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Viewing 211 to 240 of 10324
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1160
Jonathan Hall, Michael Bassett, Stephen Borman, Tom Lucas, Andrew Whitehead
Abstract Present automobile development is keenly focused on measures to reduce the CO2 output of vehicles. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) enable grid electricity, which is clean in tail-pipe emissions terms, to be utilised whilst the on-board electrical storage has sufficient charge. MAHLE Powertrain and Protean have jointly developed a plug-in hybrid demonstrator vehicle based on a C-segment passenger car. The vehicle features Protean’s compact direct drive in-wheel motors with integrated inverters on the rear axle and retains the standard gasoline engine, and manual transmission, on the front axle. To support this one-off prototype, a flexible vehicle control unit has been developed, which is easily re-configurable and adaptable to any hybrid vehicle architecture.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1254
Eric Jambor, Thomas Bradley
Abstract EcoCAR 3 is a university based competition with the goal of hybridizing a 2016 Chevrolet Camaro to increase fuel economy, decrease environmental impact, and maintain user acceptability. To achieve this goal, university teams across North America must design, test, and implement automotive systems. The Colorado State University (CSU) team has designed a parallel pretransmission plug in hybrid electric design. This design will add torque from the engine and motor onto a single shaft to drive the vehicle. Since both the torque generating devices are pre-transmission the torque will be multiplied by both the transmission and final drive. To handle the large amount of torque generated by the entire powertrain system the vehicle's rear half-shafts require a more robust design. Taking advantage of this, the CSU team has decided to pursue the use of composites to increase the shaft's robustness while decreasing component weight.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1253
Patrick Ellsworth, Roydon Fraser, Michael Fowler, Daniel VanLanen, Ben Gaffney, Caixia Wang, Trong Shen, Wenhao Wu, Paul McInnis
Abstract The drive to improve and optimize hybrid vehicle performance is increasing with the growth of the market. With this market growth, the automotive industry has recognized a need to train and educate the next generation of engineers in hybrid vehicle design. The University of Waterloo Alternative Fuels Team (UWAFT), as part of the EcoCAR 3 competition, has developed a control strategy for a novel parallel-split hybrid architecture. This architecture features an engine, transmission and two electric motors; one pre-transmission motor and one post-transmission motor. The control strategy operates these powertrain components in a series, parallel, and all electric power flow, switching between these strategies to optimize the energy efficiency of the vehicle. Control strategies for these three power flows are compared through optimization of efficiencies within the powertrain.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1255
David Mackanic, Eduardo D. Marquez, James Dennington, Jacob McClean, Kaitlyn Wheeler, Douglas Nelson
Abstract The Hybrid Electric Vehicle Team (HEVT) of Virginia Tech is currently going through several modeling and testing stages to develop models that represent the P3 PHEV powertrain the team is building as part the EcoCAR 3 competition. The model development process consists of several major steps. First, Model-in-the-Loop (MIL) testing is conducted to validate a conventional vehicle model, down-select a desired powertrain configuration, and generate initial vehicle technical specifications. HEVT is pursuing a performance powertrain that balances high performance with minimal energy consumption. Initial MIL modeling results yield an IVM-60 mph time of 4.9 seconds and an overall UF-weighted 4-cycle energy consumption of 560 Wh/km. MIL modeling provides an initial reference to compare subsequent vehicle modeling.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1256
Miriam Di Russo, Zhuoran Zhang, Hao Wu, Kathryn della Porta, Jerry C. Ku
Abstract This paper details the first year of modeling and simulation, and powertrain control development for the Wayne State University EcoCAR 3 vehicle. Included in this paper are the processes for developing simulation platforms, plant models and electronic control units to support the supervisory control system development. The EcoCAR 3 competition challenges sixteen North American universities to re-engineer the 2016 Chevrolet Camaro to reduce its environmental impact without compromising its performance and consumer acceptability. The team is in the final stages of competition Year One, which, as the “non-vehicle year,” focuses on the preliminary design, simulation, and hybrid modes selection for the team’s selected vehicle architecture.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1247
Kevin L. Snyder, Jerry Ku
Abstract The objective of the research into modeling and simulation was to provide an improvement to the Wayne State EcoCAR 2 team’s math-based modeling and simulation tools for hybrid electric vehicle powertrain analysis, with a goal of improving the simulation results to be less than 10% error to experimental data. The team used the modeling and simulation tools for evaluating different outcomes based on hybrid powertrain architecture changes (hardware), and controls code development and testing (software). The first step was model validation to experimental data, as the plant models had not yet been validated. This paper includes the results of the team’s work in the U.S. Department of Energy’s EcoCAR 2 Advanced vehicle Technical Competition for university student teams to create and test a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle for reducing petroleum oil consumption, pollutant emissions, and Green House Gas (GHG) emissions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1248
Brian Magnuson, Michael Ryan Mallory, Brian Fabien, Ajay Gowda
Abstract This study investigates using driver prediction to anticipate energy usage over a 160-meter look-ahead distance for a series, plug-in, hybrid-electric vehicle to improve conventional thermostatic powertrain control. Driver prediction algorithms utilize a hidden Markov model to predict route and a regression tree to predict speed over the route. Anticipated energy consumption is calculated by integrating force vectors over the look-ahead distance using the predicted incline slope and vehicle speed. Thermostatic powertrain control is improved by supplementing energy produced by the series generator with regenerative braking during events where anticipated energy consumption is negative, typically associated with declines or decelerations.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1252
Arjun Khanna, Sam Yacinthe, Jason Ward, M.J. Yatsko, Shawn Midlam-Mohler
The Ohio State University EcoCAR 3 team is designing a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) post-transmission parallel 2016 Chevrolet Camaro. With the end-goal of reducing the environmental impact of the vehicle, the Ohio State Camaro has been designed to have a 44-mile all-electric range. The vehicle is to consist of an 18.9 kWh Li-ion energy storage system, a 119 kW 2.0L GDI I4 engine that runs on 85% ethanol (E85) fuel, a 5-speed automated manual transmission, and a 150 kW peak-power electric machine. This report details the model and controls development process followed by the Ohio State team during Year 1 of the EcoCAR 3 competition. The focus of the paper will be on overall development of a vehicle model, initial simulation results, and supervisory controls development. Finally, initial energy consumption results from the model and future improvements will be discussed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1500
Renran Tian, Keyu Ruan, Lingxi Li, Jerry Le, Mike Rao
Abstract Driver state sensing technologies start to be widely used in vehicular systems developed from different manufacturers. To optimize the cost and minimize the intrusiveness towards driving, majority of these systems rely on in-cabin camera(s) and other optical sensors. With their great capabilities of detecting and intervening driver distraction and inattention, these technologies might become key components in future vehicle safety and control systems. However, currently there are no common standards available to compare the performance of these technologies, thus it is necessary to develop one standardized process for the evaluation purpose.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1245
Jonathan D. Cox, Michael Leamy
Abstract The Georgia Tech EcoCAR 3 team’s selection of a parallel hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) architecture for the EcoCAR 3 competition is presented in detail, with a focus on the team’s modeling and simulation efforts and how they informed the team’s architecture selection and subsequent component decisions. EcoCAR 3, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy and General Motors, is the latest in a series of Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions (AVTCs) and features 16 universities from the United States and Canada competing to transform the 2016 Chevrolet Camaro into a hybrid electric American performance vehicle. Team vehicles will be scored on performance, emissions, fuel economy, consumer acceptability, and more over the course of the four-year competition. During the first year, the Georgia Tech team considered numerous component combinations and HEV architectures, including series RWD and AWD, parallel, and power-split.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0883
Walter Mirabella, Francesco Avella, Marco Di Girolamo, Tim Abbott, Oliver Busch
Abstract A thorough bibliographic survey was carried out to collect literature-available information about blending octane numbers (BONs) of most widely used ethers by the refining industry (mainly MTBE and ETBE). The intention was to review the publicly reported BONs values, to suggest the most appropriate figures for future reference, while also understanding the causes of the differences. Summary tables feature all BON values, either explicitly reported in literature or calculated based on experimental results. Due to synergistic intermolecular interactions with hydrocarbons, BONs typically depend on base stock composition. The octane gain tends to grow as the paraffin content in the base stock increases. Moreover BONs tend to decrease as the octane numbers (ON) of the base stock increase.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0880
Carlos Alberto Romero, Ricardo Acosta, Juan Lopez
Abstract It is the aim of the present paper to communicate some preliminary results of the research in progress related to the introduction of LPG as a supplementing fuel for the Colombian power grid supply. Most of the power units operating in Colombian oil wells are running on Diesel fuel and natural gas. Other fuels like LPG, heavy and dual fuel have received attention in recent years, due partially to the necessity to relieve the national overall petroleum dependency problem, and also because of the availability of a sizable amount of LPG derived from natural gas purification. In an effort to assess the use of LPG as a fuel alternative to Diesel and natural gas in oil wells, a field study has been carried out.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0147
Toshiya Hirose, Tomohiro Makino, Masanobu Taniguchi, Hidenobu Kubota
Abstract Vehicle to vehicle communication system (V2V) can send and receive the vehicle information by wireless communication, and can use as a safety driving assist for driver. Currently, it is investigated to clarify an appropriate activation timing for collision information, caution and warning in Japan. This study focused on the activation timing of collision information (Provide objective information for safe driving to the driver) on V2V, and investigated an effective activation timing of collision information, and the relationship between the activation timing and the accuracy of the vehicle position. This experiment used Driving Simulator. The experimental scenario is four situations of (1) “Assistance for braking”, (2) “Assistance for accelerating”, (3) “Assistance for right turn” and (4) “Assistance for left turn” in blind intersection. The activation timing of collision information based on TTI (Time To Intersection) and TTC (Time To Collision).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1207
Hiroki Nagai, Masahiro Morita, Koichi Satoh
Abstract Toyota introduced the first generation Prius in 1997. The vehicle was conceived, designed and launched as a dedicated, mass-produced global hybrid vehicle platform, the first of its kind. The introduction of the 2nd and 3rd generation Prius (2003, 2009) saw vehicles with significantly improved performance, including fuel efficiency. The Prius Alpha (Japan/EU), launched in 2011, represented Toyota first foray with Li-ion battery in a strong hybrid configuration. For the Prius Alpha, the adoption of a compact Li-ion battery resulted in sufficient cabin space to allow a 3rd row of seats while maintaining high fuel efficiency. Before and after the launch of the Prius Alpha, an extensive list of tests was performed on the Li-ion battery pack, including electrical, electrochemical, mechanical, and safety. The evaluations were performed in the lab, in the field (demonstration fleets) and by acquiring vehicles used by customers.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1150
Alan Holmes, Jinming Liu, David Ames, Vijay Neelakantan, Khwaja Rahman, Timothy Grewe
Abstract An all-new electric variable transmission (EVT) developed by General Motors for rear-wheel-drive products is at the center of the plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) propulsion system for the Cadillac CT6. This transmission includes two integrated electric motors, planetary gearing, and hydraulic clutches. It is capable of power-split-hybrid operation in continuously variable transmission (CVT) ratio ranges, parallel-hybrid operation in fixed gear ratios, and all-electric propulsion in different ratio combinations. Transmission operation, mechanical design, controls design, motor design, and output capability are explained, and simulation results used as the benchmark for final development are included. All-electric launch and driving, selectable regeneration, and power blending with the turbocharged engine provide smooth and seamless propulsion through the entire driving range.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0321
Manjil Kale, Rajat Diwan, Fnu Renganathan Dinesh, Mark Benton, Prasanth Muralidharan, Paul Venhovens, Johnell Brooks, ChunKai Liu, Julie Jacobs, Craig Payne
Abstract The Deep Orange framework is an integral part of the graduate automotive engineering education at Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR). The initiative was developed to immerse students into the world of an OEM. For the 6th generation of Deep Orange, the goal was to develop an urban utility/activity vehicle for the year 2020. The objective of this paper is to explain the interior concept that offers a flexible interior utility/activity space for Generation Z (Gen Z) users. AutoPacific data were first examined to define personas on the basis of their demographics and psychographics. The resulting market research, benchmarking, and brand essence studies were then converted to consumer needs and wants, to establish technical specifications, which formed the foundation of the Unique Selling Points (USPs) of the concept.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0016
Jörg Schäuffele
Abstract The functions provided by the E/E system of modern vehicles can be assigned to the classical domains of powertrain, chassis, body and multimedia. Upcoming functions are forming new domains for advanced driver assistance and cloud integration. Therefore networking of functions is not limited to the vehicle but includes also the cloud. These trends imply major changes like the introduction of Ethernet as onboard networking technology or increasing safety and security needs. To design the best E/E architecture three groups of optimization targets are most relevant: Global vehicle targets, E/E targets derived from the implemented vehicle functions and product line targets for an E/E architecture. The PREEvision approach for E/E architecture design and optimization is a model based approach - inspired by the relevant and widely accepted automotive standards. Import and export filters allow the easy integration with PREEvision and complementation of existing tool chains.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0073
Peter Subke, Muzafar Moshref
Abstract Passenger cars are equipped with an OBD connector according to SAE J1962 / ISO 15031-3. Passenger cars that support ISO UDS on DoIP use the same connector with Ethernet pins according to ISO/DIS 13400-4 (Ethernet diagnostic connector). If external test equipment is connected to the Ethernet diagnostic connector via a 100BASE-TX cable with the RJ45 connector at the tester, a VCI is not necessary anymore. With a device that fits the Ethernet diagnostic connector physically and acts as a converter between the Ethernet signals and WLAN, external test equipment that supports wireless communication, can be connected to the vehicle. Examples for such wireless external test equipment include Android/iOS- based smart phones and tablets with purpose-made applications (APPs). The software components of external test equipment are standardized in ISO 22900 (MVCI). The MVCI D-Server processes data in ODX (ISO 22901) and sequences in OTX (ISO 13209).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1685
Sayaka Tamura, Tsutomu Yoshinari
Abstract A three-motor hybrid system suitable for a super sports car was developed. This system features high power, light weight and high response, and has high cooling performance for high-load operation such as circuit driving. The power plant drives the rear wheels using the combination of a midship-mounted V6 twin-turbo engine, the direct drive motor of a hybrid system mounted directly on the engine, and a 9-speed dual-clutch transmission (DCT). The front wheels are driven by a twin-motor unit (TMU), and the size and weight of the Intelligent Power Unit (IPU) that supplies electric power to the TMU has been reduced to enable mounting behind the seats inside the cabin. In addition, the IPU uses air-conditioner cooperative cooling to enhance the cooling performance. As a result, assist is performed even during high-load operation.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0295
Sentao Miao, Yan Fu, Margaret Strumolo, Boxiao Chen, Xiuli Chao, Erica Klampfl, Michael Tamor
Abstract With increasing evidence for climate change in response to greenhouse gasses (GHG) emitted by human activities, pressure is growing to reduce fuel consumption via increased vehicle efficiency and to replace fossil fuels with renewable fuels. While real-world experience with bio-ethanol and a growing body of research on many other renewable fuel pathways provide some guidance as to the cost of renewable transportation fuel, there has been little work comparing that cost to alternative means for achieving equivalent GHG reductions. In earlier work, we developed an optimization model that allowed the transportation and electricity generation sectors to work separately or jointly to achieve GHG reduction targets, and showed that cooperation can significantly reduce the society cost of GHG reductions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0133
Masahiro Matsubara, Fumio Narisawa, Atsuhiro Ohno, Toshiaki Aoki, Yuki Chiba
Abstract Safety concepts are essential to conform to functional safety standard ISO 26262 for automotive products. Safety requirements, which are a part of safety concepts, shall be satisfied by products to avoid hazards by vehicles to maintain their safety. Incompleteness of safety requirements must be avoided in deriving parent requirements to its children. However, measure for checking is only reviewing when the safety requirements are described in a natural language. This measure for checking is not objective or stringent. We developed a specification technique written in formal notation that addresses some of the shortcomings of capturing safety requirements for verification purposes. Safety requirements in this notation are expressed in goal tree models, which originate from goal-oriented requirement engineering Knowledge Acquisition in autOmated Specification (KAOS). Each requirement is written with propositional logic as the node of a tree.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0028
Ali Shahrokni, Peter Gergely, Jan Söderberg, Patrizio Pelliccione
Abstract In areas such as Active Safety, new technologies, designs (e.g. AUTOSAR) and methods are introduced at a rapid pace. To address the new demands, and also requirements on Functional Safety imposed by ISO 26262, the support for engineering methods, including tools and data management, needs to evolve as well. Generic and file-based data management tools, like spreadsheet tools, are popular in the industry due to their flexibility and legacy in the industry but provide poor control and traceability, while rigid and special-purpose tools provide structure and control of data but with limited evolvability. As organizations become agile, the need for flexible data management increases. Since products become more complex and developed in larger and distributed teams, the need for more unified, controlled, and consistent data increases.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0320
Tejas Janardan Sarang, Mandar Tendolkar, Sivakumar Balakrishnan, Gurudatta Purandare
Abstract In the automotive industry, multiple prototypes are used for vehicle development purposes. These prototypes are typically put through rigorous testing, both under accelerated and real world conditions, to ensure that all the problems related to design, manufacturing, process etc. are identified and solved before it reaches the hands of the customer. One of the challenges faced in testing, is the low repeatability of the real world tests. This may be predominantly due to changes in the test conditions over a period of time like road, traffic, climate etc. Estimating the repeatability of a real world test has been difficult due to the complex and multiple parameters that are usually involved in a vehicle level test and the time correlation between different runs of a real world test does not exist. In such a scenario, the popular and the well-known univariate correlation methods do not yield the best results.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1171
Shota Hirose, Akemi Okawa, Kenji Ishida, Takahiro Misu, Takeshi Tojo
Abstract Electrification of the powertrain to improve vehicle fuel economy is a key technology to achieve strict fuel economy legislation. However, only limited numbers of small class vehicles such as a B segment adopt electric powertrain. This is presumed that cost effectiveness for fuel economy is small and mounting space for additional powertrain is limited. In this paper, the optimum solution of a strong hybrid system suitable for the small vehicles was studied. First, from the viewpoint of maximization of energy efficiency, we compared contributions of engine efficiency and transmission efficiency during mode cycle driving and selected automated manual transmission as a suitable transmission for small vehicles. In comparing the hybrid system function, we determined a motor generator connecting shaft and a necessary motor generator output power for attaining both fuel economy and drivability.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0075
Steven Holland, Tim Felke, Luis Hernandez, Robab Safa-Bakhsh, Matthew A. Wuensch
Abstract Health Ready Components are essential to unlocking the potential of Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) as it relates to real-time diagnosis and prognosis in order to achieve lower maintenance costs, greater asset availability, reliability and safety. IVHM results in reduced maintenance costs by providing more accurate fault isolation and repair guidance. IVHM results in greater asset availability, reliability and safety by recommending preventative maintenance and by identifying anomalous behavior indicative of degraded functionality prior to detection of the fault by other detection mechanisms. The cost, complexity and effectiveness of the IVHM system design, deployment and support depend, to a great extent, on the degree to which components and subsystems provide the run-time data needed by IVHM and the design time semantic data to allow IVHM to interpret those messages.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0288
Zhenfei Zhan, Junqi Yang, Xueqian Chen, Zhanpeng Shen
Abstract In automobile industry, computational models built to predict the performances of the prototype vehicles are on the rise. To assess the validity or predictive capability of the model for its intended usage, validation activities are conducted to compare computational model outputs with test measurements. Validation becomes difficult when dealing with dynamic systems which often involve multiple functional responses, and the complex characteristics need to be appropriately considered. Many promising data analysis tools and metrics were previously developed to handle data correlation and evaluate the errors in magnitude, phase shift, and shape. However, these methods show their limitations when dealing with nonlinear multivariate dynamic systems. In this paper, kernel function based projection is employed to transform the nonlinear data into linear space, followed by the regular principal component analysis (PCA) based data processing.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0337
Ana M. Djuric, R.J. Urbanic, J.L. Rickli
Abstract Contemporary manufacturing systems are still evolving. The system elements, layouts, and integration methods are changing continuously, and ‘collaborative robots’ (CoBots) are now being considered as practical industrial solutions. CoBots, unlike traditional CoBots, are safe and flexible enough to work with humans. Although CoBots have the potential to become standard in production systems, there is no strong foundation for systems design and development. The focus of this research is to provide a foundation and four tier framework to facilitate the design, development and integration of CoBots. The framework consists of the system level, work-cell level, machine level, and worker level. Sixty-five percent of traditional robots are installed in the automobile industry and it takes 200 hours to program (and reprogram) them.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0344
Mohamed El-Sayed
Abstract Success in lean product realization depends on the ability to specify value from the voice of the customer at the beginning of the process. Value streaming, is therefore essential for assuring that the specified value is being pursued and achieved throughout the process. During lean implementation, however, it is usually assumed that nothing but value will be streamed if wastes are eliminated using value stream mapping. While waste elimination is necessary to make the process leaner and facilitate value streaming it is not sufficient for assuring that specified value is being streamed without structured and formalized participation of customers. With current structure of product realization processes, the voice of the customer is provided during the planning phase at the beginning of the process and customer satisfaction feedback is provided after product launch.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0524
Venkat Pisipati, Srikanth Krishnaraj, Amy McGuckin Webb, Pavankumar Reddy Kandukuri
Abstract The Automotive industry’s use of digital technology such as Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) to perform virtual validation has progressed to effectively replace a large percentage of physical validation. This is primarily due to the increased accuracy and cost/time efficiencies that virtual validation offers compared to conventional physical prototyping and testing. With product development (PD) cycles becoming more compressed, CAE has assumed a more significant role in early, advanced design and structural evaluation. One of the areas where CAE is widely employed is in development of the Instrument Panel (IP) commonly referred to as the dashboard. For the purposes of this study, the term IP represents the plastic/polymer structure only, and not the full IP sub-system. The IP sub-system includes the structural member, the Cross Car Beam (CCB) assembly and all the IP mounted modules.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0540
Minoru Akahori, Tatsuya Kano, Takayoshi Takahira, Tetsuo Goto, Katsuhiro Kajikawa, Nobuyo Kondo
Abstract A highly anti-corrosive organic-inorganic hybrid paint for automotive steel parts has been developed. The inorganic component included in the paint is silicon dioxide (SiO2), which has the capability to passivate zinc. By application of the paint on a trivalent chromatetreated zinc-plated steel sheet or a trivalent chromate-treated zinc-nickel-plated steel sheet, high anti-corrosion protection can be provided to steel materials. Particularly in the case of application over a zinc-nickel-plated steel sheet, 0 mm corrosion depth after a cyclic corrosion test (CCT) of 450 cycles was demonstrated.
Viewing 211 to 240 of 10324