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Viewing 241 to 270 of 19645
Article
2014-04-04
According to Turck's Dave Lagerstrom, it’s realistic to forecast that future manufacturing facilities will continue to drive the evolution of automation, moving away from physical plant constraints and instead solving complexities of the processes that factories tie into.
Article
2014-04-04
According to CD-adapco's Frederick Ross, the first, and most difficult, stage in the construction of a virtual prototype is the process of pulling together all of the individual CAD parts that define a vehicle.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of flat wire. This wire has been used typically for retaining rings requiring corrosion and heat resistance up to 900 °F (482 °C) and which may require moderate to severe forming and bending, but usage is not limited to such applications.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate. These products have been used typically for parts requiring corrosion and oxidation resistance up to 1800 °F (982 °C), and relatively high strength up to 1500 °F (816 °C), but usage is not limited to such applications.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers flash welded rings made of corrosion and heat-resistant austenitic steels and austenitic-type iron, nickel, or cobalt alloys, or precipitation-hardenable alloys.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of welding wire.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant steel in the form of welding wire. This wire has been used typically as filler metal for gas-metal-arc or gas-tungsten-arc welding of steels of similar composition requiring joints with strength and corrosion resistance comparable to those of the basis metal, but usage is not limited to such applications.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate. These products have been used typically for deep and shallow formed parts, but usage is not limited to such applications.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a gold-nickel alloy in the form of wire, rod, sheet, strip, foil, pig, powder, shot, and chips and a viscous mixture (paste) of powder in a suitable binder.

This filler metal has been used typically for joining corrosion and heat resistant steels and alloys where corrosion and oxidation resistant joints with good strength up to 1300 degrees F (704 degrees C), but usage is not limited to such applications. This filler metal is normally used for brazing, without flux, using a protective atmosphere.

WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, extrusions, mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock for forging, extruding, or flash welded rings. These products have been used typically for parts requiring wear, galling, and corrosion resistance up to 950 °F (510 °C), but usage is not limited to such applications. Welding, brazing, or other exposure to temperatures over 950 °F (510 °C) during fabrication may impair corrosion resistance.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of welding wire.

This wire has been used typically as bare wire filler metal for gas-tungsten-arc or gas-metal-arc welding of parts fabricated from alloys of similar composition, but usage is not limited to such applications.

WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of work-strengthened bars and wire 1-1/4 inches (31.8 mm) and under in nominal diameter of least distance between parallel sides.

These products have been used typically for parts, such as fasteners, requiring room-temperature minimum tensile strength of 200 ksi (1379 MPa) after precipitation heat treatment for use up to 1000 °F (538 °C) and having oxidation resistance up to 1200 °F (649 °C), but usage is not limited to such applications.

WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of welding wire. This wire has been used typically as filler metal for gas tungsten arc or gas metal arc welding of parts fabricated from alloys of similar or dissimilar composition, but usage is not limited to such applications.
WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This SAE Standard applies to all self-propelled machines with a gross vehicle mass up to 5000 kg that are utilized to clean material from outside paved areas, parkland, floors in non-residential buildings and areas principally exposed to pedestrian traffic. Primary methods for material removal can be by mechanical, pneumatic, washing and flushing systems, or in a combination of any system.
WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This SAE Standard applies to all self-propelled machines with a gross vehicle mass greater than 5000kg that are utilized to clean material from highways, parking lots, airfield runways, outside paved areas that are principally exposed to vehicular traffic. These machines may also be involved with road construction/repaving work. Primary methods for material removal and cleaning can be by mechanical, pneumatic, washing and flushing systems, or in a combination of any system.
WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This specification provides a standard set of procedures for sampling and testing to meet the requirements of material specifications for wrought titanium and titanium alloy products except forgings and forging stock. It is applicable to the extent specified in a material specification.
WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This SAE Recommended Practice presents the general uses, limitations on use, and appearance of the safety alert symbol.
Article
2014-04-01
With a patented approach to laser cutting of blanks from coil, LaserCoil Technologies systems enable companies to marry its laser cutting systems with any coil line automation, whether it be existing equipment currently in production or an investment in new or used equipment.
Article
2014-04-01
Miller improves select models in the XMT weld cable control (WCC) multi-process lineup to improve productivity, quality, and safety.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Gary L. Anderson, Pete G. Imbrogno
Abstract Improved Power Density through Use of Powder-Forged Helical Gears in Transmissions. With the continuing mileage improvement requirements, increasing power density is an important economic consideration in new vehicle design. This paper describes the power density improvement available through reduced grain size and inclusion levels that are typically found in wrought materials. The powder forged process is similar to tool steel manufacturing rather than wrought steel manufacturing in that powder is used to manufacture the gear resulting in smaller inclusions than typically found in wrought steel.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Domenic Leo Barsotti, Sandra Boetcher
Abstract The present study discusses the benefits of using a phase change material (PCM) based cold plate for more efficient energy storage system (ESS) cooling in Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV). This paper numerically demonstrates the benefits that a PCM cold plate has over a more conventional aluminum cold plate design. These benefits include six times more passive cooling capacity and a 66% mass reduction. Further investigations into improving the system were conducted in an effort to maximize passive cooling.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Andrey Ilinich, S. George Luckey
Abstract This paper documents the finite element (FE) analysis of a hot stamping process for high strength aluminum sheet. In this process a 7075 blank, heated above its solvus temperature, was simultaneously die quenched and stamped in a room temperature die to form a B-pillar outer reinforcement. Two modeling approaches have been investigated: an isothermal mechanical model and a non-isothermal coupled thermo-mechanical model. The accuracy of each approach was assessed by comparing the predicted strain and thickness distributions to experimental measurements from a formed panel. The coupled thermo-mechanical model provided the most accurate prediction.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xiaoming Chen, Ching-Kuo Hsiung, Ken Schmid, Changqing Du, Dajun Zhou, Chris Roman
Abstract Forming a metal gainer is a common technique used to gather material in a high stretch region along an edge in preparation for a subsequent flanging operation. This technique has proven to be successful for mild steels, but needs to be evaluated for the applicability to advanced high strength steels (AHSS). The Auto/Steel Partnership High Strength Stamping Team launched a project for this study. Experimental trials were conducted on gainer forming, trimming and flanging. Twelve (12) AHSS have been tested with tensile strengths ranging from 460 to 1240 MPa. Edge stretch limits for flanging have been evaluated and compared to flanging without gainers. Different trimming and flanging approaches have also been tried. The results show that metal gainers are not advantageous for flanging of higher strength AHSS.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
K.S. Raghavan, R.J. Comstock, B.M. Hance
Abstract An indirect method to determine friction coefficient under punch stretching conditions has been developed. The methodology involves correlation of experimental draw-in measurements to FEA predictions for a range of assumed friction coefficients. Initial evaluation with a ferritic stainless steel (SS 439) shows that the proposed indirect method to determine the effective friction coefficient during punch stretching is feasible. Friction coefficient (μ) estimate based on the indirect method was 0.15 for the sample with residual mill oil (dry), 0.12 with excess mill oil (wet), and 0.03 with polyethylene sheets between the sample blank and tooling. The importance of prescribing accurate material hardening behavior beyond uniform elongation to obtain good correlation between simulation and experimental punch loads and to better tune the model is highlighted in the paper.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Andre Sereno Lopes, Marco Colosio, Jose Castillo
Abstract This paper presents a technological comparison of weldability and mechanical properties between a dual phase steel (DP) and an advanced high strength low alloy steel (AHSLA) used for automotive structural parts in order to demonstrate some unclear characteristics of each. Samples were spot welded and had their hardness and microstructure analyzed, also a shear test was applied on the weld button area. The edge stretchability was analyzed using hole expansion tests and tensile tests to determine the tensile and yield strength, anisotropic coefficients and total elongation. Data were used to estimate crash energy absorption. The results showed an AHSLA steel with higher than typical ductility. Finally, while DP showed improved stretchability, it was also concluded that such AHSLA could perform better bendability, drawability, flangeability and weldability.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Dennis Parkes, Qingling Cui, Daniel Westerbaan, Sashank Nayak, Norman Zhou, Frank Goodwin, Daniel Liu, Sanjiwan Bhole, Daolun Chen
Abstract Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) such as dual phase (DP) steels are now being extensively used to achieve light weighting goals of vehicles because of their attractive combination of formability and high strength. High strength low alloy (HSLA) steels are also used in lightweight bodies-in-white; DP and HSLA steels are therefore often laser butt-welded together into tailor welded blanks and to create other joints. Among the laser welding processes, fiber laser welding (FLW) has been shown to provide excellent quality welds, including superior weld mechanical properties, at higher speeds than those possible with other laser welding processes. Using dissimilarly welded DP980-HSLA blanks made with different welding parameters, the tensile properties were found to not change in spite of the HSLA being weaker than the soft zone on the DP980 side of the weld. The high heat input weld was found to have more softening in comparison to its base metal (BM) (55 HV versus 46 HV) and less bainite (8% versus 15%) in its FZ in comparison to the low heat input weld.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Hua-Chu Shih, Ching-Kuo Hsiung, Bill Wendt
Abstract Edge fracture is one of the major issues for stamping Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS). Recent studies have showed this type of fracture is greatly affected by an improper trimming process. The current production trimming process used for the conventional mild steels has not been modified for AHSS trimming. In addition to the high-energy requirement, the current mechanical trimming process would generate a rough edge (burr) with microcracks in trimmed edges for AHSS trimming, which could serve as the crack initiation during forming. The purpose of this study is to develop a proper production trimming process for AHSS and elucidate the effect of the trimmed edge conditions on edge fracture. A straight edge shearing device with the capability of adjusting the shearing variables is used in this study. Two different AHSS grades, DP600 and DP980, with similar thicknesses are selected to assess the edge stretchability of the material for edge conditions created using various shearing variables.
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