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Viewing 271 to 300 of 21589
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2100
Carter L. Boad
A fully automated off-line cartridge filling station has been commissioned to support the new Boeing SAL production cell. The filing station uses automated fastener feed technology that is typically found on the machines themselves. Incorporating this technology off-line in place of the traditional manual handling processes extends the benefits of automation beyond the main manufacturing cell. A single operator is able to keep up with the demand of eight production fastening machines while maintaining the highest levels of accuracy and quality. Additional benefits to this application of automation include reduction of the operators exposure to risks associated with manual handling and repetitive tasks.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2099
Peter B. Zieve, Troy Gray, Christopher Wright
Electroimpact has retrofitted two E4100 riveting gantry machines and two more are in process. These machines use the EMR (Electromagnetic Riveter) riveting process for the installation of slug rivets. We have improved the skin side EMR to provide fast and reliable results: reliability improved by eliminating a weekly shutdown of the machine. In paper 2015-01-2515 we showed the slug rivet injector using a Synchronized Parallel Gripper that provides good results over multiple rivet diameters. This injector is mounted to the skin side EMR so that the rivet injection can be done at any position of the shuttle table. The EMR is a challenging application for the fingers due to shock and vibration. In previous designs, fingers would occasionally be thrown out of the slots. To provide reliable results we redesigned the fingers retainer to capture the finger in a slotted plastic block which slides along the outside diameter of the driver bearing.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2098
Didier Friot, Loic Meiffre, Christophe Vandaele
Abstract With air traffic demand constantly increasing and several years of aircraft production in their backlog, major aircraft manufacturers are now shifting their focus toward improving assembly process efficiency. One of the most promising solutions, known as “One Side Assembly”, aims to perform the whole assembly sequence from one side of the structure (drilling, temporary fastener installation and removal, blind fastener installation, assembly control) and with a high level of integrated automation. A one-sided, or blind fastener that is capable of matching the performance of current two-sided structural fasteners while meeting volume and cost objectives can be a major driver for assembly process efficiency improvements. To achieve a blind fastener assembly capable of both fully automated and manual installations while providing robust cycle times and assembly cost reductions is full of challenges.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2148
Ho-Sung Lee
In this paper, manufacturing of launcher structural components with superplastic forming (SPF) and solid state welding technologies is presented with several examples. Some of high strength aerospace alloys, like aluminum, titanium and superalloys, are known to have superplasticity so that complex shapes of aerospace components can be produced with this technology. A combination of superplastic forming and solid state welding processes produces lighter and stiffer components than one manufactured with conventional machining and welding. Solid state welding is an attractive method to weld materials without melting where mechanical properties are important since the welding interface is homogeneous without liquid phases.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2149
Cameron S. Gillespie
Abstract As carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) become more integrated into the design of large single piece aircraft structures, aircraft manufacturers are demanding higher speed and efficiency in Automated Fiber Placement (AFP) deposition systems. To facilitate the manufacturing of large surface area and low contour parts (wing skins, in this case) at a high production rate, Electroimpact has developed a new AFP head consisting of 20 1.5 inch wide pre-impregnated carbon tows. The new head design has been named the ‘OH20’, short for ‘One and a Half Inch, 20 Tows’. This AFP head format creates a deposition swath over 30 inches wide when all 20 tows are active. A total of four of these AFP heads have been integrated with a quick change robotic tool changer on two high speed, high acceleration, and high accuracy moving beam gantries.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2150
Joshua Cemenska, Todd Rudberg, Michael Henscheid, Andrew Lauletta, Bradley Davis
Abstract In AFP manufacturing systems, manually inspection of parts consumes a large portion of total production time and is susceptible to missing defects. The aerospace industry is responding to this inefficiency by focusing on the development of automated inspection systems. The first generation of automated inspection systems is now entering production. This paper reviews the performance of the first generation system and discusses reasonable expectations. Estimates of automated inspection time will be made, and it will be shown that the automated solution enables a detailed statistical analysis of manufactured part quality and provides the data necessary for statistical process control. Data collection allows for a reduction in rework because not all errors need to be corrected. Expectations will be set for the accuracy for both ply boundary and overlap/gap measurements. The time and resource cost of development and integration will also be discussed.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2166
Hendrik Susemihl, Christoph Brillinger, Sven Philipp Stürmer, Stephan Hansen, Christian Boehlmann, Simon Kothe, Jörg Wollnack, Wolfgang Hintze
Abstract The demand for higher production rates in aircraft industry requests more flexible manufacturing solutions. A bottleneck in production is the machining of large components by vast portal machines. Time-consuming referencing processes result in non-satisfying cost-effectiveness of these high-invest-machines. Mobile robot-based solutions are able to operate simultaneously which increases the productivity significantly. However, due to the limited workspace of robots, machining tasks have to be divided and long trajectories are separated in single overlapping segments. Thus high-accuracy referencing strategies are required to achieve desired production tolerances. In this publication different advanced optical reference strategies will be discussed taking the inhomogeneous behavior of a mobile robotic machining system into account.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2078
Eric Barton, Rick Wolf
Abstract The focus of this technical paper is a unique automatic fastening system configuration for loading, positioning & unloading pre-tacked door assemblies within a static C-Frame Drivmatic® fastening machine using an off-the-shelf, high accuracy Fanuc robot. In 2011, PMC was awarded a significant contract for supplying commercial OEM aircraft doors and recognized automation was the most feasible approach for fastening each door assembly. At the time of contract award, PMC was an established aero structure supplier with significant automation capability for machining high tolerance parts & assemblies and manual fastening resources to support many different OEM programs however PMC did not have automatic fastening experience or capability. In support of this new Tier-2 contract, PMC reached out to Gemcor to propose a collaborative robot solution for automatically fastening 5 different door assemblies that were historically fastened using a semi-automatic configuration.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2091
Leo Muijs, Manuela Snijders
Abstract The use of Collaborative Robots (Cobots) is an emerging technology that is developing at a fast pace. Within GKN Aerospace’s Fokker business a project is initiated to accelerate knowledge of application of this technology. Goal of the project is to get familiar with the technology and possibilities of a Cobot. The primary difference between Cobotics and a conventional Robotics approach is that the technology can safely exist in a human operating environment without caging or other hard guarding. Both Fokker Aerostructures and Fokker Landing Gear wanted to gain experience with this technology and worked together in the preparation of 2 projects to be showcased in their companies. Fokker Aerostructures concentrated on the application of handling of an Automatic Drilling Unit (ADU) for the production of the A350 Outboard Flap. Task of the Cobot was to pick-up an ADU from a table and insert the ADU in a drill jig.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2096
Rainer Mueller, Matthias Vette, Aaron Geenen, Tobias Masiak
Abstract Assembly processes in aircraft production are difficult to automate due to technical risks. Examples of such technical challenges include small batch sizes and large product dimensions as well as limited work space for complex joining processes and organization of the assembly tasks. A fully automated system can be expensive and requires a large amount of programming knowledge. For these reasons, ZeMA believes a semi-automated approach is the most effective means of success for optimizing aircraft production. Many methods can be considered semi automation, one of which is Human-Robot-Collaboration. ZeMA will use the example of a riveting process to measure the advantages of Human-Robot-Collaboration systems in aircraft structure assembly. In the assembly of the aircraft aft section the pressure bulkhead is mounted with a barrel section using hundreds of rivets. This assembly process is a non-ergonomic and burdensome task in which two humans must work cooperatively.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2086
Justin Lo
Abstract The fast growth of air traffic and the need for lighter and more fuel efficient aircraft is driving the ramp-up of important new aircraft programs. These increases in production rates are driving manufacturers to seek out robust and reliable installation systems. They must also adapt to the unique requirements of composite materials that now have an increasingly important place in the aerospace industry. Moreover, environmental constraints continue to evolve and drive new regulations, such as REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) in Europe. As an example, this regulation is leading to the adoption of non-chromate surface treatments and paints for most applications. The legacy generation of fasteners does not comply with all of these new requirements.
CURRENT
2017-09-19
Standard
AMS2451/6B
This specification establishes the requirements for brush plating of copper by electrodeposition.
2017-09-19
Journal Article
2017-01-2154
Alan Hiken
Abstract A review of critical technologies and manufacturing advances that have enabled the evolution of the composite fuselage is described. The author’s perspective on several development, military, and production programs that have influenced and affected the current state of commercial fuselage production is presented. The enabling technologies and current approaches being used for wide body aircraft fuselage fabrication and the potential reasons why are addressed. Some questions about the future of composite fuselage are posed based on the lessons learned from today and yesterday.
2017-09-19
Journal Article
2017-01-2165
Christian Moeller, Hans Christian Schmidt, Philip Koch, Christian Boehlmann, Simon Kothe, Jörg Wollnack, Wolfgang Hintze
Abstract The high demand of efficient large scale machining operations by concurrently decreasing operating time and costs has led to an increasing usage of industrial robots in contrast to large scaled machining centers. The main disadvantage of industrial robots used for machining processes is their poor absolute accuracy, caused by the serial construction, resilience of gearings and sensitivity for temperature changes. Additionally high process forces that occur during machining of CFRP structures in aerospace industry lead to significant path errors due to low structural stiffness of the robot kinematic. These errors cannot be detected by means of motor encoders. That is why calibration processes and internal control laws have no effect on errors caused by elastic deformation. In this research paper an approach for increasing the absolute accuracy of an industrial milling robot with help of a Laser Tracker system during machining tasks will be presented.
CURRENT
2017-09-18
Standard
AMS5333G
This specification covers a low-alloy steel in the form of investment castings.
CURRENT
2017-09-18
Standard
AMS4981H
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of bars, wire, and forgings up through 4.000 inches (101.60 mm), inclusive, in diameter or least distance between parallel sides and forging stock of any size (see 8.6).
2017-09-17
WIP Standard
J1257
This recommended practice applies to mobile construction type cranes with cantilevered, telescopic booms when used in lifting crane service.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2507
Matthias Hoch, Michal Kaczmarek, Markus Ahr
Abstract The demand for zinc-nickel coatings continuously increases in the automotive industry due to their high corrosion protection as well as superior wear and heat resistance compared to pure zinc platings. The state-of-the-art plating systems in the brake caliper industry are acid zinc-nickel electrolytes, as only they allow for direct plating on cast iron. Cast iron is the most common base material for the production of automotive brake components due to excellent mechanical and thermal properties. Well suited coatings will preserve the functional properties and provide additional advantages like improved corrosion protection and homogeneous and long lasting appearance. Consistently increasing quality demands, extended warranty periods and cost pressure lead to further developments and force the industry to look for new solutions.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2504
Scott Lambert
Abstract As the brake industry moves completely into globalization, a standardized method to define and validate the dimensions of backing plates, in a way that is both clear and feasible, is of critical importance for manufacturers at all tiers. The plate drawing not only defines the component as it fits into a brake assembly; it is also what the plate supplier relies on to define the plate for manufacture. If a drawing does not define every dimensional aspect of the product with perfect clarity, in ways that are easily measured, loss of time and resources will result from questions and/or mistakes. This paper proposes an SAE standard for defining the dimensional requirements of backing plates on the drawings themselves, and defining the measuring procedures used to validate those dimensions.
2017-09-15
WIP Standard
D17AA
This specification covers the specific requirements for 2017 aluminum alloy bar, rod and wire produced by rolling, drawing or cold finishing supplied in the annealed (O temper) condition (see 8.4). When specified, product shall be supplied in the “as fabricated” (F) temper.
CURRENT
2017-09-14
Standard
AMS5337E
This specification covers an alloy steel in the form of investment castings.
CURRENT
2017-09-14
Standard
AMS5338H
This specification covers a low-alloy steel in the form of investment castings.
CURRENT
2017-09-13
Standard
AMS4466A
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of alclad sheet and plate 0.020 to 0.500 inch (0.508 to 12.70 mm) inclusive, in thickness, supplied in the -T361 temper (see 8.5).
CURRENT
2017-09-13
Standard
AMS4163F
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of extruded bars, rods, wire, profiles, and tubing up to 2.999 inches, incl (76.17 mm, incl) in thickness, nominal diameter or wall thickness with cross-sectional area 25 in2 (161 cm2) and under (see 8.5).
CURRENT
2017-09-13
Standard
AMS5336J
This specification covers a low-alloy steel in the form of investment castings.
CURRENT
2017-09-13
Standard
J2597_201709
This SAE Recommended Practice defines a procedure for the use of computer generated saturation curves to determine peening intensity. Calculation of intensity within a tolerance band for each data set in Table 1 one is required for compliance with this practice.
CURRENT
2017-09-11
Standard
AMS4251B
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of sheet 0.040 to 0.249 inch (1.02 to 6.32 mm) in thickness (see 8.6).
CURRENT
2017-09-11
Standard
AMS4971L
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of bars, wire, forgings and flash welded rings 4.000 inches (101.60 mm) and under in diameter or least distance between parallel sides and stock for forging or flash welded rings of any size (see 8.6).
CURRENT
2017-09-07
Standard
J1237_201709
This SAE Standard covers material, dimensional, performance and test requirements for metric thread rolling screws suitable for use in general engineering applications.
CURRENT
2017-09-05
Standard
AMS4892D
This specification covers a nickel-copper alloy in the form of castings.
Viewing 271 to 300 of 21589

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