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Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Rajendra Vivekananda Hosamath, Muralidhar Nagarkatte
All top ranking automobile companies in the world believe in single world “Quality” and maintaining quality standards is a philosophy, a belief in which we live, a task which cannot be put aside for another day .To achieve the world class quality standards Divgi-Warner meticulously follows a highly effective tool known as Quality System Basics (QSB) QSB helps Divgiwarner to preserve integrity of commitment to achieve manufacturing excellence. This case study covers the Quality System Basics implementation experience of DivgiWarner Pvt. Ltd. India, one of the BorgWarner's plant based in Pune and Sirsi, India. A quality System basic consists of following 10 Key elements to establish world class quality. 1. Fast Response  Lessons Learned  Practical Problem Solving  8-D 2. Control of Non-Conforming Product 3. Verification Station 4. Standardized Operations  Work Place Organization – The 7 Wastes  Standardized Work Instructions – SOS  Operator Instructions – JES 5. Standardized Operator Training 6.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
C Venkatesan, V Faustino, S Arun, S Ravi Shankar
The automotive industry needs for sustainable seating products which offer good climate performance and superior seating comfort. The safety requirement is always a concern for current seating systems. The life of the present seating system is low and absorbs moisture over a period of time which affects seat performance (cushioning effect). Recycling is one of the major concern as per as polyurethane (PU) is concern. This paper presents the development of an alternative material which is eco-friendly and light in weight. Thermoplastic materials were tried in place PU for many good reasons. The newly developed material is closed cell foam which has better tear and abrasion resistance. It doesn’t absorb water and has excellent weathering resistance. Also it has got better cushioning effect and available in various colours. Because of superior tear resistance, we can eliminate upholstery and reduce system level cost. The development involves testing and characterization of the materials, making of prototypes and validations.
Technical Paper
2014-09-28
Johannes Schneider
The brake discs and brake drums used on motor vehicles are, in 90% of applications, made from grey cast iron. Although other designs such as composite systems comprising of a grey iron braking band and a light weight mounting bell made from aluminum, Al-MMC or entire ceramic brake discs have been developed, cast iron will continue to play a major role as a work piece material for brakes. Cast iron offers advantages in material characteristics such as good thermal conductivity, high compressive strength and damping capacity. In addition it shows a superior casting behavior and also an unbeatable competitive price per part, when compared to other brake materials or designs. Ongoing research in material and casting science are leading to new types of alloyed CI materials, fulfilling the increasing demands in terms of performance but also increasing the demands for a reliable and economical production. As a product of high volume production the economics and productive manufacturing of the brake discs is a fundamental issue to ensure the competitiveness of the manufacturers.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Roger Holden, Paul Lightowler, Simon Andreou
Abstract The 30 month COMET project aims to overcome the challenges facing European manufacturing industries by developing innovative machining systems that are flexible, reliable and predictable with an average of 30% cost efficiency savings in comparison to machine tools. From a conceptual point of view, industrial robot technology could provide an excellent base for machining being both flexible and cost efficient. However, industrial robots lack absolute positioning accuracy, are unable to reject disturbances in terms of process forces and lack reliable programming and simulation tools to ensure right first time machining, once production commences. These three critical limitations currently prevent the use of robots in typical machining applications. The COMET project is co-funded by the European Commission as part of the European Economic Recovery Plan (EERP) adopted in 2008. The EERP proposes the launch of Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) in three sectors, one of them being Factories of the Future (FoF).
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Roger Holden, Paul Lightowler, Simon Andreou
Abstract The 30 month COMET project aims to overcome the challenges facing European manufacturing industries by developing innovative machining systems that are flexible, reliable and predictable with an average of 30% cost efficiency savings in comparison to machine tools. From a conceptual point of view, industrial robot technology could provide an excellent base for machining being both flexible and cost efficient. However, industrial robots lack absolute positioning accuracy, are unable to reject disturbances in terms of process forces and lack reliable programming and simulation tools to ensure right first time machining, once production commences. These three critical limitations currently prevent the use of robots in typical machining applications. The COMET project is co-funded by the European Commission as part of the European Economic Recovery Plan (EERP) adopted in 2008. The EERP proposes the launch of Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) in three sectors, one of them being Factories of the Future (FoF).
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Karl Strauss
Abstract “Today's electronic components rely on principles of physics and science with no manufacturing precedence and little data on long term stability and reliability.” [1] Yet many are counting on their reliable performance years if not decades into the future, sometimes after being literally abandoned in barns or stored neatly in tightly sealed bags. What makes sense? To toss everything away, or use it as is and hope for the best? Surely there must be a middle ground! With an unprecedented number of missions in its future and an ever-tightening budget, NASA faces the daunting task of doing more with less. One proven way for a project to save money is to use already screened and qualified devices from the spares of its predecessors. But what is the risk in doing so? How can a project reliably count on the value of spare devices if the risk of using them is not, in itself, defined? With hundreds of thousands of devices left over from previous missions, the parts bins of NASA hold a wealth of electronic components, (possibly) ready for use many years after their production.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Santiago Droll
In contemporary industries the demand for very accurate robots is continuously growing. Yet, robot vendors are limited in the achievable accuracy of their robots, as they have no means to provide a direct end-effector feedback. Therefore, most approaches aim to identify an accurate model of the robotic system, thus providing compensation factors to correct the deflections. Models, however, are unable to represent the real physical system in a sufficient manner for path correction. The non-linearities in robotic systems are difficult to model and the dynamics cannot be neglected. A better approach is, therefore, to use direct end-effector position and orientation feedback from an external sensor as, e.g. a Leica laser tracker. The measured data can directly be compared to the nominal data from the path interpolator. Hence, the data are independent of the kinematic robot model. The residual errors can be used to calculate correction values in Cartesian space, which are mapped to each individual robot joint, thus providing a fast path correction algorithm.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Thomas G. Jefferson, Svetan Ratchev, Richard Crossley
Abstract Aerospace assembly systems comprise a vast array of interrelated elements interacting in a myriad of ways. Consequently, aerospace assembly system design is a deeply complex process that requires a multi-disciplined team of engineers. Recent trends to improve manufacturing agility suggest reconfigurability as a solution to the increasing demand for improved flexibility, time-to-market and overall reduction in non-recurring costs. Yet, adding reconfigurability to assembly systems further increases operational complexity and design complexity. Despite the increase in complexity for reconfigurable assembly, few formal methodologies or frameworks exist specifically to support the design of Reconfigurable Assembly Systems (RAS). This paper presents a novel reconfigurable assembly system design framework (RASDF) that can be applied to wing structure assembly as well as many other RAS design problems. The framework is a holistic, hierarchical approach to system design incorporating reconfigurability principles, Axiomatic Design and Design Structure Matrices.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Yanbin Yao
Abstract Drilling plays a significant process in the aircraft manufacturing. This paper develops a robot automatic drilling system for processing the titanium alloy, aluminum alloy and laminated composites component of aircraft. The accurate robot drilling system is comprised of ABB IRB6640-235 robot, drilling end-effector, end-effctor control system and vision system. Experimental results show that the system absolute location precision is within 0.3mm, and the drilling efficiency can be up to four holes per minute. The drilling efficiency and quality of the aircraft component can be increased immensely by the developed robot automatic drilling system.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Rainer Mueller, Matthias Vette, Andreas Ginschel, Ortwin Mailahn
Abstract The global competition challenges aircraft manufacturers in high wage countries. The assembly of large components happens manually in fixed position assembly. Especially the completion of the inner fuselage structure is done 100% manually. The shells have to be joined with rivets and several hundred clips have to be assembled to connect the shell to the frames. The poise of the worker is not ergonomic so a lot of physical stress is added to the worker and minimizes the working ability. Aircraft manufacturers need a lot of different production resources and qualified persons for the production, which provokes higher costs. Due to these high costs there is a demand for automated reconfigurable assembly systems, which offer a high flexibility and lower manufacturing costs. The research project “IProGro” deals with this challenge and develops innovative production systems for large parts. On one hand the flexibility is reached by a reconfigurable fixture for the components on the other hand it is achieved by assistance systems, which guide staff during assembly processes.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Richard Kingston
Abstract Industrial robots are extremely good at repetitive tasks. They exhibit excellent repeatability, making them ideal candidates for many tasks. However, increasing use of CAD based offline programming highlights the fact that industrial robots are generally not accurate devices. Several approaches have been used to compensate for this deficiency. Robot calibration is well established and factory calibrated robots are available from most industrial robot manufacturers. This can improve the spatial accuracy of robots to figures better than 1mm which is adequate for most robot processes in use today. Improvements in accuracy beyond this point can be achieved if the working range of the robot is constrained in some way. For example, limiting a robot to working in a single plane or restricting the robot to a reduced work volume can contribute to significant improvements in accuracy. However, for applications requiring high accuracy without these constraints some additional control is needed.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Greg Adams
Abstract Electroimpact has developed a second generation of mobile robots with several improvements over the first generation. The frame has been revised from a welded steel tube to a welded steel plate structure, making the dynamic response of the structure stiffer and reducing load deflections while maintaining the same weight. The deflections of the frame have been optimized to simplify position compensation. The caster mechanism is very compact, offers greater mounting flexibility, and improved maneuverability. The mechanism uses a pneumatic airbag for both lifting and suspension. The robot sled has been improved to offer greater rigidity for the same weight, and dual secondary feedback scales on the vertical axis further improve the rigidity of the overall system. Maintenance access has been improved by rerouting the cable and hose trays, and lowering the electrical cabinet. The mobile robot is sized so it can be shipped complete on a lowboy trailer for deliveries that can be completed by truck.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Joseph R. Malcomb
Abstract Automated countersink measurement methods which require contact with the workpiece are susceptible to a loss of accuracy due to cutting debris and lube build-up. This paper demonstrates a non-contact method for countersink diameter measurement on CFRP which eliminates the need for periodic cleaning. Holes are scanned in process using a laser profilometer. Coordinates for points along the countersink edge are processed with a unique filtering algorithm providing a highly repeatable estimate for major and minor diameter.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Ralf Schomaker, Richard Pedwell, Björn Knickrehm
Abstract As a result of the increasing use of fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) components in a modern commercial aircraft, manufacturers are facing new challenges - especially with regards to the realisation of significant build rates. One challenge is the larger variation of the thickness of FRP components compared with metal parts that can normally be manufactured within a very narrow thickness tolerance bandwidth. The larger thickness variation of composite structures has an impact on the shape of the component and especially on the surfaces intended to be joined together with other components. As a result, gaps between the components to be assembled could be encountered. However, from a structural point of view, gaps can only be accepted to a certain extent in order to maintain the structural integrity of the joint. Today's state of the art technologies to close gaps between FRP structures comprise shimming methods using liquid and solid shims. Another option is the use of peelable shims that offer significant economic benefits compared with liquid and solid shims.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Lucas Irving, Svetan Ratchev, Atanas Popov, Marcus Rafla
Abstract The replacement for the current single-aisle aircraft will need to be manufactured at a rate significantly higher that of current production. One way that production rate can be increased is by reducing the processing time for assembly operations. This paper presents research that was applied to the build philosophy of the leading edge of a laminar flow European wing demonstrator. The paper describes the implementation of determinate assembly for the rib to bracket assembly interface. By optimising the diametric and the positional tolerances of the holes on the two bracket types and ribs, determinate assembly was successfully implemented. The bracket to rib interface is now secured with no tooling or post processes other than inserting and tightening the fastener. This will reduce the tooling costs and eliminates the need for local drilling, de-burring and re-assembly of the bracket to rib interface, reducing the cycle time of the operation. Ultimately, self-indexing components mean that the there is more flexibility as to what point in production the bracket can be attached to the rib.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Nicholas Lum, Qun Luo
Abstract Electroimpact has designed and manufactured a flexible tooling system for the E7000-ARJ horizontal panel riveter. This tooling design accommodates panel sizes from 3.5m to 10m long, with a variety of straight and tapered curvatures. The tooling is re-configured manually and utilizes removable index plates that can be adapted to accommodate new panel types. This type of tooling is ideal for value-conscious applications where a single machine must process a large range of panel styles. Electroimpact is currently using this system to tool 17 different styles of pre-tacked panels on a single E7000-ARJ machine. This flexible system does not require large removable form boards or custom frames that index one type of panel. Instead it uses 4 form boards that are permanently mounted to the picture frame by linear rails, allowing them to index anywhere along the 10m working envelope. Each form board holds several rail mounted surface indexes that are adjusted to accommodate different panel curvatures.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Todd Rudberg, Justin Nielson, Mike Henscheid, Joshua Cemenska
Abstract The Automated Fiber Placement (AFP) machine layup run time in large scale AFP layup cells consumes approximately 30% of the entire part build time. Consequentially, further reductions to the run time of the AFP machine part programs result in small improvements to the overall cycle time. This document discusses how Electroimpact's integrated system and cell design reduces the overall cycle time by reducing the time spent on non-machine processes.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Jason Rediger, Joseph Malcomb, Craig Sylvester
Abstract A new portable floor drilling machine, the 767AFDE, has been designed with a focus on increased reach and speed, ease-of-use, and minimal weight. A 13-foot wide drilling span allows consolidation of 767 section 45 floor drilling into a single swath. A custom CNC interface simplifies machine operations and troubleshooting. Four servo-driven, air-cooled spindles allow high rate drilling through titanium and aluminum. An aluminum space frame optimized for high stiffness/weight ratio allows high speed operation while minimizing aircraft floor deflection. Bridge track tooling interfaces between the machine and the aircraft grid. A vacuum system, offline calibration plate, and transportation dolly complete the cell.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
George Nicholas Bullen
Abstract Rapid advances in cloud-based computing, robotics and smart sensors, multi-modal modeling and simulation, and advanced production are transforming modern manufacturing. The shift toward smaller runs on custom-designed products favors agile and adaptable workplaces that can compete in the global economy. This paper and presentation will describe the advances in Digital Manufacturing that provides the backbone to tighten integration and interoperability of design methods interlinked with advanced manufacturing technologies and agile business practices. The digital tapestry that seamlessly connects computer design tools, modeling and simulation, intelligent machines and sensors, additive manufacturing, manufacturing methods, and post-delivery services to shorten the time and cost between idea generation and first successful product-in-hand will be illustrated.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Lutz Neugebauer
The demand of fulfilling increasing Prime Customer requirements forces Tier 1 suppliers to continually improve their system solutions. Typically, this will involve integration of “state of the art” tools to afford the Tier 1 supplier a throughput and cost advantage. The subject “Production Optimization Approach” addresses the machine and process optimization of automated fastening machines in operation at customer factories. The paper will describe and focus on the main aspects of production optimization of existing machines to meet and exceed the required customer production and reporting criteria. Furthermore, the paper will present existing examples based on use of the established diagnostic tools
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Peter B. Zieve, Osman Emre Celek, John Fenty
Abstract The E7000 riveting machine installs NAS1097KE5-5.5 rivets into A320 Section 18 fuselage side panels. For the thinnest stacks where the panel skin is under 2mm (2024) and the stringer is under 2mm (7075), the normal process of riveting will cause deformation of the panel or dimpling. The authors found a solution to this problem by forming the rivet with the upper pressure foot extended, and it has been tested and approved for production.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Riley HansonSmith, Alan Merkley
Abstract The Boeing Company is striving to improve quality and reduce defects and injuries through the implementation of lightweight “Right Sized” automated drill and fasten equipment. This has lead to the factory adopting Boeing developed and supplier built flex track drill and countersink machines for drilling fuselage circumferential joins, wing panel to spar and wing splice stringers. The natural evolution of this technology is the addition of fastener installation to enable One Up Assembly. The critical component of One Up Assembly is keeping the joint squeezed tightly together to prevent burrs and debris at the interface. Traditionally this is done by two-sided machines providing concentric clamp up around the hole while it is being drilled. It was proposed that for stiff structure, the joint could be held together by beginning adjacent to a tack fastener, and assemble the joint sequentially using the adjacent hole clamp up from the previous hole to keep the joint clamped up. This process would significantly decrease the costs and complexity that is usually associated with two sided equipment involved in One Up drilling and fastening.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
James Cunov, Charles J. Habermann
Abstract The ever increasing use of composites for aircraft components presents opportunities for new ways to process these parts. There are myriad benefits for use of composites in achieving aircraft performance goals. However, composites come with unique challenges as well. Some of these challenges impact the ability to produce accurate parts. Traditionally, such parts have been trimmed only while clamped in dedicated rigid tools that secure the part in the nominal shape. This results in significant investment in tooling design, production, maintenance, storage and, handling. As an alternative, PaR has developed its Adaptive Manufacturing System that incorporates a Robotic Fixture and Precision Motion Machine with an Integrated Process Head. The Robotic Fixture allows the entire family of parts to be managed with one fixture that remains within the machine footprint. The fixture is programmed to command 38 individual robots to assume appropriate poses and end effector configurations to accommodate over 400 different parts in the family that range in length from 0.5 to 20 meters.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Karl-Erik Neumann, Robert Reno
Abstract The utilization of new materials and tightening of desired tolerances has driven the advancement of Practical and Portable Automated Machining. Increased demand in volume within the aerospace industry not only requires minimizing the amount of manual operations, but also applying automation inside existing manual fixtures. In the past, manual labor, with drastic limitations on achievable accuracies, has been utilized in areas that machine tools cannot either access or the limited amount of work does not justify the expense of additional machines. Assemblies requiring critical hole alignment or drilling through stack materials often are difficult to achieve using manual operations. The solution is a practical and very portable machining unit that is small enough to fit into otherwise difficult areas and is lightweight enough to be either moved into position by small machines or quickly disassembled/assembled with each subassembly capable of being positioned manually. The criteria for the developed machine were that it be; Lightweight - Under 250 lbs allowing for manual positioning or easy mechanical positioning Accurate - Maintain accuracy achieved with current PKM technology Rigid - Capable of drill/mill/orbital of titanium Flexible - Can be mounted in any orientation and is adaptable to rail, vacuum, fixed leg, gantry, etc.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Ruiqiang Lu
Abstract With the development of many new technologies in aircraft manufacturing area and the increasing competition of the global market, aircraft manufacturing enterprises have to reduce their production time and increase the cost-efficiency, with the consideration of high speed response to the changes inside enterprises or in the environment. Production scheduling is a significant process in manufacturing, especially for complicated part or component processing. This paper proposes an agent based multi-objective optimization approach for production scheduling based on Genetic Algorithms. It aims to minimize the total production cost and simultaneously reducing the emission released during production, and the delivery time and equipment constraints are satisfied as well. The new approach is tested in a virtual plant for turbine blade manufacturing. Experimental results show that a group of Pareto optimal solutions are obtained, which can be provided to the decision maker of the manufacturer to select according to different actual conditions.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Julian Lonfier, Côme De Castelbajac
Abstract As aircraft programs currently ramp up, productivity of assembly processes needs to be improved while keeping quality, reliability and manufacturing cost requirements. Efficiency of the drilling process still remains an issue particularly in the case of CFRP/metal stacks: hot and long metallic chips are difficult to remove and often damage the surface of CFRP holes. Low frequency axial vibration drilling has been proposed to solve this issue. This innovative drilling process allows breaking up the metallic chips in such a way that jamming is avoided. This paper presents a case of CFRP/Ti6Al4V drilling on a CNC machine where productivity must be increased. A comparison is made between the current regular process and the MITIS drilling process. First the analysis and comparison method is presented. The current process is analyzed and its limits are highlighted. Then the vibration process is implemented and its performances are studied. Both processes are compared according to the following criteria: chip morphology, thrust force, power consumption, tool life, cycle time, holes quality and manufacturing costs.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Joshua Norman, Cesar Moreno, Zhiyu Wang, James Mann, Christopher Saldana
Abstract The beneficial effects of contact disruption in modulation-assisted machining of aerospace alloys have been well documented, but sources for such improvements are not well understood. This study explores the underlying nature of differences that occur in energy dissipation during conventional and modulation-assisted machining by characterizing the relationship between controllable process parameters and their effects on chip formation. Simultaneous in situ force and tool position measurements are used to show that the forces in modulation-assisted machining can be described by empirical force models in conventional machining conditions. These models are found to accurately describe plastic dissipation over a range of modulation conditions and configurations, including in cases where energy expenditure decreases with the application of modulation. These observations suggest that the underlying response in modulation-assisted machining is analogous to that of conventional machining.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Jamie Skovron, Laine Mears, Durul Ulutan, Duane Detwiler, Daniel Paolini, Boris Baeumler, Laurence Claus
Abstract A state of the art proprietary method for aluminum-to-aluminum joining in the automotive industry is Resistance Spot Welding. However, with spot welding (1) structural performance of the joint may be degraded through heat-affected zones created by the high temperature thermal joining process, (2) achieving the double-sided access necessary for the spot welding electrodes may limit design flexibility, and (3) variability with welds leads to production inconsistencies. Self-piercing rivets have been used before; however they require different rivet/die combinations depending on the material being joined, which adds to process complexity. In recent years the introductions of screw products that combine the technologies of friction drilling and thread forming have entered the market. These types of screw products do not have these access limitations as through-part connections are formed by one-sided access using a thermo-mechanical flow screwdriving process with minimal heat. The friction drilling, thread forming process, hereto referred to as “FDS” is an automated continuous process that allows multi-material joining by utilizing a screw as both the tool and the fastener.
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