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1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430135
WILLIAM SCHROEDER, THOMAS H. HAZLETT
THE paper deals particularly with those phases of aircraft production concerned with sheet metal forming, namely, basic analyses of sheet metal forming operations, classification of parts into basically similar groups, forming techniques, and limits to which the commonest materials may be successfully formed. Emphasis is placed upon the need for quantitative knowledge of the forming limits for die and aircraft design. All of the common types of forming equipment, with their applications and limitations, are discussed. Methods capable of high rates of production, such as the rubber pressure hydro-press and the double-acting press, are discussed in more detail. Forming limits are presented and techniques are discussed for flanging, stretching, drawing, and redrawing.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430138
C. G. PETERSON
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430140
R. B. SCHENCK
THE development of a practical method for producing steel cartridge cases became necessary when the critical shortage of copper made it imperative that the standard brass cases be replaced with ones made of steel. A group of manufacturers, including Buick, worked on the problem with the Ordnance Department, and a cartridge case committee was formed, consisting of representatives from both Ordnance and industry. Very successful results have accrued from this cooperative program, and, according to latest reports, steel cartridge cases in practically all calibers will soon be in volume production. This paper tells the story of how the process developed by the Buick engineers was accomplished, and describes the method in detail. The Buick process has been applied successfully to the manufacture of steel cases of the 75-mm size, which are now being produced in large quantities. Thirty-one major manufacturing operations are used in the production of these cases, the most interesting and unique ones being a series of four cold-drawing operations.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430143
J. O. ALMEN
IT is doubtful whether we are getting more net work from metals today in dynamically loaded parts than was obtainable 25 years ago, and no super-strength-alloy discoveries seem imminent; however, much can be done to increase the fatigue strength of many machine parts made from ordinary structural materials by merely extending processes already known to be satisfactory, and avoiding practices that reduce fatigue strength. We have today new concepts of fatigue failure: Fatigue failures result only from tension stresses, never from compressive stresses. Any surface, no matter how smoothly finished, is a stress-raiser. Structural materials are not rigid. Many fatigue failures can be traced to elastic deflection for which no allowance was made in design. From experience with practical machine parts, we can only conclude that stress calculations by textbook methods are wholly inadequate unless we generously temper our calculations with experience. The accuracy of stress data from photo-elasticity, brittle lacquers, extensometers, and similar methods is usually greater than by mathematical analysis, but these are far from reliable.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430127
JOSEPH GESCHELIN
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430165
PHIL KOENIG
DEVELOPMENTS resulting from research inspired by the war's demands for greater speed, larger volume, and material and labor conservation, have led to the manufacture of many airplane parts by the impact-extrusion method. Where the previous methods called for casting, forging, or machining from solid stock, research has developed ways to use the impact-extrusion method that are more rapid and economical. Aluminum and aluminum alloys can be extruded by this method and their size is limited only by the power of the press available for the work. Small parts are produced in large quantities by the use of multiple dies. Experiments have established the pressures required to form these materials by the impact-extrusion method, complicated designs and shapes can be easily produced, and there seems to be no limit to the height to which the metal will flow, if the required force is applied to the tools.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430153
A. W. HARRIS
ALTHOUGH shaving had already become a common method of finishing spur and helical gears in the automotive industry before the war, there were many problems that had to be solved before this method could be applied to aircraft-engine gears. The major objection of the aircraft industry to shaving has been the probability of distortion during heat-treatment subsequent to finishing the tooth form. Mr. Harris suggests that the heat-treatment procedure be changed to make expansion more uniform, and then an allowance be introduced in cutting the gear originally to compensate for this uniform expansion. Another objection to shaving has been the probability of highly concentrated stresses due to cutter marks and the line of demarcation between the hobbed and shaved contour in the tooth fillet. Mr. Harris proposes a form of hob for giving smooth fillet contours that will blend with the shaved active profile of the gear. The author also discusses the types of errors that might occur in the gear before shaving and be only partially corrected.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430041
H. H. Zornig
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430032
L. B. Rivard
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430038
H. S. White
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430036
H. R. Turner
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430035
Wm. F. Pioch
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430076
Roy Long
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430071
G.A. MacGillivray
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430068
Ralph E. Davison
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430070
W. E. Brainard
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430057
C. H. Lenhart
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430056
George A. Arnold
ABSTRACT
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430058
W. A. Saylor
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430108
A. W. HERRINGTON
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430105
C. L. Eksergian
ABSTRACT
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430099
J. H. Macleod
ABSTRACT
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430088
Willard T. Chevalier
1942-12-01
Standard
AMS6413
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of mechanical tubing.
1942-12-01
Standard
AMS6381
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of mechanical tubing.
1942-12-01
Standard
AMS5033
1. ACKNOWLEDGMENT: A vendor must mention this specification number and its last revision in all quotations and when acknowledging purchase orders.
1942-12-01
Standard
AMS5044
This specification covers a carbon steel in the form of sheet and strip.
1942-12-01
Standard
AMS5042B
This specification has been declared “NONCURRENT” by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of August 2009. It is recommended, therefore, that this specification not be specified for new designs. “NONCURRENT” refers to those specifications which have previously been widely used and which may be required for production or processing of existing designs in the future. The Aerospace Materials Division, however, does not recommend these specifications for future use in new designs. “NONCURRENT” specifications are available from SAE upon request.
1942-12-01
Standard
AMS5575B
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant steel in the form of welded tubing.
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