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WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This SAE Standard applies to all self-propelled machines with a gross vehicle mass up to 5000 kg that are utilized to clean material from outside paved areas, parkland, floors in non-residential buildings and areas principally exposed to pedestrian traffic. Primary methods for material removal can be by mechanical, pneumatic, washing and flushing systems, or in a combination of any system.
WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This SAE Standard applies to all self-propelled machines with a gross vehicle mass greater than 5000kg that are utilized to clean material from highways, parking lots, airfield runways, outside paved areas that are principally exposed to vehicular traffic. These machines may also be involved with road construction/repaving work. Primary methods for material removal and cleaning can be by mechanical, pneumatic, washing and flushing systems, or in a combination of any system.
WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This SAE Recommended Practice presents the general uses, limitations on use, and appearance of the safety alert symbol.
WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This specification provides a standard set of procedures for sampling and testing to meet the requirements of material specifications for wrought titanium and titanium alloy products except forgings and forging stock. It is applicable to the extent specified in a material specification.
Article
2014-04-01
With a patented approach to laser cutting of blanks from coil, LaserCoil Technologies systems enable companies to marry its laser cutting systems with any coil line automation, whether it be existing equipment currently in production or an investment in new or used equipment.
Article
2014-04-01
Miller improves select models in the XMT weld cable control (WCC) multi-process lineup to improve productivity, quality, and safety.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mersin Hurpekli, Rifat Yilmaz, Emin Kondakci, Nuri Solak
Abstract Honing is a low-speed abrading process to remove metallic and non-metallic materials from a surface. Honing corrects surface errors produced by other machining operations prior to honing. Moreover,, the honing grooves, the volume and the direction of the valleys control the amount of oil available, by keeping the oil on the bore surface and by improving the spreading of the oil. The traditional honing process that uses ceramic abrasives has been replaced by the superior abrasives that is Metal Bonded Diamond [1,2]. However, the main drawback of diamond honing is that it leaves more torn metal and folded metal on surface [3]. The folded and / or torn metal partially covers the honing grooves and interrupts oil flow in groove. Hence, it causes abrasive wear as axial scratches on the cylinder surface. Diamond is the strongest material known that is less friable, wear very little, requires more pressure and tends to plough through metal surface rather than cut. On the other hand, conventional abrasives that are ceramic abrasives have self-sharpening properties and higher friability.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Gary L. Anderson, Pete G. Imbrogno
Abstract Improved Power Density through Use of Powder-Forged Helical Gears in Transmissions. With the continuing mileage improvement requirements, increasing power density is an important economic consideration in new vehicle design. This paper describes the power density improvement available through reduced grain size and inclusion levels that are typically found in wrought materials. The powder forged process is similar to tool steel manufacturing rather than wrought steel manufacturing in that powder is used to manufacture the gear resulting in smaller inclusions than typically found in wrought steel.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Bert Bras, Andrew Carlile, Thomas Niemann, Sherry Mueller, Hyung Chul Kim, Timothy Wallington, Heidi McKenzie, Susan Rokosz
Abstract Tools are now publicly available that can potentially help a company assess the impact of its water use and risks in relation to their global operations and supply chains. In this paper we describe a comparative analysis of two publicly available tools, specifically the WWF/DEG Water Risk Filter and the WBCSD Global Water Tool that are used to measure the water impact and risk indicators for industrial facilities. By analyzing the risk assessments calculated by these tools for different scenarios that include varying facilities from different industries, one can better gauge the similarities and differences between these water strategy tools. Several scenarios were evaluated using the water tools, and the results are compared and contrasted. As will be shown, the results can vary significantly.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jiangong Zhu, Zechang Sun, Xuezhe Wei, Haifeng Dai, Hongzhang Cen
Abstract This paper presents a three-dimensional electrochemical electrode plate pair model to study the effect of the electrode tabs configuration. Understanding the distribution of current density, potential and heat generation rate is critical for designing li-ion batteries and conducting effective design optimization studies. We developed several electrode plate pair models which were different in position and size of tabs. Results showed the influence and comparison of different configuration on the distribution of current density, potential density and heat generation rate at different discharge process. The distribution was predicted as a function of tabs. It can provide a theoretical basis for improving battery thermal performance and cooling system design.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Domenic Leo Barsotti, Sandra Boetcher
Abstract The present study discusses the benefits of using a phase change material (PCM) based cold plate for more efficient energy storage system (ESS) cooling in Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV). This paper numerically demonstrates the benefits that a PCM cold plate has over a more conventional aluminum cold plate design. These benefits include six times more passive cooling capacity and a 66% mass reduction. Further investigations into improving the system were conducted in an effort to maximize passive cooling.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kambiz Jahani, Sajjad Beigmoradi, Mohsen Bayani Khaknejad
Abstract The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of spot-weld modeling approaches on NVH virtual simulation problems. For this purpose, finite element method is considered for further simulations. The goal is to evaluate and compare results within the domain of 0 to 200 Hz by modeling spot-welds with three different element types: a rigid body constraint element (RBE), two rigid body elements with hexahedral solid element (RBE3-HEXA-RBE3) and CWELD constraint. In order to evaluate the effects, three main NVH analyses are chosen for this study. In the first place, a free-free modal analysis is performed for the BIW and trimmed body models of a D-segment saloon car in order to estimate natural frequencies and mode shapes. Afterwards, a frequency response analysis is performed to evaluate the dynamic stiffness of engine mount. Finally, a noise transfer function (NTF) simulation is carried out to calculate the sound pressure level at driver ear's location. The out coming results from each type of simulations are extracted and compared to investigate the effect of spot-weld modeling on the accuracy of FEM analyses results concerning NVH problems.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ould Mohamed Lemine Yahya, Houssem Eddine Miled
Abstract The ultrasonic (US) welding of wires in automotive harnesses is increasingly used as an alternative to mechanical splices. However, this welding process may harm the electrical terminals crimped on the wires ends as a result on the energy propagation along the wire up the terminal with a frequency that is close to the terminals' natural frequencies. The modeling of the ultrasonic welding had been investigated by several authors from the process and weld strength perspective but the modeling of its effect on electrical terminals in automotive harnesses has not been given much attention in the literature. This paper describes and illustrates approaches used for modeling of the impact of the US welding on the electrical terminals in terms of stress and deformation from qualitative and quantitative perspectives and the related benefits/limitations from predictive standpoint. Illustrations are given on an actual terminal with respect to a typical ultrasonic welding process.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Seiji Furusako, Kodama Shinji, Yasunobu Miyazaki, Tetsuro Nose, Yoshiaki Akiniwa
To achieve improvement of crashworthiness and weight reduction of car bodies, the application of high strength steel sheets to car bodies is expanding [1, 2]. However cross tension strength of spot welded joints decreases as material strength increases in the range of material strength exceeding 780MPa grade. Therefore arc spot welding was attempted to enhance the joint strength in a high strength steel sheet of 980MPa in tensile strength. Consequently, the following experimental results were obtained: 1) cross tension strength (CTS) of the arc spot welded joints doubled compared with CTS of spot welded joints when appropriate welding conditions such as heat input and hole diameter of the sheet were selected and 2) height of excess weld decay in addition to the diameter of weld metal for the arc spot welded joints played an important role in improving CTS.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jianghui Mao, Sayed Nassar
Abstract In this paper, experimental study and FEA simulation are performed to investigate the effect of three different methods for joining dissimilar metal coupons in terms of their strength and load transferring capacity. The joining techniques considered include adhesive bonding, bolting and hybrid bolting-and-bonding. Elastic-plastic material model with damage consideration is used for each of the joint components. Traction-separation rule and failure criterion is defined for adhesive. Load transfer capacity and the failure mode are assessed for each type of joining. Joint strength is examined in terms of the effects of adhesive property, bolt preload level, and friction coefficient. Results show that load transferred and failure mechanism vary significantly between samples with different joint methods; preload evolution in bolt changes with friction coefficient; hybrid joint generally has advantage over the other two methods, namely, bolting-only and bonding-only. With appropriate damage model, the FEA could successfully simulate the actual failure mode of the single slap joint samples.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Joy H Forsmark
Abstract High ductility cast aluminum alloys are seeing more use in vehicles as a greater effort is made to replace components made from heavier steel and iron alloys with lighter weight alloys such as aluminum. High ductility cast aluminum has significant advantages by allowing for complex shape and considerable consolidation of parts in body structures. However, joining can be a challenge because one popular method for aluminum joining, self-piercing riveting (SPR), requires a ductility of greater than 10%, forcing the common high ductility Al alloys to undergo a T6 heat treatment which adds cost and potential distortion issues to Al component. In this study, friction stir spot welding was investigated as a potential joining technique for this material in the as-cast condition. Samples of as-cast Aural-2™ alloy were joined to Aural-2™, 5754, and 6061 alloys, to determine the manufacturing feasibility, weld strength, and fatigue strength using this joining technique.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yanhua Shen, Chun Jin
Abstract The large power mining dump truck usually has electric drive system for the harsh operating conditions of mining. The traction motor and multi-stage reducer are assembled in the limited space of the two rear wheels. The permanent magnet motor is often used as traction motor for its much advantage characteristic. However, the permanent magnet is particularly sensitive to the high temperatures since it can loose a part of magnetization when it is exposed to a high temperature. It is necessary to have better cooling system for improvement thermal performance of permanent magnet (PM) motor. The heat losses generated by permanent magnet motor in the off-road electric driving truck are cooled by the water to maintain the motor working effectively. This paper is focus on analyzing the thermal behavior of the PM motor numerically and experimentally. The 2-D transient temperature field of motor is investigated based on different losses of the permanent magnet motor which is determined by the magnetic field analysis.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yu Hsien Wu, Sreekanth Surapaneni, Kumar Srinivasan, Paul Stibich
Abstract Automotive vehicle body electrophoretic (e-coat) and paint application has a high degree of complexity and expense in vehicle assembly. These steps involve coating and painting the vehicle body. Each step has multiple coatings and a curing process of the body in an oven. Two types of heating methods, radiation and convection, are used in the ovens to cure coatings and paints during the process. During heating stage in the oven, the vehicle body has large thermal stresses due to thermal expansion. These stresses may cause permanent deformation and weld/joint failure. Body panel deformation and joint failure can be predicted by using structural analysis with component surface temperature distribution. The prediction will avoid late and costly changes to the vehicle design. The temperature profiles on the vehicle components are the key boundary conditions used to perform structure analysis. This paper presents an efficient method to predict vehicle body temperature profiles as the vehicle pass through the radiant section of an e-coat and/or paint oven.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ram Iyer, Jin Zhou, Li Lu, Jeffrey Webb, Qaiser Khan
Abstract A CAE simulation methodology was developed to predict the warpage and shape deviation from nominal in finished plastic sub-assemblies that are joined using Infra-Red (IR), hot-plate or vibration welding processes. An automotive glove box bin and door sub-assembly was used to develop the methodology. It was seen that part warpage from injection molding and welding causes warpage in final assembled product which results in gaps and the consequent loss in quality of appearance. The CAE simulation methodology included prediction of the part warpage with residual stress from the injection molding process, use the post-molded shape as an initial part condition for the welding process, and simulation of the welding process itself. The welding process simulation included fixturing of the parts in the welding process, localized heating in the case of an IR welding process, fusion of the parts at the weld locations and thermal creep resulting in long term stress and shape relaxation of the part.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Keisuke Kojima, Takeshi Ogawa
Abstract The CO2 emission from automobile plants is large. A majority of this quantity comes from the body painting process. A breakdown of CO2 emissions from the painting process shows the significant impact of painting process equipment such as the oven used to cure paint and the air conditioning facilities used to maintain controlled temperature and humidity on CO2 emissions. It was concluded, therefore, that shortening these processes will effectively promote the reduction of CO2 emissions. Removing the primer process means that the basecoat (BC) and clearcoat (CC), which provide color and marketability, would be applied on the E-coat directly. By the removing the primer several issues are raised such as stone chipping resistance, weather durability, color variation and appearance. By contrast, this 3Wet painting system applies two coats of waterborne basecoat, dividing it up into 1-Base and 2-Base and then CC, in order to achieve both targets, quality and color variation. For severe corrosion areas, chipping primer (CP) is applied to keep chipping resistance before the application of 1-Base.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Josh Mcilvaine, Malika Warner
Abstract Thermoplastic polyesters are widely used in the automotive industry and are the material of choice for many types of electrical and electronic components due to their excellent balance of mechanical and electrical properties. Under certain conditions including elevated temperatures and the presence of high humidity, thermoplastic polyesters such as polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) have the potential to suffer hydrolytic attack. Recognizing the need for standardization, USCAR USCAR (The United States Council for Automotive Research) established component level testing guidelines specific to connectors. In response, many companies developed HR (hydrolysis resistant) PBT resins to help manufactures meet these requirements. As with many additive technologies in plastics, there are trade-offs. In this case, hydrolysis resistance was often improved at the expense of melt viscosity stability and high flow during the injection molding process. In addition to improved hydrolysis resistance, there is an emerging need for PBT with improved electrical performance for use in automotive connectors for electric hybrid vehicles.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Takaaki Kondo, Kentarou Ishiuchi
Abstract To reduce the Body in White (BIW) mass, it is necessary to expand the application of Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) to complex shaped parts. In order to apply AHSS to complex shaped parts with thinner gauge, high formability steel is required. However, higher strength steels tend to display lower elongations, compared with low/medium strength steels. Current AHSS are applied to limited parts for this reason. The new 1.2GPa material, with high formability, was developed to solve this issue. The mechanical property targets for the high elongation 1.2GPa material were achieved by precise metallurgical optimization. Many material aspects were studied, such as formability, weldabilty, impact strength, and delayed fracture. As the result of this development, 1.2GPa AHSS has been applied to a new vehicle launched in 2013.The application of this material was the 1st in the world, and achieved a 11kg mass reduction.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Dennis Parkes, Qingling Cui, Daniel Westerbaan, Sashank Nayak, Norman Zhou, Frank Goodwin, Daniel Liu, Sanjiwan Bhole, Daolun Chen
Abstract Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) such as dual phase (DP) steels are now being extensively used to achieve light weighting goals of vehicles because of their attractive combination of formability and high strength. High strength low alloy (HSLA) steels are also used in lightweight bodies-in-white; DP and HSLA steels are therefore often laser butt-welded together into tailor welded blanks and to create other joints. Among the laser welding processes, fiber laser welding (FLW) has been shown to provide excellent quality welds, including superior weld mechanical properties, at higher speeds than those possible with other laser welding processes. Using dissimilarly welded DP980-HSLA blanks made with different welding parameters, the tensile properties were found to not change in spite of the HSLA being weaker than the soft zone on the DP980 side of the weld. The high heat input weld was found to have more softening in comparison to its base metal (BM) (55 HV versus 46 HV) and less bainite (8% versus 15%) in its FZ in comparison to the low heat input weld.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Andre Sereno Lopes, Marco Colosio, Jose Castillo
Abstract This paper presents a technological comparison of weldability and mechanical properties between a dual phase steel (DP) and an advanced high strength low alloy steel (AHSLA) used for automotive structural parts in order to demonstrate some unclear characteristics of each. Samples were spot welded and had their hardness and microstructure analyzed, also a shear test was applied on the weld button area. The edge stretchability was analyzed using hole expansion tests and tensile tests to determine the tensile and yield strength, anisotropic coefficients and total elongation. Data were used to estimate crash energy absorption. The results showed an AHSLA steel with higher than typical ductility. Finally, while DP showed improved stretchability, it was also concluded that such AHSLA could perform better bendability, drawability, flangeability and weldability.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
K.S. Raghavan, R.J. Comstock, B.M. Hance
Abstract An indirect method to determine friction coefficient under punch stretching conditions has been developed. The methodology involves correlation of experimental draw-in measurements to FEA predictions for a range of assumed friction coefficients. Initial evaluation with a ferritic stainless steel (SS 439) shows that the proposed indirect method to determine the effective friction coefficient during punch stretching is feasible. Friction coefficient (μ) estimate based on the indirect method was 0.15 for the sample with residual mill oil (dry), 0.12 with excess mill oil (wet), and 0.03 with polyethylene sheets between the sample blank and tooling. The importance of prescribing accurate material hardening behavior beyond uniform elongation to obtain good correlation between simulation and experimental punch loads and to better tune the model is highlighted in the paper.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xiaoming Chen, Ching-Kuo Hsiung, Ken Schmid, Changqing Du, Dajun Zhou, Chris Roman
Abstract Forming a metal gainer is a common technique used to gather material in a high stretch region along an edge in preparation for a subsequent flanging operation. This technique has proven to be successful for mild steels, but needs to be evaluated for the applicability to advanced high strength steels (AHSS). The Auto/Steel Partnership High Strength Stamping Team launched a project for this study. Experimental trials were conducted on gainer forming, trimming and flanging. Twelve (12) AHSS have been tested with tensile strengths ranging from 460 to 1240 MPa. Edge stretch limits for flanging have been evaluated and compared to flanging without gainers. Different trimming and flanging approaches have also been tried. The results show that metal gainers are not advantageous for flanging of higher strength AHSS.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Hua-Chu Shih, Ching-Kuo Hsiung, Bill Wendt
Abstract Edge fracture is one of the major issues for stamping Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS). Recent studies have showed this type of fracture is greatly affected by an improper trimming process. The current production trimming process used for the conventional mild steels has not been modified for AHSS trimming. In addition to the high-energy requirement, the current mechanical trimming process would generate a rough edge (burr) with microcracks in trimmed edges for AHSS trimming, which could serve as the crack initiation during forming. The purpose of this study is to develop a proper production trimming process for AHSS and elucidate the effect of the trimmed edge conditions on edge fracture. A straight edge shearing device with the capability of adjusting the shearing variables is used in this study. Two different AHSS grades, DP600 and DP980, with similar thicknesses are selected to assess the edge stretchability of the material for edge conditions created using various shearing variables.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Paul R. Stibich, Yu Hsien Wu, Weidong Zhang, Michao Guo, Kumar Srinivasan, Sreekanth Surapaneni
Abstract This paper describes a comprehensive methodology for the simulation of vehicle body panel buckling in an electrophoretic coat (electro-coat or e-coat) and/or paint oven environment. The simulation couples computational heat transfer analysis and structural analysis. Heat transfer analysis is used to predict temperature distribution throughout a vehicle body in curing ovens. The vehicle body temperature profile from the heat transfer analysis is applied as an input for a structural analysis to predict buckling. This study is focused on the radiant section of the curing ovens. The radiant section of the oven has the largest temperature gradients within the body structure. This methodology couples a fully transient thermal analysis to simulate the structure through the electro-coat and paint curing environments with a structural, buckling analysis. The ability to predict the buckling phenomenon using a virtual simulation will reduce the risk of late production changes to the vehicle class “A” surfaces.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shailesh Mani Pandey, Qasim Murtaza, Kalpana Gupta
Abstract The functions of a piston ring are to seal off the combustion pressure, to distribute and control the oil, to transfer heat and to stabilize the piston. Most piston rings and metallic sealing rings for modern application where running conditions are severe, require some form of coating to minimise abrasion and corrosion. The piston ring coating improves the life of engine as well as fuel efficiency. In this study, physical vapour deposition (ion chrome plating) was investigated; plates with similar composition as the piston ring material were prepared by the casting process using induction arc furnace and sand mould. Wear test of the coating was conducted on pin on disc machine under dry conditions. The wear rate was calculated using mass loss methods on an electronic balance having least count of 1× 10−4 g. The wear rate of the coating was found to be increased with increase in load as well as sliding speed for the ion plating with the counter body of tungsten carbide but in the case of ion plating with the HCS & MS it is found to be decreased.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Li Yanhua, Jianping Lin
Abstract Similar laser welded blanks with same material and same gauge have been extensive applied in automobile body for improving the material utilization and extending maximum coil size. It is known that, for TWBs with dissimilar material and thicknesses, the difference of material properties and/or thickness of the welded blanks, change of the material properties in the weld seam and heat-affected zones (HAZ) as well as location and orientation of the weld seam are reasons for reduced formability. However, the plastic deformation capacity of TWBs is reduced even when the material and thickness are the same. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the deformation behaviors of similar laser welded joints. Uniaxial tensile of five laser welded joints, with 90°,60°,45°,30°and 0°weld orientations, were tested by using optical measurement-DIC (Digital Image Correlation). Strain /strain ratio distribution and evolution of each joint was analyzed and compared with base material. In addition, mechanical property of weld was determined using rule of mixture and hardness testing.
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