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Viewing 31 to 60 of 19842
2015-01-23
Standard
J411_201501
This SAE Information Report describes the processing and fabrication of carbon and alloy steels. The basic steelmaking process including iron ore reduction, the uses of fluxes, and the various melting furnaces are briefly described. The various types of steels: killed, rimmed, semikilled, and capped are described in terms of their melting and microstructural differences and their end product use. This document also provides a list of the commonly specified elements used to alloy elemental iron into steel. Each element’s structural benefits and effects are also included. A list of the AISI Steel Products Manuals is included and describes the various finished shapes in which steel is produced.
2015-01-22
Standard
AMS2403M
This specification covers the engineering requirements for electrodeposition of nickel and the properties of the deposit.
2015-01-22
Standard
AMS4983F
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of forgings 1.00 inch (25.4 mm) and under in nominal cross-sectional thickness and of forging stock any size.
2015-01-22
Standard
AMS2423E
This specification covers the engineering requirements for electrodeposition of a hard nickel and the properties of the deposit.
2015-01-20
Article
The air-cooled 3U nine-slot D2D chassis from Curtiss-Wright comes in a 3/4 ATR tall long format.
2015-01-20
Article
The No. 1031 is a 650°F electrically heated walk-in oven from Grieve, currently used at a customer location for curing composite components.
2015-01-17
WIP Standard
AMS5045J
This specification covers a carbon steel in the form of sheet and strip.
2015-01-15
Article
Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had its latest 3-D printing technology at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, showing off a replica of a classic Shelby Cobra made via the rapidly propagating technology.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS4520L
This specification covers a copper alloy in the form of strip. This strip has been used typically for rolled, split bushings, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS4930H
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of bars, wire, forgings, flash welded rings 4.000 inches (101.60 mm) and under in nominal diameter or distance between parallel sides, and stock for forging or flash welded rings of any size.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS4934G
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of extruded bars, and shapes, flash welded rings up through 3.000 inches (76.20 mm) inclusive, in nominal diameter or least distance between parallel sides, and stock for flash welded rings of any size..
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS4950D
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of bars, wire, forgings, and flash welded rings 4.000 inches (101.60 mm) and under in nominal diameter or least distance between parallel sides and of stock for forging or flash welded rings of any size (See 8.6).
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS5708L
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of bars, wire, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging, flash welded rings, or heading. These products have been used typically for parts, such as bolts and turbine blades, requiring high strength up to 1500 °F (816 °C) and oxidation resistance up to 1750 °F (954 °C), but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS4986E
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of forgings 4.0 inches (101.6 mm) and under in nominal cross-sectional thickness and of forging stock.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS4987E
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of forgings 4.00 inches (101.6 mm) and under in nominal cross-sectional thickness and of forging stock of any size.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS5622/H1025
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel product in the solution and precipitation heat treated (H1025) condition.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS5660L
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel-iron alloy in the form of bars and forgings 5 inches (127 mm) and under, and forging stock of any size.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS7847D
This specification covers a tantalum alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate from 0.010 through 0.250 inch (0.25 through 6.35 mm), inclusive.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS4090F
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of plate. This plate has been used typically for structural applications requiring plate with high strength, moderate fatigue strength, and high fracture-toughness, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-01-14
Article
Car put on display is based on electrical and mechanical components from a Renault electric vehicle "city car" simply as a proof of process. Much testing and refinement remain. Help is being provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and SABIC.
2015-01-14
Standard
AMS7849E
This specification covers tantalum in the form of sheet, strip, plate, and foil up through 0.1875 inch (4.75 mm), inclusive.
2015-01-14
Standard
AMS7912D
This specification covers an aluminum-beryllium alloy in the form of bars, rods, tubing, and shapes consolidated from powder by extrusion.
2015-01-14
Standard
AMS7913D
This specification covers an aluminum-beryllium alloy in the form of sheet and plate consolidated from powder by extrusion and then rolled.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0115
MV Rajasekhar, J Perumal, Samir Rawte, Nabin Nepal
Abstract In current scenario importance of fuel efficient vehicles, lesser emissions & energy efficiency are the major considerations for any vehicle manufacturer. To meet these expectations vehicle manufacturer are exploring alternate powertrains to reduce emissions and produce better fuel efficient vehicles. For any vehicle manufacturer component cost, weight and package volume are the major driving factors for success. This is even true for latest upcoming hybrid and electric vehicles as well. To gain advantage and introduce products faster, OEMs are inclined to electrify their existing platforms to compete with other manufacturers. To convert existing vehicles into hybrid vehicles, all the major components like e machine, High voltage battery, power electronics etc. needs to be carefully packaged along with existing components in the same package space.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0165
Sivaprasad Koralla, Ganesh Bhagwant Gadekar, V Ramana Pavan Nadella, Susanta Dey
Abstract Spot welding is the primary joining method used in automobiles. Spot-weld plays a major role to maintain vehicle structural integrity during impact tests. Robust spot weld failure definitions is critical for accurate predictions of structural performance in safety simulations. Spot welds have a complex metallurgical structure, mainly consisting of fusion and heat affected zones. For accurate material property definitions in simulation models, huge number of inputs from test data is required. Multiple tests, using different spot weld joinery configurations, have to be conducted. In order to accurately represent the spot-weld behavior in CAE, detailed modeling is required using fine mesh. The current challenge in spot-weld failure assessment is developing a methodology having a better trade-off between prediction accuracy, testing efforts and computation time. In view of the above, cohesive zone models have been found to be very effective and accurate.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0175
Sajeev Silvester, Alex Lakic, Michael Buckley
Abstract Dimensional distortion, cosmetic distortion issues can arise during heating and cooling in the paint shop processing of car bodies. A car body can be in perfect cosmetic condition as it leaves the BIW facility, yet develop distortion defects during painting. Traditionally such issues have only been detectable on new car body designs by building and painting prototypes of a new design. The timing of such activities, by their very nature, mean that precious little time is available to address these issues by design changes in today's condensed new vehicle programmes. The result is often a vehicle entering production with partial resolution of an issue, accompanied by on-going product rework and rectification activities throughout the lifecycle of the product. This created the need for developing a CAE simulation tool which could predict these issues very early during the virtual CAE build phases of a vehicle program itself.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0204
Satyajeet Kulkarni, Abhijit Kumbhar, Jagannath M Paranjpe, Nagesh Voderahobli Karanth
Abstract To achieve first time right product in any new part development, the process requires number of trials, skilled manpower, huge cost and massive time. In case of forging process, to develop a new component lot of physical trials are required to be conducted due to the process variations. The need of the hour is shorter development time with highest quality. All these requirements can be achieved with the help of reliable computer simulations. With computer simulation, the process can be optimized and crack analysis can be carried out. Additionally the use of computer simulation in forging process reduces no. of trials, ultimately saves time and energy. The paper deals with forging process optimization by effective use of computer simulation. Existing forging process and modified forging process was simulated.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0187
Venu Ganti, Yogesh Dewangan, Saurabh Arvariya, Shyamsananth Madhavan
Abstract Scuffing is an instantaneous failure which occurs when the meshed gear flanks undergo adhesive wear under extreme operating temperatures at medium- or high-speed conditions. It is one of the common failures in transmission gears, which tend to operate under long-duty cycle hours. The tip and the root regions often experience higher contact pressures because of the loading and surface curvature. These higher pressures, coupled with higher sliding velocities and heat generation, make the tip and root regions in the gear susceptible to scuffing. Gear geometry, material composition and lubricant properties influence scuffing. A balanced gear tooth design with lower sliding velocities is often chosen as an approach to avoid scuffing. However, in the current scenarios of transmissions with high power density requirements, achieving a balanced gear tooth design is rare. Lubricants with higher viscosity avoid scuffing, but have adverse effects on the transmission efficiency.
Viewing 31 to 60 of 19842

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