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Viewing 271 to 300 of 20488
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0504
Shin-Jang Sung, Jwo Pan
Abstract Analytical stress intensity factor solutions for welds in lap-shear specimens of equal thickness under pinned and clamped loading conditions based on the beam bending theory are presented and examined. Finite element analyses are also employed to obtain the stress intensity factor solutions for welds in lap-shear specimens under both clamped and pinned loading conditions. The computational solutions are compared well with the analytical solutions. The results of the analytical and computational solutions indicate that the bending moments at the clamped edges reduce the mode I and II stress intensity factor solutions by about 7% to 10% for the given specimen geometry. The effects of the clamped grips depend on the ratio of the weld width to the specimen length. Comparisons of the stress intensity factor solutions suggest that the fatigue lives of the welds in lap-shear specimens under clamped loading conditions should be higher than those under pinned loading conditions.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0501
Seung Hoon Hong, Frank Yan, Shin-Jang Sung, Jwo Pan, Xuming Su, Peter Friedman
Abstract Failure mode and fatigue behavior of flow drill screw (FDS) joints in lap-shear specimens of aluminum 6082-T6 sheets with and without clearance hole are investigated based on experiments and a structural stress fatigue life estimation model. Lap-shear specimens with FDS joints were tested under cyclic loading conditions. Optical micrographs show that the failure modes of the FDS joints in specimens with and without clearance hole are quite similar under cyclic loading conditions. The fatigue lives of the FDS joints in specimens with clearance hole are longer than those of the FDS joints in specimens without clearance hole for the given load ranges under cyclic loading conditions. A structural stress fatigue life estimation model is adopted to estimate the fatigue lives of the FDS joints in lap-shear specimens under high-cycle loading conditions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0328
Scott Curran, Paul Chambon, Randall Lind, Lonnie Love, Robert Wagner, Steven Whitted, David Smith, Brian Post, Ronald Graves, Craig Blue, Johney Green, Martin Keller
Abstract Rapid vehicle powertrain development has become a technological breakthrough for the design and implementation of vehicles that meet and exceed the fuel efficiency, cost, and performance targets expected by today’s consumer. Recently, advances in large scale additive manufacturing have provided the means to bridge hardware-in-the-loop with preproduction mule chassis testing. This paper details a case study from Oak Ridge National Laboratory bridging the powertrain-in-the-loop development process with vehicle systems implementation using big area additive manufacturing (BAAM). For this case study, the use of a component-in-the-loop laboratory with math-based models is detailed for the design of a battery electric powertrain to be implemented in a printed prototype mule. The ability for BAAM to accelerate the mule development process via the concept of computer-aided design to part is explored.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1130
Mike Johns, Heinz Kamping, Kristian Krueger, James Mynderse, Chris Riedel
Abstract Tapered roller bearings used to support pinion and differential gears in automotive drive axles perform best with accurate assembled preload. One of the most common high volume production assembly methods relies on bearing friction to adjust preload; however torque is an indirect measure of load, can be influenced by the raceway condition, and is difficult to control. A new method to measure preload utilizes frequency response to estimate axial preload from system stiffness. The stiffness can be measured dynamically and an assembly method automated to set preload without the need for torque or dimensional measurements. By eliminating the need for a torque signal, the raceway conditions which contribute to setting torque do not contribute to the preload setting accuracy. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of using frequency response to measure stiffness and estimate preload.
2016-04-05
Standard
J3071_201604
This SAE Battery Identification and Cross Contamination Prevention document is intended to provide information that may be applicable to all types of Rechargeable Energy Storage System (RESS) devices. It is important to develop a system that can facilitate sorting by chemistry. The recycler is interested in the chemistry of the RESS. This is true for the recyclers of Lead Acid, Lithium Ion, Nickel Cadmium etc. Thus recyclers of RESS will receive RESS from automotive, commercial, and industrial applications. These RESS have the potential to be contaminated with a RESS of an incompatible chemistry. It is recognized that mitigation methods to reduce or eliminate the introduction of incompatible chemistries into a given recycling stream would also benefit safety and the environment.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0394
Minghuang Cheng, Norihiko Sawa
Abstract This paper describes the development of a fatigue life prediction method for Laser Screw Welding (LSW). Fatigue life prediction is used to assess the durability of automotive structures in the early design stages in order to shorten the vehicle development time. The LSW technology is a spot-type joining method similar to resistance spot welding (RSW), and has been developed and applied to body-inwhite structures in recent years. LSW can join metal panels even when a clearance exists between the panels. However, as a result of this favorable clearance-allowance feature of LSW, a concave shape may occur at the nugget part of the joint. These LSW geometric features, the concavity of nuggets and the clearance between panels, are thought to affect the local stiffness behavior of the joint. Therefore, while assessing the fatigue life of LSW, it is essential to estimate the influence of these factors adequately for the representation of the local stiffness behavior of the joint.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1344
Koushi Kumagai, Masaaki Kuwahara, Tsuyoshi Yasuki, Norimasa Koreishi
Abstract This paper describes the development of a fracture finite element (FE) model for laser screw welding (LSW) and validation of the model with experimental results. LSW was developed and introduced to production vehicles by Toyota Motor Corporation in 2013. LSW offers superb advantages such as increased productivity and short pitch welding. Although the authors had previously developed fracture FE models for conventional resistance spot welding (RSW), a fracture model for LSW has not been developed. To develop this fracture model, many comprehensive experiments were conducted. The results revealed that LSW had twice as many variations in fracture modes compared to RSW. Moreover, fracture mode bifurcations were also found to result from differences in clearance between welded plates. In order to analyze LSW fracture phenomena, detailed FE models using fine hexahedral elements were developed.
2016-04-04
Article
This past November Caterpillar opened its new Additive Manufacturing (AM) Factory at its Tech Center in Mossville, IL, to consolidate and expand its 3D printing activities. AM engineer Brittany Hancock recently gave Off-Highway Engineering a tour of the new facility and discussed the company’s current and future plans regarding the use of 3D printing technology.
2016-04-04
Standard
ARP1836C
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) outlines the functional and design requirements for a b self-propelled belt conveyor for handling baggage and cargo at aircraft bulk cargo holds. Additional considerations and requirements may legally apply in other countries. As an example, for operation in Europe (E.U. and E.F.T.A.), the applicable EN standards shall be complied with.
2016-03-31
WIP Standard
AMS2371K
This specification covers quality assurance sampling and testing procedures used to determine conformance to applicable material specification requirements of wrought corrosion and heat-resistant steel and alloy products and of forging stock.
2016-03-31
Standard
AMS5080K
This specification covers a carbon steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
2016-03-31
Standard
AMS5069G
This specification covers a low-carbon steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
2016-03-29
WIP Standard
B16AA
This specification covers the requirements for brush plating of nickel-tungsten by electrodeposition. This process has been used as a chromium alternative for repair and OEM applications that require exceptionaly hard elcectroplated deposits. It’s typically used in aerospace, automotive and oil and gas to improve hardness and wearability and to repair damaged or worn parts, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2016-03-28
Standard
AMS4195D
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of flat sheet and plate 0.500 inch (12.70 mm) and under in nominal thickness.
2016-03-28
Standard
AMS5645S
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of forgings over 0.50 inch (12.7 mm) in nominal diameter or least distance between parallel sides, wire, bars, and mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock of any size for forging or flash welded rings (see 8.6).
2016-03-24
WIP Standard
AMS2759/3G
This specification, in conjunction with the general requirements for steel heat treatment covered in AMS2759, establishes the requirements for heat treatment of precipitation-hardening corrosion- resistant and maraging steel parts. Parts are defined in AMS2759.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2670K
This specification covers the engineering requirements for producing brazed joints using copper as the brazing filler metal.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2451/1B
This specification establishes the requirements for a general purpose brush plating of nickel applied by electrodeposition.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2757C
This specification covers the engineering requirements for producing a continuous thin epsilon iron carbonitride compound layer on parts by means of a gaseous, low-temperature process, and properties of the case.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2451/4C
This specification establishes the requirements for brush plating of cadmium by electrodeposition.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS3415E
This specification covers an aluminum brazing flux in granular form. This product has been used typically for dip brazing of aluminum and aluminum alloys at temperatures above 1050 degrees F (564 degrees C), but usage is not limited to such applications.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2451/11B
This specification covers the requirements for brush plating of cobalt by electrodeposition.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2451/12A
This specification covers the engineering requirements and process for brush plating of tin by electrodeposition. It shall be used, in conjunction with AMS 2451, for general-purpose tin deposits.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2451/13A
This specification covers the engineering requirements and process for brush plating of silver by electrodeposition. It shall be used, in conjunction with AMS 2451, for silver deposits.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2451/2B
This specification covers the requirements and process controls for brush plating of hard, low stress nickel by electrodeposition.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2451/3B
This specification covers the requirements for brush plating of low-hardness, low-stress nickel by electrodeposition.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2451/5B
This specification covers the requirements and process controls for brush plating of hard chromium by electrodeposition.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2451/7B
This specification covers the requirementsfor brush plating of medium-hardness, low stress nickel by electrodeposition.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2451/8B
This specification covers the requirements for brush plating of non-cyanide silver by electrodeposition.
Viewing 271 to 300 of 20488

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