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Viewing 31 to 60 of 19642
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Nelson W. Sorbo, Jason J. Dionne
Abstract The use of composite materials and composite stackups (CO-Ti or CO-Al) in aerospace and automotive applications has been and will continue to grow at a very high rate due to the high strength and low weight of the materials. One key problem manufacturers have using this material is the ability to efficiently drill holes through the layers to install fasteners and other components. This is especially true in stackups of CFRP and titanium due to the desire of drilling dry for the CFRP layer and the need for cooling when drilling the high strength Ti layer. By using CO2 through tool cooling, it is possible to protect both layers. Through work supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and Department of Energy (DOE) it is shown that CO2 through tool cooling productivity can be significantly increased while maintaining required hole tolerances in both the composite and Ti layers. Improvements in tool life have been demonstrated when compared to either emulsion or dry drilling.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Julian Lonfier, Côme De Castelbajac
Abstract As aircraft programs currently ramp up, productivity of assembly processes needs to be improved while keeping quality, reliability and manufacturing cost requirements. Efficiency of the drilling process still remains an issue particularly in the case of CFRP/metal stacks: hot and long metallic chips are difficult to remove and often damage the surface of CFRP holes. Low frequency axial vibration drilling has been proposed to solve this issue. This innovative drilling process allows breaking up the metallic chips in such a way that jamming is avoided. This paper presents a case of CFRP/Ti6Al4V drilling on a CNC machine where productivity must be increased. A comparison is made between the current regular process and the MITIS drilling process. First the analysis and comparison method is presented. The current process is analyzed and its limits are highlighted. Then the vibration process is implemented and its performances are studied. Both processes are compared according to the following criteria: chip morphology, thrust force, power consumption, tool life, cycle time, holes quality and manufacturing costs.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Janice Meraglia, Mitchell Miller
As part of a comprehensive counterfeit mitigation effort, the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) has created a program of four initiatives including the requirement of SigNature DNA marking on microcircuits. The Agency’s efforts began prior to the National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2012, Section 818. Also, in the April 26, 2013 memo from Under Secretary Frank Kendall, the Office of Secretary of Defense is clearly focused on “prevention and early warning,” as the “primary” defense against counterfeits. SigNature DNA marking is within the spirit and guidance set forth by both DLA and OSD. Section 818 compels government action and creates real liability for contractors. Among other provisions, Section 818 requires the government and contractors to establish “…policies and procedures to eliminate counterfeit electronic parts from the defense supply chain” and “…mechanisms to enable traceability of parts.” SigNature® DNA provides per part forensic traceability and can be implemented as part of a comprehensive inventory management system.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Karl Strauss
“Today’s electronic components rely on principles of physics and science with no manufacturing precedence and little data on long term stability and reliability.” [1] Yet many are counting on their reliable performance years if not decades into the future, sometimes after being literally abandoned in barns or stored neatly in tightly sealed bags. What makes sense? To toss everything away, or use it as is and hope for the best? Surely there must be a middle ground! This paper discusses a three-phase initiative ultimately leading to the issuance of guidelines on the use of devices that have been subjected to long term storage, including recommended and required re-examinations based on Physics of Failure rather than fear and conjecture that is so prevalent today
Technical Paper
2014-09-01
Zachary A. Collier, Steve Walters, Dan DiMase, Jeffrey M. Keisler, Igor Linkov
Counterfeit electronic components entering into critical infrastructure and applications through the global supply chain threaten the economy and national security. In response to the growing threat from counterfeits, the Society of Automotive Engineers G-19 Committee is developing AS6171. This aerospace standard is focused on testing facilities with a goal of standardizing the process of counterfeit detection. An integral part of the standard is a semi-quantitative risk assessment method. This method assigns risk scores to electronic components based on a number of relevant criteria, and places the components into one of five risk tier levels corresponding to an appropriate level of laboratory testing to ensure the authenticity of the component. In this way, the methodology aims at standardizing the risk assessment process and bases the identified risk as guidance for commensurate testing protocols. This paper outlines the risk assessment method contained within AS6171 and briefly explores other complementary efforts and research gaps within the G-19 and electronics community.
Standard
2014-08-26
This set of criteria shall be utilized by accredited Certification Bodies (CBs) to establish compliance, and grant certification to AS5553A, Aerospace Standard; Counterfeit Electronic Parts; Avoidance, Detection, Mitigation, and Disposition.
Standard
2014-08-26
Scope is unavailable.
Article
2014-08-25
Coriolis Composites and SAFRAN Aircelle worked together on a thrust reverser component demonstrator made with carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) material and an AFP process. This component is an inner fixed structure, made of two monolithic carbon skins and a core.
Standard
2014-08-25
This specification covers a free-machining, low-alloy steel in the form of round bars 3.50 inches (88.9 mm) and under in nominal diameter.
Standard
2014-08-22
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
Standard
2014-08-22
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
Article
2014-08-20
KUKA Aerospace, a developer of automated manufacturing systems for aircraft manufacturing and assembly, is locating its first U.S. facility outside of Michigan in Everett, WA. The 29,000-ft² center will provide a service and maintenance hub close to KUKA Aerospace customers on the West Coast and help support current expansion.
Article
2014-08-20
A soon-to-be-published SAE International standard, AS6500, is designed to encourage suppliers and OEMs to put more focus on manufacturability during the early phases of a product’s life cycle. The objective: more reliable, affordable, and on-schedule weapon systems.
Standard
2014-08-20
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) identifies the requirements for mitigating counterfeit products in the Authorized Distribution supply chain by the Authorized Distributor. If not performing Authorized Distribution, such as an Authorized Reseller, Broker, or Independent Distributor, refer to another applicable SAE standard.
Standard
2014-08-20
This document covers all metal, self-locking wrenching nuts, plate nuts, shank nuts, and gang channel nuts made from a corrosion and heat resistant steel of the type identified under the Unified Numbering System as UNS S66286 and of 160 ksi tensile strength at room temperature, with maximum test temperature of parts at 1200 °F.
WIP Standard
2014-08-20
This SAE Standard includes only those towing winches commonly used on skidders and crawler tractors. These winches are used on self-propelled machines described in SAE J1057; J1116; and J1209. Specifically excluded are those winches used for hoisting operations. This document classifies the major types of winch and establishes nomenclature for major winch components. Examples used here are not intended to include all existing winches nor to be descriptive of any particular winch.
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