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Viewing 4771 to 4781 of 4781
1922-01-01
Technical Paper
220066
E H SHAUGHNESSY
The author outlines the history of the Air-Mail Service and states that the recent policy has been to carry out the intent of the Congress, to align the service with the desire of the administration for economy and to discontinue too rapid expansion. After a description of the routes and divisions and a listing of the present landing-fields and radio stations, the present equipment is outlined and commented upon, tabular and statistical data being presented. The discussion covers the organization and performance of the service, the casualties, the cost of operation and the policy governing future plans.
1922-01-01
Technical Paper
220053
L G PLANT
The many improvements effected in gasoline-engine construction during the war for airplane, heavy truck, tractor and tank usage have done much toward making the gasoline-driven rail motor-car a practical possibility today. The gasoline-electric cars built by the General Electric Co. are mentioned and light rail motor-car construction is discussed in general terms. Reliability and low maintenance cost are commented upon briefly, and the requirements of service for rail motor-cars are outlined.
1921-01-01
Technical Paper
210014
GLENN L MARTIN
Aviation has no perfect analogy, for it has no precedent. Two classifications are made. Scheduled service includes the carrying of mail, express or passengers on a definite and regularly maintained schedule, independent of, or supplementary to, other forms of transportation. Special service includes pleasure flights, oil-field survey, selecting industrial land-sites, planning cities, aerial photography, forest-fire patrol, visiting remote points, exploration, aerial advertising, delivery of perishable products, real-estate survey and industrial purposes. Each of these classifications requires different equipment, organization and operating personnel. The equipment requirements and the reliability of aerial transportation are discussed, the necessity for suitable terminals and federal flying regulations are emphasized, the subject of insurance is commented upon and the development of aerial commercial transportation is outlined.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190019
J H TOWERS
Abstract THIS article, written shortly after the signing of the armistice, deals with the Naval aviation situation at the outbreak of war and its development during the war, ending with a brief discussion of the probable future lines of development. Figures are given showing the expansion occurring during the nineteen months of warfare, and the different ways in which the various types of aircraft were used. Future development is treated briefly, but that logical assumptions were made is indicated by the fact that the year which has elapsed since the article was written has shown a very decided trend along the lines indicated.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190007
O E HUNT
THE impression that recent aircraft experience should have taught engineers how to revolutionize automobile construction and performance, is not warranted by the facts involved. Aircraft and automobiles both embody powerplants, transmission mechanisms, running gear, bodies and controls, but their functions are entirely different. The controls of an airplane, except in work on the ground, act upon a gas, whereas with an automobile the resistant medium is a relatively solid surface. Similarly, the prime function of the fuselage is strength, weight considerations resulting in paying scant attention to comfort and convenience, which are the first requirements of an automobile body. Aircraft running-gear is designed for landing on special fields, and is not in use the major portion of the time. The running-gear is the backbone of an automobile, in use continuously for support, propulsion and steering; hence its utterly different design.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190064
D W DOUGLAS
The factors included in the commercial airplane problem are the practical use that can be made of airplanes, the volume of business that can be expected, the necessary changes from present military types to make an efficient commercial airplane and what the future holds for this new means of transportation. The requirements for passenger transportation, airmail and general express service, are first discussed in detail, consideration then being given to other possibilities such as aerial photography and map-making, the aerial transportation of mineral ores, sport and miscellaneous usage. Changes in the present equipment of engines and airplanes to make them suitable for commercial use are outlined, and special features of aerial navigation, landing fields and legal questions are mentioned.
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170038
E. L. Woods
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170034
L. B. DUNTLEY
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140013
H. D. CHURCH
1909-01-01
Technical Paper
090002
A. ATWATER KENT
1909-01-01
Technical Paper
090010
H. M. BECK
Viewing 4771 to 4781 of 4781