Display:

Results

Viewing 19231 to 19260 of 19780
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440059
John B. Emanuel
Any similarity of the incidents, characters and Engineering drawings portrayed in this paper to current Douglas practice is purely coincidental. This is the way we are moving though we have a long ways to go before we get there.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440124
Thomas Wolfe
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440087
A. J. Pepin
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440193
E. S. JENKINS
THE design of airplane joints and fastenings has become a very important problem, for approximately 50% of the total cost of a modern all-metal air frame is made up of the costs of fastening together the many bits and pieces that constitute the structure. When the metal airplane was developed, manufacturers resorted to new methods of fastening, such as rivets, spot welding, and various types of removable fasteners, in place of the bolts, screws, and glue of earlier days. Later, cementing became feasible even for metal fabrication, with the aid of the new resin adhesives. Mr. Jenkins gives here an analysis of the structural behavior of both continuous connections, such as cemented joints, and discontinuous connections, such as riveted and spot-welded joints.
1943-12-01
Standard
AMS6252C
No scope available.
1943-11-01
Magazine
1943-10-01
Standard
AMS6550A
Primarily for general use is light wall-thickness sections where minimum tensile strength up to 160,000 psi (1105 MPa) is required and parts may be welded during fabrication. This specification has been declared "Noncurrent" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of April 19, 1988. It is recommended, therefore, that this specification not be specified for new designs.
1943-10-01
Standard
AMS6280A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
1943-10-01
Standard
AMS5032
This specification covers a low-carbon steel in the form of wire supplied as coils of wire or, when specified, as straight lengths.
1943-10-01
Standard
AMS5112B
This specification covers a carbon steel in the form of wire supplied as coils, spools, or cut lengths. This wire has been used typically for springs subject to high stress or requiring good fatigue properties up to 200 °F (93 °C), but usage is not limited to such applications.
1943-10-01
Standard
AMS5115A
This specification covers a carbon steel in the form of wire supplied as coils of wire or as finished springs. Primarily for springs, such as valve springs, subject to moderate stresses and requiring good fatigue properties.
1943-10-01
Standard
AMS6535A
Primarily for use where welding and moderate tensile properties are required. May be used where minimum tensile strength up to 180,000 psi (1240 MPa) is required for wall thicknesses up to 0.125 in. (3 mm) and proportionately lower strength is required in heavier thicknesses. This specification has been declared "Noncurrent" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of 19 April 1988. It is recommended, therefore, that this specification not be specified for new designs.
1943-10-01
Standard
AMS6357A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
1943-10-01
Standard
AMS6358
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
1943-10-01
Standard
AMS5050A
This specification covers a low-carbon steel in the form of seamless tubing. This tubing has been used typically for oil lines and other parts requiring high-quality tubing suitable for severe forming and for welding or brazing, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1943-10-01
Magazine
1943-10-01
Standard
AMS6440A
This specification covers a low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
1943-08-01
Magazine
1943-07-01
Magazine
1943-06-01
Magazine
1943-05-01
Magazine
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6550
Primarily for general use is light wall-thickness sections where minimum tensile strength up to 160,000 psi (1105 MPa) is required and parts may be welded during fabrication. This specification has been declared "Noncurrent" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of April 19, 1988. It is recommended, therefore, that this specification not be specified for new designs.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6270A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6300
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, and forging stock.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6272A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS5036
This specification covers a low-carbon steel in the form of sheet and strip coated on both faces with aluminum-silicon alloy by the hot-dip process. Primarily for low-stressed parts, such as brackets, clips, and sheathing, requiring corrosion resistance and oxidation resistance up to 1200F degrees (650C degrees).
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS3075
This specification covers a stable, nonvolatile, petroleum-base compound in a form suitable for application by dipping at 170 to 210 °F (77 to 99 °C).
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS3072A
This specification covers a blend of corrosion-preventive compound concentrate and petroleum-base aircraft-engine lubricating oil in the form of a ready-to-use liquid.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6320A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
Viewing 19231 to 19260 of 19780

Filter