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1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640130
J. W. Meier
The characteristics and advantages of electron beam welding using both vacuum and nonvacuum techniques are discussed and related to the use of this process in production. Specific applications of both techniques are selected and described in detail as a means of evaluating this process relative to quality, versatility, controllability, adaptability for automation, and economics.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640121
Robert W. Gardner
This paper discusses the progress of cold extrusion processing from basic experimental work through production application of standard machine tools and processes to presses and auxiliary equipment for shearing and heading (slug production) and extrusion operations. Development of the press and die unit for the use of hot rolled bar on large extrusions is described. Design standards on the box bushing type of shear die unit for extrusion slugs is also discussed. Cold extrusion processing with the modern press and auxiliary equipment is treated for both small and large extrusions and production speeds. The paper also describes the development and use of service equipment for size and volume control of slugs, as well as safety devices or checking equipment for the extrusion press.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640122
Francis W. Boulger
The stresses developed during cold extrusion are so high that more accurate stress estimates are necessary for judging the limitations in applying the process to a particular application. This paper reviews a few research investigations dealing with the effects of variables in cold extrusion processes on punch pressures and limiting reductions without cracking. Some information is also presented about the effects of processing and elevated temperature working on strength of parts.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640029
D. E. Irwin
Abstract The utilization of technicians to assume responsibility for certain technical work done by professional engineers is an effective method to improve engineering productivity. However, such utilization in industry has not met earlier expectations and, as a result, there is a lack of public understanding and acceptance of the work of technicians. This paper discusses some reasons for such slow growth and challenges industry to examine present trends as they may affect manpower planning. An illustration of how one company has successfully utilized technicians is presented with some suggestions to insure such success.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640533
M. T. Hatae
The need for rapid movement of material to minimize the cost of rescheduling spacecraft launchings has emphasized the extensive use of air cargo shipment by the aerospace industry. This paper presents some new techniques of packaging which have been developed to protect material during handling and transportation. Techniques discussed are moisture intake considerations by sealed containers, package cushioning application for shock and vibration isolation, the trend toward flexible environmental covers, control of temperature during the shipping cycle, and trends in packaging with plastics. Also discussed are the basic principles of packaging engineering to acquaint air cargo carriers with the process of package development.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640530
R. F. Stoessel
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS5609
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS2815D
This specification covers procedures for marking bare wire for welding to provide positive identificaiton of cut lengths, regardless of length, and of spools, and to ensure that the wire is clean and free from foreign materials and corrosion.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640002
R. J. Schwinghamer
Abstract Both electrohydraulic and magnetic forming are discussed in detail. Pertinent data and comparisons of the exploding bridgewire type loads used in electrohydraulic forming versus the inductive coil loads associated with magnetic forming are provided, and appropriate mathematical relationships are noted. Specialized diagnostic techniques useful in both methods of forming are discussed. Examples of capabilities are shown.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS5661
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel-iron alloy in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings. These products have been used typically for parts, such as turbine discs, shafts, and blades, requiring high strength than AMS 5660 up to 1400 °F (760 °C) and oxidation resistance up to 1600 °F (871 °C), but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS5716
This specification covers a heat-resistant iron-nickel alloy in the form of bars, wire, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS5743B
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of bars, forgings, and forging stock. These products have been used typically for parts requiring oxidation resistance and high strength up to 800 degrees F (427 degrees C) and where such parts may require welding during fabrication, but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS5508A
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate. These products have been used typically for parts, such as shrouds, ducts, and cases, requiring oxidation resistance up to 1000 degrees F (538 degrees C), but usage is not limited to such applications. Creep strength and resistance to tempering of this steel are better than those of the common 13Cr type.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS5549A
This specification covers a corrosion and moderate heat resistant steel in the form of plate.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS5331A
This specification has been declared "NONCURRENT" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of September 1996. It is recommended, therefore, that this specification not be specified for new designs. This specification covers a low-alloy steel in the form of sand castings. Primarily for cast parts requiring heat treatment to minimum yield strengths up to 180,000 psi (1240 MPa).
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS5340
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of investment castings.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS7728A
This specification covers an iron-nickel-cobalt alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate. These products have been used typically for electronic elements to be sealed to hard glasses during assembly, but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS7819
This specification covers an arc-cast molybdenum alloy in the form of round bars. These bars have been used typically for parts requiring high modulus and uniform strength up to 2300 °F (1260 °C) but usage is not limited to such applications. This alloy is not recommended for use in oxidizing atmospheres above 1000 °F (540 °C) unless protected by a suitable coating.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS7848
This specification covers a tantalum alloy in the form of bars and rods.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS7898
This specification covers tungsten in the form of pressed, sintered, and wrought sheet, strip, plate, and foil.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS2350B
To establish the issue of specifications, standards, and recommended practices published by standardizing agencies other than divisions and committees of the Aerospace Council of SAE approved for use in determining conformance to requirements of Aerospace Material Specifications (AMS) and other specifications in which this specification is referenced.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS7727
This specification covers an iron-nickel-cobalt alloy in the form of bars and forgings. Those products have been used typically for electronic elements to be sealed to hard glasses during assembly, but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS7726A
This specification covers a low-expansion iron-nickel-cobalt alloy in the form of wire. This wire has been used typically for the fabrication of lead wires and other electronic elements to be sealed to hard glasses during the assembly of electronic components, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640800
M. B. Hollander, C. J. Cheng, J. A. Quimby
Abstract Friction welded assemblies of various sizes, shapes, and material combinations are described and the basic friction welding cycle parameters are tabulated. Photomicrographs of typical welds are shown. Work-piece size, shape, and material properties greatly influence welding parameters, although excellent friction welds can be achieved in all cases. It is shown that the necessity for rotating at least one work piece to develop the frictional heat does not limit the usefulness of the process.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS5717
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS5706
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging, flash welded rings, or heading procured in inch/pound units. MAM 5706 is the metric version of this AMS. These products have been used typically for parts, such as fasteners, flanges, and rings, requiring high strength up to 1500 degrees F and oxidation resistance up to 1750 degrees F, particularly those parts which are formed or welded and then heat treated to develop required properties, but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS2550B
This specification covers the enginering requirements for a treatment to provide enhanced corrosion resistance to sheet metal parts, such as brackets, spacers, and washers, fabricated from martensitic corrosion-resistant steels, usually AMS 5504 or AMS 5508 and having hardness not higher than 40 HRC, or ferritic corrosion-resistant steels, usually AMS 5506. The treatment is not recommended for use on parts subject to impact in service.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS5567
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of seamless or welded tubing.
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