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Viewing 4771 to 4793 of 4793
1929-01-01
Technical Paper
290047
OSCAR ESKUCHE
A TABULAR statement in which comparisons are made between acceleration and deceleration is presented by the author as proof of the need of frequent and scientific maintenance practices with regard to brakes. From the viewpoint of service, the author believes that the engineer's findings as to what constitutes the best lining for the particular brake he has designed for his particular car must be adhered to strictly. No one brake-lining will work equally well on all cars. In reconditioning used cars of any make, he has purchased the lining supplied by the manufacturer of the particular make of car when possible. Although water affects brakes equipped with molded linings, the trouble is only momentary, according to the author, because the heat quickly dries off the surface moisture. Squeaks are seldom caused by the molded lining itself, but mostly by protruding rivets, out-of-round brake-bands or brake-shoes, foreign matter on the linings, or eccentric adjustments.
1929-01-01
Technical Paper
290057
L. M. WOOLSON
ALTHOUGH the author and his associates have designed, built and tested a Diesel airplane-engine, a description of the mechanical details is omitted because the engine is still in the experimental stage. The general subject of Diesel engines for aircraft is therefore presented in its broader aspects. Typical indicator-diagrams of a gasoline engine and of a Deisel engine are compared as a means of ascertaining whether the pessimistic attitude that the Diesel engine cannot be made light enough for aircraft-propulsion purposes is justified. These considerations lead to the statement that, since a practicable Diesel aircraft-engine must run at speeds five or six times as fast as the stationary or marine-type of Diesel powerplants, whereas the ignition time-lag is substantially the same, it can be seen that the high-speed engine demands a different type of combustion than does the low-speed Diesel.
1929-01-01
Technical Paper
290010
E. J. HALL
THE 4¼ x 5½-in. six-cylinder motorcoach engine built by his company is used by the author as an example of the methods governing its design, the main controlling factors being that regularly recurring maintenance operations should come in groups, so that the operator can systematize his shop-work; that all units should be interchangeable; that any operation should be completed by a trained crew in a maximum time of 2 hr.; and that removal of the engine from the chassis should almost never be necessary except for work on the main bearings and for crankshaft regrinding.
1929-01-01
Technical Paper
290087
LEONARD ROSE
HEREIN the author points out, as a preface to a description of the preventive-maintenance system which he describes, that any system of maintenance is only as good as the men behind it and the honesty with which they use it. The personnel must be convinced that if the system is followed it will help the men to better themselves by pointing out their mistakes. The workers must be made to realize that the thing which really counts is not so much who made the mistake but what the mistake was and why it was made. Daily, weekly and general inspections are practised in accordance with this preventive-maintenance policy, and details of the procedure with regard to records are given by the author. The company's repair and overhaul program is designed to eliminate guesswork to the greatest possible extent by providing instruments and standard testing-apparatus for determining the actual condition of the various motorcoach units both before and after repairs are made.
1929-01-01
Technical Paper
290088
ADRIAN HUGHES
THE SATISFACTORY maintenance of motorcoaches probably has been the subject of more extensive discussion and study than has any other phase of fleet operation, in the author's opinion. Effective economical maintenance has a large influence on net profit, but the maintenance of motorcoaches is merely one phase of operation and, while it influences the other phases, it likewise is influenced by them. Cooperation is the most important factor contributing to successful maintenance, but the author remarks the difficulty of segregating any part of the organization which can be considered solely responsible. He asks where the maintenance organization begins and where it ends, and answers that it seems necessary to include the office, operating, garage and shop divisions and even the selling division. Each division must know something of the work of the other divisions and how its work fits in with that of the general organization.
1929-01-01
Technical Paper
290086
E. D. SIRRINE
1925-01-01
Technical Paper
250025
J E MILLS
Successful operation of a general service-station depends upon the application of several business fundamentals. The service division of a car sales organization can be made to produce a fair profit by following proper methods, but the importance of the service division as a possible asset or liability has only recently begun to be recognized by the more progressive sales companies; surprisingly few service-station operators or managers have attempted to study the condition and to correct faults and increase the efficiency of their shops, while fewer still have any definite control-records for their guidance. Too many organizations try to conduct their service divisions with little or no attempt to follow the business principles that are observed by the foremost corporations in many lines of industry, with the inevitable result that the monthly balance sheets of the service-stations vary from a heavy loss to a fortunate profit.
1925-01-01
Technical Paper
250070
J E WHITBECK
The personnel and the ground facilities that have produced such excellent results in the Air Mail Service are discussed apart from the flying equipment and its operation in the air. An airway is on the ground and the performance and safety of the pilots are dependent upon the ground facilities provided and the efficiency of the ground personnel. Pilots perform a highly important part in the operation of airlines and no matter how good the flying equipment may be, the desired results cannot be obtained without thoroughly trained and capable pilots. When selecting new pilots, the Air Mail Service looks for men who handle an airplane in a businesslike way and who are able, without taking unnecessary risks, to fly the ship without letting the ship fly them.
1925-01-01
Technical Paper
250060
A R KELSO
Machine-repair analysis and a criticism of present-day equipment, with analytical tables based on data collected from a 5 months' study, are followed by conclusions relative to the reliability of present-day equipment. Eight types of common machine-tools are considered and the maintenance advantage of one over the other is deduced from the consolidated tables based on monthly reports. A comparison of each class of machine-tools with the others is made, as well as a summary of the weaknesses of each class from the frequency of repairs of the elementary parts. The attention of the builders is drawn to the conditions that the shop encounters with their equipment. A maintenance budget-system is described that has been installed in one plant to give the men a comparative idea of particular equipment that is running in excess of the budget time. It also serves in lieu of an inspection of the conditions of the equipment and is an indication of the time when overhauling is advisable.
1923-01-01
Technical Paper
230022
DON T HASTINGS
The author states that the word “service” has been and still is the most abused word in the automobile language and enumerates some of the causes of poor service. Good service is then considered as constituting a sales asset. The new attitude toward service is described and the progress of the building-up of a combined flat-rate and piece-work system is outlined. The flat-rate and the piece-work features are analyzed, inclusive of the methods applied to each and comments upon the results obtained. Records form an all-important part, and these are kept on special forms that are illustrated; the method of their utilization is given in detail. The duties of the different members of the service personnel are specified, and it is shown how the different factors are made to combine and produce service that satisfies the car-owner.
1923-01-01
Technical Paper
230021
OTIS C FUNDERBURK
1923-01-01
Technical Paper
230054
O T KREUSSER
To furnish each year better, prompter and less costly service compels the development of field service-branches that operate on a sound business basis such that all the capital involved is applied toward operating all of the floor-space to its maximum capacity, turning-over the stock with the maximum frequency, justifying the existence of the tool equipment and having the right men all pull together. Data are necessary in the conduct of any business on an efficient basis, and the field experience provides a definite channel to bring to the designing and the production organizations the information that is most valuable in making an improved product. Two tendencies of the industry are toward automobiles that become lower in overall costs per mile of transportation and vehicles that function with less trouble, delay and inconvenience.
1922-01-01
Technical Paper
220066
E H SHAUGHNESSY
The author outlines the history of the Air-Mail Service and states that the recent policy has been to carry out the intent of the Congress, to align the service with the desire of the administration for economy and to discontinue too rapid expansion. After a description of the routes and divisions and a listing of the present landing-fields and radio stations, the present equipment is outlined and commented upon, tabular and statistical data being presented. The discussion covers the organization and performance of the service, the casualties, the cost of operation and the policy governing future plans.
1922-01-01
Technical Paper
220053
L G PLANT
The many improvements effected in gasoline-engine construction during the war for airplane, heavy truck, tractor and tank usage have done much toward making the gasoline-driven rail motor-car a practical possibility today. The gasoline-electric cars built by the General Electric Co. are mentioned and light rail motor-car construction is discussed in general terms. Reliability and low maintenance cost are commented upon briefly, and the requirements of service for rail motor-cars are outlined.
1921-01-01
Technical Paper
210014
GLENN L MARTIN
Aviation has no perfect analogy, for it has no precedent. Two classifications are made. Scheduled service includes the carrying of mail, express or passengers on a definite and regularly maintained schedule, independent of, or supplementary to, other forms of transportation. Special service includes pleasure flights, oil-field survey, selecting industrial land-sites, planning cities, aerial photography, forest-fire patrol, visiting remote points, exploration, aerial advertising, delivery of perishable products, real-estate survey and industrial purposes. Each of these classifications requires different equipment, organization and operating personnel. The equipment requirements and the reliability of aerial transportation are discussed, the necessity for suitable terminals and federal flying regulations are emphasized, the subject of insurance is commented upon and the development of aerial commercial transportation is outlined.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190007
O E HUNT
THE impression that recent aircraft experience should have taught engineers how to revolutionize automobile construction and performance, is not warranted by the facts involved. Aircraft and automobiles both embody powerplants, transmission mechanisms, running gear, bodies and controls, but their functions are entirely different. The controls of an airplane, except in work on the ground, act upon a gas, whereas with an automobile the resistant medium is a relatively solid surface. Similarly, the prime function of the fuselage is strength, weight considerations resulting in paying scant attention to comfort and convenience, which are the first requirements of an automobile body. Aircraft running-gear is designed for landing on special fields, and is not in use the major portion of the time. The running-gear is the backbone of an automobile, in use continuously for support, propulsion and steering; hence its utterly different design.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190019
J H TOWERS
Abstract THIS article, written shortly after the signing of the armistice, deals with the Naval aviation situation at the outbreak of war and its development during the war, ending with a brief discussion of the probable future lines of development. Figures are given showing the expansion occurring during the nineteen months of warfare, and the different ways in which the various types of aircraft were used. Future development is treated briefly, but that logical assumptions were made is indicated by the fact that the year which has elapsed since the article was written has shown a very decided trend along the lines indicated.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190064
D W DOUGLAS
The factors included in the commercial airplane problem are the practical use that can be made of airplanes, the volume of business that can be expected, the necessary changes from present military types to make an efficient commercial airplane and what the future holds for this new means of transportation. The requirements for passenger transportation, airmail and general express service, are first discussed in detail, consideration then being given to other possibilities such as aerial photography and map-making, the aerial transportation of mineral ores, sport and miscellaneous usage. Changes in the present equipment of engines and airplanes to make them suitable for commercial use are outlined, and special features of aerial navigation, landing fields and legal questions are mentioned.
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170034
L. B. DUNTLEY
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170038
E. L. Woods
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140013
H. D. CHURCH
1909-01-01
Technical Paper
090002
A. ATWATER KENT
1909-01-01
Technical Paper
090010
H. M. BECK
Viewing 4771 to 4793 of 4793