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Viewing 19231 to 19260 of 21386
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630238
Joseph M. Palsulich
High energy rate forging is an outstanding development in metalworking technology. Many advantages over conventional metalworking processes are offered by this new method. Controlled energy and high rates of billet deformation set this process apart from all others. The benefits derived from this controlled energy and high rate of deformation are numerous, as this paper shows.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630230
L. A. Harlander
This paper describes various considerations in the application of mechanization and automation to merchant vessels. Crew tasks and equipment are analyzed to determine those areas that offer the greatest gains for lower operating costs by the elimination or reduction of manual functions and the use of automation. Degrees of automation are explored to ascertain the most practical manning scales and the corresponding capital investments necessary. Two vessels are described to illustrate the engineering features that could reduce manning requirements.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630234
I. J. Stewart, P. R. Arzt
The results of laboratory investigations and shop experience related to the machining of the alloy systems of columbium, molybdenum, tantalum, and tungsten are presented. Material properties and their relationships to maching characteristics are discussed, as are certain economic aspects of shop practice. Empirical data are presented to illustrate and quantify the more significant characteristics, and conclusions are drawn for appropriate shop maching conditions. In general, these metals are very difficult to machine; the most notable exceptions are the infiltrated forms of tungsten, whose extraordinary maching characteristics approach those of the light metals, and the molybdenum group, which are readily machinable by certain processes. However, grinding any of the refractory metals is slow and difficult, and very smooth finishes are exceedingly difficult to obtain.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630203
Boris Pundick
It is often asserted that the electronics industry has been slow to mechanize its production lines. The author admits the validity of the charge and then points out what he feels are good and sufficient reasons underlying this phenomenon. He suggests that change is perhaps the only thing that the electronics manufacturer can depend on. How to cope with change and at the same time mechanize production is the dilemma to which the author addresses himself.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630372
J. J. Gilbeau, D. G. Huber
The basic design philosophy and various problems and solutions encountered in developing ground handling systems for liquid hydrogen are summarized. A brief description of the design system for the handling of liquid hydrogen is outlined. The authors conclude that handling of LH2 can be safely accomplished provided adequate precautions are taken based on their findings and experience gained through the Centaur program.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630338
Richard H. Sprince, J. L. DeWeese, G. L MacPherson, R. W. Wirta, John Conley, R. S. Mosher
The evolution of the relationship between man and the machine he selects to perform work, from the standpoint of control, is traced through the various eras of history. This, paper describes the cyclic effect in the man-machine relationship, that is, the integration and lack of integration of the operator in the task loop, from the days of the Stone Age through the Machine Age, the Age of Automation, and up to today. Recognizing the increased performance and sophistication of present-day machines, a discussion is presented of the component and equipment design considerations necessary for integrating man and machine through remote controls.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630337
James K. Figenshau
Many remotely controlled manipulative devices have been designed and operated successfully for extended periods in nuclear, industrial, underwater, underseas, high temperature, inert gas, hard vacuum, space, explosive, corrosive, toxic, and other hazardous environments. This paper describes the environmental protection for typical manipulative devices and discusses design parameters, methods of operation, design features, materials of construction, and, where possible, operating experience to date.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630306
C. Sieling, H. E. Westenberg
The Agri-Robot is a new automatic plow which, once set up properly, does not require an operator. This machine, and others using the same concept will do a great deal to solve the continually growing shortage of farm workers. The operation of the Agri-Robot is based on hydraulic control, feeler wheels, and solenoid valves operating safety devices. The economic advantages of a robot plow include less manpower required on the farm, greater plowing efficiency, and being able to plow at the exact proper time, providing better crops.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630271
C. M. Fixman, R. R. Peterson
The development of integrated powerplants for automated ships is studied. Two steam plant approaches and two gas turbine plant concepts were visualized. Feasibility studies and detailed workings of the various powerplants are presented. The Maritime Administration must evaluate the most efficient and practical propulsion plant to determine which will effect the greatest overall economy of operation -- the purpose being to improve the economic climate of American shipping.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630279
W. Andrew Haggerty
Since the introduction of electrochemical machining (ECM) just a few years ago, interest in this process has grown at a very rapid rate. Many papers and articles have been written explaining the nature of the process and how it can be applied to removing metal. This paper briefly reviews how the ECM process works, what its advantages are, and how it can be applied to accomplish various jobs; also, some of the process parameters that affect the dimensional tolerances, surface finish, and metal removal rates that can be obtained by ECM.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630165
A. James Waldron
The formal method of logical planning and scheduling, known as PERT (Program Evaluation and Review Technique) is described in its basic methodology. Its application to scheduling manufacturing operations, including an example of machine loading, is discussed. The simple thesis of separating planning from scheduling is developed, and establishment of the famous “Critical Path” is shown. It has been discovered that a very small percentage of all the time consuming operations on any project or plan, controls the completion time of that plan. Finding these critical items in order for the manager to efficiently function on the “management by exception” principle is the purpose of the network planning method described. The rules for establishing the “arrow diagram” plan of execution are listed and discussed.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630072
CHARLES E. DRURY
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630046
Roland P. Koehring
This paper presents a discussion of a wide range of powder metallurgy applications that have been in use for many years in the automotive industry and some of the advantages that have resulted from their use. It also discusses some recently developed newer materials and processes that have advanced powder metallurgy applications to a new plateau of wider acceptance and performance scope. It concludes with a review of some future “dream materials and processes,” which may result in still wider performance and acceptance of powder metallurgy in the automotive industry.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630060
Osamu Madono
The important advantage of the Shaw process is that it permits precision casting of not only small but also large castings. We applied the Shaw Process for making large cast tools, including press tools and die blocks that weighed 5 tons and 1/2 ton at their greatest weights, respectively. Hundreds of cast press tools and nearly 100 forging die blocks and rolls have already been produced with successful results. Much experimental and research work has been carried out for establishing the production methods that are most effective not only in casting but also in finishing. As a result of actual production, we recognize the advantage of the Shaw Process more clearly with respect to reduction of both production time and costs.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630045
Samuel Thompson, E. T. Johnson
With today's increased automobile warranties, quality control in the manufacture of automobile parts and components is becoming more critical. In manufacturing parts such as clutch plates by powder metallurgy, there are definite steps the manufacturer takes, from designing the part to obtaining a reorder. Quality control plays an important role in most of these steps.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630044
Richard B. Thomson
Comprehensive discussion of the progress of the powder metallurgy industry. One hundred percent inspection of all attributes of a component is not possible at a price anyone can afford to pay. Realistic and reasonably thorough inspection, is possible, however, through the use of statistical methods. Statistical quality control, which replaces the old intuition method, enables powder metallurgy parts users to outlay a minimum amount of capital expenditure, to have assured overall reliability, and assure predictability among other advantages.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630026
R. H. Wesley
Electrospark, or electrohydraulic forming, uses a rapid discharge of electrical energy either across the gap between a pair of spaced electrodes immersed in a liquid pressure transmitting medium, or through an initiating filament connected between the electrodes. Pressure ranges up to 200,000 psi. Advantages include speed, simplicity, versatility, and economy.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630024
N. N. Ida, W. W. Hawkesworth, A. A. Ezra, L. Boze
This paper discusses the experiences, techniques, and findings applicable to explosive forming undertaken at Martin-Denver. These explosive forming experiments were conducted using free-forming techniques. A discussion of development of scaling laws and their application in explosive forming, together with detail formulas controlling these effects are presented. Four basic dimensions of explosive forming -- mass, length, time, and temperature -- together with 22 variables and their interdependence are formulated. An analysis of material properties, formability limits, and limiting parameters of materials used in these tests is given. Various methods of explosive forming such as plug cushion concept, carriage free forming, and sandwiching are described and other process controls, as well as development of specific production equipment, are outlined.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630025
Warren G. Mang
This paper presents a serious consideration for expanding manufacturing techniques, reducing material costs, and increasing production rates with greater reliability through use of “Dynapak” high-energy rate metalworking machines. The process of high-energy rate, high velocity impact metalworking is explained and areas for present and future applications in O.E.M. parts manufacture are suggested. The unique controllability of Dynapak machines is discussed and supported by case histories. Metal behaviors, strain rates, and tooling associated with high velocity impact equipment are discussed and findings presented. Additional data pertaining to such items as automation plans, one-shot forging of complicated shaped parts, and forward and backward extrusion techniques are included.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630023
W. J. Digneit, D. W. Pontius
Under a new program of quality control in the field of powder metallurgy automotive parts called quality assurance, the supplier is made a closer partner with the buyer to get a more dependable part that consistently meets all requirements and specifications. The quality assurance program consists of review of potential suppliers, contract negotiations, initial quality assurance surveys, and routine quality assurance surveys.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630429
Louis Alexander
The design and usage of structural parts from iron powders is discussed. Various powder grades and compositions are reviewed in light of particular applications. Methods and effects of processing, such as pressing and sintering, on iron powder metals are analyzed. Basically, the design engineer must determine the physical properties required of a particular part and the cost of materials and alloys, as well as machinability. The design of parts for mass production from iron powder requires close cooperation between the product design engineer and the powdered metal parts fabricator.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630409
W. R. Morrison, E. Raymond
The family of planning and scheduling techniques known generally as critical path analysis has received wide publicity in the past few years as a tool for planning major industrial projects such as the building of ships, or factories, or the development of missiles and spacecraft. The application of this technique to the scheduling problem of overhauling turbine aircraft and engines has produced the following results: improved descriptions of the detailed work involved with an overhaul; effective centtalized control over the various phases of the overhaul; logical sequencing of the many and varied jobs to be done in the highly complex and specialized aircraft systems; improved parts availability; reduced out-of-service time of the aircraft being overhauled.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630452
Robert Bakish
This paper discusses electron beams and their generation, configuration of electron beams used for welding, sources for electron beam information and manufacturers of electron beam welding machines, tooling for electron beam welding, accomplishments with electron beams in joining aerospace materials, and the future of electron beams in welding technology.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630439
G. D. Kittredge, W. L. Streets
The problem of JP-6 jet fuel deterioration during ambient storage, which gives rise to serious thermal instability, has been studied under Air Force sponsorship. During this study, four of five JP-6 fuels stored 78 weeks at ambient temperature degraded in thermal stability. This paper reports the effects of various additives and gases upon the stability of jet fuel, describes the analytic work, and lists the conclusions reached after numerous tests.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630554
Harry G. Romig
Managements of Corporations consisting of several Divisions are responsible for establishing Organizations in each Division that must institute Production Controls in Manufacturing and Assembly areas. These must be of such nature that Maximum Reliability will be achieved with respect to each Component, each Assembly, and each System. Incentives are described that awaken a competitive spirit with respect to final Quality in articles shipped among production workers. This Quality Consciousness is maintained in associated areas, such as the Receiving and Receiving Inspection Areas. Vendor parts and various procedures and techniques for gaining the wholehearted support of vendors in the procurement of parts within engineering specification requirements are presented in considerable detail. Vendor surveys, vendor rating plans, but chiefly close cooperation with vendors are among the tools that good managements employ to secure quality parts.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630552
Ray H. Zimmerman
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630547
F. L. Moncher, D. T. Johnstone
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630545
Charles H. Kohler, Walton Y. Cook
HISTORICAL
1963-01-01
Standard
AMS2815B
This specification covers procedures for marking bare wire for welding to provide positive identificaiton of cut lengths, regardless of length, and of spools, and to ensure that the wire is clean and free from foreign materials and corrosion.
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