Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 121 to 150 of 9009
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0479
Soichi Hareyama, Ken-ichi Manabe, Makoto Nakashima, Takayuki Shimodaira, Akio Hoshi
Abstract This investigation describes a method for estimating the absolute lock effect in bolted joint. Observation results of loosening phenomenon in industrial vehicle are analyzed for the linear relation by the proposed regression formula. Based on the relation, in early stages of the development test, the rate of clamping force decrease can be estimated accurately after prolonged operation by measuring the clamping force behavior. The tendency to decrease is observed about the depression type and working load type loosening. For evaluation design bases, the residual clamping force estimation chart is established. The L-N (Loosening Lifetime - Number of Cycles to Loosening N) diagram is proposed for the loosening lifetime prediction for working load type loosening also. Using the loosening damage (cumulative decrease of clamping force) and L-N diagram, the lifetime to loosening failure can be predicted accurately for the locking device and method as an absolute evaluation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0468
Raj S. Roychoudhury
Abstract A new weld design to form plastic hollow articles is conceived. Its design is T-shaped such that the joint loading under pressure is no longer in peel but in tension, vertically to the weld surface. This weld design can be easily achieved, overcoming the limitation of die lock in injection molding and by the hot plate weld design adopted for this welding. Test samples were built to evaluate the new weld design concept and hot plates designed to help perform this weld joint. Pull test on the conventional L-shaped and the new T- shaped welded samples show an improvement of about 50% weld strength for the new T-shaped weld design. Hence a weld joint stronger than the parent material, in forming plastic hollow articles, is possible.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1276
Aditi Moorthy, Robert De Kleine, Gregory Keoleian, Jeremy Good, Geoff Lewis
Abstract The problem of accessibility to public transit is well-documented in transportation theory and network literature, and is known as the last mile problem. A lack of first and last mile transit services impairs access to public transit causing commuters to opt for private modes of transit over public modes. This paper analyzes the implications of a shared autonomous vehicle (AV) taxi system providing last mile transit services in terms of environmental, cost, and performance metrics. Conventional public transit options and a hypothetical last-mile shared autonomous vehicle (SAV) system are analyzed for transit between Ann Arbor and Detroit Wayne County Airport for life cycle energy, emissions, total travel time, and travel costs. In the case study, energy savings from using public transit options with AV last mile service were as high as 37% when compared to a personal vehicle option.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1273
Qiang Dai, Jarod C. Kelly, Amgad Elgowainy
Abstract Vehicle lightweighting has been a focus of the automotive industry, as car manufacturers seek to comply with corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions standards for model year (MY) 2017-2025 vehicles. However, when developing a lightweight vehicle design, the automotive industry typically targets maximum vehicle weight reduction at minimal cost increase. In this paper, we consider the environmental impacts of the lightweighting technology options. The materials used for vehicle lightweighting include high-strength steel (HSS), aluminum, magnesium and carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). Except for HSS, the production of these light materials is more GHG-intensive (on a kg-to-kg basis) compared with the conventional automotive materials they substitute. Lightweighting with these materials, therefore, may partially offset the GHG emission reductions achieved through improved fuel economy.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0296
Oberti Dos Santos Almeida
Abstract One of the biggest challenges for the Product Development Engineers is to have a clear understanding of the Quality Principles and Disciplines they should follow while they are engineering. In general, the current Product Development System guides of the Automakers companies are mostly focused on provide guidance for the Engineers on the following areas: Design Efficiency; Design Rules for Product Robustness; Design Validation; Product Reliability; Testing Procedures. The introduction of a new/advanced technology system alone does not mean low incidence of customer complaints. The only way to get that is plan/execute Consumer Driven Design with excellence. Global Vehicles are more sensitive to Quality since they must satisfy diverse cultural customers without compromise reliability. When a new vehicle is being developed to be sold in many markets around the world - Global Product - this problem is even bigger. Different markets mean different customer expectations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0536
William Goodwin, Claudio Mancuso, Nicolas Brown
This paper describes how distributive computing along with statistical subsystem simulation can be applied to produce near production ready embedded vehicle software and calibrations. Coupling distributive computing and statistical simulation was first employed over a decade ago at General Motors to design and analyze propulsion subsystem hardware. Recently this method of simulation has been enhanced extending its capabilities to both test embedded vehicle code as well as develop calibrations. A primary advantage of this simulation technique is its ability to generate data from a statistically significant population of subsystems. The result is the acquisition of an optimal data set enabling the development of a robust design now including both embedded code and calibrations. Additionally it has been shown that there are significant economic advantages in terms of time and cost associated with this type of development when compared to traditional method.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0242
Yakov Fradkin, Michel Cordonnier, Andrew Henry, David Newton
Abstract Ford Motor Company’s assembly plants build vehicles in a certain sequence. The planned sequence for the plant’s trim and final assembly area is developed centrally and is sent to the plant several days in advance. In this work we present the study of two cases where the plant changes the planned sequence to cope with production constraints. In one case, a plant pulls ahead two-tone orders that require two passes through the paint shop. This is further complicated by presence in the body shop area of a unidirectional rotating tool that allows efficient build of a sequence “A-B-C” but heavily penalizes a sequence “C-B-A”. The plant changes the original planned sequence in the body shop area to the one that satisfies both pull-ahead and rotating tool requirements. In the other case, a plant runs on lean inventories. Material consumption is tightly controlled down to the hour to match with planned material deliveries.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0244
Joshua Lyon, Junheung Park, Yakov Fradkin, Jeff Tornabene
Abstract We describe an optimization model developed by Ford Motor Company to reallocate stamped parts between facilities when business conditions change. How can the business meet new targets when demand starts to exceed existing capacity? Likewise, how can it respond when demand is lower than expected? Sometimes the business can reduce costs by transferring production to a different location or by outsourcing parts. We describe in this paper how mathematical optimization can identify solutions that balance both logistical and outsourcing costs. We explain the algorithm and demonstrate with a small example how it recommends sourcing plans that minimize cost.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0340
Li Lu, Jane Zhou, Ram Iyer, Jeffrey Webb, Derren Woods, Thomas Pietila
Abstract Injection molding tools are expensive and the fatigue failure during production would result in very costly rework on the tool and downtime. Currently, mold designs are mostly based on expert experience without a careful stress analysis and the mold tool life cycle relies largely on rough estimates. The industry state of the art applies averaged temperature change and peak pressure load on the mold tool. The static analysis is then performed. Mold temperature history and thermal shock are not considered in the durability analysis. In this paper, a transient thermal analysis of the tool is performed in conjunction with the injection molding process simulation. The spatial and temporal variation of temperature, pressure and clamping forces are exported from Moldflow simulation. These histories of temperature and pressure are converted to appropriate loading curves and mapped into Abaqus FEA model.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0338
Jeong Kyun Hong, Andrew Cox
Abstract Even under uniaxial loading, seemingly simple welded joint types can develop multi-axial stress states, which must be considered when evaluating both the fatigue strength and failure location. Based on the investigation of fatigue behavior for the multi-axial stress state, a procedure for fatigue behavior of welded joints with multi-axial stress states was proposed using an effective equivalent structural stress range parameter combined normal and in-plane shear equivalent structural stress ranges and the master S-N curve approach. In automotive structures, fatigue failure is often observed at weld end, which often show a complex stress state. Due to simplified weld end representation having a sharp right-angled weld corner, the fatigue failure prediction at the weld end tends to be overly conservative due to the excessive stress concentration at the right-angled weld termination.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1239
Naoya Take, Takuya Kadoguchi, Masao Noguchi, Kimihiro Yamanaka
Abstract Power modules are used to operate three-phase alternating current motors in hybrid vehicles and electric vehicles. Good fuel efficiency and high power density are required in the field of hybrid vehicles. To achieve this goal, the miniaturization of the power module will be necessary. This trend may make a current density, which is created by insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) and free wheel diodes (FWDs), higher in power modules. Solder is often used as the joint material of power modules. It is known that a current density larger than 10 kA/cm2 causes solder electromigration. This phenomenon may cause delamination of the joint area. In addition, the ambient temperature has an influence on electromigration. The temperature of an engine compartment is high, so it is likely to cause electromigration. However, the current density of the double-sided cooling power modules in 2007 with solder joint is lower than 0.4 kA/cm2, and this value is lower than 10 kA/cm2.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0351
Guofei Chen, Mingchao Guo
Abstract Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) have been extensively used in the automotive industry for vehicle weight reduction. Although AHSS show better parent metal fatigue performance, the influence of material strength on spot weld fatigue is insignificant. To overcome this drawback, structural adhesive can been used along with spot weld to form weld-bond joints. These joints significantly improve spot weld fatigue performance and provide high joint stiffness enabling down-gauge of AHSS structures. However, modeling the adhesive joints using finite element methods is a challenge due to the nonlinear behavior of the material. In this study, the formulation of cohesive element based on the traction-separation constitutive law was applied to predict the initiation and propagation of the failure mode in the adhesively bonded joints for lap shear and coach peel specimens subjected to quasi-static loadings.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0248
Fabian Jorg Uwe Koark, Arvind Korandla
Abstract Motivation - Ambiguous product targets, a global market, innovation pressure, changing process requirements and limited resources describe the situation for engineering management in the most R&D organizations. Achieving complex objective with limited resources is a question of performance. Performance in engineering departments is highly correlated to the existing capability of the engineering staff. When the reduction of engineering effort in development projects becomes additional goal for the management, an increase of engineering productivity is required. International engineering sites are established globally to push the capacity limits and to increase the productivity by the accessing big employment markets of engineering talents. By solving the conflict of limited resources and complex engineering goals, a need organizational challenge occurs - global co-engineering.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0233
Weihong Guo, Shenghan Guo, Hui Wang, Xiao Yu, Annette Januszczak, Saumuy Suriano
Abstract The wide applications of automatic sensing devices and data acquisition systems in automotive manufacturing have resulted in a data-rich environment, which demands new data mining methodologies for effective data fusion and information integration to support decision making. This paper presents a new methodology for developing a diagnostic system using manufacturing system data for high-value assets in automotive manufacturing. The proposed method extends the basic attributes control charts with the following key elements: optimal feature subset selection considering multiple features and correlation structure, balancing the type I and type II errors in decision making, on-line process monitoring using adaptive modeling with control charts, and diagnostic performance assessment using shift and trend detection. The performance of the developed diagnostic system can be continuously improved as the knowledge of machine faults is automatically accumulated during production.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1537
Ananya Bhardwaj
Abstract Improving brake cooling has commanded substantial research in the automotive sector, as safety remains paramount in vehicles of which brakes are a crucial component. To prevent problems like brake fade and brake judder, heat dissipation should be maximized from the brakes to limit increasing temperatures. This research is a CFD investigation into the impact of existing wheel center designs on brake cooling through increased cross flow through the wheel. The new study brings together the complete wheel and disc geometries in a single CFD study and directly measures the effect on brake cooling, by implementing more accurately modeled boundary conditions like moving ground to replicate real conditions correctly. It also quantifies the improvement in the cooling rate of the brake disc with a change in wheel design, unlike previous studies.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1240
Koki Matsushita
Abstract For the purpose of improving vehicle fuel efficiency, it is necessary to reduce energy loss in the alternator. We have lowered the resistance of the rectifying device and connecting components, and control the rectifying device with an IC to reduce rectification loss. For the package design, we have changed the structure of the part on which the rectifying device is mounted into a high heat dissipation type. The new structure has enabled optimizing the size of the rectifying device, resulting in the reduction of size of the package. In addition, the rectifying device is mounted using a new soldering material and a new process, which has improved the reliability of the connection. Moreover, since the alternator has introduced a new system, the controller IC has a function for preventing malfunction of the rectifying device and a function for detecting abnormalities, in order to ensure safety.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1225
Jayaraman Krishnasamy, Martin Hosek
Abstract An advanced electric motor with hybrid-field topology has been developed for automotive traction applications. Departing from the conventional radial- and axial-field designs, the hybrid-field motor features three-dimensional magnetic flux paths, which are enabled by a novel isotropic soft magnetic material produced by a unique additive-manufacturing process based on spray forming. The motor is expected to offer an unprecedented combination of high power output, compact size, low weight and energy efficiency, achieving more than two times higher power density than state-of-the-art high-performance traction motors.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1323
Jerry Lai, Youssef Ziada, Juhchin Yang
Abstract In the assembly of axles and wheel hubs, a nut is frequently used to fasten them as one unit. In order for the nut to hold the assembly in its final position, crimping is a widely-used method which prevents nut from loosening. A reliable crimping process not only prevents movement of the nut during axle operation but should also minimize the possibility of cracking the rim. If the nut cracks during assembly, it can start to rust and deteriorate. The service life span of the axle assembly hence shortens as a result. The quality of crimping operation is determined by the component designs, the process parameters, and the crimping tool geometry. It would be time-consuming and costly to evaluate these factors empirically; let alone the requirement of prototypes in the early stage of a new program. A dynamic finite element methodology which adopts the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation from ABAQUS explicit solver is developed to simulate the complete crimping process.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0314
Lu Huang, Ming Shi, Patrick Russell
Abstract Fracture strain data provide essential information for material selection and serve as an important failure criterion in computer simulations of crash events. Traditionally, the fracture strain was measured by evaluating the thinning at fracture using tools such as a microscope or a point micrometer. In the recent decades, digital image correlation (DIC) has evolved as an advanced optical technique to record full-field strain history of materials during deformation. Using this technique, a complete set of the fracture strains (including major, minor, and thickness strains) can be approximated for the material. However, results directly obtained from the DIC can be dependent on the experiment setup and evaluation parameters, which potentially introduce errors to the reported values.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0255
Malli Kartheek Yalamanchili, Nitin Sharma, Kevin Thomson
Abstract The crashworthiness of body-in-white (BIW) plays a vital role in full vehicle crash performance. The structural integrity of BIW is controlled via strength of the spot welds and adhesives that are the primary entities to join sheet metal. The number of welds and amount of adhesives in the entire BIW directly affects the cost and the cycle time of the BIW; which makes them a good candidate for optimization. However optimization of the welds and/or adhesives not only reduces the number of connections but also provides the opportunity to improve the structural performance and mass saving by placing them optimally for the structural responses. This paper discusses the optimization of full vehicle structural performance for the small overlap crash event using the length of adhesives in the BIW as parameters. Included in the study were length of the adhesives and gage variables, defined in the front-end structure of the vehicle.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0301
Lu Huang, Ming Shi
Abstract Digital image correlation (DIC) technique has been proved as a potent tool to determine the forming limit curve (FLC) of sheet metal. One of the major technical challenges using the DIC to generate FLC is to accurately pinpoint the onset of localized necking from the DIC data. In addition to the commonly applied ISO 12004-2 standard, a plethora of other DIC data analysis approaches have been developed and used by various users and researchers. In this study, different approaches, including spatial, temporal and hybrid approaches, have been practiced to determine the limit strains at the onset of localized necking. The formability of a 980GEN3 sheet steel was studied in this work using the Marciniak cup test coupled with a DIC system. The resulting forming limits determined by different approaches were compared. Strengths and limitations of each approach were discussed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1321
Meisam Mehravaran, Yi Zhang
Abstract Degas bottles have been extensively used in vehicles in order to act as an air pillow on top of the cooling loop and provide space for expansion. One of the important characteristics of the bottle which defines if it will work in a certain loop is the so called “capacity” of the bottle which defines the flowrate that degas bottle would be able to pass through without any foaming. Considering the complex geometry of degas bottle and the foaming phenomena, predicting the behavior of coolant in the bottle passages is challenging which requires costly tests. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been extensively used in simulating multi-phase flows in automotive components. In the current project, CFD has been used to simulate the behavior of flow in bottle chambers and to provide guidelines for the design team in order to increase the bottle performance/capacity. The CFD guidelines were in agreement with test results and lead to improving the degas bottle capacity.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0126
Joshua W. Finn, John R. Wagner
Abstract Hybrid vehicle embedded systems and payloads require progressively more accurate and versatile thermal control mechanisms and strategies capable of withstanding harsh environments and increasing power density. The division of the cargo and passenger compartments into convective thermal zones which are independently managed can lead to a manageable temperature control problem. This study investigates the performance of a Peltier-effect thermoelectric zone cooling system to regulate the temperature of target objects (e.g., electronic controllers, auxiliary computer equipment, etc) within ground vehicles. Multiple thermoelectric cooling modules (TEC) are integrated with convective cooling fans to provide chilled air for convective heat transfer from a robust, compact, and solid state device. A series of control strategies have been designed and evaluated to track a prescribed time-varying temperature profile while minimizing power consumption.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0183
Mingyu Wang, Timothy Craig, Edward Wolfe, Tim J LaClair, Zhiming Gao, Michael Levin, Danrich Demitroff, Furqan Shaikh
Abstract It is widely recognized in the automotive industry that, in very cold climatic conditions, the driving range of an Electric Vehicle (EV) can be reduced by 50% or more. In an effort to minimize the EV range penalty, a novel thermal energy storage system has been designed to provide cabin heating in EVs and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) by using an advanced phase change material (PCM). This system is known as the Electrical PCM-based Thermal Heating System (ePATHS) [1, 2]. When the EV is connected to the electric grid to charge its traction battery, the ePATHS system is also “charged” with thermal energy. The stored heat is subsequently deployed for cabin comfort heating during driving, for example during commuting to and from work. The ePATHS system, especially the PCM heat exchanger component, has gone through substantial redesign in order to meet functionality and commercialization requirements.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1330
Youssef Ziada, Juhchin Yang, David DeGroat-Ives
Abstract Owing to decreased development cycle timing, designing components for manufacturability has never been as important. Assessing manufacturing feasibility has therefore become an increasingly important part of new product engineering. This manufacturing feasibility is conventionally assessed based on static stiffness of components and fixture assemblies. However, in many operations, excess vibration represents the actual limitation on processing a workpiece. Limits on how far into components a tool can reach or the amount of processing time required to machine a feature is commonly decreased significantly due to vibration. Critical time is spent resolving these vibration problems during product launches. Depending on the machining configurations these vibrations can be due to the part & work support structure or due to the tooling & spindle assembly.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1513
Young-Chang Cho, Chin-Wei Chang, Andrea Shestopalov, Edward Tate
Abstract The airflow into the engine bay of a passenger car is used for cooling down essential components of the vehicle, such as powertrain, air-conditioning compressor, intake charge air, batteries, and brake systems, before it returns back to the external flow. When the intake ram pressure becomes high enough to supply surplus cooling air flow, this flow can be actively regulated by using arrays of grille shutters, namely active grille shutters (AGS), in order to reduce the drag penalty due to excessive cooling. In this study, the operation of AGS for a generic SUV-type model vehicle is optimized for improved fuel economy on a highway drive cycle (part of SFTP-US06) by using surrogate models. Both vehicle aerodynamic power consumption and under-hood cooling performance are assessed by using PowerFLOW, a high-fidelity flow solver that is fully coupled with powertrain heat exchanger models.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0266
Shervin Shoai Naini, Junkui (Allen) Huang, Richard Miller, John R. Wagner, Denise Rizzo, Scott Shurin, Katherine Sebeck
Designing an efficient cooling system with low power consumption is of high interest in the automotive engineering community. Heat generated due to the propulsion system and the on-board electronics in ground vehicles must be dissipated to avoid exceeding component temperature limits. In addition, proper thermal management will offer improved system durability and efficiency while providing a flexible, modular, and reduced weight structure. Traditional cooling systems are effective but they typically require high energy consumption which provides motivation for a paradigm shift. This study will examine the integration of passive heat rejection pathways in ground vehicle cooling systems using a “thermal bus”. Potential solutions include heat pipes and composite fibers with high thermal properties and light weight properties to move heat from the source to ambient surroundings.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1703
Ryan A. Howell, Richard Gerth
Abstract Fe-Mn-Al-C steel alloys have been previously studied for their potential as an alternative steel alloy for Rolled Homogeneous Armor (RHA). Prior examination of the material system has shown promise in this capacity due to the high strength and reduced density of Mn steels as compared to RHA. The prior tested materials were both wrought and cast versions but were all less than an inch in thickness. The alloy is once again being examined, but this time in thicker wrought plate. The aim of the current body of work is to develop a Military Specification (MIL-SPEC) for this new class of ballistically capable material. For industry and communities interested in such material development, the purpose of this paper, then, is to provide a summary of the processing parameters, the prior ballistic and dynamic material testing, cutting and welding approaches, and the extent of progress on industrial sized thick plate development.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1529
Nicholas Simmonds, John Pitman, Panagiotis Tsoutsanis, Karl Jenkins, Adrian Gaylard, Wilko Jansen
Abstract Cooling drag, typically known as the difference in drag coefficient between open and closed cooling configurations, has traditionally proven to be a difficult flow phenomenon to predict using computational fluid dynamics. It was seen as an academic yardstick before the advent of grille shutter systems. However, their introduction has increased the need to accurately predict the drag of a vehicle in a variety of different cooling configurations during vehicle development. This currently represents one of the greatest predictive challenges to the automotive industry due to being the net effect of many flow field changes around the vehicle. A comprehensive study is presented in the paper to discuss the notion of defining cooling drag as a number and to explore its effect on three automotive models with different cooling drag deltas using the commercial CFD solvers; STARCCM+ and Exa PowerFLOW.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1707
C. Matthew Enloe, Jason Coryell, Jeff Wang
Abstract Retained austenite stability to both mechanically induced transformation and athermal transformation is of great importance to the fabrication and in-vehicle performance of automotive advanced high strength steels. Selected cold-rolled advanced high strength steels containing retained austenite with minimum tensile strengths of 980 MPa and 1180 MPa were pre-strained to pre-determined levels under uniaxial tension in the rolling direction and subsequently cooled to temperatures as low as 77 K. Room temperature uniaxial tensile results of pre-strained and cooled steels indicate that retained austenite is stable to athermal transformation to martensite at all tested temperatures and pre-strain levels. To evaluate the combined effects of temperature and pre-strain on impact behavior, stacked Charpy impact testing was conducted on the same 980 MPa minimum tensile strength steel following similar pre-straining in uniaxial tension.
Viewing 121 to 150 of 9009