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Viewing 1 to 30 of 14893
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1819
Antonio J. Torregrosa, Alberto Broatch, Vincent Raimbault, Jerome Migaud
Abstract Intake noise has become one the main concerns in the design of highly-supercharged downsized engines, which are expected to play a significant role in the upcoming years. Apart from the low frequencies associated with engine breathing, in these engines other frequency bands are also relevant which are related to the turbocharger operation, and which may radiate from the high-pressure side from the compressor outlet to the charge air cooler. Medium frequencies may be controlled with the use of different typologies of resonators, but these are not so effective for relatively high frequencies. In this paper, the potential of the use of multi-layer porous materials to control those high frequencies is explored. The material sheets are located in the side chamber of an otherwise conventional resonator, thus providing a compact, lightweight and convenient arrangement.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1830
Denis Blanchet, Luca Alimonti, Anton Golota
Abstract This paper presents new advances in predicting wind noise contribution to interior SPL in the framework of the Wind Noise German Working Group composed of Audi, Daimler, Porsche and VW. In particular, a new approach was developed that allows to fully describe the wind noise source using CFD generated surface pressure distribution and its cross-correlation function and apply this source on an SEA side glass. This new method removes the need to use a diffuse acoustic field or several plane waves with various incidence angle to approximate the correct acoustics source character to apply on the SEA side glass. This new approach results are compared with results previously published which use more deterministic methods to represent the side glass and the interior of a vehicle.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1847
Olivier Robin, Celse Kafui Amedin, Alain Berry, Noureddine Atalla, Olivier Doutres, Franck Sgard
A method for estimating the sound absorption coefficient of a material under a synthesized Diffuse Acoustic Field was recently proposed, as an alternative to classical sound absorption measurements in reverberant rooms (Robin O., Berry A., Doutres O., Atalla N., ‘Measurement of the absorption coefficient of absorbing materials under a synthesized diffuse acoustic field’, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 136 (1) EL13-EL19, 2014). Using sound field reproduction approaches and a synthetic array of acoustic monopoles facing the material, estimation of the sound absorption coefficient under a reproduced Diffuse Acoustic Field in a hemi-anechoic room was shown to be feasible. The method was successfully tested on a few samples of melamine foam of close thicknesses and areas, but the influence of several parameters such as the source height, or the samples dimensions together with the nature of the porous material was not fully investigated.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1848
Jean-Loup Christen, Mohamed Ichchou, Olivier Bareille, Bernard Troclet
Abstract The problem of noise transmission through a structure into a cavity appears in many practical applications, especially in the automotive, aeronautic and space industries. In the mean time, there is a trend towards an increasing use of composite materials to reduce the weight of the structures. Since these materials usually offer poor sound insulation properties, it is necessary to add noise control treatments. They usually involve poroelastic materials, such as foams or mineral wools, whose behaviour depends on many parameters. Some of these parameters may vary in rather broad ranges, either because of measurement uncertainties or because their values have not been fixed yet in the design process. In order to efficiently design sound protections, performing a sensitivity analysis can be interesting to identify which parameters have the most influence on the relevant vibroacoustic indicators and concentrate the design effort on them.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1851
Arnaud Duval, Minh Tan Hoang, Valérie Marcel, Ludovic Dejaeger
Abstract The noise treatments weight reduction strategy, which consists in combining broadband absorption and insulation acoustic properties in order to reduce the weight of barriers, depends strongly on surface to volume ratio of the absorbing layers in the reception cavity. Indeed, lightweight technologies like the now classical Absorber /Barrier /Absorber layup are extremely efficient behind the Instrument Panel of a vehicle, but most of the time disappointing when applied as floor insulator behind the carpet. This work aims at showing that a minimum of 20 mm equivalent “shoddy” standard cotton felt absorption is requested for a floor carpet insulator, in order to be able to reduce the weight of barriers. This means that a pure absorbing system that would destroy completely the insulation properties and slopes can only work, if the noise sources are extremely low in this specific area, which is seldom the case even at the rear footwells location.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1850
Christian Thomas, Nouredine Atalla
In passenger aircraft the most important noise control treatment is the primary insulation attached to the fuselage. Next to its acoustic properties the primary insulation main purpose is the thermal insulation and the minimization of condensed water. In general it consists of fibrous materials like glass wool wrapped in a thin foil. Due to stringent flame, smoke and toxicity requirements the amount of available materials is limited. Furthermore the amount of material installed in aircraft per year is much smaller compared to needs in the automotive industry. Therefore the best lay-up of the available materials is needed in terms of acoustics. This paper presents a tool for numerical optimization of the sound insulation package. To find an improved insulation the simulation tool is used in interaction with a measurement database. The databank is constructed from aircraft grade materials such as fibrous materials, foams, resistive screens and impervious heavy layers.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1852
Ehsan Fatourehchi, Vishak Elisaus, Mahdi Mohammadpour, Stephanos Theodossiades, Homer Rahnejat
Abstract Efficiency and durability are key areas of research and development in modern racing drivetrains. Stringent regulations necessitate the need for components capable of operating under highly loaded conditions whilst being efficient and reliable. Downsizing, increasing the power-to-weight ratio and modification of gear teeth geometry to reduce friction are some of the actions undertaken to achieve these objectives. These approaches can however result in reduced structural integrity and component durability. Achieving a balance between system reliability and optimal efficiency requires detailed integrated multidisciplinary analyses, with the consideration of system dynamics, contact mechanics/tribology and stress analysis/structural integrity. This paper presents an analytical model to predict quasi-static contact power losses in lubricated spur gear sets operating under the Elastohydrodynamic regime of lubrication.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1788
Charles Pezerat
Abstract Identification of vibration sources, defects and/or material properties consists generally in solving inverse problems. The called RIFF method (French acronym meaning Windowed and Filtered Inverse Solving) is one way to solve this kind of inverse problem. The basic principle of the RIFF approach consists in measuring vibration displacement on a meshgrid in a local area of interest, injecting measured data in the motion equation and calculating the searched unknown. Compared to other usual inverse techniques, the RIFF method has the curious particularity of needing the knowledge of the local motion equation only. Boundary conditions, sources or dynamic behaviors outside the area of interest can be completely ignored, whereas they are required for the direct problem solving. The searched unknown can then be identified locally with respect to the frequency and can be mapped by using a scanning process of the area of interest.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1791
Noé F. Melo, Claus Claeys, Elke Deckers, Bert Pluymers, Wim Desmet
Abstract The NVH performance of conventional panels and structures is mainly driven by their mass. Silence often requires heavy constructions, which conflicts with the emerging trend towards lightweight design. To face the challenging and often conflicting task of merging NVH and lightweight requirements, novel low mass and compact volume NVH solutions are required. Vibro-acoustic metamaterials with stopband behavior come to the fore as possible novel NVH solutions combining lightweight requirements with superior noise and vibration insulation, be it at least in some targeted and tunable frequency ranges, referred to as stopbands. Metamaterials are artificial materials or structures engineered from conventional materials to exhibit some targeted performance that clearly exceeds that of conventional materials. They consist typically of (often periodic) assemblies of unit cells of non-homogeneous material composition and/or topology.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1792
Aurélien Lonni, Olivier Tanneau
Abstract Nowadays, downsizing and turbochargers are more frequently used, mostly for petrol engines. It can lead to an increase of NVH issues related to the turbos, such as the hiss noise propagation in the air ducts. Hutchinson, among all its activities, supplies rubber and plastic parts for the car industry, especially in fluid management systems. The turbocharger’s airborne noise issue has now been tackled for ten years by implementing acoustic devices in the line and providing solutions to car manufacturers with our hot-side rubber ducts. In this paper, will be first presented the main HP air loop NVH issues, and then explained an approach to design technical solutions. Generally speaking, the noise propagates inside the hot side air hoses, crosses the weakest parts of the system by acoustic emissivity to reach finally the driver and passengers’ ears.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1776
Alexander Rabofsky, Alexander Koeck, Martin Mittermaier
Abstract Lightweight vehicle design causes special demands for functional NVH design. The reduction of weight by reducing material thickness, enabled by new alloys, the combination of materials and new materials increases the sensitivity of a vehicle body to the vibrational and acoustical response of external forces like powertrain or road and wind excitation. To be able to fully raise lightweight potentials design has to be driven closer to functional boundaries, putting higher demands on the accuracy of the prediction by simulation. For a robust design a very broad view on several loadcases is needed to make sure that by optimization on one target no other target is violated. In this paper, optimization strategies for complex NVH load-cases should be investigated in detail. In reality, load-cases, excitations as well as boundary conditions are very often complex and complicated.
2016-04-11
Journal Article
2016-01-9081
Sean A. McKelvey, Yung-Li Lee
Abstract Multiaxial loading on mechanical products is very common in the automotive industry, and how to design and analyze these products for durability becomes an important, urgent task for the engineering community. Due to the complex nature of the fatigue damage mechanism for a product under multiaxial state of stresses/strains which are dependent upon the modes of loading, materials, and life, modeling this behavior has always been a challenging task for fatigue scientists and engineers around the world. As a result, many multiaxial fatigue theories have been developed. Among all the theories, an existing equivalent stress theory is considered for use for the automotive components that are typically designed to prevent Case B cracks in the high cycle fatigue regime.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0386
HongTae Kang, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh, Xuming Su, Mingchao Guo, Yung-Li Lee, Shyam Pittala, Chonghua Jiang, Brian Jordon
Abstract Friction stir linear welding (FSLW) is widely used in joining lightweight materials including aluminum alloys and magnesium alloys. However, fatigue life prediction method for FSLW is not well developed yet for vehicle structure applications. This paper is tried to use two different methods for the prediction of fatigue life of FSLW in vehicle structures. FSLW is represented with 2-D shell elements for the structural stress approach and is represented with TIE contact for the maximum principal stress approach in finite element (FE) models. S-N curves were developed from coupon specimen test results for both the approaches. These S-N curves were used to predict fatigue life of FSLW of a front shock tower structure that was constructed by joining AM60 to AZ31 and AM60 to AM30. The fatigue life prediction results were then correlated with test results of the front shock tower structures.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0191
Gursaran D. Mathur
Water drainage characteristics of an evaporator changes with the age of the vehicle. This is due to the fact that with time, a part of the hydrophilic coating washes off with the moisture that condenses over the evaporator core from the air-stream. Hence, the effectiveness of the evaporator for water drainage deteriorates with the age of the vehicle. At this condition more water is retained in the evaporator as the contact angle increases. Author has conducted experiments with evaporators from multiple vehicles from different OEMs. These evaporators were analyzed to determine the effectiveness of the hydrophilic coating as a function of time or vehicle age. This is the first paper in the open literature that deals with the vehicle mileage or vehicle age with the evaporator plate contact angle and surface coating of an evaporator.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0188
Elankathiravan Mathivanan, Liping Liu
In the present work, the effect of various nanofluids on convective heat transfer performance in an automotive radiator was analyzed based on measured nanofluid properties. Al2O3, TiC, SiC, MWNT (multi-walled nanotube) and SiO2 nanoparticles ranging between 1 and 100 nm in size were dispersed in distilled water to form nanofluids. An ultrasonic generator was used to provide uniform particle dispersion in the fluid and keep the mixture stable for a long period of time. The impact of various particle types and their volume concentration on fluid properties such as density, thermal conductivity and viscosity were experimentally analyzed. It is observed that the nanofluid properties increased with the increase in particle volume concentration. TiO2 nanofluids were observed to show the highest increase in density (2.6% higher than the base fluid at a 1% vol. concentration) and also the largest enhancement in thermal conductivity (7.5% augmentation at 1% concentration).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0196
Sivanandi Rajadurai, Madhusudhanan Paulraj, Alrin Maria Victor
Abstract The numerical methodology is developed to estimate the backpressure value acquired from the cold flow bench into the hot flow conditions by equalizing various gas flow properties such as gas density and gas constant. The exhaust muffler geometry is adopted for virtual analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of the exhaust muffler in hot and cold flow conditions shows 60% of difference in back pressure values. The same muffler sample is tested in hot and cold flow test bench for back pressure on same measurement location used in CFD tool, the test result difference between these two conditions is obtained as 61%. By using derived 1D calculation, the cold flow back pressure results are extrapolated to generate hot flow back pressure values for the exhaust muffler system. These extrapolated values are then validated with the back pressure analysis results performed in both CFD and flow test bench using cold and hot flow conditions.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0302
Hongyi Xu, Ching-Hung Chuang, Ren-Jye Yang
Abstract In structural design optimization, it is challenging to determine the optimal dimensions and material for each component simultaneously. Material selection of each part is always formulated as a categorical design variable in structural optimization problems. However, it is difficult to solve such mixed-variable problems using the metamodelbased strategy, because the prediction accuracy of metamodels deteriorates significantly when categorical variables exist. This paper investigates two different strategies of mixed-variable metamodeling: the “feature separating” strategy and the “all-in-one” strategy. A supervised learning-enhanced cokriging method is proposed, which fuses multi-fidelity information to predict new designs’ responses. The proposed method is compared with several existing mixed-variable metamodeling methods to understand their pros and cons.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0286
Changsheng Wang, Haijiang Liu, Tao Zhang, Zhiyong Zhu, Liang Liu
Abstract With the increasing development in automotive industry, finite element (FE) analysis with model bias prediction has been used more and more widely in the fields of chassis design, body weight reduction optimization and some components development, which reduced the development cycles and enhanced analysis accuracy significantly. However, in the simulation process of plastic fuel tank system, there is few study of model validation or verification, which results that non-risky design decisions cannot be enhanced due to too much consuming time. In this study, to correct the discrepancy and uncertainty of the simulated finite element model, Bayesian inference-based method is employed, to quantify model uncertainty and evaluate the simulated results based on collected data from real mechanical tests of plastic fuel tanks and FE simulations under the same boundary conditions.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0290
Kyoo Sil Choi, Erin Barker, Guang Cheng, Xin Sun, Joy Forsmark, Mei Li
Abstract In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) microstructure-based finite element modeling method (i.e., extrinsic modeling method) is developed, which can be used in examining the effects of porosity on the ductility/fracture of Mg castings. For this purpose, AM60 Mg tensile samples were generated under high-pressure die-casting in a specially-designed mold. Before the tensile test, the samples were CT-scanned to obtain the pore distributions within the samples. 3D microstructure-based finite element models were then developed based on the obtained actual pore distributions of the gauge area. The input properties for the matrix material were determined by fitting the simulation result to the experimental result of a selected sample, and then used for all the other samples’ simulation. The results show that the ductility and fracture locations predicted from simulations agree well with the experimental results.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0291
Chad W. Chichester, Aleksandra Nevskaya
Abstract When designing and employing lubricants, film thickness modeling techniques must be used as part of an overall design approach to insure mating components, in relative motion have proper lubricating films to separate surface asperities. Improper asperity separation will lead to increased friction and wear, and overall reduce system reliability, serviceability, and efficiency. Many of the tools to model tribofilms used today are rooted in empirical studies completed with hydrocarbon based fluids as the lubricating medium. Generally, these modeling techniques have also been applied to non-hydrocarbon based lubricants, and this may not be an accurate method to model such fluids. As demands for improved lubricant performance continue to rise, so too does the need for improved tribofilms modeling techniques. This paper will discuss a modeling techniques developed, in which, silicone based polymer molecular structures are designed with tribological film performance in mind.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0350
Andre Camboa, Bernardo Ribeiro, Miguel Vaz, Luis Pinheiro, Ricardo Malta
The development of an automotive hood for an electric vehicle based on a polymer-metal hybrid configuration is described in this paper. Here, special focus is given only to the engineering design and prototyping phases which are the initial stages of a much bigger project. A project that aims to evaluate the cost efficiency, weight penalty and structural integrity of adopting polydicyclopentadiene as an exterior body material in low production volume vehicles, among them the electric ones. For the engineering design and prototyping phases, three different reinforcement geometries were developed and six mechanical simulations were done through finite element analysis to aid best frame geometry selection and optimization. The entire hood was then prototyped containing the optimized geometry. The fabrication of the frame was made through metal stamping and the exterior panel through reaction injection moulding. Adhesive bonding was used for its assembly.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0348
Nan Wang, Sergey Golovashchenko
Abstract Stamping die design recommendations attempt to limit the production of burrs through accurate alignment of the upper and lower trimming edges. For aluminum automotive exterior panels, this translates to a clearance less than 0.1 mm. However, quality of sheared edge and its stretchability are affected by stiffness of the cutting tool against opening of the clearance between the shearing edges. The objective of the study is to investigate the influence of stiffness of trimming or piercing dies against opening of the cutting clearance on sheared edge stretchability of aluminum blanks 6111-T4. For experimental study, one side of the sample had sheared surface obtained by the trimming process while the other side of the sample had a smooth surface achieved by metal finish. Burr heights of the sheared edge after different trimming configurations with 10% clearance were measured.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0353
Suleman Ahmad, Dimitry Sediako, Anthony Lombardi, C. (Ravi) Ravindran, Robert Mackay, Ahmed Nabawy
Abstract Aluminum alloys have been replacing ferrous alloys in automotive applications to reduce the weight of vehicles. The engine block is a striking example of weight reduction, and is made of Al-Si-Cu-Mg (319 type) alloys. The wear resistance in the engine block is enabled by cast iron liners, and these liners introduce tensile residual stress due to a thermo-mechanical mismatch. Typically, an artificial aging treatment effectively reduces residual stress. In this study, neutron diffraction was used to measure the residual stress profiles along the cylinder bridge of a T5 treated 319 aluminum alloy engine block. Results indicated high tensile residual stresses (200-300 MPa) in the hoop and axial orientation at depths of 50-60 mm below the head deck. The high residual stresses were likely due to a combination of minimal stress relief during artificial aging and stress development during post process cooling.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0355
Takashi Iwama
Abstract Although reduction of the thickness of materials used in the automobile body is important for weight reduction, reducing the thickness of outer panels deteriorates dent resistance and surface distortion. To investigate the potential for weight reduction, the factors which influence the surface distortion and dent resistance properties were evaluated quantitatively with the aim of securing these properties. The materials used in these experiments were a tensile strength (TS) 340MPa grade bake hardenable (BH) steel sheet, which is often used in door outers, and a TS 440MPa grade BH steel sheet for outer panels. Surface distortion increases as a result of higher yield point (YP). It is possible to suppress the increase in surface distortion by increasing the blank holding force (BHF) in press forming. However, because this reduces the BHF range to the forming limit, application of low YP material is considered to be more advantageous for suppressing surface distortion.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0354
Ryoji Suzuki, Yukihide Yokoyama, Takeo Shibano, Tatsuki Sugiura, Noriaki Katori
Abstract 1 One issue raised by the use of austenitic stainless steels in commercial vehicles is the increase in material costs. To reduce those material costs, a nitric acid electropolishing treatment was applied to SUS436L (18 Cr - 1.5 Mo - 0.4 Nb) and corrosion tests were conducted to compare its corrosion resistance to that of SUS316L(16 Cr - 12 Ni - 2 Mo). Compared to SUS316L, SUS436L subjected to nitric acid electropolishing indicated superior corrosion resistance. In addition, XPS and TEM analyses showed that while the SUS436L passivation film layer contained approximately twice as much chromium, its thickness was also generally reduced by approximately half, to 2 nm. These results suggest that electropolishing with nitric acid, which is highly oxidative, formed a fine passivation film.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0356
Hua-Chu Shih
Prephosphated steels have been developed by applying the phosphate coating on zinc coated sheet steels to increase the lubricity in the automotive stamping process and adding extra corrosion protection. The prephosphate coating was also found to be able to further absorb the lubricant, which can reduce the oil migration and excessive amount of lubricant dripping on the die surface and the press floor. Due to its enhanced lubricity characteristic, the applications have been expanded to more-recently developed advanced high strength steels (AHSS). Because of the higher strength of AHSS, it is crucial to understand their performance under more extreme forming conditions such as higher die temperature, contact pressure and sliding speed, etc. The intent of this study is to investigate the tribological performance and die wear behavior of prephosphated AHSS in the die tryout and production conditions.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0359
Jeff Wang, Charles Enloe, Jatinder Singh, Curt Horvath
Abstract Impact toughness (or resistance to fracture) is a key material property for press hardened steel used in construction of the safety-critical elements of automotive body structures. Prior austenite grain size, as primarily controlled by the incoming microstructure and austenitization process, is a key microstructural feature that influences the impact toughness of press hardened steel. In this paper, a special Charpy V-notch impact test is developed to quantify the impact toughness of press hardened steel sheets with various prior austenite grain sizes, by stacking a number of thin sheets via mechanical riveting. Both the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature and upper shelf energy are analyzed in an effort to establish a correlation between impact toughness and prior austenite grain size. Within tested conditions, impact performance shows only a slight decrease as the prior austenitic grain size increases from 18 to 38 microns.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0358
Saeid Nasheralahkami, Sergey Golovashchenko, Kaicen Pan, Lindsay Brown, Bindiya Gugnani
Abstract In recent years, implementation of dual phase (DP) Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) and Ultra High Strength Steels (UHSS) is increasing in automotive components due to their superior structural performance and vehicle weight reduction capabilities. However, these materials are often sensitive to trimmed edge cracking if stretching along sheared edge occurs in such processes as stretch flanging. Tool wear is another major issue in the trimming of UHSS because of higher contact pressures at the interface between cutting tools and sheet metal blank caused by UHSS’s higher flow stresses and the presence of a hard martensitic in the microstructure. The objective of the present paper is to study the influence of trimming conditions and tool wear on quality of trimmed edge of DP980 steel sheet. For this purpose, mechanically trimmed edges were characterized for DP980 steel, sheared with six different cutting clearances (from 4% to 40% of the sheet thickness).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0333
Pavel Lykov, Rustam Baytimerov, Sergey Vaulin, Evgeny Safonov, Dmitry Zherebtsov
Abstract Due to its unique physical properties (high thermal and electric conductivity) copper is one of the most interesting materials in point of view of additive manufacturing in particular of Selective Laser Melting (SLM). But because of the low laser radiation absorption, low melting point and high thermal conductivity it is difficult to fabricate of copper components without pores. Results of many research have been shown that for successful Selective Laser Melting of copper powder is needed high laser power (more than 300 W) and high laser scanning speed (more than 600 mm/s). However now most SLM machines are equipped with laser plants with output power up to 200 W.In this research, SLM machine with 200 W maximum power CO2 laser has been used. For determination of the influence of SLM process parameters on quality of copper parts cubic specimens have been fabricated. The point distance, exposure time and base plate preheating temperature have been changing.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0392
HongTae Kang, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh, Xuming Su, Mingchao Guo, Yung-Li Lee, Sai Boorgu, Chonghua Jiang
Abstract Joining technology is a key factor to utilize dissimilar materials in vehicle structures. Adaptable insert weld (AIW) technology is developed to join sheet steel (HSLA350) to cast magnesium alloy (AM60) and is constructed by combining riveting technology and electrical resistance spot welding technology. In this project, the AIW joint technology is applied to construct front shock tower structures composed with HSLA350, AM60, and Al6082 and a method is developed to predict the fatigue life of the AIW joints. Lap-shear and cross-tension specimens were constructed and tested to develop the fatigue parameters (load-life curves) of AIW joint. Two FEA modeling techniques for AIW joints were used to model the specimen geometry. These modeling approaches are area contact method (ACM) and TIE contact method.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 14893