Display:

Results

Viewing 12751 to 12780 of 13466
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350003
T. L. Preble
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350007
Peter Altman
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350010
WILLIAM LITTLEWOOD
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350013
P. W. Fassler
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350015
ERVING R. GURNEY, LOWELL H. BROWN
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350017
P. R. Croll, L. E. DuBey
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350016
Sherman W. Bushnell
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350022
Arthur Nutt
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350020
J. S. Parkinson
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350021
G. M. Maverick
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350032
C.F. Becker
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350034
Pierre Schon
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350054
J. A. Weiger
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350065
S. B. Shaw
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350076
W. B. GOODMAN
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350064
C. B. VEAL
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350086
J. F. Campbell
THIS paper covers in a general way the development of a complete fuel injection system, including fuel injector, discharge nozzle, control system, fuel system, etc., and the application of the system to Pratt and Whitney Wasp engines, Wright Aeronautical Cyclone, Curtiss Conqueror and Allison V-1710 engines, also the installation of the Pratt and Whitney Wasp engine in service airplanes and the performance obtained with the system.
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350083
R. F. Gagg
AN outline of some current problems in aircraft engines with particular reference to the types used for main-line scheduled-transport operations is presented, it being limited so far as possible to a consideration of the conventional four-stroke gasoline-engine. Types of airline service are considered and, as regards engine sizes, it is remarked that airline service demands engines in a range of sizes from the maximum available to about 250 hp. as a minimum. Statistics of the present performance of airline engines are given, and it is stated that the horsepower output required to meet the contemplated schedule with the most adverse wind normally expected on the route is a nearly correct measure of the true effective size of the airline engine; further, that its durability and performance should, in general, be judged on that basis. The importance of fuel consumption is stressed.
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350078
Austin M. Wolf
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350100
J. H. Kindelberger, J. L. Atwood
ONE of the most essential points in the development of any airplane is the necessity for complete cooperation between the operator and the contractor in regard to necessary and desirable features to be incorporated, and this is particularly important for a commercial-transport airplane. This coordination was carried through to a remarkably efficient culmination in the development of the Douglas transport for T.W.A. Points discussed include arrangement of cabin and cockpit, seating facilities, upholstery, elimination of vibration, heating and ventilating, soundproofing, toilet facilities, lighting, vision and maintenance. The care with which all these practical considerations were worked out is discussed, and special emphasis is laid on the important points of soundproofing and maintenance in which a remarkable degree of perfection has been attained.
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350097
S. D. Heron
OIL cooling of aircraft powerplants is increasingly difficult. The weight and drag of the oil coolers necessary with the present maximum “Oil-in” temperature of 185 deg. fahr. (85 deg. cent.) are both decidedly objectionable. It appears possible to increase the “oil-in” temperature to about 220 deg. fahr. (104 deg. cent.) with oils which can be produced by the newer refining methods. The use of an “oil-in” temperature of 220 deg. fahr. would render possible a material reduction in weight, size and drag of oil coolers in comparison with present practice. Oils suitable for use at 220 deg. fahr. “oil-in” temperature would not be likely to cause a material increase of engine-starting difficulty, as they would only be used in summer when the shearing resistance of the oil has slight influence on engine starting. The approximate temperature cycle encountered by the oil in its passage through a modern aircraft-engine is discussed.
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350093
C. H. Schlesman
THE characteristics of automotive worm gearing have been investigated through the use of a special dynamometer installation capable of testing standard passenger-car and bus axles. The equipment employed in the measurement of the efficiency and of maximum permissible torque attainable with various lubricants has been described. A complete study of the effect of lubricants upon gear performance requires measurement of the rate of wheel-tooth wear, the amount and nature of corrosion, and the extent of lubricant oxidation and polymerization, as well as investigation of the rate of wheel pitting. Researches carried out for the purpose of studying the mechanism of tooth fatigue are described, and the results of the study reported. The conclusion is reached that no single lubricant possesses all of the characteristics desired in worm-gear lubrication.
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350113
J. M. Shoemaker, T. B. Rhines, H. H. Sargent
DURING the last year studies by subsidiaries of United Aircraft Corp. on cowls for radial air-cooled engines have been continued in the wind tunnel and in flight. Model tests comparing the performance of fixed cowls under various conditions are reported, and further research on flapped cowls for controlled cooling is described. Tests were made over a wide range of flap angles to show the possibilities of this type of cooling regulation, and a new form of cowl with flaps located well behind the engine at the fuselage firewall was studied. Flight tests with such a cowl showed that the qualitative variations indicated in the wind tunnel adequately represent full-scale conditions. The results of these flight tests are described in some detail. An attempt is made to reduce the various wind-tunnel results to a form suitable for estimation of cowl characteristics for design purposes, and the results of this work are correlated with information obtained in flight.
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350112
Kenneth A. Browne
THE need for improvement of fuel consumption in modern aircraft is stressed. The basic economy of oil engines for airline service is briefly summarized, together with the effect of lower fuel consumption on the range and payload of airplanes. The theoretical efficiencies of the Otto and Diesel cycles are compared with the efficiency actually obtained on present aircraft engines. The data are presented in condensed graphic form for easy comparison. A prediction is made of the fuel economy that may be expected from the gasoline aircraft-engine in the near future, together with a summary of the means required to obtain it. The prospective place of the compression-ignition engine in commercial and military service is briefly outlined. An analysis of the weight possibilities of compression-ignition engines as compared to present gasoline engines is made.
Viewing 12751 to 12780 of 13466

Filter