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Viewing 8971 to 9000 of 9002
1921-01-01
Technical Paper
210007
KINGSTON FORBES
The field of body engineering is broader than it is ordinarily considered to be; the author's intention is to bring to the attention of the automotive industry the breadth and scope of body engineering and outline the way this side of the industry can be considered and developed. After describing the body engineer's position, the author then discusses at some length the conflict between art and economy in this connection. He classifies a body-engineering department under the six main divisions of body construction, open and closed; sheet metal, body metal, fenders, hood, radiators and the like; trimming; top building; general hardware; painting and enameling, and comments upon each. Following this he elaborates the reasons for need of attention to details in body designing and mentions the opportunity there is at present for bringing the materials used in body construction to definite standards.
1921-01-01
Technical Paper
210055
C S MOODY
The author considers first the materials available for construction, in connection with the S.A.E. standard specifications, and presents a comparison of the different metals with comments thereon. In regard to metallurgical problems the designer's first task is to determine what the various stresses in the parts are and their magnitude; hence, a true appreciation of the terms “shock” and “fatigue” is necessary; a somewhat lengthy explanation of their meaning is given. The construction features of the different parts of the tractor are treated in general, no attempt being made to cover details; comments are presented on front axles, wheels, bearings, cylinders, valves, valve-seats, transmissions and gears. Heat-treating is then considered in some detail, three specific reasons for annealing before machining being given and five which are governing factors in regard to heat-treatment in general.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200022
ARCHIBALD BLACK
A tendency exists in most shops to assume that brazed joints cannot be successfully heat-treated. As a consequence, many fittings used in aircraft work and assembled by brazing smaller parts together are finished and installed without being heat-treated after the brazing operation. This practice causes parts to be used that not only do not develop the available strength of the material, but which are in some cases, under internal stress due to the heating in the brazing operation. Recent experiments made at the Naval Aircraft Factory show that the assumption mentioned is entirely erroneous. The author considers this matter with a view to specifying the use of steels and brazing spelters which will permit the subsequent or perhaps the simultaneous heat-treatment of the parts.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200047
CARL J BAER
Abstract The author states that production and transportation are so closely interwoven that they cannot be considered separately and that the great problem of transportation can be satisfactorily solved only by the utilization of our navigable inland waterways. He then compares the United States with European countries in regard to the problems of inland waterway transportation and reviews the history of such transportation in this country. The organization of the Mississippi Valley Waterways Association and its activities are described. The need of considering the inland waterways transportation problem as a mechanical engineering problem is emphasized. It is recommended that a standardized system for handling freight on inland rivers be adopted and an outline is given of the requirements of such a system. A statement of Government activities in connection with this problem is presented and the policy of the Government outlined.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200051
A G. DREFS
In the automotive industries there are four major divisions of activity, manufacturing, financing, engineering and sales. The first three and especially the first two are today real problems. There have been no real sales obstacles. The paper discusses production-control, especially the routing of materials, and systems of accounting pertaining to shop production. They cannot be separated without destroying the effectiveness and efficiency of one or both. The divisions of the production department, the planning department, scheduling an order for production and preparing cost data are then considered at length. The distributing of overhead expense and the securing of complete factory costs are then fully discussed and illustrated by diagrams.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200044
ARNOLD P YERKES
The comparatively slow introduction of mechanical power for farm operations has been a surprise and a disappointment to many. It is easily understandable why the deficient machines failed to sell but not so clear why really efficient outfits failed to make greater headway. No one can make a thorough study of the existing situation and conclude that any or all of the reasons given are even in a large part responsible for the slowness in adopting the tractor more generally on the farms; it is obvious that there are other strong influences. Most of these are connected with the farm business itself and, by considering the matter in relation to the individual farmer rather than farmers as a class, these influences become more clear.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190009
J G UTZ
THE United States was practically unprepared in the field of military motor-transport at the beginning of the war. Due largely to the cooperation of the Society of Automotive Engineers and its members individually, this handicap was overcome and a position stronger in this respect than that of any of the other belligerents was attained. The early efforts and the cooperation between the Society and the various Government departments are described, especially with reference to the Quartermaster Corps which at that time had charge of all motor transportation. Regarding the Class B truck, it is shown that the Society acted as a point of contact between the various members of the industry and the War Department and, although not fostering any program or plan of its own, it was largely responsible for the success of the standardization program conceived and carried out by the Army.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190060
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180002
JESSE G VINCENT
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180045
H R VAN DEVENTER
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180049
C W DYSON
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180050
DONALD MCLEOD LAY
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170044
RALPH H. SHERRY
The author states that the purpose of the paper is to outline that phase of metallurgical work pertaining to the connection between the laboratory and production in the automotive industry. Reasons are cited for selecting certain designs for parts to facilitate machining, complete or partial case-hardening, finishing and assembling. The next step is the choice of materials, a subject which is treated at some length. The author then takes up in turn the field for standardization in steel specifications, inspection of materials, physical testing of steels, uniformity of composition of metals, heat-treating operations, methods of carburizing, depths of case-hardening, treatment after carburization, errors in overspeeding hardening operations and drawing heat-treatment at low temperatures. Types of pyrometers, operations on hardened work, inspection for hardness and selection of hardening equipment are some of the other topics discussed.
1916-01-01
Technical Paper
160038
H. M. JEWETT
The question as to whether a part should be made or bought is one that must be settled by the individual maker according to the value of his product, the nature of the part, his capital available for manufacturing purposes and the price at which his product is sold. The author describes the practice followed by some of the large companies, showing that in spite of their being quantity producers, they have found it desirable to buy a number of important parts. Certain parts are rarely made by automobile manufacturers, either because they can be bought more cheaply or because the machinery to produce them is intricate. The author sums up the problem by stating that a manufacturer makes the unit on account of not getting deliveries or because he does not get a fair price from the parts maker or an article good enough to satisfy his conditions. In order to give individuality to the product, the car maker often produces certain parts, such as the engine, himself.
1915-01-01
Technical Paper
150006
CORNELIUS T. MYERS
1915-01-01
Technical Paper
150015
R. E. VINCENT
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140046
H. Sidney Smith
ABSTRACT
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140022
Joseph A. Anglada
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130037
E. F. LAKE
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130030
K. W. ZIMMERSCHIELD
1912-01-01
Technical Paper
120015
EDWARD W. CURTIS
1912-01-01
Technical Paper
120034
FRANK W. TRABOLD
1911-01-01
Technical Paper
110027
H. W. Gillett
1911-01-01
Technical Paper
110029
JAMES N. HEALD
1909-01-01
Technical Paper
090007
HENRY CAVE
1908-01-01
Technical Paper
080004
THOS. J. FAY
1908-01-01
Technical Paper
080009
E. S. FOLJAMBE
1908-01-01
Technical Paper
080008
Richard W. Funk
ABSTRACT
1908-01-01
Technical Paper
080015
THOS. J. FAY
1907-01-01
Technical Paper
070001
THOS. J. FAY
Viewing 8971 to 9000 of 9002