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CURRENT
2017-04-04
Standard
AMS5351G
This specification covers a corrosion and moderate heat resistant steel in the form of sand castings.
CURRENT
2017-04-04
Standard
AMS5358D
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of investment castings.
CURRENT
2017-04-04
Standard
AMS5363F
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of sand or centrifugal castings.
2017-04-04
WIP Standard
AMS4975N
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of bars, wire, flash welded rings 3.00 inches (76.2 mm) and under in nominal diameter or least distance between parallel sides and 16 square inches (103 cm2) and under in cross-sectional area and stock of any size for flash welded rings.
CURRENT
2017-04-04
Standard
AMS5644E
Primarily for parts requiring corrosion resistance and high strength up to 600 F (315 C), and when such parts may require welding during fabrication.
CURRENT
2017-04-04
Standard
AMS5384F
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of investment castings.
2017-04-04
WIP Standard
AMS2249H
This specification defines limits of variation for determining acceptability of the composition of cast or wrought titanium and titanium alloy parts and material acquired from a producer. When specifically referenced in the material specification, the purchaser may apply check analysis limits to determine the acceptability of parts and materials at purchaser final acceptance or verification testing operation. Check analysis limits are not for producers use at producer’s acceptance testing. Composition of parts and materials must conform to the limits of the material specification. Check limits are not permitted for ladle or ingot analysis.
2017-04-04
WIP Standard
AMS4902L
This specification covers one grade of commercially-pure titanium in the form of sheet, strip, and plate up through 1.000 inch (25.40 mm). This material typically has been used for parts requiring aqueous corrosion resistance, moderate strength up to 400 °F (204 °C) and oxidation resistance up to 600 °F (316 °C), but usage is not limited to such applications.
CURRENT
2017-04-04
Standard
AMS6481D
This specification covers a nitriding grade of premium aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
CURRENT
2017-04-03
Standard
AMS5550F
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of sheet and strip.
CURRENT
2017-04-03
Standard
AMS5623D
This specification covers a high-expansion steel in the form of bars, forgings, and forging stock.
CURRENT
2017-04-03
Standard
AMS5683G
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of welding wire.
CURRENT
2017-04-03
Standard
AMS5691H
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of covered welding electrodes. Primarily for shielded-metal-arc welding of parts fabricated from steels of similar composition, particularly when the weld zone is required to have strength and corrosion-resistance comparable to those of the parent metal.
CURRENT
2017-04-03
Standard
AMS4617A
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of extruded bars, rods, wire, shapes, and tubing 0.040 to 4.499 inches (1.01 to 114.27 mm) inclusive, in nominal diameter or least thickness, and with areas up to 32 in2 (206 cm2), inclusive (see 8.5).
2017-03-31
WIP Standard
GA AM17-B
This document summarizes data guidelines to establish statistically determined minimum values for the mechanical properties (i.e., static mechanical property) for additive manufactured (AM) metals published in SAE AMS specifications. Such values are not intended to be used in designing actual parts.
CURRENT
2017-03-30
Standard
AMS4933F
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of extruded bars, tubes, and shapes, and flash welded rings up through 4.000 in2 (25.81 cm2) cross-section and stock for flash welded rings.
CURRENT
2017-03-30
Standard
AMS4261G
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of investment castings. These castings have been used typically for components requiring low weight, moderate strength and soundness, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2017-03-30
Magazine
Designing Electronic Warfare to Regain Airborne Military Dominance Certifying Composite Designs for Aerospace and Defense Electric Rockets and the Future of Satellite Propulsion Flat Cable Technology for Aerospace Applications XPONENTIAL 2017 – An AUVSI Experience Pulse Analysis Techniques for Radar and Electronic Warfare Reconfigurable Radio Tracks Flights Worldwide Development of an Optically Modulated Scatterer Probe for a Near-Field Measurement System Using Dempster-Shafer Fusion for Personnel Intrusion Detection Angular Random Walk Estimation of a Time-Domain Switching Micromachined Gyroscope Using Fisher Information Criteria for Chemical Sensor Selection via Convex Optimization Methods Luminescence Materials as Nanoparticle Thermal Sensors
CURRENT
2017-03-28
Standard
AMS4939C
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate through 4.000 inches (101.60 mm) nominal thickness.
CURRENT
2017-03-28
Standard
J1639_201703
This SAE Recommended Practice provides a system for classification and specification for limited number of polyamides (nylons) used in the Automotive Industry. Based upon ASTM D 4066, Classification System for Nylon Injection and Extrusion Materials (PA), it calls for additional descriptive characteristics and properties commonly used in the Automotive Industry. This document applies to natural and non-color matched black, heat-stabilized polyamide compounds only. Color matched compounds shall be defined by the proprietary OEM standards. This document allows for the use of recycled, reconstituted, and regrind materials provided that the requirements as stated in this document are met, the material has not been altered or modified to change its suitability for safe processing and use, and the material shall be identified as such.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1264
Gregory L. Talbert, Edward John Vinarcik
Abstract 6061-O temper extruded rod may be used as feed stock in forming processes for automotive pressure vessel applications. Key parameters for forming are the strength and hardness of the material. The purpose of this paper was to reduce variation in hardness to achieve a process capability index of 1.33 or greater. Among the process steps affecting hardness, annealing is the most critical. Initially, the process showed unacceptable hardness variation. Initial anneal recipes called for a 4-hour soak at 775°F (413°C). Initial process capability for hardness was a Cpk of 1.12, with tensile strength readings very close to the upper specification limit. Initial temperature uniformity surveys of the anneal oven showed a large variation in temperature distribution, with some areas of the oven staying below 650°F (343°C). Initial improvement efforts focused on soak time.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1240
Koki Matsushita
Abstract For the purpose of improving vehicle fuel efficiency, it is necessary to reduce energy loss in the alternator. We have lowered the resistance of the rectifying device and connecting components, and control the rectifying device with an IC to reduce rectification loss. For the package design, we have changed the structure of the part on which the rectifying device is mounted into a high heat dissipation type. The new structure has enabled optimizing the size of the rectifying device, resulting in the reduction of size of the package. In addition, the rectifying device is mounted using a new soldering material and a new process, which has improved the reliability of the connection. Moreover, since the alternator has introduced a new system, the controller IC has a function for preventing malfunction of the rectifying device and a function for detecting abnormalities, in order to ensure safety.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1372
Bo Wang, Smruti Panigrahi, Mayur Narsude, Amit Mohanty
Abstract Increasing number of vehicles are equipped with telematics devices and are able to transmit vehicle CAN bus information remotely. This paper examines the possibility of identifying individual drivers from their driving signatures embedded in these telematics data. The vehicle telematics data used in this study were collected from a small fleet of 30 Ford Fiesta vehicles driven by 30 volunteer drivers over 15 days of real-world driving in London, UK. The collected CAN signals included vehicle speed, accelerator pedal position, brake pedal pressure, steering wheel angle, gear position, and engine RPM. These signals were collected at approximately 5Hz frequency and transmitted to the cloud for offline driver identification modeling. A list of driving metrics was developed to quantify driver behaviors, such as mean brake pedal pressure and longitudinal jerk. Random Forest (RF) was used to predict driver IDs based on the developed driving metrics.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1700
Rebekah L. Houser, Willett Kempton, Rodney McGee, Fouad Kiamilev, Nick Waite
Abstract Electric vehicles (EVs) hold the potential to greatly shape the way the electric power grid functions. As a load, EVs can be managed to prevent overloads on the electric power system. EVs with bidirectional power flow (V2G) can provide a wide range of services, including load balancing, and can be used to increase integration of renewable resources into electric power markets. Realizing the potential of EVs requires more advanced communication than the technology that is in wide use. Common charging standards do not include a means for an EV to send key vehicle characteristics such as maximum charge rate or battery capacity to a charging station and thus to the grid.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1677
Bharathi Krishnamoorthy, Jacob Eapen, Santosh kshirsagar, Giri Nammalwar, Torsten Wulf, Miguel Mancilla
Abstract Automotive industry is witnessing a significant growth in the number of Electronic Control Units (ECUs) and its features owing to the focused inclination towards customer preference, comfort, safety, environmental friendliness and governmental regulations. The software components are booming as the pivotal to cater to the technology-driven trends such as diverse mobility, autonomous driving, electrification, and connectivity. This necessitates exhaustive testing to ensure quality of the system as any unpredictable failures may impose severe financial and market risk on the OEM. The industry has largely supplemented Hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) testing to manual testing considering the testing constraints posed by the latter. Automation trends complement the demand for quick yet exhaustive testing prior to the market launch.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1321
Meisam Mehravaran, Yi Zhang
Abstract Degas bottles have been extensively used in vehicles in order to act as an air pillow on top of the cooling loop and provide space for expansion. One of the important characteristics of the bottle which defines if it will work in a certain loop is the so called “capacity” of the bottle which defines the flowrate that degas bottle would be able to pass through without any foaming. Considering the complex geometry of degas bottle and the foaming phenomena, predicting the behavior of coolant in the bottle passages is challenging which requires costly tests. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been extensively used in simulating multi-phase flows in automotive components. In the current project, CFD has been used to simulate the behavior of flow in bottle chambers and to provide guidelines for the design team in order to increase the bottle performance/capacity. The CFD guidelines were in agreement with test results and lead to improving the degas bottle capacity.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1323
Jerry Lai, Youssef Ziada, Juhchin Yang
Abstract In the assembly of axles and wheel hubs, a nut is frequently used to fasten them as one unit. In order for the nut to hold the assembly in its final position, crimping is a widely-used method which prevents nut from loosening. A reliable crimping process not only prevents movement of the nut during axle operation but should also minimize the possibility of cracking the rim. If the nut cracks during assembly, it can start to rust and deteriorate. The service life span of the axle assembly hence shortens as a result. The quality of crimping operation is determined by the component designs, the process parameters, and the crimping tool geometry. It would be time-consuming and costly to evaluate these factors empirically; let alone the requirement of prototypes in the early stage of a new program. A dynamic finite element methodology which adopts the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation from ABAQUS explicit solver is developed to simulate the complete crimping process.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1663
Alan Druschitz, Christopher Williams, Erin Connelly, Bob Wood
Abstract Binder jetting of sand molds and cores for metal casting provides a scalable and efficient means of producing metal components with complex geometric features made possible only by Additive Manufacturing. Topology optimization software that can mathematically determine the optimum placement of material for a given set of design requirements has been available for quite some time. However, the optimized designs are often not manufacturable using standard metal casting processes due to undercuts, backdraft and other issues. With the advent of binder-based 3D printing technology, sand molds and cores can be produced to make these optimized designs as metal castings.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1666
David Weiss, Orlando Rios
Abstract Aluminum alloys containing cerium have excellent castability and retain a substantial fraction of their room temperature strength at temperatures of 200°C and above. High temperature strength is maintained through a thermodynamically trapped, high surface energy intermetallic. Dynamic load partitioning between the aluminum and the intermetallic increases mechanical response. Complex castings have been produced in both permanent mold and sand castings. This versatile alloy system, using an abundant and inexpensive co-product of rare earth mining, is suitable for parts that need to maintain good properties when exposed to temperatures between 200 and 315°C.
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