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Viewing 31 to 60 of 19611
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Roger Holden, Paul Lightowler, Simon Andreou
The EU project “COMET” was designed to look at high accuracy robotics in a series of modular “plug-ins” For On-line compensation we looked at different deployment techniques including super-calibrated “dry-run” based on commercially available quasi-static technology; live corrections; and augmented high accuracy using external automation to correct the inherent inaccuracies in the robot.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Roger Holden, Paul Lightowler, Simon Andreou
The EU project “COMET” was designed to look at high accuracy robotics in a series of modular “plug-ins” For Offline compensation we looked at different calibration techniques and offline robot programming methods.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Nicholas Lum, Qun Luo
Electroimpact has designed and manufactured a flexible tooling system for the E7000 horizontal panel riveting machine. This flexible tooling is intended to accommodate several different panel sizes; anywhere from 3.5m long to 10m long, with a variety of different straight and tapered curvatures. The tooling is re-configured manually which reduces its overall complexity, and utilizes removable indexing plates that can be adapted to accommodate new panel types. This type of tooling is ideal for value conscious applications where it is necessary to process a large range of different panels using a single machine. Electroimpact is currently using this system to tool 17 different styles of pre-tacked panels on a single E7000 horizontal riveting machine. This part holding method does not require large removable form boards or custom frames that index only one type of panel. Instead it uses 4 form boards that are permanently mounted to the machine by linear rails, allowing them to index anywhere along the 10m machine.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Julian Lonfier, Côme De Castelbajac
As aircraft programs currently ramp up, productivity of assembly processes needs to be improved while keeping quality, reliability and manufacturing cost requirements. Efficiency of the drilling process still remains an issue particularly in the case of CFRP/metal stacks: hot and long metallic chips are difficult to remove and often damage the surface of CFRP holes. Low frequency axial vibration drilling has been proposed to solve this issue. This innovative drilling process allows breaking up the metallic chips in such a way that jamming is avoided. This paper presents a case of CFRP/Ti6Al4V drilling on a CNC machine where productivity must be increased. A comparison is made between the current regular process and the MITIS drilling process. First the analysis and comparison method is presented. The current process is analyzed and its limits are highlighted. Then the vibration process is implemented and its performances are studied. Both processes are compared according to the following criteria: chip morphology, thrust force, power consumption, tool life, cycle time, holes quality and manufacturing costs.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
James Cunov, Charles J. Habermann
The ever increasing use of composites for aircraft components presents opportunities for new ways to process these parts. There are myriad benefits for use of composites in achieving aircraft performance goals. However, composites come with unique challenges as well. Some of these challenges impact the ability to produce accurate parts. Traditionally, such parts have been trimmed only while clamped in dedicated rigid tools that secure the part in the nominal shape. This results in significant investment in tooling design, production, maintenance, storage, handling, etc. As an alternative, PaR has developed its Adaptive Manufacturing System that incorporates a Robotic Fixture and Precision Motion Machine with Integrated Process Head. The Robotic fixture allows the entire family of parts to be managed with one fixture that remains within the machine footprint. The fixture is programmed to command the 38 individual robots to assume appropriate poses and end effector configuration to accommodate each of the over 400 parts in the family that range in length from 0.5 to 20 meters.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Louis Columbus
Aerospace suppliers face the daunting task of constantly improving time-to-market, reducing cost of quality and turning compliance into a competitive advantage. Managing to these constraints while staying profitable is a challenge faced by the entire aerospace supply chain face today. The intent of this presentation is to share five lessons learned on how aerospace suppliers can optimize for these three constraints while growing their businesses. The first is electronically enabling traceability both within a multi-tier supply chains and throughout suppliers. Automating traceability at the shop floor improves quality management and accelerates compliance. Specific methodologies and metrics used to accomplish this will be provided. Second, lessons learned from implementing Manufacturing Execution Systems (MES) showing how shop floor visibility has a direct effect on supplier performance is illustrated with case studies and metrics. Third, lessons learned in making compliance pay by benchmarking performance to AS9100C, ISO9001, and ITAR standards is provided.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Rostislav Sirotkin, Galina Susova, Gennadii Shcherbakov
Sirotkin R. Susova G. NIAT, Scherbakov G. AR IAC Abstract The problem of ensuring aviation safety was and remains actual. To realize requirements to the safety, established by standards of the international level, for example, AS9100C, AS9017 and MSG-3, is (expediently rational) to make use of national experience of the solution of this problem. Ensuring non-failure operation of parts of a design and systems of the planes / helicopters influencing safety of flights, in the Russian aviation industry is traditionally regulated by requirements of the national aviation standards establishing an order, the contents and methods of performance of the corresponding works at all stages of life cycle of a product Purpose of work (Objectives) To guarantee a normalized risk level of possible violation of safety of flights of the plane because of refusals by a way (on a basis) purposeful impact on critical parameters of critical elements (parts) of a design of a glider and the equipment during all life cycle (design, production, maintenance at operation).
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Roger Holden, Paul Lightowler, Simon Andreou, William Thomas, Jon Moran
This is a work package within STeM (Structural Technology Maturity), a UK Government research project aimed at stimulating R&D and innovation activities. STeM is an Industry lead TSB (Technology Strategy Board) & BIS (Business Innovation & Skills) funded initiative that supports new concepts in wing structure and manufacturing, to enable expansion of the boundaries of aerodynamic performance. The project goal was to deliver "one-shot" robotic drilling and fastening of an innovative composite aircraft assembly for GKN Aerospace. The first major technology advance was to prove that a robot can take one tool (drill and countersink) and make the hole (up to ¼" diameter), then pick-up another separate tool (fastener) and go to exactly the same place/vector to apply the fastener. This meant a multi-function end effector wasn't needed - which in-turn meant only a small payload robot is needed, on a small width rail. This dramatically reduces the capital investment in the robot solution, and requires much less energy, so it's a greener solution as well.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Sylvain Laporte, Etienne Gueydon, Alain Auffret, Cosme De Castelbajac
In today’s aircraft assembly process several new features make drilling operations very challenging according to production requirements. Parts are made of thin or thick multi-material stacks with a large scope to cover and complex assembly sequences. In addition, the current ramp-up in aircraft programs involves improving productivity while keeping process quality and reliability. In this context robotic solution answers perfectly to all these requirements as it is flexible, reconfigurable, fast and agile. Among the possible end-effectors, the barrel multifunction end effector (MFEE) is the flexible solution to allow many different process configurations. The latest developments have been focused on the drilling equipment of this barrel MFEE. In fact the drilling process efficiency can be constantly improved especially in terms of quality and productivity. Therefore vibration-assisted drilling system has been integrated into the barrel MFEE drilling module. This innovative drilling process allows breaking up the metallic chips in such a way that jamming is avoided.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Greg Adams
Electroimpact has developed a second generation of mobile robots with several improvements over the first generation. The frame has been revised to a welded plate structure, making the dynamic response of the structure stiffer and reducing load deflections while maintaining the same weight. The deflections of the frame have been optimized to simplify position compensation. The caster mechanism is very compact, offers greater mounting flexibility, and improved maneuverability. The mechanism uses a pneumatic airbag for both lifting and suspension. The robot sled has been improved to offer greater rigidity for the same weight, and dual secondary feedback scales on the vertical axis further improve the rigidity of the overall system. Maintenance access has been improved by rerouting the cable and hose trays, and lowering the electrical cabinet. The mobile robot is sized so it can shipped complete on a lowboy trailer for deliveries that can be completed by truck. It can also be broken down for container shipping, and reassembly at the customers’ site is a straightforward process.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Nelson W. Sorbo, Jason J. Dionne
The use of composite materials and composite stackups (CO-Ti or CO-Al) in aerospace and automotive applications has been and will continue to grow at a very high rate due to the high strength and low weight of the materials. One key problem manufacturers have using this material is the ability to efficiently drill holes through the layers to install fasteners and other components. This is especially true in stackups of CFRP and titanium due to the desire of drilling dry for the CFRP layer and the need for cooling when drilling the high strength Ti layer. By using CO2 through tool cooling, it is possible to protect both layers. Through work supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and Department of Energy (DOE) it is shown that CO2 through tool cooling productivity can be significantly increased while maintaining required hole tolerances in both the composite and Ti layers. Improvements in tool life are expected when compared to either emulsion or dry drilling. By providing dry CO2 cooling through the tip of the drill, resin binders in the CFRP don’t soften, and cool Ti chips don’t degrade the composite at either exit or mid-levels.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Yvan Blanchard
Today, the design of complex composites structures is managed by taking into account both engineering and basic manufacturing constraints, as ply shape and continuity. But in order to optimize the laminate, it is strongly advised to also take into account material and process constraints, as the machine limitations in the case of automated manufacturing use. A new innovative software technology has been developed to include engineering, material and process specifications, to help designers and NC programmers to optimize the final layup program in terms of structural properties and productivity. A typical aerospace case studies will be presented to highlights these software capabilities.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Samira Keivanpour, Christian Mascle, Daoud Ait Kadi
The End of Life phase of Aircraft is a relatively complex phase in life cycle of this product. The retired Aircrafts need to be parked in a certain conditions. The valuable parts are disassembled and the rest of them are dismantled. Materials are separated and upgraded, waste is burned or deserted and toxic materials restrained or incinerated. All of these activities should be performed in an ecologically right manner; however, collectively produced added values for all stakeholders need to be considered. This paper aims to provide a conceptual framework for value chain analysis of Aircraft recycling process in the context of sustainable development. The value chain related to recycling aircraft at the end of life was chosen to generate an in-depth analysis of a value chain, considering environmental and socio-economic concerns. The value chain framework for recycling of fleets is identified. The key processes with environmental and social impacts are determined. The decision making process along the value chain and the policy framework including codes, regulations and standards are addressed.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Todd Rudberg, Justin Nielson, Mike Henscheid, Joshua Cemenska
In an effort to improve the floor-to-floor manufacturing rate of our Automated Fiber Placement (AFP) manufacturing cells, we analyzed data taken in an actual high production facility and categorized time consumed. Actual part program execution time is approximately 25-30% of total time for this cell. We found that huge improvements could be made by improving only a few basic items. This paper will describe the data taken and our recommendations for improving the throughput of AFP cells.
Technical Paper
2014-09-01
Zachary A. Collier, Steve Walters, Dan DiMase, Jeffrey M. Keisler, Igor Linkov
Counterfeit electronic components entering into critical infrastructure and applications through the global supply chain threaten the economy and national security. In response to the growing threat from counterfeits, the Society of Automotive Engineers G-19 Committee is developing AS6171. This aerospace standard is focused on testing facilities with a goal of standardizing the process of counterfeit detection. An integral part of the standard is a semi-quantitative risk assessment method. This method assigns risk scores to electronic components based on a number of relevant criteria, and places the components into one of five risk tier levels corresponding to an appropriate level of laboratory testing to ensure the authenticity of the component. In this way, the methodology aims at standardizing the risk assessment process and bases the identified risk as guidance for commensurate testing protocols. This paper outlines the risk assessment method contained within AS6171 and briefly explores other complementary efforts and research gaps within the G-19 and electronics community.
WIP Standard
2014-07-31
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, and forging stock.
Article
2014-07-29
ZF Friedrichshafen AG recently announced the expansion of its headquarters for China and Asia-Pacific, located in Shanghai. The company will expand its space for offices, laboratories, and test benches to 54,000 m² (581,000 ft²), an increase from the current 11,000 m² (118,000 ft²).
Article
2014-07-29
For fuselage-mounted equipment, ITT’s strut integrated isolator technology incorporates a fail-safe elastomeric cartridge directly in a strut, eliminating the need for separate elastomeric mounts.
Standard
2014-07-29
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
Standard
2014-07-29
This specification covers an aircraft quality nitriding grade low alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
Standard
2014-07-29
This specification covers an aircraft quality, low alloy steel in the form of heat treated bars and forgings, and of forging stock.
Standard
2014-07-29
This specification covers a premium aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
Standard
2014-07-29
This specification covers a premium aircraft-quality, maraging steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
Standard
2014-07-29
This specification covers a premium aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
Standard
2014-07-28
This specification covers an aluminum or aluminum alloy in the form of sheet, laminated and edge bonded.
Article
2014-07-25
ZF Friedrichshafen AG has formed a joint venture with YTO, a leading manufacturer of construction and agricultural machines, on the production of tractor steering axles for vehicles from 25 to 230 hp (19 to 172 kW).
Standard
2014-07-25
This specification covers the specific requirements for 7075 aluminum alloy bar, rod, wire, and special shapes produced by rolling, drawing, or cold finishing.
WIP Standard
2014-07-24
At the Spring, 2014 meeting, a General Agreement Ballot was authorized to change the requirement for adhesion testing from being a lot test to being a periodic test.
WIP Standard
2014-07-24
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of extruded profiles.
Viewing 31 to 60 of 19611

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