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Viewing 181 to 210 of 20418
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1258
Tatsuya Iida, Hiroya Mitani, Mamoru Sato
Abstract 1 Inside a paint booth to spray paint on vehicle bodies, bumpers, and other parts (hereinafter referred to as “works”), air whose temperature and humidity are controlled by air-conditioner is supplied by blower fans through filters. Dust-eliminated and regulated air flow is sent downward from top to bottom (hereinafter referred to as “downflow”) in the painting booth. Conventionally, paint which does not adhere to work in spraying (hereinafter referred to as “paint mist”) is collected while flowing at a high speed through a slit opening called venturi scrubber in a mixture of air and water. However, this mist collecting system using venturi scrubber requires a large space with a large amount of pressure loss while consuming substantial energy. By radically changing the mist collecting principle, we developed a new compact system with less pressure loss aiming to reduce energy consumption by 40% in a half-size booth.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0361
Takeki Matsumoto, Nan Li, Xin Shi, Jianguo Lin
Abstract To reduce the fuel consumption as well as to improve the crash safety of vehicles, the usage of hot stamping parts is increasing dramatically in recent years. Aisin Takaoka has produced hot stamping parts since 2001 and has developed various technologies related to Hot Stamping. In an actual hot stamping process, parts with insufficient strength could be produced sometimes at a prototyping phase, even under the proper forming conditions. In order to understand these phenomena, in this paper, phase transformation in a boron steel 22MnB5 under various cooling rates were investigated and the effects of pre-strain conditions on the phase transformations were characterised. Uniaxial tensile specimens were stretched under isothermal conditions to different strain levels of 0-0.3, at strain rates of 0.1-5.0/s and deformation temperatures of 650-800°C.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0296
Monika Minarcin
Abstract Increasing electrification of the vehicle as well as the demands of increased connectivity presents automotive manufacturers with formidable challenges. Automakers and suppliers likely will encounter three practices that will influence how they develop and manufacture highly connected vehicles and future e-mobility platforms: 1) hierarchical production processes in fixed footprints that do not share data freely; 2) lack of real-time, in-line quality inspection and correction processes for complex miniaturized electronic components; and 3) floor to enterprise resource and execution systems that can collect, analyze and respond to rapidly changing production needs.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0337
Ana M. Djuric, R.J. Urbanic, J.L. Rickli
Abstract Contemporary manufacturing systems are still evolving. The system elements, layouts, and integration methods are changing continuously, and ‘collaborative robots’ (CoBots) are now being considered as practical industrial solutions. CoBots, unlike traditional CoBots, are safe and flexible enough to work with humans. Although CoBots have the potential to become standard in production systems, there is no strong foundation for systems design and development. The focus of this research is to provide a foundation and four tier framework to facilitate the design, development and integration of CoBots. The framework consists of the system level, work-cell level, machine level, and worker level. Sixty-five percent of traditional robots are installed in the automobile industry and it takes 200 hours to program (and reprogram) them.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0340
Tina Hull, Monika A. Minarcin
Abstract Applications using industrial robotics have typically led to establishing a safeguarded space encompassing a wide radius around the robot. Operator access to this hazard zone was restricted by a combination of means, such as hard guarding, safeguarding, awareness means, and personal protective equipment. The introduction of collaborative robots is redefining safeguarding requirements. Many collaborative robots have inherently safe designs that enable an operator and a robot to work within a shared, collaborative workspace. New technology in industrial robotics has opened up opportunities for collaborative operation. Collaborative operation could include either industrial or collaborative robots, depending on its application. The current defined modes of collaborative operation are hand guiding; speed and separation monitoring; safety-rated monitored stop; and, power and force limiting.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0389
Mingchao Guo, Ramchandra Bhandarkar, Weidong Zhang, Guofei Chen, Zhenke Teng
Abstract This paper describes static and fatigue behavior of resistance spot welds with the stack-up of conventional mild and advanced high strength steels, with and without adhesive, based on a set of lap shear and coach peel coupon tests. The coupons were fabricated following specified spot welding and adhesive schedules. The effects of similar and dissimilar steel grade sheet combinations in the joint configuration have been taken into account. Tensile strength of the steels used for the coupons, both as-received and after baked, and cross-section microstructure photographs are included. The spot weld SN relations between this study and the study by Auto/Steel Partnership are compared and discussed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0357
Daniel J. Branagan, Andrew E. Frerichs, Brian E. Meacham, Sheng Cheng, Alla V. Sergueeva
Abstract The historical development of autobody steels has demonstrated a paradoxical relationship between strength and ductility, with increasing strength necessary for lightweighting commensurate with reductions in ductility necessary for cold formability. This in turn creates geometric constraints in part design and manufacturing, ultimately limiting usage of these higher strength steel grades in automobiles. Quench and tempering including variants such as quench, partitioning, and tempering are known approaches to increase strength while attempts to overcome the paradox have focused on increasing ductility through three distinct deformation mechanisms including; 1) shear band induced plasticity (SIP), 2) transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), and 3) twinning induced plasticity (TWIP).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0370
Zhigang Wei, Yunfei Qu, Dongying Jiang, Limin Luo, Jason Hamilton, Kay Ellinghaus, Markus Pieszkalla
Fatigue life assessment is an integral part of the durability and reliability evaluation process of vehicle exhaust components and systems. The probabilistic life assessment approaches, including analytical, experimental, and simulation, CAE implementation in particular, are attracting significant attentions in recent years. In this paper, the state-of-the-art probabilistic life assessment methods for vehicle exhausts under combined thermal and mechanical loadings are reviewed and investigated. The loading cases as experienced by the vehicle exhausts are first categorized into isothermal fatigue, anisothermal fatigue, and high-temperature thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) based on the failure mechanisms. Subsequently, the probabilistic life assessment procedures for each category are delineated, with emphasis on product validation.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0374
Zhigang Wei, George Zhu, Litang Gao, Limin Luo
Vehicle exhaust components and systems under fatigue loading often show multiple failure modes, which should be treated, at least theoretically, with rigorous advanced bi-modal and multi-modal statistical theories and approaches. These advanced methods are usually applied to mission-critical engineering applications such as nuclear and aerospace, in which large amounts of test data are often available. In the automotive industry, however, the sample size adopted in the product validation is usually small, thus the bi-modal and multi-modal phenomena cannot be distinguished with certainty.
2016-04-05
WIP Standard
AMS4940C
This specification covers one grade (Grade 1) of commercially-pure titanium in the form of sheet, strip, and plate up through a thickness of 1.000 inch (25.40 mm).
2016-04-05
WIP Standard
AMS5357D
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of investment castings.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0329
Piyush Bubna, Michael P. Humbert, Marc Wiseman, Enrico Manes
Abstract Conventional car manufacturing is extremely capital and energy-intensive. Due to these limitations, major auto manufacturers produce very similar, if not virtually identical, vehicles at very large volumes. This limits potential customization for different users and acts as a barrier to entry for new companies or production techniques. Better understanding of the barriers for low volume production and possible solutions with innovative production techniques is crucial for making low volume vehicles viable and accelerating the adoption of new production techniques and lightweight materials into the competitive marketplace. Additive manufacturing can enable innovative design with minimal capital investment in tooling and hence should be ideal for low and perhaps high volume parts. For this reason, it was desired to evaluate potential opportunities in manufacturing automotive parts with additive techniques.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0346
Patrick Garcia, Jiri Radous, Artur Krol, Jacek Bosek, Caroline Baeten
During the 4 last years, Lean has been successfully implemented in one of the Tenneco’s Business Units: Ride Performance. This paper reflects on the results and more specifically on the third principle of Lean [1] “How to make flow” and on the fifth principle “To strive for perfection” obtained in the fields of “Product Development” related to Processes, Tools and People. Processes and Hard Tools. How to improve the flow in the engineering processes? It will be shown that In general standardized processes supported by some integrated tools and, more specifically Some workload leveling in testing, CAD Departments, Standardization in design processes, testing procedures and prototypes development processes and Standardization and availability of components and parts for prototype building are key enablers to enhance flow in the Product Development.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0341
Jan-Friedrich Brand, Patrick Garcia, Laxman Nalage, Pradip Ithape
Abstract Several factors influence a company working culture including its industry, its geographical region, as well as the cultural and the educational background of its employees. Despite these, Japanese companies have successfully transferred a company’s working culture from Japan to other countries [2], so that only minor regional differences in productivity remain. Such transfer is possible with a strong process oriented mind set and working style. This paper examines the change in a working culture associated with the prototyping of exhaust systems in India. That change required a shift from a reactive “firefighting” mode of working to a structured, projectable and reliable working environment. The goal was to achieve increased in-time delivery, higher quality, greater flexibility, more innovation and reduced cost. The same process approach may be transferred from India to other parts of the world, while allowing for country-specific influences on a company’s working culture.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1366
Sivanandi Rajadurai, Guru Prasad Mani
Abstract Tube bends are critical in an exhaust system. The acceptability of tube bends is based on the induced level of shape imperfections considered. An analysis is presented for the performance tuning of the genetic algorithm including the importance of raw material selection, ovality and elongation property. This study is an attempt to analyze the ovality effect of STAC 60/60 material. CAE tools are essential to exploit the design of experiments and find out the optimum values of the design parameters in comparison with full factorial designs. Especially the effects of materials, dimensions and geometry shape of the ultimate strength were discussed by both CAE and experiments. The ultimate strength of steel tube was evaluated at least 20-30% as a local strain independent of the materials. The dependency of ultimate bending angle on original centre angle of the tube bend was clarified.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0359
Jeff Wang, Charles Enloe, Jatinder Singh, Curt Horvath
Abstract Impact toughness (or resistance to fracture) is a key material property for press hardened steel used in construction of the safety-critical elements of automotive body structures. Prior austenite grain size, as primarily controlled by the incoming microstructure and austenitization process, is a key microstructural feature that influences the impact toughness of press hardened steel. In this paper, a special Charpy V-notch impact test is developed to quantify the impact toughness of press hardened steel sheets with various prior austenite grain sizes, by stacking a number of thin sheets via mechanical riveting. Both the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature and upper shelf energy are analyzed in an effort to establish a correlation between impact toughness and prior austenite grain size. Within tested conditions, impact performance shows only a slight decrease as the prior austenitic grain size increases from 18 to 38 microns.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0506
Daisuke Tomomatsu
Abstract This study developed technology for simultaneously welding heterogeneous resin tubes in order to weld and integrate resin tubes with two different specifications (low temperature and high temperature). The aim of integration was cost and weight reduction. The cost reduction due to reducing the number of parts exceeded the increase in material cost due to a change to resin materials. Base material fracture of the resin tubes was set as the breaking format condition, and the welding parameters of the joint part rotations and the friction time between the joint part and the resin tubes were specified as the weld strength judgment standard. In addition, the fused thickness determined by observing the cross-section after welding was specified as the weld quality judgment standard. The range over which weld boundary peeling does not occur and weld strength is manifest was clarified by controlling the welding parameters and the fused thickness.
2016-04-05
Standard
J3071_201604
This SAE Battery Identification and Cross Contamination Prevention document is intended to provide information that may be applicable to all types of Rechargeable Energy Storage System (RESS) devices. It is important to develop a system that can facilitate sorting by chemistry. The recycler is interested in the chemistry of the RESS. This is true for the recyclers of Lead Acid, Lithium Ion, Nickel Cadmium etc. Thus recyclers of RESS will receive RESS from automotive, commercial, and industrial applications. These RESS have the potential to be contaminated with a RESS of an incompatible chemistry. It is recognized that mitigation methods to reduce or eliminate the introduction of incompatible chemistries into a given recycling stream would also benefit safety and the environment.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1130
Mike Johns, Heinz Kamping, Kristian Krueger, James Mynderse, Chris Riedel
Abstract Tapered roller bearings used to support pinion and differential gears in automotive drive axles perform best with accurate assembled preload. One of the most common high volume production assembly methods relies on bearing friction to adjust preload; however torque is an indirect measure of load, can be influenced by the raceway condition, and is difficult to control. A new method to measure preload utilizes frequency response to estimate axial preload from system stiffness. The stiffness can be measured dynamically and an assembly method automated to set preload without the need for torque or dimensional measurements. By eliminating the need for a torque signal, the raceway conditions which contribute to setting torque do not contribute to the preload setting accuracy. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of using frequency response to measure stiffness and estimate preload.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1383
James Jan, Eben Prabhu, Xingfu Chen, Ulrich Weiss
Abstract Air quenching is a common manufacturing process in automotive industry to produce high strength metal component by cooling heated parts rapidly in a short period of time. With the advancement of finite element analysis (FEA) methods, it has been possible to predict thermal residual stress by computer simulation. Previous research has shown that heat transfer coefficient (HTC) for steady air quenching process is time and temperature independent but strongly flow and geometry dependent. These findings lead to the development of enhanced HTC method by performing CFD simulation and extracting HTC information from flow field. The HTC obtained in this fashion is a continuous function over the entire surface. In current part of the research, two patching algorithms are developed to divide entire surface into patches according to HTC profile and each patch is assigned a discrete HTC value.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1560
Bo Lin, Chinedum E. Okwudire
Abstract Ball nut assemblies (BNAs) are used in a variety of applications, e.g., automotive, aerospace and manufacturing, for converting rotary motion to linear motion (or vice versa). In these application areas, accurate characterization of the dynamics of BNAs using low-order models is very useful for performance simulation and analyses. Existing low-order contact load models of BNAs are inadequate, partly because they only consider the axial deformations of the screw and nut. This paper presents a low-order load distribution model for BNAs which considers the axial, torsional and lateral deformations of the screw and nut. The screw and nut are modeled as finite element beams, while Hertzian Contact Theory is used to model the contact condition between the balls and raceways of the screw and nut. The interactions between the forces and displacements of the screw and nut and those at the ball-raceway contact points are established using transformation matrices.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0982
Philip Lawson, John Houldcroft, Andrew Neil, Andrea Balcombe, Richard Osborne, Antonio Ciriello, Wilhelm Graupner
Abstract A recent trend in powertrain development organisations has been to apply processes historically associated with manufacturing. The aim is to capitalise on the resulting productivity gains to contain the increasing test demand necessary to develop current and future product. Significant obstacles to the implementation of manufacturing derived methods include the lack of clarity of the engineering test requirements and existing working practices in the product development environment. The System Optimisation Approach has been presented in previous work as a potential solution [1]. As an extension, this paper introduces a new concept closely related to the established manufacturing principle of Process Capability (Cp). Application of the resulting method quantifies the test facility’s capability to provide a test result subject to a specified statistical confidence within a certain number of test repeats.
2016-04-05
WIP Standard
AMS5540P
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
2016-04-05
Standard
USCAR38-1
This specification defines test methods and performance criteria for evaluating ultrasonically welded wire-to-terminal metallurgical bonds. The examples used are specific to the linear weld type of process equipment. USCAR-38 is not applicable for “Splice Welding”. The specification is applicable to wire-on-pad configurations with a typical weld shown in Figure 1. This test specification subjects parts under test to environmental exposures to simulate a lifetime of field exposure for a road vehicle. Exposures called-out in this specification include Thermal Shock, Temperature Humidity Cycling and mechanical abuse. This test specification is intended to evaluate the strength and performance of the interface between wires to an electrical terminal. Validation of the performance of the Terminal is a separate task and can be accomplished using a component validation test such as SAE/USCAR-2, which evaluates whether the entire connection system is acceptable.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0505
Pai-Chen Lin, Shihming Lo
Abstract A concept of combining friction stir spot welding (FSSW) and clinching, denoted as friction stir clinching (FSC), was proposed to join alclad 2024-T3 aluminum sheets. A tool, having a smooth probe and a flat shoulder, and a die, having a circular cavity and a round groove, were used to make FSC joints. The failure loads and fatigue lives of FSC joints made by various punching depths, rotational speeds, and dwelling times, were evaluated to obtain the admissible processing parameters. Optical micrographs of the FSC joints, before and after failure, were examined to understand the effects of processing parameters on the mechanical interlock and alclad layer distribution, which strongly correlate to the failure load, failure mode, and fatigue life of FSC joints. Finally, the static and fatigue performance of FSC joints made by the admissible processing parameters was obtained. The feasibility of the FSC process for alclad 2024-T3 aluminum sheets was confirmed.
2016-04-05
WIP Standard
AMS2374F
This specification covers quality assurance sampling and testing procedures used to determine conformance to applicable material specifications of corrosion and heat-resistant steel and alloy forgings.
2016-04-04
Article
This past November Caterpillar opened its new Additive Manufacturing (AM) Factory at its Tech Center in Mossville, IL, to consolidate and expand its 3D printing activities. AM engineer Brittany Hancock recently gave Off-Highway Engineering a tour of the new facility and discussed the company’s current and future plans regarding the use of 3D printing technology.
2016-04-04
Standard
ARP1836C
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) outlines the functional and design requirements for a b self-propelled belt conveyor for handling baggage and cargo at aircraft bulk cargo holds. Additional considerations and requirements may legally apply in other countries. As an example, for operation in Europe (E.U. and E.F.T.A.), the applicable EN standards shall be complied with.
2016-03-31
Standard
AMS5080K
This specification covers a carbon steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
2016-03-31
Standard
AMS5069G
This specification covers a low-carbon steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
Viewing 181 to 210 of 20418

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