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Viewing 19231 to 19260 of 19844
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450027
David W. Long
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450034
Robert H. Dalgleish
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450045
Richard S. Frank
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450087
Leo Berner
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450104
Lee H. Ford
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450113
Raymond B. Aufmuth
ABSTRACT
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450164
G. VENNERHOLM
PRESENTED here are the most important developments and improvements relative to static ferrous castings made in recent years, along with an analysis of the influence they may have on future design and manufacturing methods of the automotive, aircraft, and related industries. These developments have been due, in part, Mr. Vennerholm believes, to wartime necessities, which are requiring castings capable of taking higher stresses than ever before. As a result, new steels and molding materials have been introduced, as well as improvements in melting, molding, and heat-treat techniques, better methods of inspection, and greater uniformity of product.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450169
J. H. BREWSTER
THIS report is written with the intention of providing a better understanding as to the possibilities, advantages, disadvantages, and limitations of both flight-induced and forced cooling. Herein presented from a different point of view are the essentials and fundamentals pertaining to both types of cooling for incompressible flow. Generalized effects of various cooling parameters on cooling power are included in plot form in the body of the text, while mathematical proofs and derivations are submitted in the Appendix.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450153
E. C. JETER
PRESSURE casting is any casting method in which the mold cavity is filled by pouring metal into it under pressure from sources other than gravity. This pressure may be exerted by means of centrifugal force obtained by rotating the mold, or by exerting air pressure on the molten bath from which the mold cavity is being filled. Mr. Jeter describes the highlights of the development and improvements of the centrifugal casting field, and particularly the improvements in steel centrifugal castings in the past several years. He also describes briefly the air-pressure casting method.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450117
R. R. Nolan
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450115
H. A. Mullen, L. Boelter
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450237
J. W. CUNNINGHAM
INCREASES the take-off horsepower of aircooled aircraft engines had made it imperative that methods of getting more efficient cooling be devised. In 1939 a program was initiated, therefore, to develop ways of applying high-conductivity (that is, copper and aluminum) fins to cylinder barrels to take the place of the integral steel fins on the cylinder barrels of earlier aircooled engines. Presented here are descriptions of the various methods of attaching these fins that were investigated, together with the advantages of each method.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450198
H. B. OSBORN
PRESENTED here in understandable terms are the principles of induction heating, along with a discussion of the equipment needed, control factors involved, and applications in the automotive industry. Induction heating will continue to fill an important need in industry, for it reduces the man-hours and material charges per unit manufactured, as well as having such advantages as accurate temperature control, minimum floor space required, and more efficient use of equipment.
1945-01-01
Magazine
1944-12-01
Magazine
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS2605A
This specification provides requirements and procedures for air-pressure leak testing of parts.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS2602A
This specification provides requirements and procedures for air-pressure leak testing of parts.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS2510A
This specification covers the engineering requirements for finishng aircraft parts and assemblies with an engine gray enamel.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS2606B
This specification provides requirements and procedures for air-pressure leak testing of parts.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS2607A
This specification provides requirements and procedures for air-pressure leak testing of parts.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS6282
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of mechanical tubing.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS5082
This specification covers a carbon steel in the form of seamless tubing.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS3420A
This specification covers silica gel dehydrating agent in the form of a granular powder in either plain or indicator grades. Indicator grades shall be impregnated with cobalt chloride.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS6342
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS6323
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of mechanical tubing.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS5050B
This specification covers a low-carbon steel in the form of seamless tubing. This tubing has been used typically for oil lines and other parts requiring high-quality tubing suitable for severe forming and for welding or brazing, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1944-11-01
Magazine
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS5560
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of seamless tubing. This tubing has been used typically for parts, such as fluid-conducting lines, not subjected to high pressure and requiring good corrosion resistance, but usage is not limited to such applications. Welding, brazing, or other exposure to temperatures over 800 °F (427 °C) during fabrication may impair corrosion resistance.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS2402A
This specification covers the requirements for electrodeposited zinc plating. Unless otherwise stated on the engineering drawing, high strength steel parts having a hardness of 45 HRC or greater shall not be electroplated.
Viewing 19231 to 19260 of 19844

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