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Viewing 181 to 210 of 20491
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
AMS5654G
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
AMS6400A
This specification establishes requirements for steel forgings of any shape or form from which finished parts are to be made (See 8.2, 8.3, & 8.4). This specification covers steel forgings suitable for use in the construction of aircraft/aerospace equipment
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
AMS6454F
This specification covers a premium-aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
AMS6409E
This specification covers a low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
AMS5648M
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
AMS5918A
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy in the form of bars.
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
AMS6435G
This specification covers a premium aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
AMS6455L
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
AMS6476E
This specification covers a low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
AMS6523H
This specification covers a premium aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
AMS5846D
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of bars, forgings, and forging stock.
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
AMS6456E
This specification covers a low-alloy steel in the form of welding wire.
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
AMS5576L
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant steel in the form of welded tubing.
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
AMS5647K
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
2016-04-05
WIP Standard
AMS5350K
This specification covers a corrosion and moderate heat-resistant steel in the form of investment castings.
2016-04-05
WIP Standard
AMS5442B
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
2016-04-05
WIP Standard
AMS4940C
This specification covers one grade (Grade 1) of commercially-pure titanium in the form of sheet, strip, and plate up through a thickness of 1.000 inch (25.40 mm).
2016-04-05
WIP Standard
AMS5357D
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of investment castings.
2016-04-05
WIP Standard
AMS5540P
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1352
Venkata Suresh Yaparala, B. S. Guru Prasad, Harsha Mottedoddi Puttaswamy
Abstract Residual stresses and thermal distortion are a common phenomenon observed in any welding method. This is a result of non-uniform stresses generated due to highly localized heating at the joint edges, which fuses the base material and leads to considerable amount of changes in mechanical properties. Thus, it is very important to evaluate these effects in any welded structural members before designing for actual loading condition. Therefore, accurate prediction of these stresses and distortion is of critical importance to ensure the in-service structural integrity of welded structures. The recent advancement in Computational simulation and numerical techniques helps in evaluating the weld distortion and residual stresses. The moving heat flux approach and Element birth/death method makes it easier to analyze the weld distortion. This is done with the use of ANSYS® Commercial FE software.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1347
S. Khodaygan
Abstract Fixtures play a key role in locating workpieces to manufacture high quality products within many processes of the product lifecycle. Inaccuracies in workpiece location lead to errors in position and orientation of machined features on the workpiece, and strongly affect the assemblability and the final quality of the product. The accurate positioning of workpiece on a fixture is influenced by rigid body displacements and rotations of the workpiece. In this paper, a systematic approach is introduced to investigate the located workpiece position errors. A new mathematical formulation of fixture locators modeling is proposed to establish the relationship between the workpiece position error and its sources. Based on the proposed method, the final locating errors of the workpiece can be accurately estimated by relating them to the specific dimensional and geometric errors or tolerances of the workpiece and the related locators.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1358
Jerry Lai, Youssef Ziada, Juhchin Yang
Abstract During the planetary gear assembly, staking is a widely-used method for affixing pinion shafts onto the position. A reliable staking process not only prevents the movement of shaft during transmission operation, but also minimizes the distortion of the assembly due to the staking process. The quality of staking operations is determined by the component designs, the process parameters, and the staking tool geometry. It would be extremely time-consuming and tedious to evaluate these factors empirically; not even mention the requirement of prototypes in the early stage of a new program. A Finite Element methodology is developed to simulate the complete staking process including shaft press in, staking, and after staking tool release. The critical process parameters, such as staking force, staking length, shaft and holes interference amount, etc., are then evaluated systematically.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1366
Sivanandi Rajadurai, Guru Prasad Mani
Abstract Tube bends are critical in an exhaust system. The acceptability of tube bends is based on the induced level of shape imperfections considered. An analysis is presented for the performance tuning of the genetic algorithm including the importance of raw material selection, ovality and elongation property. This study is an attempt to analyze the ovality effect of STAC 60/60 material. CAE tools are essential to exploit the design of experiments and find out the optimum values of the design parameters in comparison with full factorial designs. Especially the effects of materials, dimensions and geometry shape of the ultimate strength were discussed by both CAE and experiments. The ultimate strength of steel tube was evaluated at least 20-30% as a local strain independent of the materials. The dependency of ultimate bending angle on original centre angle of the tube bend was clarified.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1380
S. Khodaygan, Amir Ghasemali, Hamed Afrasiab
Abstract One of the most important characteristics of industrial products, especially mechanical set-ups, is considering the tolerances of production and assembly of these set-ups, which directly influences the products’ operations. In sheet metal structures, due to the high flexibility of the sheets, the errors appeared while assembly will be as highly influential as the errors due to the production tolerance of the sheets. As a result, having a comprehensive model which could analyze the assembly process of these structures and also clarifies the relation between the tolerance of the parts and the ultimate changes of the set-up will be of considerable importance. During the assembly process, the contact effect between the components is inevitable. If such effect is not considered, the contact surfaces will permeate. The purpose of this paper is to present a method to analyze the tolerance of flexible sheet structures, considering the contact effect between surfaces.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1538
Vaibhav V. Gokhale, Carl Marko, Tanjimul Alam, Prathamesh Chaudhari, Andres Tovar
Abstract This work introduces a new Advanced Layered Composite (ALC) design that redirects impact load through the action of a lattice of 3D printed micro-compliant mechanisms. The first layer directly comes in contact with the impacting body and its function is to prevent an intrusion of the impacting body and uniformly distribute the impact forces over a large area. This layer can be made from fiber woven composites imbibed in the polymer matrix or from metals. The third layer is to serve a purpose of establishing contact between the protective structure and body to be protected. It can be a cushioning material or a hard metal depending on the application. The second layer is a compliant buffer zone (CBZ) which is sandwiched between two other layers and it is responsible for the dampening of most of the impact energy.
Viewing 181 to 210 of 20491

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