dielectric barrier between the electrodes of the device, ultimately leading to actuator failure. Several researchers have studied a variety of parameters related to degradation and time-dependent dielectric breakdown of various polymers such as PMMA or PVC that are often used in actuator construction. Many of these studies compare the degradation of these materials to that of borosilicate glass in which it is claimed that there is no observable degradation to the glass. Recent research at West Virginia University has shown that certain actuator operating conditions can lead to degradation of a glass barrier and can ultimately result in failure.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2130
Yucheng Liu, Thomas Sippel, Ge He
Abstract Oven and flame tests were designed and conducted to evaluate the heat resistance of a ceramic coating material, Cerakote C-7700Q, and evaluate its viability to replace the intumescent coating as one painting material for helicopter engine cowlings. The test results showed that the currently used painting scheme of the engine cowlings failed the 220°C oven test while after replacing the epoxy seal coat with the Cerakote, the new painting system passed the 220°C test in regards to painting bubbling. This study explained why serious appearance defects occurred in the inner skin of the engine cowling when the aircraft is hovering and suggested that one most time- and cost-effective solution is to repaint the current engine cowlings with a new three coating system of Cerakote, surface protection HS7072-622, and intumescent paint as a fireproof lacquer.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2086
Justin Lo
Abstract The fast growth of air traffic and the need for lighter and more fuel efficient aircraft is driving the ramp-up of important new aircraft programs. These increases in production rates are driving manufacturers to seek out robust and reliable installation systems. They must also adapt to the unique requirements of composite materials that now have an increasingly important place in the aerospace industry. Moreover, environmental constraints continue to evolve and drive new regulations, such as REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) in Europe. As an example, this regulation is leading to the adoption of non-chromate surface treatments and paints for most applications. The legacy generation of fasteners does not comply with all of these new requirements.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2087
Peter Mueller-Hummel, Alex Hjorten
Abstract This article characterizes the special features of machining composite in comparison to machining metal. Simplified theoretic models will demonstrate how CFRP should be machined without delamination, burn marks and cutting tool breakages. Different strategies can be chosen depending on the material removal rate. The paper will present, based on this analytical approach, how milling cutters should be designed for optimal trimming, and how a drill should be designed in order to avoid the entrance, inner and exit delamination. While entrance and exit delamination is well understood, the paper will focus more to the delamination inside the bore. The appearance and the avoidance of the so called "Volcano Effect" and the reason why holes in composite becomes smaller after a couple of days will be explained. The comparison between 4 different cutting tool technologies will prove and give a better understanding how to use this theoretical approach.
2017-09-19
Journal Article
2017-01-2154
Alan Hiken
Abstract A review of critical technologies and manufacturing advances that have enabled the evolution of the composite fuselage is described. The author’s perspective on several development, military, and production programs that have influenced and affected the current state of commercial fuselage production is presented. The enabling technologies and current approaches being used for wide body aircraft fuselage fabrication and the potential reasons why are addressed. Some questions about the future of composite fuselage are posed based on the lessons learned from today and yesterday.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2149
Cameron S. Gillespie
Abstract As carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) become more integrated into the design of large single piece aircraft structures, aircraft manufacturers are demanding higher speed and efficiency in Automated Fiber Placement (AFP) deposition systems. To facilitate the manufacturing of large surface area and low contour parts (wing skins, in this case) at a high production rate, Electroimpact has developed a new AFP head consisting of 20 1.5 inch wide pre-impregnated carbon tows. The new head design has been named the ‘OH20’, short for ‘One and a Half Inch, 20 Tows’. This AFP head format creates a deposition swath over 30 inches wide when all 20 tows are active. A total of four of these AFP heads have been integrated with a quick change robotic tool changer on two high speed, high acceleration, and high accuracy moving beam gantries.
2017-08-09
Tech Insights
TI-0001
As the aerospace industry continues on its quest for ever-increased efficiency, so goes the quest for ever-more composite content on aircraft. And with it, more opportunities to repair it. Typical composite panel fiber reinforcements are carbon, aramid, and fiberglass. The machining techniques for these typical composite materials are similar, but minor differences exist, such as the style of cutting tool or drill bit. Automated drilling methods that may be used during original manufacture are rarely used in typical composite repair situations.
2017-06-29
Journal Article
2017-01-9453
Tobias Hoernig
Abstract Within the scope of today’s product development in automotive engineering, the aim is to produce lighter and solid parts with higher capabilities. On the one hand lightweight materials such as aluminum or magnesium are used, but on the other hand, increased stresses on these components cause higher bolt forces in joining technology. Therefore screws with very high strength rise in importance. At the same time, users need reliable and effective design methods to develop new products at reasonable cost in short time. The bolted joints require a special structural design of the thread engagement in low-strength components. Hence an extension of existing dimensioning of the thread engagement for modern requirements is necessary. In the context of this contribution, this will be addressed in two ways: on one hand extreme situations (low strength nut components and high-strength fasteners) are considered.
2017-06-26
White Paper
WP-0001
NASA has embarked on an ambitious program to integrate additive manufacturing techniques and to develop processes for the microgravity environment. The most recent example of this program is the successful launch and deployment of the first 3D printer on the International Space Station. In this one-year effort, students were required to meet a series of milestones to design, manufacture, and test their ideas in close cooperation with members of the NASA Exploration Augmentation Module (EAM) concept team.The participants in this project were tasked with thinking of new solutions using AM that would simultaneously be recyclable with minimal loss in mechanical properties but also have the capacity for high mechanical properties. Working in interdisciplinary teams, the participant teams investigated the use of recycled materials, characterization, testing, modeling, and tool development.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1765
Albert Allen, Noah Schiller, Jerry Rouse
Abstract Corrugated-core sandwich structures with integrated acoustic resonator arrays have been of recent interest for launch vehicle noise control applications. Previous tests and analyses have demonstrated the ability of this concept to increase sound absorption and reduce sound transmission at low frequencies. However, commercial aircraft manufacturers often require fibrous or foam blanket treatments for broadband noise control and thermal insulation. Consequently, it is of interest to further explore the noise control benefit and trade-offs of structurally integrated resonators when combined with various degrees of blanket noise treatment in an aircraft-representative cylindrical fuselage system. In this study, numerical models were developed to predict the effect of broadband and multi-tone structurally integrated resonator arrays on the interior noise level of cylindrical vibroacoustic systems.
2017-04-11
Journal Article
2017-01-9450.01
Ali Reza Taherkhani, Carl A. Gilkeson PhD, Philip Gaskell PhD, Rob W. Hewson PhD, Vassili Toropov PhD, Amin Rezaienia PhD, Harvey Thompson
ABSTRACT
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1304
Alejandro Rosas Vazquez, Fernando Paisano, Diego Santillan Gutierrez
Abstract For many years, the use of in-mold fasteners has been avoided for various reasons including: not fully understanding the load cases in the part, the fear of quality issues occurring, the need for servicing, or the lack of understanding the complexity of all failure modes. The most common solution has been the use of secondary operations to provide attachments, such as, screws, metal clips, heat staking, sonic welding or other methods which are ultimately a waste in the process and an increase in manufacturing costs. The purpose of this paper is to take the reader through the design process followed to design an in-molded attachment clip on plastic parts. The paper explores the design process for in-molded attachment clips beginning with a design concept idea, followed by basic concept testing using a desktop 3D printer, optimizing the design with physical tests and CAE analysis, and finally producing high resolution 3D prototypes for validation and tuning.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0279
Onkar P Bhise, S Ravishankar
Abstract Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is used extensively as the inner tube material in various Aerospace and Industrial hose constructs. The fluoropolymer exhibits various unique mechanical properties from other fluoropolymers including chemical inertness, non-adhesiveness and low friction coefficient making it an attractive solution for hose applications. PTFE material can be modeled using various material modeling approaches including linear-elastic, hyperelastic and viscoplastic depending on the level of accuracy required in predicting material response. Fluoropolymers, like PTFE, are considered viscoelastic-viscoplastic materials. In other words, the material exhibits both viscous and elastic characteristics when undergoing deformation but also possesses behavior in which the deformation of the material also depends on the rate by which loads are applied.
2016-12-21
Journal Article
2016-01-9082
Bradley Michael, Rani Sullivan, Dulip Samaratunga, Ratneshwar Jha
Abstract Polymer matrix composites are increasingly adopted in aerospace and automotive industries due to their many attributes, such as their high strength to weight ratio, tailorability, and high fatigue and durability performance. However, these materials also have complex damage and failure mechanisms, such as delaminations, which can severely degrade their strength and fatigue performance. To effectively and safely use composite materials in primary structures, it is essential to assess composite damage response for development of accurate predictive models. Therefore, this study focuses on determining the response of damaged and undamaged carbon epoxy beams subjected to vibration loadings at elevated temperatures. The Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) technique is used to analyze the beams’ modal response. The HHT shows potential in identifying the nonlinear damaged response of the beams.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2101
Burak Deger, Fazli Melemez, Aykut Kibar lng
Abstract A hybrid drilling process of multi material stacks with one shot drilling recently emerge as an economical and time efficient method in aerospace industry. Even though the comprehensive experience and knowledge is available for the cutting parameters of composites and metals alone, significant gap exist for the hybrid drilling parameters. Determination of these parameters such as feed rate, spindle speed and pecking depth has vital importance so as to provide a robust and optimal process to ensure dimensionally high quality, burr and delamination free holes. Main challenge of hybrid drilling operation is to obtain required hole diameter with adequate homogeneity and repeatability. In this study, effect of cutting parameters on dimensional hole quality was investigated. In addition to the hole diameter tolerances, CFRP hole enlargement phenomena which is encountered as a specific drawback of metal-exit stack configurations is also addressed within the scope of this study.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-2112
Hilmar Apmann
Abstract As a new material FML, made by aluminum foils and Glasfiber-Prepreg, is a real alternative to common materials for fuselages of aircrafts like monolithic aluminum or CFRP. Since experiences within A380 this material has some really good advantages and develops to the status as alternative to aluminum and composite structures. To become FML as a real alternative to aluminum and carbon structures there are many things to improve: design, material, costs and process chain. So following one of the main goals for an industrial application for high production rates of aircrafts is the automation of production processes inside the process chain for FML-parts like skins and panels for fuselages. To reach this goal for high production rates first steps of automation inside this new process chain have been developed in the last two years. Main steps is the automated lay-up of metallic foils and Glasfiber-Prepreg.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-2116
Peter Mueller-Hummel
Abstract Drilling holes into metal with MQL (Minimal Quantity Lubrication) is a normal procedure, because the drill is designed for drilling metal and the malleable capability of the metal compensates for the insufficient cutting capability of a worn out drill. Drilling composite materials using the same drill (designed for drilling metal) is a different procedure, because composite fibers are not malleable like metal at all. Due to this fact the tools become very hot trying to forge composite fibers like metal. The elastic behavior of the composite and the delamination inside the hole makes the tool temporary smaller than the diameter of the drill. The hole in the metal part of the stack remains slightly larger due to the heat and the thermal expansion rate. This paper shows how to drill metal and composite with the same diameter, so that achieving H8 quality is no longer a dream.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2475