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Viewing 19231 to 19260 of 19642
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, and forging stock.
Standard
1942-03-01
No scope available.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
Standard
1942-03-01
No scope available.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, and forging stock. These products have been used typically for carburized parts which require low minimum core hardness and allow a wide hardness range in sections 0.375 in. (9.50 mm) and under in nominal thickness, but usage is not limited to such applications. The core may or may not be machinable after hardening.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of heat treated bars and forgings.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers an aluminum bronze alloy in the form of centrifugal and chill castings.
Standard
1942-03-01
ABSTRACT
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers a carbon steel in the form of seamless tubing. This tubing has been used typically for parts requiring tubing of moderate strength suitable for forming, welding, and brazing, but usage is not limited to such applications.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers a carbon steel in the form of strip.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers a carbon steel in the form of bars, forgings, and forging stock. This product has been used typically for parts requiring low strength and high ductility, but usage is not limited to such applications..
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers a carbon steel in the form of wire supplied as coils of wire or as finished springs. Primarily for springs, such as valve springs, subject to moderate stresses and requiring good fatigue properties.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers a low-carbon steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, and forging stock.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, and forging stock.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification establishes the requirements for anodic coatings on aluminum alloys.
Standard
1942-03-01
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
Technical Paper
1942-01-01
GEORGE THARRATT
THE primary purpose of “Production Breakdown Illustration” is to speed the production of military aircraft by giving each workman a simple picture of the part or assembly upon which he is working, together with an easily understood description of the operations and tools necessary to do his job. It is a modern adaptation of the ancient device of transmitting thought by pictorial representations, used by man through the centuries. As developed at the Douglas Aircraft Co., the use of production illustrations has proved of tremendous value not only to the mechanic on the production line but in the perfecting of designs for new type airplanes, the more efficient use of the production line technique, the more accurate determination of material needs, the speedier development of tooling and jigging requirements, and in other phases of the manufacturing process. Production illustration routines now fall into four major phases. First, during the design stage when innumerable new problems arise as the result of the demand for better airplane performance, the illustrations facilitate closer coordination among the various specialists who have the responsibility of solving these problems.
Technical Paper
1942-01-01
R. H. Clark
Technical Paper
1942-01-01
WILLIAM D. LEWIS
Viewing 19231 to 19260 of 19642

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