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2015-01-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-9101
Susan Sawyer-Beaulieu, Edwin K.L. Tam
Abstract Life-cycle assessments (LCAs) conducted, to date, of the end-of-life phase of vehicles rely significantly on assumed values and extrapolations within models. The end phase of vehicles, however, has become all the more important as a consequence of increasing regulatory requirements on materials recovery, tightening disposal restrictions, and the rapid introduction of new materials and electronics, all potentially impacting a vehicle's efficacy for achieving greater levels of sustainability. This article presents and discusses selected research results of a comprehensive gate-to-gate life-cycle-inventory (LCI) of end-of-life vehicle (ELV) dismantling and shredding processes, constructed through a comprehensive and detailed case study, and argues that managing and implementing creative dismantling practices can improve significantly the recovery of both reusable and recyclable materials from end-of-life vehicles. Although the amount of parts and materials recovered and directed for reuse, remanufacturing or recycling may be as much as 11.6% by weight of the ELVs entering a dismantling process [1], greater rates of reuse and/or recycling may be achieved by the strategic management of the ELVs entering the dismantling process according to age.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2584
Krisada Wannatong, Sompach Kongviwattanakul, Thananchai Tepimonrat, Thanadech Priroon
Abstract End of line test (EOL) of Engine Control Units (ECU) is the process of ECU functions validation before releasing ECUs to the car assembly process. Examples of ECU function that need to be validated are idle control, air path control and faults manager function. To perform EOL, a vehicle and a chassis dynamometer are used to enable control functions validation inside the ECU. However, this poses high operating cost and long setup time. This paper presents the development of Hardware-in-the-Loop (HiL) system, which imitates real vehicle behavior on a chassis dynamometer. The diesel high pressure pump model was developed using an empirical dynamic modeling approach. The engine model was developed using AVL BOOST RT software, an engine cycle simulation modeling approach. The vehicle model was developed using AVL CRUISE software. In order to interface the engine and vehicle models with the ECU, HiL system was implemented. In the new EOL process, the vehicle was operated following the Extra Urban Driving Cycle (EUDC) including short engine idling time.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2805
Benjamin Kingsbury, Jonathan Stewart, Zhentao Wu, Roy Douglas, Kang Li
Abstract This study describes an innovative monolith structure designed for applications in automotive catalysis using an advanced manufacturing approach developed at Imperial College London. The production process combines extrusion with phase inversion of a ceramic-polymer-solvent mixture in order to design highly ordered substrate micro-structures that offer improvements in performance, including reduced PGM loading, reduced catalyst ageing and reduced backpressure. This study compares the performance of the novel substrate for CO oxidation against commercially available 400 cpsi and 900 cpsi catalysts using gas concentrations and a flow rate equivalent to those experienced by a full catalyst brick when attached to a vehicle. Due to the novel micro-structure, no washcoat was required for the initial testing and 13 g/ft3 of Pd was deposited directly throughout the substrate structure in the absence of a washcoat. Initial results for CO oxidation indicate that the advanced micro-structure leads to enhanced conversion efficiency.
2014-10-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-9028
Theodoros Kosmanis, Georgios Koretsis, Athanasios Manolas
Abstract The implementation of an electronic differential system in a delta-type, electrically assisted, three wheel Human Powered Vehicle is the subject of this paper. The electronic differential algorithm is based on the turning angle of the vehicle and its geometrical characteristics. The theoretical analysis is applied in a realistic human powered tricycle constructed in the premises of the Alexander Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki. The system's efficiency is validated through test measurements performed on the rear wheels during vehicle's operation in appropriately selected routes. The measurements are performed for both typical cornering and oversteering.
2014-10-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-9027
Berna Balta, Onur Erk, H. Ali Solak, Numan Durakbasa
Rear underrun protection device is crucial for rear impact and rear under-running of the passenger vehicles to the heavy duty trucks. Rear underrun protection device design should obey the safety regulative rules and successfully pass several test conditions. The objective and scope of this paper is the constrained optimization of the design of a rear underrun protection device (RUPD) beam of heavy duty trucks for impact loading using correlated CAE and test methodologies. In order to minimize the design iteration phase of the heavy duty truck RUPD, an effective, real-life testing correlated, finite element model have been constructed via RADIOSS software. Later on, Pareto Optimization has been applied to the finite element model, by constructing designed experiments. The best solution has been selected in terms of cost, manufacturing and performance. Finally, real-life verification testing has been applied for the correlation of the optimum solution.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2434
Paul Salama, Adam Lubinsky, Bryan Roy, Ziga Ivanic, Paul Lipson, Luis Torres, Joseph Tario, Robert Ancar
Abstract The emergence of electric vehicle (EV) delivery trucks is resulting in health and environmental benefits, less noise, reduction of foreign energy dependency, and economic development opportunities. Green Loading Zones (GLZs) are dedicated curbside spaces for commercial delivery EVs meant to incentivize and accelerate market adoption. This study examined the impact and potential benefits of this strategy for New York City. Discussions with fleets revealed that while they are realizing operational savings and other benefits from the use of EVs, their incremental costs over diesel vehicles can take a very long time to recover, even with existing subsidy programs. Complementary incentives like GLZs can provide further justification for the investment in cleaner technology. Most fleets interviewed would place a high monetary value on guaranteed delivery locations and reduced parking violation expenses. Inclusion of GLZ electrical infrastructure to charge the EV battery could extend the range and operational capacity or permit the fleet to purchase vehicles with smaller battery packs, both of which would increase the cost effectiveness of this technology.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2433
Abhishake Goyal, Nadeem Yamin, Naveen Kumar
Abstract Fuel cells are a promising energy source on account of their high efficiency and low emissions. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are clean and environmental-friendly power sources, which can become future energy solutions especially for transport vehicles. They exhibit good energy efficiency and high power density per volume. Working at low temperatures (<90°C), hydrogen fuelled proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are identified as promising alternatives for powering autos, houses and electronics. At the middle of the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The MEA consists of a proton exchange membrane, catalyst layers, and gas diffusion layers (GDL). However, most of the researchers have already mentioned that PEMFC are not competitive enough to rechargeable lithium ion battery with respect to price because of the rare metal used such as platinum in it. Presence of platinum in PEM fuel cells is one of the reasons why fuel cells are excluded from commercialization.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2430
Rajendra Vivekananda Hosamath, Muralidhar Nagarkatte
Abstract All top ranking automobile companies in the world believe in single word “Quality” and maintaining quality standards is a philosophy, a belief in which we live, a task which cannot be put aside for another day. To achieve the world class quality standards Divgi-Warner meticulously follows a highly effective tool known as Quality System Basics (QSB).QSB helps Divgi-Warner to preserve integrity of commitment to achieve manufacturing excellence. This case study covers the Quality System Basics implementation experience of Divgi-Warner Pvt. Ltd. (DWPL) India, a BorgWarner's plants located at Pune and Sirsi in India. Quality system basic consists of following 10 Key elements to establish world class quality:- 1 Fast Response Meeting (FRM).2 Control of Non-Conforming Product.3 Verification Station.4 Standardized Operations.5 Standardized Operator Training.6 Error Proofing Verification.7 Layered Process Audits (LPA).8 Risk Priority Number (RPN) Reduction.9 Contamination Control.10 Supply Chain Management.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2428
Burcu Guleryuz, Cagkan Kocabas, Erkan Ozturk
Abstract Remanufacturing is a process in which used products are disassembled, and their components are repaired and used in the production of new products. This study investigates the impact of various remanufacturing decisions on Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) profitability and market cannibalization in an infinite-horizon production scenario for heavy duty vehicle (HDV) clutches. A discrete event simulation model is developed for benchmarking of different scenarios using various factors and their levels. There are two consumer segments as primary customer and grey customer in the market. Three different end of life (EOL) clutch quality conditions are defined, and three different percentages of clutch collect strategies are defined for all EOL products in the market. Therefore, a total of nine combinations (i.e., three quality index and three collecting strategies) are benchmarked in terms of total profit from new and remanufactured HDV clutches, number of customers won, and amount of saved raw material for environmental considerations.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2335
Balakrishnan Natesan
Abstract Phosphorous is an important alloying element in powder metallurgy applications. It is used in Powder metal parts for effective Sintering, dimensional stability, improved machinability, corrosion resistance etc. However it does have some negative effects on properties of Powder metal parts. The purpose of the paper is to study the effect of phosphorous on Powder metal gear of Mix A and Mix B having identical composition differing only in phosphorous content. The samples were detailed on each stage, viz. sintering & Heat treatment. In addition two defective samples were studied to observe the extent to which phosphorous may deteriorate the Powder metal Gear.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2319
Iman Hazrati Ashtiani, Mehrnoosh Abedi
Abstract Road train vehicles have been applied as one of the common and efficient ways for transportation of goods, specifically hazardous liquid cargos, in different nations. These vehicles have a wide variety of lengths and towing systems such as the fifth wheel or the dolly draw-bar. Based upon specific regulations, they could be authorized to move on specific roads. In order to avoid hazard and danger in case of accidents, safety performance of a B-train vehicle as a specific type of road train vehicles is investigated in this paper. A Multi-Body Dynamic (MBD) model, which consists of a prime mover and two trailers coupled by fifth wheels, are simulated in the initial phase of the study. The developed dynamic model is capable of simulating required tests as well as the SAE lane change, along with a constant radius turn for the purpose of roll and yaw stability analysis and safety evaluation. The effects of variation of the fluid fill level are considered in this research. The trammel pendulum concept is adopted for simulation of fluid movements, known as sloshing, in two articulated tankers of the model.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2503
Johannes Schneider
The brake discs and brake drums used on motor vehicles are, in 90% of applications, made from grey cast iron. Although other designs such as composite systems comprising of a grey iron braking band and a light weight mounting bell made from aluminum, Al-MMC or entire ceramic brake discs have been developed, cast iron will continue to play a major role as a work piece material for brakes. Cast iron offers advantages in material characteristics such as good thermal conductivity, high compressive strength and damping capacity. In addition it shows a superior casting behavior and also an unbeatable competitive price per part, when compared to other brake materials or designs. Ongoing research in material and casting science are leading to new types of alloyed CI materials, fulfilling the increasing demands in terms of performance but also increasing the demands for a reliable and economical production. As a product of high volume production the economics and productive manufacturing of the brake discs is a fundamental issue to ensure the competitiveness of the manufacturers.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2127
Karl Strauss
Abstract “Today's electronic components rely on principles of physics and science with no manufacturing precedence and little data on long term stability and reliability.” [1] Yet many are counting on their reliable performance years if not decades into the future, sometimes after being literally abandoned in barns or stored neatly in tightly sealed bags. What makes sense? To toss everything away, or use it as is and hope for the best? Surely there must be a middle ground! With an unprecedented number of missions in its future and an ever-tightening budget, NASA faces the daunting task of doing more with less. One proven way for a project to save money is to use already screened and qualified devices from the spares of its predecessors. But what is the risk in doing so? How can a project reliably count on the value of spare devices if the risk of using them is not, in itself, defined? With hundreds of thousands of devices left over from previous missions, the parts bins of NASA hold a wealth of electronic components, (possibly) ready for use many years after their production.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2138
Ron Wang, Michelle Bash, Steven D. Pekarek
Abstract In this research, excitation strategies for a salient-pole wound rotor synchronous machine are explored using a magnetic equivalent circuit model that includes core loss. It is shown that the excitation obtained is considerably different than would be obtained using traditional qd-based models. However, through evaluation of the resulting ‘optimal’ excitation, a relatively straightforward field-oriented type control is developed that is consistent with a desire for efficiency yet control simplicity. Validation is achieved through hardware experiment. The usefulness/applicability of the simplified control to variable speed applications is then considered.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2275
Karl-Erik Neumann, Robert Reno
Abstract The utilization of new materials and tightening of desired tolerances has driven the advancement of Practical and Portable Automated Machining. Increased demand in volume within the aerospace industry not only requires minimizing the amount of manual operations, but also applying automation inside existing manual fixtures. In the past, manual labor, with drastic limitations on achievable accuracies, has been utilized in areas that machine tools cannot either access or the limited amount of work does not justify the expense of additional machines. Assemblies requiring critical hole alignment or drilling through stack materials often are difficult to achieve using manual operations. The solution is a practical and very portable machining unit that is small enough to fit into otherwise difficult areas and is lightweight enough to be either moved into position by small machines or quickly disassembled/assembled with each subassembly capable of being positioned manually. The criteria for the developed machine were that it be; Lightweight - Under 250 lbs allowing for manual positioning or easy mechanical positioning Accurate - Maintain accuracy achieved with current PKM technology Rigid - Capable of drill/mill/orbital of titanium Flexible - Can be mounted in any orientation and is adaptable to rail, vacuum, fixed leg, gantry, etc.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2238
Richard Kingston
Abstract Industrial robots are extremely good at repetitive tasks. They exhibit excellent repeatability, making them ideal candidates for many tasks. However, increasing use of CAD based offline programming highlights the fact that industrial robots are generally not accurate devices. Several approaches have been used to compensate for this deficiency. Robot calibration is well established and factory calibrated robots are available from most industrial robot manufacturers. This can improve the spatial accuracy of robots to figures better than 1mm which is adequate for most robot processes in use today. Improvements in accuracy beyond this point can be achieved if the working range of the robot is constrained in some way. For example, limiting a robot to working in a single plane or restricting the robot to a reduced work volume can contribute to significant improvements in accuracy. However, for applications requiring high accuracy without these constraints some additional control is needed.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2237
Rainer Mueller, Matthias Vette, Andreas Ginschel, Ortwin Mailahn
Abstract The global competition challenges aircraft manufacturers in high wage countries. The assembly of large components happens manually in fixed position assembly. Especially the completion of the inner fuselage structure is done 100% manually. The shells have to be joined with rivets and several hundred clips have to be assembled to connect the shell to the frames. The poise of the worker is not ergonomic so a lot of physical stress is added to the worker and minimizes the working ability. Aircraft manufacturers need a lot of different production resources and qualified persons for the production, which provokes higher costs. Due to these high costs there is a demand for automated reconfigurable assembly systems, which offer a high flexibility and lower manufacturing costs. The research project “IProGro” deals with this challenge and develops innovative production systems for large parts. On one hand the flexibility is reached by a reconfigurable fixture for the components on the other hand it is achieved by assistance systems, which guide staff during assembly processes.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2246
Yanbin Yao
Abstract Drilling plays a significant process in the aircraft manufacturing. This paper develops a robot automatic drilling system for processing the titanium alloy, aluminum alloy and laminated composites component of aircraft. The accurate robot drilling system is comprised of ABB IRB6640-235 robot, drilling end-effector, end-effctor control system and vision system. Experimental results show that the system absolute location precision is within 0.3mm, and the drilling efficiency can be up to four holes per minute. The drilling efficiency and quality of the aircraft component can be increased immensely by the developed robot automatic drilling system.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2264
Peter B. Zieve, Osman Emre Celek, John Fenty
Abstract The E7000 riveting machine installs NAS1097KE5-5.5 rivets into A320 Section 18 fuselage side panels. For the thinnest stacks where the panel skin is under 2mm (2024) and the stringer is under 2mm (7075), the normal process of riveting will cause deformation of the panel or dimpling. The authors found a solution to this problem by forming the rivet with the upper pressure foot extended, and it has been tested and approved for production.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2256
Roger Holden, Paul Lightowler, Simon Andreou
Abstract The 30 month COMET project aims to overcome the challenges facing European manufacturing industries by developing innovative machining systems that are flexible, reliable and predictable with an average of 30% cost efficiency savings in comparison to machine tools. From a conceptual point of view, industrial robot technology could provide an excellent base for machining being both flexible and cost efficient. However, industrial robots lack absolute positioning accuracy, are unable to reject disturbances in terms of process forces and lack reliable programming and simulation tools to ensure right first time machining, once production commences. These three critical limitations currently prevent the use of robots in typical machining applications. The COMET project is co-funded by the European Commission as part of the European Economic Recovery Plan (EERP) adopted in 2008. The EERP proposes the launch of Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) in three sectors, one of them being Factories of the Future (FoF).
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2257
Roger Holden, Paul Lightowler, Simon Andreou
Abstract The 30 month COMET project aims to overcome the challenges facing European manufacturing industries by developing innovative machining systems that are flexible, reliable and predictable with an average of 30% cost efficiency savings in comparison to machine tools. From a conceptual point of view, industrial robot technology could provide an excellent base for machining being both flexible and cost efficient. However, industrial robots lack absolute positioning accuracy, are unable to reject disturbances in terms of process forces and lack reliable programming and simulation tools to ensure right first time machining, once production commences. These three critical limitations currently prevent the use of robots in typical machining applications. The COMET project is co-funded by the European Commission as part of the European Economic Recovery Plan (EERP) adopted in 2008. The EERP proposes the launch of Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) in three sectors, one of them being Factories of the Future (FoF).
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2259
Greg Adams
Abstract Electroimpact has developed a second generation of mobile robots with several improvements over the first generation. The frame has been revised from a welded steel tube to a welded steel plate structure, making the dynamic response of the structure stiffer and reducing load deflections while maintaining the same weight. The deflections of the frame have been optimized to simplify position compensation. The caster mechanism is very compact, offers greater mounting flexibility, and improved maneuverability. The mechanism uses a pneumatic airbag for both lifting and suspension. The robot sled has been improved to offer greater rigidity for the same weight, and dual secondary feedback scales on the vertical axis further improve the rigidity of the overall system. Maintenance access has been improved by rerouting the cable and hose trays, and lowering the electrical cabinet. The mobile robot is sized so it can be shipped complete on a lowboy trailer for deliveries that can be completed by truck.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2267
George Nicholas Bullen
Abstract Rapid advances in cloud-based computing, robotics and smart sensors, multi-modal modeling and simulation, and advanced production are transforming modern manufacturing. The shift toward smaller runs on custom-designed products favors agile and adaptable workplaces that can compete in the global economy. This paper and presentation will describe the advances in Digital Manufacturing that provides the backbone to tighten integration and interoperability of design methods interlinked with advanced manufacturing technologies and agile business practices. The digital tapestry that seamlessly connects computer design tools, modeling and simulation, intelligent machines and sensors, additive manufacturing, manufacturing methods, and post-delivery services to shorten the time and cost between idea generation and first successful product-in-hand will be illustrated.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2250
Nicholas Lum, Qun Luo
Abstract Electroimpact has designed and manufactured a flexible tooling system for the E7000-ARJ horizontal panel riveter. This tooling design accommodates panel sizes from 3.5m to 10m long, with a variety of straight and tapered curvatures. The tooling is re-configured manually and utilizes removable index plates that can be adapted to accommodate new panel types. This type of tooling is ideal for value-conscious applications where a single machine must process a large range of panel styles. Electroimpact is currently using this system to tool 17 different styles of pre-tacked panels on a single E7000-ARJ machine. This flexible system does not require large removable form boards or custom frames that index one type of panel. Instead it uses 4 form boards that are permanently mounted to the picture frame by linear rails, allowing them to index anywhere along the 10m working envelope. Each form board holds several rail mounted surface indexes that are adjusted to accommodate different panel curvatures.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2249
Thomas G. Jefferson, Svetan Ratchev, Richard Crossley
Abstract Aerospace assembly systems comprise a vast array of interrelated elements interacting in a myriad of ways. Consequently, aerospace assembly system design is a deeply complex process that requires a multi-disciplined team of engineers. Recent trends to improve manufacturing agility suggest reconfigurability as a solution to the increasing demand for improved flexibility, time-to-market and overall reduction in non-recurring costs. Yet, adding reconfigurability to assembly systems further increases operational complexity and design complexity. Despite the increase in complexity for reconfigurable assembly, few formal methodologies or frameworks exist specifically to support the design of Reconfigurable Assembly Systems (RAS). This paper presents a novel reconfigurable assembly system design framework (RASDF) that can be applied to wing structure assembly as well as many other RAS design problems. The framework is a holistic, hierarchical approach to system design incorporating reconfigurability principles, Axiomatic Design and Design Structure Matrices.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2248
Santiago Droll
In contemporary industries the demand for very accurate robots is continuously growing. Yet, robot vendors are limited in the achievable accuracy of their robots, as they have no means to provide a direct end-effector feedback. Therefore, most approaches aim to identify an accurate model of the robotic system, thus providing compensation factors to correct the deflections. Models, however, are unable to represent the real physical system in a sufficient manner for path correction. The non-linearities in robotic systems are difficult to model and the dynamics cannot be neglected. A better approach is, therefore, to use direct end-effector position and orientation feedback from an external sensor as, e.g. a Leica laser tracker. The measured data can directly be compared to the nominal data from the path interpolator. Hence, the data are independent of the kinematic robot model. The residual errors can be used to calculate correction values in Cartesian space, which are mapped to each individual robot joint, thus providing a fast path correction algorithm.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2234
Nelson W. Sorbo, Jason J. Dionne
Abstract The use of composite materials and composite stackups (CO-Ti or CO-Al) in aerospace and automotive applications has been and will continue to grow at a very high rate due to the high strength and low weight of the materials. One key problem manufacturers have using this material is the ability to efficiently drill holes through the layers to install fasteners and other components. This is especially true in stackups of CFRP and titanium due to the desire of drilling dry for the CFRP layer and the need for cooling when drilling the high strength Ti layer. By using CO2 through tool cooling, it is possible to protect both layers. Through work supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and Department of Energy (DOE) it is shown that CO2 through tool cooling productivity can be significantly increased while maintaining required hole tolerances in both the composite and Ti layers. Improvements in tool life have been demonstrated when compared to either emulsion or dry drilling.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2253
Ralf Schomaker, Richard Pedwell, Björn Knickrehm
Abstract As a result of the increasing use of fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) components in a modern commercial aircraft, manufacturers are facing new challenges - especially with regards to the realisation of significant build rates. One challenge is the larger variation of the thickness of FRP components compared with metal parts that can normally be manufactured within a very narrow thickness tolerance bandwidth. The larger thickness variation of composite structures has an impact on the shape of the component and especially on the surfaces intended to be joined together with other components. As a result, gaps between the components to be assembled could be encountered. However, from a structural point of view, gaps can only be accepted to a certain extent in order to maintain the structural integrity of the joint. Today's state of the art technologies to close gaps between FRP structures comprise shimming methods using liquid and solid shims. Another option is the use of peelable shims that offer significant economic benefits compared with liquid and solid shims.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2273
James Cunov, Charles J. Habermann
Abstract The ever increasing use of composites for aircraft components presents opportunities for new ways to process these parts. There are myriad benefits for use of composites in achieving aircraft performance goals. However, composites come with unique challenges as well. Some of these challenges impact the ability to produce accurate parts. Traditionally, such parts have been trimmed only while clamped in dedicated rigid tools that secure the part in the nominal shape. This results in significant investment in tooling design, production, maintenance, storage and, handling. As an alternative, PaR has developed its Adaptive Manufacturing System that incorporates a Robotic Fixture and Precision Motion Machine with an Integrated Process Head. The Robotic Fixture allows the entire family of parts to be managed with one fixture that remains within the machine footprint. The fixture is programmed to command 38 individual robots to assume appropriate poses and end effector configurations to accommodate over 400 different parts in the family that range in length from 0.5 to 20 meters.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2274
Riley HansonSmith, Alan Merkley
Abstract The Boeing Company is striving to improve quality and reduce defects and injuries through the implementation of lightweight “Right Sized” automated drill and fasten equipment. This has lead to the factory adopting Boeing developed and supplier built flex track drill and countersink machines for drilling fuselage circumferential joins, wing panel to spar and wing splice stringers. The natural evolution of this technology is the addition of fastener installation to enable One Up Assembly. The critical component of One Up Assembly is keeping the joint squeezed tightly together to prevent burrs and debris at the interface. Traditionally this is done by two-sided machines providing concentric clamp up around the hole while it is being drilled. It was proposed that for stiff structure, the joint could be held together by beginning adjacent to a tack fastener, and assemble the joint sequentially using the adjacent hole clamp up from the previous hole to keep the joint clamped up. This process would significantly decrease the costs and complexity that is usually associated with two sided equipment involved in One Up drilling and fastening.
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