Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 271 to 300 of 15907
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-2112
Hilmar Apmann
Abstract As a new material FML, made by aluminum foils and Glasfiber-Prepreg, is a real alternative to common materials for fuselages of aircrafts like monolithic aluminum or CFRP. Since experiences within A380 this material has some really good advantages and develops to the status as alternative to aluminum and composite structures. To become FML as a real alternative to aluminum and carbon structures there are many things to improve: design, material, costs and process chain. So following one of the main goals for an industrial application for high production rates of aircrafts is the automation of production processes inside the process chain for FML-parts like skins and panels for fuselages. To reach this goal for high production rates first steps of automation inside this new process chain have been developed in the last two years. Main steps is the automated lay-up of metallic foils and Glasfiber-Prepreg.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-2119
Gergis W. William, Samir N. Shoukry, Jacky C. Prucz, Mariana M. William
Abstract Air cargo containers are used to load freight on various types of aircrafts to expedite their handling. Fuel cost is the largest contributor to the total cost of ownership of an air cargo container. Therefore, a better fuel economy could be achieved by reducing the weight of such containers. This paper aims at developing innovative, lightweight design concepts for air cargo containers that would allow for weight reduction in the air cargo transportation industry. For this purpose, innovative design and assembly concepts of lightweight design configurations of air cargo containers have been developed through the applications of lightweight composites. A scaled model prototype of a typical air cargo container was built to assess the technical feasibility and economic viability of creating such a container from fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials. The paper is the authoritative source for the abstract.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-2118
Patrick Land, Luis De Sousa, Svetan Ratchev, David Branson, Harvey Brookes, Jon Wright
Abstract With increased demand for composite materials in the aerospace sector there is a requirement for the development of manufacturing processes that enable larger and more complex geometries, whilst ensuring that the functionality and specific properties of the component are maintained. To achieve this, methods such as thermal roll forming are being considered. This method is relatively new to composite forming in the aerospace field, and as such there are currently issues with the formation of part defects during manufacture. Previous work has shown that precise control of the force applied to the composite surface during forming has the potential to prevent the formation of wrinkle defects. In this paper the development of various control strategies that can robustly adapt to different complex geometries are presented and compared within simulated and small scale experimental environments, on varying surface profiles.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-2126
Ali Mohamed Abdelhafeez, Sein Leung Soo, David Aspinwall, Anthony Dowson, Dick Arnold
Abstract Despite the increasing use of carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites, titanium and aluminium alloys still constitute a significant proportion of modern civil aircraft structures, which are primarily assembled via mechanical joining techniques. Drilling of fastening holes is therefore a critical operation, which has to meet stringent geometric tolerance and integrity criteria. The paper details the development of a three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model for drilling aerospace grade aluminium (AA7010-T7451 and AA2024-T351) and titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloys. The FE simulation employed a Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian (CEL) technique. The cutting tool was modelled according to a Lagrangian formulation in which the mesh follows the material displacement while the workpiece was represented by a non-translating and material deformation independent Eulerian mesh.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2124
Sara Nilsson, Jonas Jensen, Mats Björkman, Erik Sundin
Abstract Carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) is one of the most commonly used materials in the aerospace industry today. CFRP in pre-impregnated form is an anisotropic material whose properties can be controlled to a high level by the designer. Sometimes, these properties make the material hard to predict with regards to how the geometry affects manufacturing aspects. This paper describes eleven design rules originating from different guidelines that describe geometrical design choices and deals with manufacturability problems that are connected to them, why they are connected and how they can be minimized or avoided. Examples of design choices dealt with in the rules include double curvature shapes, assembly of uncured CFRP components and access for non-destructive testing (NDT). To verify the technical content and ensure practicability, the rules were developed by, inter alia, studying literature and performing case studies at SAAB Aerostructures.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-8066
Marco Maurizi, Daniel Hrdina
Abstract Total cost of ownership is requiring further improvements to piston friction reduction as well as additional gains in thermal efficiency. A piston compression height reduction in combination with carbon based piston pin coatings is enabling advancements in both demands. MAHLE implemented a new innovative metal joining technology by using laser welding to generate a cooling gallery. The MonoLite concept offers design flexibility which cannot be matched by any other welding process. Especially an optimum design and position of the cooling gallery as well as durability for very high peak cylinder pressures can be matched. This is particularly advantageous for complex combustion bowl geometries that are needed in modern diesel engines to meet fuel economy and emission requirements. The MonoLite steel piston technology offers a superior compression height reduction potential compared to typical friction welded designs.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2125
Henry Hameister
This paper presents an approach to how existing production systems can benefit from Industry 4.0 driven concepts. This attempt is based on a communication gateway and a cloud-based system, that hosts all algorithms and models to calculate a prediction of the tool wear. As an example we will show the Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding (RFSSW), a solid state joining technique, which is examined at the Institute of Production Engineering (LaFT) of the Helmut-Schmidt-University, University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, for years. RFSSW is a sub-section of friction welding, where a rotating tool that consists out of three parts is used to heat up material to a dough-like state. Since Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding produces a selective dot-shaped connection of overlapping materials, the production requirements are similar to riveting or resistance spot welding.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1996
David R. Markham, J. Michael Cutbirth
Abstract Modern military electronics systems are generating increasingly higher heat loads, necessitating larger capacity thermal management systems (TMSs). These high-capacity TMSs must meet the strict size and weight requirements of these advancing platforms. Commercially available compressor technology can generate sufficient cooling for these systems; however, they are too heavy and expansive. Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a compact, lightweight, high-speed screw compressor that can provide a large cooling capacity with a small package envelope. The compressor housing material is light-weight with a low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), allowing a wide operating temperature range. The compressor, with a nominal cooling capacity from 20 kW to 60 kW, was tested over a range of saturated suction conditions, pressure ratios, rotational speeds, and oil lubrication conditions.
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-2022
Ajay Rao, Vivek Karan, Pradeep Kumar
Abstract Turbulence is by far the number one concern of anxious passengers and a cause for airline injuries. Apart from causing discomfort to passengers, it also results in unplanned downtime of aircrafts. Currently the Air Traffic Control (ATC) and the meteorological weather charts aid the pilot in devising flight paths that avoid turbulent regions. Even with such tailored flight paths, pilots report constant encounters with turbulence. The probability of turbulence avoidance can be increased by the use of predictive models on historical and transactional data. This paper proposes the use of predictive analytics on meteorological data over the geographical area where the aircraft is intended to fly. The weather predictions are then relayed to the cloud server which can be accessed by the aircraft planned to fly in the same region. Predictive algorithms that use Time series forecasting models are discussed and their comparative performance is documented.
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-2071
Brian A. Hann
Abstract Laser Based Powder Bed Fusion, a specific application of additive manufacturing, has shown promise to replace traditionally fabricated components, including castings and wrought products (and multiple-piece assemblies thereof). In this process, powder is applied, layer by layer, to a build plate, and each layer is fused by a laser to the layers below. Depending on the component, it appears that only 3-5% of the powder charged into the powder bed fusion machine is fused. Honeywell’s initial part qualification efforts have prohibited the reuse of powder. Any unfused powder that exits the dispenser (i.e., surrounds the build or is captured in the overflow) is considered used. In order for the process to be broadly applicable in an economical manner, a methodology should be developed to render the balance of the powder (up to 97% of the initial charge weight) as re-usable.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1910
Philippe Dufrenoy, Vincent Magnier, Ruddy MANN, Anne-Lise CRISTOL, ITZIAR SERRANO
Abstract An original methodology is described to characterize mechanical properties of braking sintered material from the microstructure. Firstly, a compressive test on cube extracted from the friction pad is performed. This compressive test is instrumented with a camera leading to use the digital image correlation method giving local information. Indeed, it is possible to identify the elastic and residual strains mechanisms and to make connection with the microstructure. All these information are introduced in a finite element analysis to identify the mechanical properties of the components using an optimization algorithm. As regards of the 2D measurements, it is relevant to confirm the tendency with a 3D information. Secondly, an ex-situ compression test in a micro tomography is performed. This test is coupled to digital image correlation and a 3D simulation is performed exhibiting elastic-plastic behavior and confirming results found in the 2D study.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1932
Niclas Strömberg
Abstract During several years a toolbox for performing virtual rig tests of disc brake systems has been developed by the author. A thermo-flexible multi-body model of a test rig is derived and implemented by coupling two types of models: a finite element model and a multi-body model. The finite element model is a thermo-mechanical model of the pad-disc system that is formulated including thermo-elasticity, frictional contact and wear. The energy balance of the contact interface is governed by contact conductance that depends linearly on the contact pressure and the frictional heat depends on a temperature dependent coefficient of friction. Instead of adopting a standard Lagrangian approach, the disc is formulated in an Eulerian frame like a fluid. This is then coupled to the pad most accurately by using Signorini’s contact conditions, Coulomb’s law of friction and Archard’s law of wear.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1942
Sarah Chen, Steve Hoxie
Abstract Developing a brake system with high overall customer satisfaction rating is a constant challenge for OEMs as well as their brake suppliers. Brake system performance is directly linked to the engagement between the rotors and pads. The materials for the rotors and pads play a key role in the nature of the engagement. Therefore, to meet the performance targets, it is critical to have a good understanding of the brake rotor materials and their impacts. Gray iron is the most widely used brake rotor material in the industry owing to its superior thermal handling capacity, damping characteristics, and wear and cost advantages. G30 per ASTM A48 is generally specified for most brake rotors with minimum tensile strength of 200 MPa and Brinell hardness of 187∼241. G20 is also widely used for brake rotors, especially for brake smoothness and optimal lining life.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1912
Bo Hu, Sydney Luk, Peter Filip
Abstract Copper and copper alloys are widely used in friction materials such as brake pad formulations as one of key ingredients by providing good thermal conductivity and high temperature friction stability to achieve desired friction performance, fade and wear resistance. However, the use of copper or copper containing material is being restricted in brake pads due to environment and health concerns. Extensive works have been made to explore the copper substitutes but most of these efforts became ineffective and failed with issues either thermal fade or excessive pad/rotor wear. In this paper, friction and wear responses were examined when a metallic composite material was used as the copper substitute in NAO and Low-met brake formulations where the copper and copper alloys were added 8% and 22% respectively.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1916
Raffaele Gilardi, Davide Sarocchi, Loredana Bounous
Abstract A wide range of different carbon powders is available and currently used in friction materials like coke, graphite and carbon black. The effect of the type of carbon on braking performance has been extensively investigated in the past and it has been demonstrated that graphite can play an important role in copper-free brake pads. However, there are no studies about the influence of carbon powders on the processability of brake pads. Brake pads need to be painted in order to avoid corrosion. Typically electrostatic painting is used on an industrial scale, which requires the brake pads to be conductive. NAO brake pads (and especially Cu-free NAO brake pads) are rather insulating, and therefore difficult to paint. In this presentation we’ll show how special carbon powders can increase the electrical conductivity and therefore allow easy painting of brake pads. Based on these investigations, a new copper-free NAO formulation has been developed.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1937
Taylor Erva, Adam Loukus, Luke Luskin
Abstract Aluminum metal matrix composite brake rotors with a selective ceramic function reinforcement gradient (FRG) have been developed for automotive applications. This paper will highlight the design, manufacturing, and testing of the rotors. Weight saving of an aluminum composite rotor in comparison to an industry standard cast iron rotor is 50-60%. With this material change comes design considerations to manage rotor temperature, rotor surface integrity, and friction. Manufacturing methods to meet these design constraints were needed to develop a viable high performance aluminum composite rotor. High pressure squeeze casting with soluble coring techniques were developed to incorporate the selective FRG MMC rotors. Dynamometer testing was performed, concentrating on brake friction and temperature to evaluate the macro and micro interfaces in the rotors.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1926
Matthew Robere
Abstract Brake pad to rotor adhesion following exposure to corrosive environments, commonly referred to as “stiction”, continues to present braking engineers with challenges in predicting issues in early phases of development and in resolution once the condition has been identified. The goal of this study took on two parts - first to explore trends in field stiction data and how testing methods can be adapted to better replicate the vehicle issue at the component level, and second to explore the impacts of various brake pad physical properties variation on stiction propensity via a controlled design of experiments. Part one will involve comparison of various production hardware configurations on component level stiction tests with different levels of prior braking experience to evaluate conditioning effects on stiction breakaway force.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1951
Björn Dingwerth
Abstract Caused by a number of beneficial properties inherently from the zinc-nickel material, this electrodeposited alloy is used more and more for cathodically protecting layers on ferrous components like cast iron brake calipers. Direct plating from acidic solutions is the state-of-the-art solution for zinc-nickel surface finishing of these components. To contribute to the continuous improvement of the final component and reduce the finishing cost, areas for improvement have been scrutinized in a current finishing system. Areas for improvement have been identified in the uniformity of the nickel distribution within different current densities and in the handling and economy of the metallic zinc anodes used for zinc metal replenishment. While today’s acidic zinc-nickel electrolytes suit and usually exceed the requirements for an alloy containing 10-15% nickel, nickel incorporation may drop just below 12% incorporation rate in areas which are plated at high current densities.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1913
Alessandro Sanguineti, Federico Tosi, Andrea Bonfanti, Flavio Rampinelli
Abstract Organic brake pads for automotive can be defined as brake linings with bonding matrix constituted of high-temperature thermosetting resins. Bonded together inside the polymeric binder are a mix of components (e.g. abrasives, lubricants, reinforcements, fillers, modifiers…), each playing a distinctive role in determining the tribology and friction activity of the final friction material. The herein reported work presents inorganic “alkali-activated”-based materials suitable for the production of alternative brake linings (i.e. brake pads), by means of an unconventional low-temperature wet process. Exploiting the hydraulic activity of specific components when exposed to an alkaline environment, such peculiar inorganic materials are capable of coming to a complete hardening without the need of traditional high-temperature energivorous procedures.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1957
Seonho Lee, Heejae Kang, Ohchul Kwon, Chirl Soo Shin
Abstract A trend in automotive parts development is the pursuit of long life, high quality and reliability. The increase in service life of automotive wheel bearings, by improving the rolling contact fatigue (RCF) life of bearing steels, was investigated. Conventional studies of bearing steels and heat treatments have dealt with quenching and tempering (Q/T) in 52100 steel. This study is a new trial to increase the strength of bearing steels by special austempering in phases after general Q/T heat treatments.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1930
Heewook Lee
Abstract Contamination protection of brake rotors has been a challenge for the auto industry for a long time. As contamination of a rotor causes corrosion, and that in turn causes many issues like pulsation and excessive wear of rotors and linings, a rotor splash protection shield became a common part for most vehicles. While the rotor splash shield provides contamination protection for the brake rotor, it makes brake cooling performance worse because it blocks air reaching the brake rotor. Therefore, balancing between contamination protection and enabling brake cooling has become a key critical factor when the splash shield is designed. Although the analysis capability of brake cooling performance has become quite reliable, due to lack of technology to predict contamination patterns, the design of the splash protection shield has relied on engineering judgment and/or vehicle tests. Optimization opportunities were restricted by cost and time associated with vehicle tests.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1943
Tadayoshi Matsumori, Yoshitsugu Goto, Noboru Sugiura, Kenji Abe, Yoshihiro Osawa, Yosuke Akita, Satoshi Wakamatsu, Katsuya Okayama, Kyoko Kosaka
Abstract This paper deals with friction under wet condition in the disk brake system of automobiles. In our previous study, the variation of friction coefficient μ was observed under wet condition. And it was experimentally found that μ becomes high when wear debris contains little moisture. Based on the result, in this paper, we propose a hypothesis that agglomerates composed of the wet wear debris induce the μ variation as the agglomerates are jammed in the gaps between the friction surfaces of a brake pad and a disk rotor. For supporting the hypothesis, firstly, we measure the friction property of the wet wear debris, and confirm that the capillary force under the pendular state is a factor contributing to the μ variation. After that, we simulate the wear debris behavior with or without the capillary force using the particle-based simulation. We prepare the simulation model for the friction surfaces which contribute to the friction force through the wear debris.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1939
Toshikazu Okamura
Abstract Brake judder is one of the most serious problems in automotive-brake systems. It is basically a forced vibration caused by the friction-surface geometry of a brake disc, and therefore, disc rotors play a significant role in judder. There are two types of judder: cold and hot. Hot judder is caused by the thermo-mechanical deformation of a brake disc due to high-speed braking. There are several shapes of deformation, e.g., coning and circumferential waviness. Circumferential waviness is caused by thermo-mechanical buckling and typically found as a butterfly shape in a 2nd rotational-order and hot-spotting. In a previous paper, two groups of disc castings with different material homogeneity were machined intentionally to have two kinds of dimensional variations.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1914
Pavlina Peikertova, Miroslava Kuricova, Alena Kazimirova, Jana Tulinska, Magdalena Barancokova, Aurelia Liskova, Marta Staruchova, Mira Horvathova, Silvia Ilavska, Eva Jahnova, Michaela Szabova, Miroslav Vaculik, Jana Kukutschova, Karla Kucova, Maria Dusinska, Peter Filip
Abstract Particulate air pollution from road traffic currently represents significant environmental and health issue. Attention is also paid to the “non-exhaust pollution sources,” which includes brake wear debris. During each brake application, the airborne and nonairborne particles are emitted into the environment due to wear. High temperatures and pressures on the friction surfaces initiate chemical and morphological changes of the initial components of brake pads and rotating counterparts. Understanding of impact of matter released from brakes on health is vital. Numerous studies clearly demonstrated that particulate matter caused potential adverse effects related to cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, stimulation of proinflammatory factors, and mutagenicity on the cellular level. This paper compiles our main results in the field of genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and aquatic toxicity of airborne brake wear particles.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1909
Diego Adolfo Santamaria Razo, Fernao Persoon
Abstract Environmental and financial factors are leading developments in the automotive industry and friction materials are no exception. Different organizations around the globe are increasing their attention on fine dust emissions. End users are more and more focused on comfort and cost due to global economic conditions. Two of these factors are directly related to each other: comfort and fine dust. They are the result of tribologic mechanisms resulting from pad and disc wear. These mechanisms linked to friction performance are the consequence of the interaction between friction material surface and disc surface. This interaction forms the third body layer and extensive studies have been carried out on this. This paper describes a detailed characterization of a new group of developed fibres. This new family of fibres has been specially engineered to offer an enhanced friction material surface reinforcement due to the specially designed aspect ratio.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1915
Meechai Sriwiboon, Seong Rhee, Kritsana Kaewlob, Nipon Tiempan, Rungrod Samankitesakul
Abstract As some brake engineers believe that brake squeal can be related to pad hardness, friction coefficient or compressibility while others disagree, a study has been undertaken to develop further insights. Two commercial formulas, one low-copper NAO and the other copper-free NAO, were made into disc pads of varying porosity without an underlayer and they were checked for specific gravity, porosity, hardness (HRS and HRR), natural frequencies, compressibility, friction, wear and squeal. With increasing porosity, the hardness and natural frequencies continue to decrease. The compressibility definitely does not increase, but rather slightly decrease or stays the same. The coefficient of friction decreases for the low-copper along with pad and disc wear reduction, and increases for the copper-free along with pad wear increase with no change in disc wear. No obvious correlation emerges between brake squeal and pad hardness, friction coefficient or compressibility.
2016-09-16
Journal Article
2016-01-9017
Janka Cafolla, Derick Smart, Barry Warner
Abstract The lifting and excavating industry are not as advanced as automotive in the use of modern CAE tools in the early stages of design and development of heavy machinery. There is still a lack of confidence in the integrity of the results from FE simulations and optimisation and this becomes a barrier to the adoption of virtual prototyping for vehicle verification. R&D of Tata Steel has performed tests on two forklift truck overhead guards supplied by a major manufacturer. Based on the international standard for Falling Object Protective Structures (FOPS) as an initial input to the method of testing, the main aim of this study was to generate as much test data as possible to correlate the Finite Element (FE) simulations of two tests - a static and a dynamic test. The static test was developed to deform the overhead guard plastically in a slow controlled manner, so it would be easier to correlate the measured data to FE simulation.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1776
Alexander Rabofsky, Alexander Koeck, Martin Mittermaier
Abstract Lightweight vehicle design causes special demands for functional NVH design. The reduction of weight by reducing material thickness, enabled by new alloys, the combination of materials and new materials increases the sensitivity of a vehicle body to the vibrational and acoustical response of external forces like powertrain or road and wind excitation. To be able to fully raise lightweight potentials design has to be driven closer to functional boundaries, putting higher demands on the accuracy of the prediction by simulation. For a robust design a very broad view on several loadcases is needed to make sure that by optimization on one target no other target is violated. In this paper, optimization strategies for complex NVH load-cases should be investigated in detail. In reality, load-cases, excitations as well as boundary conditions are very often complex and complicated.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1848
Jean-Loup Christen, Mohamed Ichchou, Olivier Bareille, Bernard Troclet
Abstract The problem of noise transmission through a structure into a cavity appears in many practical applications, especially in the automotive, aeronautic and space industries. In the mean time, there is a trend towards an increasing use of composite materials to reduce the weight of the structures. Since these materials usually offer poor sound insulation properties, it is necessary to add noise control treatments. They usually involve poroelastic materials, such as foams or mineral wools, whose behaviour depends on many parameters. Some of these parameters may vary in rather broad ranges, either because of measurement uncertainties or because their values have not been fixed yet in the design process. In order to efficiently design sound protections, performing a sensitivity analysis can be interesting to identify which parameters have the most influence on the relevant vibroacoustic indicators and concentrate the design effort on them.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1851
Arnaud Duval, Minh Tan Hoang, Valérie Marcel, Ludovic Dejaeger
Abstract The noise treatments weight reduction strategy, which consists in combining broadband absorption and insulation acoustic properties in order to reduce the weight of barriers, depends strongly on surface to volume ratio of the absorbing layers in the reception cavity. Indeed, lightweight technologies like the now classical Absorber /Barrier /Absorber layup are extremely efficient behind the Instrument Panel of a vehicle, but most of the time disappointing when applied as floor insulator behind the carpet. This work aims at showing that a minimum of 20 mm equivalent “shoddy” standard cotton felt absorption is requested for a floor carpet insulator, in order to be able to reduce the weight of barriers. This means that a pure absorbing system that would destroy completely the insulation properties and slopes can only work, if the noise sources are extremely low in this specific area, which is seldom the case even at the rear footwells location.
Viewing 271 to 300 of 15907