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WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, extrusions, mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock for forging, extruding, or flash welded rings. These products have been used typically for parts requiring wear, galling, and corrosion resistance up to 950 °F (510 °C), but usage is not limited to such applications. Welding, brazing, or other exposure to temperatures over 950 °F (510 °C) during fabrication may impair corrosion resistance.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate. These products have been used typically for deep and shallow formed parts, but usage is not limited to such applications.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate. These products have been used typically for parts requiring corrosion and oxidation resistance up to 1800 °F (982 °C), and relatively high strength up to 1500 °F (816 °C), but usage is not limited to such applications.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant steel in the form of welding wire. This wire has been used typically as filler metal for gas-metal-arc or gas-tungsten-arc welding of steels of similar composition requiring joints with strength and corrosion resistance comparable to those of the basis metal, but usage is not limited to such applications.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of flat wire. This wire has been used typically for retaining rings requiring corrosion and heat resistance up to 900 °F (482 °C) and which may require moderate to severe forming and bending, but usage is not limited to such applications.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of welding wire. This wire has been used typically as filler metal for gas tungsten arc or gas metal arc welding of parts fabricated from alloys of similar or dissimilar composition, but usage is not limited to such applications.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers flash welded rings made of corrosion and heat-resistant austenitic steels and austenitic-type iron, nickel, or cobalt alloys, or precipitation-hardenable alloys.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of welding wire.

This wire has been used typically as bare wire filler metal for gas-tungsten-arc or gas-metal-arc welding of parts fabricated from alloys of similar composition, but usage is not limited to such applications.

WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of welding wire.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of work-strengthened bars and wire 1-1/4 inches (31.8 mm) and under in nominal diameter of least distance between parallel sides.

These products have been used typically for parts, such as fasteners, requiring room-temperature minimum tensile strength of 200 ksi (1379 MPa) after precipitation heat treatment for use up to 1000 °F (538 °C) and having oxidation resistance up to 1200 °F (649 °C), but usage is not limited to such applications.

WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a gold-nickel alloy in the form of wire, rod, sheet, strip, foil, pig, powder, shot, and chips and a viscous mixture (paste) of powder in a suitable binder.

This filler metal has been used typically for joining corrosion and heat resistant steels and alloys where corrosion and oxidation resistant joints with good strength up to 1300 degrees F (704 degrees C), but usage is not limited to such applications. This filler metal is normally used for brazing, without flux, using a protective atmosphere.

WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This SAE Standard applies to all self-propelled machines with a gross vehicle mass up to 5000 kg that are utilized to clean material from outside paved areas, parkland, floors in non-residential buildings and areas principally exposed to pedestrian traffic. Primary methods for material removal can be by mechanical, pneumatic, washing and flushing systems, or in a combination of any system.
WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This SAE Standard applies to all self-propelled machines with a gross vehicle mass greater than 5000kg that are utilized to clean material from highways, parking lots, airfield runways, outside paved areas that are principally exposed to vehicular traffic. These machines may also be involved with road construction/repaving work. Primary methods for material removal and cleaning can be by mechanical, pneumatic, washing and flushing systems, or in a combination of any system.
WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This SAE Recommended Practice presents the general uses, limitations on use, and appearance of the safety alert symbol.
WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This specification provides a standard set of procedures for sampling and testing to meet the requirements of material specifications for wrought titanium and titanium alloy products except forgings and forging stock. It is applicable to the extent specified in a material specification.
Article
2014-04-01
With a patented approach to laser cutting of blanks from coil, LaserCoil Technologies systems enable companies to marry its laser cutting systems with any coil line automation, whether it be existing equipment currently in production or an investment in new or used equipment.
Article
2014-04-01
Miller improves select models in the XMT weld cable control (WCC) multi-process lineup to improve productivity, quality, and safety.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mersin Hurpekli, Rifat Yilmaz, Emin Kondakci, Nuri Solak
Abstract Honing is a low-speed abrading process to remove metallic and non-metallic materials from a surface. Honing corrects surface errors produced by other machining operations prior to honing. Moreover,, the honing grooves, the volume and the direction of the valleys control the amount of oil available, by keeping the oil on the bore surface and by improving the spreading of the oil. The traditional honing process that uses ceramic abrasives has been replaced by the superior abrasives that is Metal Bonded Diamond [1,2]. However, the main drawback of diamond honing is that it leaves more torn metal and folded metal on surface [3]. The folded and / or torn metal partially covers the honing grooves and interrupts oil flow in groove. Hence, it causes abrasive wear as axial scratches on the cylinder surface. Diamond is the strongest material known that is less friable, wear very little, requires more pressure and tends to plough through metal surface rather than cut. On the other hand, conventional abrasives that are ceramic abrasives have self-sharpening properties and higher friability.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Gary L. Anderson, Pete G. Imbrogno
Abstract Improved Power Density through Use of Powder-Forged Helical Gears in Transmissions. With the continuing mileage improvement requirements, increasing power density is an important economic consideration in new vehicle design. This paper describes the power density improvement available through reduced grain size and inclusion levels that are typically found in wrought materials. The powder forged process is similar to tool steel manufacturing rather than wrought steel manufacturing in that powder is used to manufacture the gear resulting in smaller inclusions than typically found in wrought steel.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Wei-Jen Lai, Shin-Jang Sung, Jwo Pan, Yunan Guo, Xuming Su
Failure mode and fatigue behavior of dissimilar laser welds in lap-shear specimens of aluminum and copper sheets are investigated. Quasi-static tests and fatigue tests of laser-welded lap-shear specimens under different load ranges with the load ratio of 0.1 were conducted. Optical micrographs of the welds after the tests were examined to understand the failure modes of the specimens. For the specimens tested under quasi-static loading conditions, the micrograph indicates that the specimen failed through the fusion zone of the aluminum sheet. For the specimens tested under cyclic loading conditions, two types of failure modes were observed under different load ranges. One failure mode has a kinked crack initiating from the interfacial surface between the aluminum and copper sheets and growing into the aluminum fusion zone at an angle close to 90°. The other failure mode has an interfacial crack initiating at the interfacial surface between the aluminum and copper sheets and growing along the interfacial surface between the fusion zone and the copper base metal at an angle close to 90°.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Li Huang, John V. Lasecki, Haiding Guo, Xuming Su
In present paper, the process of joining aluminum alloy 6111T4 and steel HSLA340 sheets by self-piercing riveting (SPR) is studied. The rivet material properties were obtained by inverse modeling approach. Element erosion technique was adopted in the LS-DYNA/explicit analysis for the separation of upper sheet before the rivet penetrates into lower sheet. Maximum shear strain criterion was implemented for material failure after comparing several classic fracture criteria. LS-DYNA/implicit was used for springback analysis following the explicit riveting simulation. Large compressive residual stress was observed near frequent fatigue crack initiation sites, both around vicinity of middle inner wall of rivet shank and upper 6111T4 sheet.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Dileep Kumar Gupta, Abhishek Sharma, Varun Pathak, Naveen Kumar
Due to high energy demand and limited availability of fossil fuels, the energy necessity becomes a point of apprehension as it results in hike of fuel prices. It is essential to develop renewable energy resources while considering the impact on environment. In the last decade, demand of alternative fuels has increased a lot. Therefore, researchers have already started working on the aim of developing a green fuel to overcome the future energy demand. And as we know that the biodiesel is generally prepared from the non-edible and renewable resources thus, it can be among the competitive alternative future fuels. Besides that, it does not require any prior engine modifications for its usual advantage among other alternative fuels while using it within certain boundaries. However, the process biodiesel production is in itself time consuming which increases the cost of production while decreasing the yield. Supercritical method is drawing major attention for its efficient means with overcoming the negatives of conventional production processes.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Bert Bras, Andrew Carlile, Thomas Niemann, Sherry Mueller, Hyung Chul Kim, Timothy Wallington, Heidi McKenzie, Susan Rokosz
Abstract Tools are now publicly available that can potentially help a company assess the impact of its water use and risks in relation to their global operations and supply chains. In this paper we describe a comparative analysis of two publicly available tools, specifically the WWF/DEG Water Risk Filter and the WBCSD Global Water Tool that are used to measure the water impact and risk indicators for industrial facilities. By analyzing the risk assessments calculated by these tools for different scenarios that include varying facilities from different industries, one can better gauge the similarities and differences between these water strategy tools. Several scenarios were evaluated using the water tools, and the results are compared and contrasted. As will be shown, the results can vary significantly.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jiangong Zhu, Zechang Sun, Xuezhe Wei, Haifeng Dai, Hongzhang Cen
Abstract This paper presents a three-dimensional electrochemical electrode plate pair model to study the effect of the electrode tabs configuration. Understanding the distribution of current density, potential and heat generation rate is critical for designing li-ion batteries and conducting effective design optimization studies. We developed several electrode plate pair models which were different in position and size of tabs. Results showed the influence and comparison of different configuration on the distribution of current density, potential density and heat generation rate at different discharge process. The distribution was predicted as a function of tabs. It can provide a theoretical basis for improving battery thermal performance and cooling system design.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Domenic Leo Barsotti, Sandra Boetcher
Abstract The present study discusses the benefits of using a phase change material (PCM) based cold plate for more efficient energy storage system (ESS) cooling in Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV). This paper numerically demonstrates the benefits that a PCM cold plate has over a more conventional aluminum cold plate design. These benefits include six times more passive cooling capacity and a 66% mass reduction. Further investigations into improving the system were conducted in an effort to maximize passive cooling.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kambiz Jahani, Sajjad Beigmoradi, Mohsen Bayani Khaknejad
Abstract The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of spot-weld modeling approaches on NVH virtual simulation problems. For this purpose, finite element method is considered for further simulations. The goal is to evaluate and compare results within the domain of 0 to 200 Hz by modeling spot-welds with three different element types: a rigid body constraint element (RBE), two rigid body elements with hexahedral solid element (RBE3-HEXA-RBE3) and CWELD constraint. In order to evaluate the effects, three main NVH analyses are chosen for this study. In the first place, a free-free modal analysis is performed for the BIW and trimmed body models of a D-segment saloon car in order to estimate natural frequencies and mode shapes. Afterwards, a frequency response analysis is performed to evaluate the dynamic stiffness of engine mount. Finally, a noise transfer function (NTF) simulation is carried out to calculate the sound pressure level at driver ear's location. The out coming results from each type of simulations are extracted and compared to investigate the effect of spot-weld modeling on the accuracy of FEM analyses results concerning NVH problems.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ould Mohamed Lemine Yahya, Houssem Eddine Miled
Abstract The ultrasonic (US) welding of wires in automotive harnesses is increasingly used as an alternative to mechanical splices. However, this welding process may harm the electrical terminals crimped on the wires ends as a result on the energy propagation along the wire up the terminal with a frequency that is close to the terminals' natural frequencies. The modeling of the ultrasonic welding had been investigated by several authors from the process and weld strength perspective but the modeling of its effect on electrical terminals in automotive harnesses has not been given much attention in the literature. This paper describes and illustrates approaches used for modeling of the impact of the US welding on the electrical terminals in terms of stress and deformation from qualitative and quantitative perspectives and the related benefits/limitations from predictive standpoint. Illustrations are given on an actual terminal with respect to a typical ultrasonic welding process.
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