Display:

Results

Viewing 19231 to 19260 of 21588
1965-02-01
Technical Paper
650147
Lewis Balamuth
A review is presented of recent progress on ultrasonic metal deformation using high-frequency vibratory energy. Both general theoretical and experimental considerations are discussed, starting with the ultrasonic motor itself and covering the relationship between the unique properties of ultrasonic energy and unusual effects produced therein. Current work relating to three important areas of the ultrasonic metal deforming operations are stressed; these include wire drawing and material extrusion, rolling of sheet metal, and forging of sheet metal.
1965-02-01
Technical Paper
650858
James K. S. Lee, Sheldon Leonard
Data are presented from an experiment conducted to measure changes in heat generated at the interface between leads during electronic resistance welding as process parameters were varied The objective was to establish the value of this type of measurement for determining mechanical strength of a joint. The experiment consisted of preparation of microweld specimens, infrared detection of the relative heat generated during welding, physical tests of the samples, and statistical analysis of these data. Results indicate that the amount of heat detected at the material interface during welding may be used for evaluating the quality of the finished weld. Minimum weld strength can be predicted with a confidence of 95%.
1965-02-01
Technical Paper
650850
A. Koudounaris, E. A. Silva
This paper provides a means of estimating the energy distribution during a resistance weld between a round wire and a ribbon. It also shows that energy considerations are not adequate to predict the success of a weld system and that a consideration of the thermal nature of the materials involved is required to achieve a satisfactory heat balance. A ratio of physical properties is provided that can be used to predict the compatibility of a wire and ribbon before the extensive process of weld schedule development and qualification is begun.
1965-02-01
Technical Paper
650761
R. Gellert
Ultrasonic energy is being used today to make solid-state metallurgical bonds without applying heat. Many previously unweldable metal combinations are now both easy and economical to join. Fluxes, inert atmospheres, and elaborate cleaning procedures are no longer necessary. Ultrasonically assisted soldering makes it possible to solder to aluminum, silicon, germanium, and other metals, without the use of flux. The use of ultrasonic energy to assist fusion welding, arc welding, brazing, and the like is being investigated, and initial results show improved joint characteristics and lower fusion temperatures.
1965-02-01
Technical Paper
650762
Lewis Balamuth
A review is presented of recent progress on ultrasonic metal deformation using high-frequency vibratory energy. Both general theoretical and experimental considerations are discussed, starting with the ultrasonic motor itself and covering the relationship between the unique properties of ultrasonic energy and unusual effects produced therein. Operations discussed are: metal-to-metal, metal-to-plastic, plastic-to-plastic, and rigid plastic assembly.
1965-02-01
Technical Paper
650753
K. J. Miller, J. D. Nunnikhoven
The laser, as a metallurgical fusion welding process, was little more than a dream approximately four years ago. Many uses have been proposed for the laser but one of the most promising uses for the process, to the welding engineer and to the designer of aerospace hardware, is its now proven capability as a fusion welding process. This paper discusses where, in metallurgical joining, the laser can be employed to join members which would be impossible to fusion weld by any other fusion welding process with any degree of reliability. There are now indications that the laser process “begins” where the electron beam process “leaves off” in the fusion welding of small components in close proximity to glass or ceramic seals. This paper also goes into detail relative to the application of the process on various materials, its effect on materials, and on various configurations which appear to be particularly adaptable for the process.
HISTORICAL
1965-02-01
Standard
AMS5687D
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of wire.
HISTORICAL
1965-02-01
Standard
AMS2472
This specification establishes the requirements for dyed anodic coatings on aluminum alloys.
HISTORICAL
1965-02-01
Standard
AMS5553
This specification covers nickel in the form of sheet and strip.
HISTORICAL
1965-02-01
Standard
AMS5587
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of seamless tubing.
1964-12-01
Magazine
1964-11-01
Magazine
HISTORICAL
1964-10-01
Standard
J434A_196410
This SAE standard covers the minimum mechanical properties measured on separately cast test pieces of varying thickness and microstructural requirements for ductile iron castings used in automotive and allied industries. Castings may be specified in the as-cast or heat-treated condition. If castings are heattreated, prior approval from the customer is required. The appendix provides general information on chemical composition, microstructure and casting mechanical properties, as well as other information for particular service conditions. In this standard SI units are primary and in-lb units are derived.
1964-09-01
Magazine
1964-08-01
Magazine
1964-07-01
Magazine
HISTORICAL
1964-06-30
Standard
AMS7461
APPLICATION: Premium quality bolts and screws for use up to 600 F (315 C) where a high strength lightweight fastener is required.
HISTORICAL
1964-06-30
Standard
AMS6438
This specification covers a premium aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate. This product has been used typically for heat treated parts, which may be welded during fabrication and which require through-hardening to high strength levels, for use up to 600 degrees F (316 degrees C), but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1964-06-30
Standard
AMS6385A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
HISTORICAL
1964-06-30
Standard
AMS7730
HISTORICAL
1964-06-30
Standard
AMS2416C
This specification covers the engineering requirements for an electrodeposit of cadmium into an electrodeposit of nickel on carbon, low-alloy, and corrosion-resistant steels.
HISTORICAL
1964-06-30
Standard
AMS6431
This specification covers a premium aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
HISTORICAL
1964-06-30
Standard
AMS2468A
This specification establishes the engineering requirements for producing a hard coating on aluminum alloys and the properties of such coating. This coating has been used typically to increase, by the formation of a dense aluminum oxide, surface hardness and resistance to abrasion and corrosion of aluminum-alloy parts containing, in general, less than 6% copper or 8% silicon or a total of 8% of both, but usage is not limited to such applications. Alloys with higher silicon content alone can be coated satisfactorily with proper precautions in processing. Careful consideration should be given to the use of this process on highly-stressed parts because of the resultant marked lowering of fatigue performance and on parts with sharp corners and edges where chipping may result.
HISTORICAL
1964-06-01
Standard
AMS5751A
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings. Primarily for parts, such as turbine components, requiring high strength up to 1600 degrees F (870 degrees C) and oxidation resistance up to 1800 degrees Farenheit (980 degrees C). This specification has been declared "Noncurrent" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of October 16, 1987. It is recommended, therefore, that this specification not be specified for new designs.
HISTORICAL
1964-06-01
Standard
AMS5549B
This specification covers a corrosion and moderate heat resistant steel in the form of plate.
HISTORICAL
1964-06-01
Standard
AMS7728B
This specification covers an iron-nickel-cobalt alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate. These products have been used typically for electronic elements to be sealed to hard glasses during assembly, but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1964-06-01
Standard
AMS7726B
This specification covers a low-expansion iron-nickel-cobalt alloy in the form of wire. This wire has been used typically for the fabrication of lead wires and other electronic elements to be sealed to hard glasses during the assembly of electronic components, but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1964-06-01
Standard
AMS5717A
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
Viewing 19231 to 19260 of 21588

Filter