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Viewing 19231 to 19260 of 21277
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620497
I. J. Stewart
Results are reported of drilling and tapping tests on the high cobalt alloy steel, MX-2, hardened to 50-56 Rockwell C. The empirical data are presented and discussed, and conclusions are drawn as to best shop practice. 52 Rc has been found to be a nominal upper limit to the use of steel cutting tools. At and below this limit, this material may be drilled readily and tapped under appropriate cutting conditions; above 52 Rc, special procedures are required to attain adequate life from high-speed steel tools.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620496
I. J. Stewart
The results of emprical investigations of the drilling, tapping, and surface grinding characteristics of D6aC alloy steel hardened to 54 Rc are reported. This material is machined readily by these processes under appropriate cutting conditions; however, this hardness level appears to be an upper limit to the use of steel drills and taps. A new type of tap, characterized by a unique land geometry, has been developed and tested; this has proved substantially superior to conventional geometries for the present application. Recommendations are formulated for machining this material by each of these processes, and for certain design limitations attendant thereto.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620494
I. J. Stewart
Fabricating studies have been conducted on high-strength titanium alloy 13V-11Cr-3A1 in solution treated and aged condition--workpiece hardness was 45 Rc. The aged alloy was found to be less sensitive to strain hardening during machining than the solution treated form. This material is quite abrasive to cutting tools, when turning this alloy, use of a large side cutting edge angle is advantageous. A 5% aqueous solution of barium hydroxide was far superior to other turning fluids tested. The relationships between the cutting forces and the parameters feedrate and depth of cut have been established; a similar equation has been derived for unit horsepower. For drilling and tapping, a highly chlorinated cutting oil was the best fluid tested. A grinding method which minimizes residual stresses and distortion has been developed. Rough and finish grinding conditions are recommended which result in grinding ratios of 10–20 respectively.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620493
J. H. Crawford
Because of the rapid growth of uses of high temperature materials, newer methods of working these materials have been necessary. One method showing great promise today is the use of electrolytic machining. Since electrolytic machining is independent of most physical properties of the materials, the metal removal rates depend principally upon applied current. Advantages and disadvantages of the process are presented with examples of some of the hardware produced.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620523
A. L. Kitchin, H. Mansfield
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620519
Jens L. Wennberg, Clarence L. Mehl, E. J. Krabacher
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620485
Harry A. Hokanson
High-voltage electron beam welding is discussed for a variety of aerospace applications. These include repair welding, welding of miniature electronic components, and welding of structural hardware. The specific procedure for each application is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on discussing the contribution of the characteristics of the process - low energy input, high-purity welding environment, and precise controllability - to the success of each application.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620476
F. N. Witzke, L. M. Nelson
The benefits resulting from utilization of precision spindle, polar graph type roundness gages include better understanding of roundness, faster setup, improved machine tolerance capabilities, and fewer rejected parts. There are advantages to the use of true roundness gages in high production, limited production or prototype work, and engineering evaluation. In addition to roundness, the rotating table polar graph roundness gage can be used for concentricity, squareness, flatness, and other geometric relationship measurements.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620125
R. H. Smith
Building maintenance and sanitation provides economic opportunities for good management through an Industrial Engineering approach. The Engineering Div. of Chrysler Corp. gained million dollar savings with these methods. This Industrial Engineering approach is indicated by its sanitation program which includes work sampling, methods development, performance goals, measurement of what is to be cleaned, work load determination, detailed schedules, detailed material control, quality measurement, supervisory training, employee training, and detailed supervisory follow-up. Although valuable individually, these methods together provide a gold mine for progress and cost saving.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620142
Robert E. Wilbert
The complexities of manufacture brought about by the demand for variety of models of practically every commodity have necessitated a new approach to manufacturing methods. This paper presents a method based on versatility of operating equipment and on precise control of tools from design and usage standpoints. The plan affords flexibility in manufacture and at the same time obtains important cost savings
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620136
Richard L. Bidwell
This paper touches on three major areas concerning a new 4000 ton self contained extrusion press, namely: 1. A brief explanation of the extrusion process as it is accomplished at Grand Rapids. 2. Some detail information concerning the 4000 ton press including its specific press cycle. 3. An illustration of some of the products being produced or that will be produced on the 4000 ton press.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620150
A. V. Feigenbaum
Today, the American consumer is demanding progressively higher levels of product quality. Also, demand and need has been for more automatic and reliable products. Quality control has progressed to the concept of total quality control, governed by marketing, engineering, purchasing, manufacturing engineering, manufacturing supervision, mechanical inspection, shipping, field engineering, and field testing.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620178
Charles W. Getz
This is a dissertation on the use of networking techniques in the United States Air Force, using Program Evaluation and Review Techniques (PERT). Basically, PERT is a tool of management in its efforts to plan, schedule, and control production. Use of PERT by the Air Force in weapon system management is expounded in its various phases. Means of developing uniformity in the use of PERT when establishing costs for activities are outlined. A Bibliography on PERT and other networking techniques is also included.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620182
John Sawyer
Ohio farm operations are outlined, showing how their basic pattern will change. This change will release the grain production from limitations formerly imposed by livestock programs. The separation from livestock operations, plus other discoveries and changes will demand a new design of power to be all-purpose in design and ability. Future farms will be a one machine operation.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620180
Walter M. Shaffer
This paper covers the development and features of a unique narrow aisle gas fork lift truck. It shows how three individually selective types of hydraulic circuits are utilized for a hydrostatic drive to power a rotatable front end - load assembly in a vehicle which is a new approach to narrow aisle stacking. The result is a lift truck which uses narrow aisles for storing material and retains the speed, utility, and endurance of conventional equipment.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620203
J. H. Beno
A fundamental problem in the design of a remotely controlled handling device is the command and data link. Where the handling device is to have limited mobility a direct-wired system is suitable. Where greater mobility and a large number of control functions are required a multiplex type control system and data link becomes more attractive. For mobility over greater distances, radio control may be used. The Hughes Mobot Mark II is an example of the second system. Technical details of Mobot Mark II are given and experience with reliability, maintainability, and operator training requirements are presented. The adaptation of this control system to a radio control and data link is also outlined.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620063
Richard F. Brackin
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620074
Robert S. Ames, J. Byron Jones, Florence R. Meyer
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620088
H. P. Furth, R. W. Waniek
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620092
G. Niemann, H. Rettig, G. Lechner
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620113
L. T. SZADY, C. R. MOORE
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620108
D. F. Brower
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620004
Robert Felts
HISTORICAL
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS5805
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of welding wire.
HISTORICAL
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS5800
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of welding wire. This wire has been used typically as filler metal for gas-tungsten-arc or gas-metal-arc welding of parts fabricated from alloys of similar composition, but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS5362D
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of investment castings. These castings have been used typically for structural parts, where welding during fabrication may be required, for use up to 1500 °F (816 °C), but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS5542G
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
HISTORICAL
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS5541A
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of sheet and strip. These products have been used typically for parts requiring high strength up to 1500 degrees F (816 degrees C) and oxidation resistance up to 1800 degrees F (982 degrees C), but usage is not limited to such applications. Parts may be formed and then heat treated to improve strength at elevated temperatures.
HISTORICAL
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS5550A
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of sheet and strip.
HISTORICAL
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS5552A
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
Viewing 19231 to 19260 of 21277

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