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2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0394
Minghuang Cheng, Norihiko Sawa
Abstract This paper describes the development of a fatigue life prediction method for Laser Screw Welding (LSW). Fatigue life prediction is used to assess the durability of automotive structures in the early design stages in order to shorten the vehicle development time. The LSW technology is a spot-type joining method similar to resistance spot welding (RSW), and has been developed and applied to body-inwhite structures in recent years. LSW can join metal panels even when a clearance exists between the panels. However, as a result of this favorable clearance-allowance feature of LSW, a concave shape may occur at the nugget part of the joint. These LSW geometric features, the concavity of nuggets and the clearance between panels, are thought to affect the local stiffness behavior of the joint. Therefore, while assessing the fatigue life of LSW, it is essential to estimate the influence of these factors adequately for the representation of the local stiffness behavior of the joint.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0542
Hiroshi Kawaguchi, Osamu Funatsumaru, Hiroyoshi Sugawara, Hiroshi Sumiya, Takanobu Iwade, Tomitaka Yamamoto, Takashi Koike, Ryuta Kashio
Abstract Trivalent chromium passivation is used after zinc plating for enhancing corrosion resistance of parts. In the passivating process, the amount of dissolved metal ions (for example zinc and iron) in the passivation solution increases the longer the solution is used. This results in a reduced corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures. Adding a top coat after this process improves the corrosion resistance but has an increased cost. To combat this, we strove to clarify the mechanism of decreased corrosion resistance and to develop a trivalent chromium passivation with a higher corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures. At first, we found that in parts produced from an older solution, the passivation layer has cracks which are not seen in parts from a fresh/new solution. These cracks grow when heated at temperatures over 120 degrees Celsius.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0543
Takashi Hara, Masaki Kato, Kazuki Mizutani
Abstract There are such outside door handles called smart handles which have a transmitting antenna, a lock/unlock sensor, and a sensor detection circuit, with which operation of door lock is possible just by "touching" the electrostatic-capacitance type sensor of the handles.As the design of the outside handles, body color painting and Cr plating are adopted. However, if plating is applied over the entire surface of a smart handle, electromagnetic waves transmitted from the antenna will be blocked since plating material is electrically conductive. In addition to this, touching a part other than the sensor may change the electrostatic-capacitance of the sensor, which results in unwanted functioning of the lock/unlock sensor. Because of this, only part of the handle, which does not hinder the transmission of electromagnetic waves and does not cause unwanted functioning, is covered by plating, that is called, "Partially plated specifications" (Figure 1).
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0317
Yuanzhan Wang, Jason B. Siegel, Anna G. Stefanopoulou
Abstract This paper addresses scheduling of quantized power levels (including part load operation and startup/shutdown periods) for a propane powered solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) hybridized with a lithium-ion battery for a tracked mobile robot. The military requires silent operation and long duration missions, which cannot be met by batteries alone due to low energy density or with combustion engines due to noise. To meet this need we consider an SOFC operated at a few discrete power levels where maximum system efficiency can be achieved. The fuel efficiency decreases during transients and resulting thermal gradients lead to stress and degradation of the stack; therefore switching power levels should be minimized. Excess generated energy is used to charge the battery, but when it’s fully charged the SOFC should be turned off to conserve fuel.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1198
Pascal Schmalen, Peter Plapper, Wayne Cai
Abstract Laser welding of dissimilar metals such as Aluminum and Copper, which is required for Li-ion battery joining, is challenging due to the inevitable formation of the brittle and high electrical-resistant intermetallic compounds. Recent research has shown that by using a novel technology, called laser braze-welding, the Al-Cu intermetallics can be minimized to achieve superior mechanical and electrical joint performance. This paper investigates the robustness of the laser braze-welding process. Three product and process categories, i.e. choice of materials, joint configurations, and process conditions, are studied. It is found that in-process effects such as sample cleanness and shielding gas fluctuations have a minor influence on the process robustness. Furthermore, many pre-process effects, e.g. design changes such as multiple layers or anodized base material can be successfully welded by process adaption.
2016-04-05
WIP Standard
AMS5441B
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging, flash welded rings, or heading.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0329
Piyush Bubna, Michael P. Humbert, Marc Wiseman, Enrico Manes
Abstract Conventional car manufacturing is extremely capital and energy-intensive. Due to these limitations, major auto manufacturers produce very similar, if not virtually identical, vehicles at very large volumes. This limits potential customization for different users and acts as a barrier to entry for new companies or production techniques. Better understanding of the barriers for low volume production and possible solutions with innovative production techniques is crucial for making low volume vehicles viable and accelerating the adoption of new production techniques and lightweight materials into the competitive marketplace. Additive manufacturing can enable innovative design with minimal capital investment in tooling and hence should be ideal for low and perhaps high volume parts. For this reason, it was desired to evaluate potential opportunities in manufacturing automotive parts with additive techniques.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1344
Koushi Kumagai, Masaaki Kuwahara, Tsuyoshi Yasuki, Norimasa Koreishi
Abstract This paper describes the development of a fracture finite element (FE) model for laser screw welding (LSW) and validation of the model with experimental results. LSW was developed and introduced to production vehicles by Toyota Motor Corporation in 2013. LSW offers superb advantages such as increased productivity and short pitch welding. Although the authors had previously developed fracture FE models for conventional resistance spot welding (RSW), a fracture model for LSW has not been developed. To develop this fracture model, many comprehensive experiments were conducted. The results revealed that LSW had twice as many variations in fracture modes compared to RSW. Moreover, fracture mode bifurcations were also found to result from differences in clearance between welded plates. In order to analyze LSW fracture phenomena, detailed FE models using fine hexahedral elements were developed.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1383
James Jan, Eben Prabhu, Xingfu Chen, Ulrich Weiss
Abstract Air quenching is a common manufacturing process in automotive industry to produce high strength metal component by cooling heated parts rapidly in a short period of time. With the advancement of finite element analysis (FEA) methods, it has been possible to predict thermal residual stress by computer simulation. Previous research has shown that heat transfer coefficient (HTC) for steady air quenching process is time and temperature independent but strongly flow and geometry dependent. These findings lead to the development of enhanced HTC method by performing CFD simulation and extracting HTC information from flow field. The HTC obtained in this fashion is a continuous function over the entire surface. In current part of the research, two patching algorithms are developed to divide entire surface into patches according to HTC profile and each patch is assigned a discrete HTC value.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1560
Bo Lin, Chinedum E. Okwudire
Abstract Ball nut assemblies (BNAs) are used in a variety of applications, e.g., automotive, aerospace and manufacturing, for converting rotary motion to linear motion (or vice versa). In these application areas, accurate characterization of the dynamics of BNAs using low-order models is very useful for performance simulation and analyses. Existing low-order contact load models of BNAs are inadequate, partly because they only consider the axial deformations of the screw and nut. This paper presents a low-order load distribution model for BNAs which considers the axial, torsional and lateral deformations of the screw and nut. The screw and nut are modeled as finite element beams, while Hertzian Contact Theory is used to model the contact condition between the balls and raceways of the screw and nut. The interactions between the forces and displacements of the screw and nut and those at the ball-raceway contact points are established using transformation matrices.
2016-04-05
WIP Standard
AMS4970K
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of bars, wire, forgings, and forging stock.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0982
Philip Lawson, John Houldcroft, Andrew Neil, Andrea Balcombe, Richard Osborne, Antonio Ciriello, Wilhelm Graupner
Abstract A recent trend in powertrain development organisations has been to apply processes historically associated with manufacturing. The aim is to capitalise on the resulting productivity gains to contain the increasing test demand necessary to develop current and future product. Significant obstacles to the implementation of manufacturing derived methods include the lack of clarity of the engineering test requirements and existing working practices in the product development environment. The System Optimisation Approach has been presented in previous work as a potential solution [1]. As an extension, this paper introduces a new concept closely related to the established manufacturing principle of Process Capability (Cp). Application of the resulting method quantifies the test facility’s capability to provide a test result subject to a specified statistical confidence within a certain number of test repeats.
2016-04-05
Standard
USCAR38-1
This specification defines test methods and performance criteria for evaluating ultrasonically welded wire-to-terminal metallurgical bonds. The examples used are specific to the linear weld type of process equipment. USCAR-38 is not applicable for “Splice Welding”. The specification is applicable to wire-on-pad configurations with a typical weld shown in Figure 1. This test specification subjects parts under test to environmental exposures to simulate a lifetime of field exposure for a road vehicle. Exposures called-out in this specification include Thermal Shock, Temperature Humidity Cycling and mechanical abuse. This test specification is intended to evaluate the strength and performance of the interface between wires to an electrical terminal. Validation of the performance of the Terminal is a separate task and can be accomplished using a component validation test such as SAE/USCAR-2, which evaluates whether the entire connection system is acceptable.
2016-04-05
Standard
J3071_201604
This SAE Battery Identification and Cross Contamination Prevention document is intended to provide information that may be applicable to all types of Rechargeable Energy Storage System (RESS) devices. It is important to develop a system that can facilitate sorting by chemistry. The recycler is interested in the chemistry of the RESS. This is true for the recyclers of Lead Acid, Lithium Ion, Nickel Cadmium etc. Thus recyclers of RESS will receive RESS from automotive, commercial, and industrial applications. These RESS have the potential to be contaminated with a RESS of an incompatible chemistry. It is recognized that mitigation methods to reduce or eliminate the introduction of incompatible chemistries into a given recycling stream would also benefit safety and the environment.
2016-04-04
Article
This past November Caterpillar opened its new Additive Manufacturing (AM) Factory at its Tech Center in Mossville, IL, to consolidate and expand its 3D printing activities. AM engineer Brittany Hancock recently gave Off-Highway Engineering a tour of the new facility and discussed the company’s current and future plans regarding the use of 3D printing technology.
2016-04-04
Standard
ARP1836C
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) outlines the functional and design requirements for a b self-propelled belt conveyor for handling baggage and cargo at aircraft bulk cargo holds. Additional considerations and requirements may legally apply in other countries. As an example, for operation in Europe (E.U. and E.F.T.A.), the applicable EN standards shall be complied with.
2016-03-31
WIP Standard
AMS2371K
This specification covers quality assurance sampling and testing procedures used to determine conformance to applicable material specification requirements of wrought corrosion and heat-resistant steel and alloy products and of forging stock.
2016-03-31
Standard
AMS5080K
This specification covers a carbon steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
2016-03-31
Standard
AMS5069G
This specification covers a low-carbon steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
2016-03-29
WIP Standard
B16AA
This specification covers the requirements for brush plating of nickel-tungsten by electrodeposition. This process has been used as a chromium alternative for repair and OEM applications that require exceptionaly hard elcectroplated deposits. It’s typically used in aerospace, automotive and oil and gas to improve hardness and wearability and to repair damaged or worn parts, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2016-03-28
Standard
AMS4195D
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of flat sheet and plate 0.500 inch (12.70 mm) and under in nominal thickness.
2016-03-28
Standard
AMS5645S
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of forgings over 0.50 inch (12.7 mm) in nominal diameter or least distance between parallel sides, wire, bars, and mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock of any size for forging or flash welded rings (see 8.6).
2016-03-24
WIP Standard
AMS2759/3G
This specification, in conjunction with the general requirements for steel heat treatment covered in AMS2759, establishes the requirements for heat treatment of precipitation-hardening corrosion- resistant and maraging steel parts. Parts are defined in AMS2759.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2670K
This specification covers the engineering requirements for producing brazed joints using copper as the brazing filler metal.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2451/1B
This specification establishes the requirements for a general purpose brush plating of nickel applied by electrodeposition.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2451/4C
This specification establishes the requirements for brush plating of cadmium by electrodeposition.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2753D
This specification covers the requirements for an epsilon-iron nitride case on ferrous parts produced by immersion in a low-temperature, agitated, fused salt bath.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS3117A
This specification covers a zinc molybdate primer in the form of a liquid.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2451/9C
This specification covers the requirements for brush plating of zinc-nickel by electrodeposition.
2016-03-22
WIP Standard
AMS2615G
This specification provides requirements and procedures for hydraulic-pressure leak testing of parts.
Viewing 271 to 300 of 20491

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