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Viewing 19231 to 19260 of 19755
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6272A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS5036
This specification covers a low-carbon steel in the form of sheet and strip coated on both faces with aluminum-silicon alloy by the hot-dip process. Primarily for low-stressed parts, such as brackets, clips, and sheathing, requiring corrosion resistance and oxidation resistance up to 1200F degrees (650C degrees).
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS3075
This specification covers a stable, nonvolatile, petroleum-base compound in a form suitable for application by dipping at 170 to 210 °F (77 to 99 °C).
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS3072A
This specification covers a blend of corrosion-preventive compound concentrate and petroleum-base aircraft-engine lubricating oil in the form of a ready-to-use liquid.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6322A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6320A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6327A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars and forgings.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6325A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of heat treated bars and forgings.
1943-04-01
Magazine
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6274A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
1943-03-01
Standard
AMS6310A
No scope available.
1943-03-01
Magazine
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430143
J. O. ALMEN
IT is doubtful whether we are getting more net work from metals today in dynamically loaded parts than was obtainable 25 years ago, and no super-strength-alloy discoveries seem imminent; however, much can be done to increase the fatigue strength of many machine parts made from ordinary structural materials by merely extending processes already known to be satisfactory, and avoiding practices that reduce fatigue strength. We have today new concepts of fatigue failure: Fatigue failures result only from tension stresses, never from compressive stresses. Any surface, no matter how smoothly finished, is a stress-raiser. Structural materials are not rigid. Many fatigue failures can be traced to elastic deflection for which no allowance was made in design. From experience with practical machine parts, we can only conclude that stress calculations by textbook methods are wholly inadequate unless we generously temper our calculations with experience.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430130
GILBERT K. BROWER
IN this paper, Mr. Brower presents data relative to the re-refining of aircraft-engine lubricating oils, based on 12 years' experience with the use of such oils by one of the major U. S. air transport operators. Stress is placed on this subject at the present time not from the economical viewpoint of peace-time but from a conservation and emergency supply standpoint, which is of prime importance during wartime. A plea is made for more cooperation and coordination, as regards the subject of oil re-refining by the Army Air Forces, the Army's motorized ground forces, the Navy, the WPB, and the OPC, as well as the oil and aviation industries. A distinction is made between the terms “reclamation” and “re-refining.” A review of service (flight) experience, cost figures, and several re-refining processes is included.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430127
JOSEPH GESCHELIN
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430165
PHIL KOENIG
DEVELOPMENTS resulting from research inspired by the war's demands for greater speed, larger volume, and material and labor conservation, have led to the manufacture of many airplane parts by the impact-extrusion method. Where the previous methods called for casting, forging, or machining from solid stock, research has developed ways to use the impact-extrusion method that are more rapid and economical. Aluminum and aluminum alloys can be extruded by this method and their size is limited only by the power of the press available for the work. Small parts are produced in large quantities by the use of multiple dies. Experiments have established the pressures required to form these materials by the impact-extrusion method, complicated designs and shapes can be easily produced, and there seems to be no limit to the height to which the metal will flow, if the required force is applied to the tools.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430153
A. W. HARRIS
ALTHOUGH shaving had already become a common method of finishing spur and helical gears in the automotive industry before the war, there were many problems that had to be solved before this method could be applied to aircraft-engine gears. The major objection of the aircraft industry to shaving has been the probability of distortion during heat-treatment subsequent to finishing the tooth form. Mr. Harris suggests that the heat-treatment procedure be changed to make expansion more uniform, and then an allowance be introduced in cutting the gear originally to compensate for this uniform expansion. Another objection to shaving has been the probability of highly concentrated stresses due to cutter marks and the line of demarcation between the hobbed and shaved contour in the tooth fillet. Mr. Harris proposes a form of hob for giving smooth fillet contours that will blend with the shaved active profile of the gear.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430011
H. S. Martin
ABSTRACT
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430041
H. H. Zornig
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430038
H. S. White
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430035
Wm. F. Pioch
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430036
H. R. Turner
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430032
L. B. Rivard
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430071
G.A. MacGillivray
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430070
W. E. Brainard
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430076
Roy Long
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430068
Ralph E. Davison
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430056
George A. Arnold
ABSTRACT
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430057
C. H. Lenhart
Viewing 19231 to 19260 of 19755

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