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Viewing 211 to 240 of 7379
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2159
Luigi Di Palma, Assunta Sorrentino, Pasquale Vitiello, Carmelo Izzo
The target of this paper is to describe the SHM project developed at CIRA. In order to achieve the low weigh target in the MALE UAV structures, the SHM project has the target to setup a system that, being able to evaluate the current state of the structure, will enable minus conservative assumption in the composite structural design. A lamb wave based procedure has been developed in order to analyze the presence of a barely visible impact defect (BVID). The techniques for the damage detections of composite and metallic structures have been developed through extensive numerical-experimental analysis based on lambwave investigation by using piezoelectric sense- actuators. The use of SHM technology and methodology has shown the possibility to have a significant reduction in the structural weight. The technology has achieved a TRL level between 4 and 5 and in order to achieve a higher TRL a test on a component in relevant environment is planned at the end of 2014. The application on MALE UAV prototype will be done also considering the STANAG 4671 (USAR) NATO airworthiness regulation.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2182
Marc Olivas, Jérôme Genoulaz, Luca Incarbone
In this paper, we present a new application of electromagnetic topology to model the channel formed by an aircraft harness to develop fault detection and localization. This method allows the numerical simulation of reflectometry signals for any kind of wired uniform and non-uniform.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2202
Jonathan G. Pelham, Ip-Shing Fan, Ian Jennions, Jim McFeat
UAS (Unmanned aircraft system), widely known to the general public as drones, are comprised of two major system elements: an Unmanned Aircraft (UA) and a Ground Control Station (GCS). UAS have a high mishap rate when compared to manned aircraft. This high mishap rate is one of several barriers to the acceptance of UAS for more widespread usage. Better awareness of the UA real time as well as long term health situation may allow timely condition based maintenance. Vehicle health and usage are two parts of the same solution to improve vehicle safety and lifecycle costs. These can be worked on through the use of two related aircraft management methods, these are: IVHM (Integrated Vehicle Health Management) which combines diagnosis and prognosis methods to help manage aircraft health and maintenance, and FOQA (Flight Operations Quality Assurance) systems which are mainly used to assist in pilot skill quality assurance. However, the addition of IVHM and FOQA systems to a UA, no matter how valuable, will face tight requirements on their weight, volume, and power consumption.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2106
Hitoshi Oyori, Noriko Morioka
With airlines increasingly directing their attention to operating costs and environmental initiatives, the More Electric Architecture for Aircraft and Propulsion (MEAAP) is emerging as a viable solution for improved performance and eco-friendly aircraft operations. This paper focuses on electric taxiing that does not require the use of jet engines or the auxiliary power unit (APU) during taxiing, either from the departure gate to take-off or from landing to the arrival gate. Many researchers and engineers are considering introducing electric taxiing systems as part of efforts to improve airport conditions. To help cut aircraft emissions at airports, MEAAP seeks to introduce an electric taxiing system that would reduce the duration for which engines and APUs operate while on the ground. Given this goal, the aircraft electrical system deployed for use at airports must rely on a power source other than the jet engines or APU. A report based on a specific airport indicates that use of the jet engine and APU while on the aircraft is on the ground consumes 3% of all fuel consumed during the course of a flight.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2146
William Bense
Operational reliability of aircraft engines can be increased if one can detect signs of damages before failure. Prognosis and Health Monitoring (PHM) consists in detecting these signs, and giving the probability of equipment anomaly at a defined horizon. This article presents a global overview of PHM systems. Using a system engineering approach, the needs and the equipments to monitor are clearly specified. The dedicated algorithms and embedded / ground systems split are then defined. Embedded system is mainly limited to data acquisition and data reduction. Ground system contains most of the algorithmic part. First, embedded indicators are normalized in order to be compared flight by flight. Then several kinds of approach can be applied to these indicators: among them, trend analysis toward a predefined threshold or anomaly detection. When an anomaly is detected, a classification algorithm identifies failure signature and associated equipment. Lastly, Remaining Useful Life (RUL) is estimated.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2227
Shuhei Segawa, Junich Tamura, Satoshi Suzuki, Hisao Oka, Kiichi Meguro, Yoshiji Satou
In the expansion of composite material application, it is one of the most important subjects in assembly of aircraft structure how drilling of composite/metal stack should be processed in an efficient way. This paper will show the result of development of a drill bit for CFRP/Aluminum-alloy stack by Kawasaki Heavy Industries (KHI) and Sumitomo Electric Hardmetal (SEH). In order to improve workability and economic performance, the drill bit which enables drilling CFRP/Al-alloy stack: at 1 shot; from both directions; without air blow and coolant (just usual vacuuming); was required. A best mix drill bit which has smooth multi angles edge and pointed finishing edge was produced as a result of some trials. Developed drill bit achieved required performance and contributed to large cost reduction, labor hour saving, production speed increase and work environment improvement.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2238
Manoj Radle, Biswadip Shome
Liquid ring pumps are used in aircraft fuel systems in conjunction with main impeller pumps. These pumps are used for priming the pump system as well as to remove fuel vapor and air from the fuel. Prediction of cavitation in liquid ring pumps is important as cavitation degrades the performance of these pumps and leads to their failure. As test based assessment of cavitation risk in liquid ring pump is expensive and time consuming, recent approaches have been to assess and predict the risk of cavitation using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods with the goal to quicken the design process and optimize the performance of these pumps. The present study deals with the development and assessment of a CFD methodology to simulate cavitation for a liquid fuel pump used in aircraft fuel systems. The study simulates the cavitation phenomena using a multi-phase flow model consisting of fuel vapor, air, and liquid fuel phases. The rotation of the blades is simulated using two approaches, a steady state multiple reference frame approach and a transient sliding mesh approach.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2249
Christian Modest, Frank Thielecke
This paper presents a model-based approach for the multi-objective design of optimized diagnosis functions for high lift actuation systems. These systems are used to augment lift at low speed during takeoff and landing, and are safety critical. This demands requirements to the detection of failures and the isolation of root causes in order to provide a high availability at low risk. Dedicated functions cover the determination of features, the detection of symptoms and the isolation of root causes by means of inference and resolution. The aim of the design approach is to provide these functions in an optimal manner with respect to multiple objectives. In order to be clear and traceable the approach consists of separate consecutive steps. These are arranged by using systems engineering principles. With respect to requirements, models of different levels of detail are developed and used to design stepwise all required functions. This is done by evaluating cause-effect matrices, temporal information about the appearance of effects, and a configuration graph.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2250
Nayeff Najjar, James Hare, Paul D'Orlando, Gregory Leaper, Krishna Pattipati, Andre Silva, Shalabh Gupta, Rhonda Walthall
This paper addresses the issue of fault diagnosis in the heat exchanger of an aircraft Air Conditioning System (ACS). The heat exchanger cools the air by transferring the heat to the ram-air. Due to a variety of biological, mechanical and chemical reasons, the heat exchanger may experience fouling conditions that reduces the efficiency and could considerably affect the functionality of the ACS. Since, the access to the heat exchanger is limited and time consuming, it is preferable to implement an early fault diagnosis technique that would facilitate Condition Based Maintenance (CBM). The main contribution of the paper is pre-flight fault assessment of the heat exchanger using a combined model-based and data-driven approach of fault diagnosis. A Simulink model of the ACS, that has been designed and validated by an industry partner, has been used for generation of sensor data for various fouling conditions. A total of nine different fouling levels are simulated including the nominal condition.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2294
Faisal Khan, Ian Jennions, Tarapong Sreenuch
In today's aircraft the diagnostic and prognostic systems play a crucial part in aircraft safety while reducing the operating and maintenance costs. Aircraft are very complex in their design and require consistent monitoring of systems to establish the overall vehicle health status. Most diagnostic systems utilize advanced algorithms (e.g. Bayesian belief networks or neural networks) which usually operate at system or sub-system level. The sub-system reasoners collect the input from components and sensors to process the data and provide the diagnostic/detection results to the flight advisory unit. Several sources of information must be taken into account when assessing the vehicle health, to accurately identify the health state in real time. These sources of information are independent system-level diagnostics that do not exchange any information/data with the surrounding systems. This limits the system by preventing cross check or health status information exchange amongst the related sub-systems.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2333
Ravi Rajamani, Abhinav Saxena, Frank Kramer, Michael Augustin, J.B. Schroeder, Kai Goebel, Ginger Shao, Indranil Roychoudhury, Wei Lin
The term Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) describes a set of capabilities that enable sustainable and safe operation of components and subsystems within aerospace platforms. However, very little guidance exists for the systems engineering aspects of design with IVHM in mind. It is probably because of this that designers have to use knowledge picked up exclusively by experience rather than by established process. This motivated a group of leading IVHM practitioners within the aerospace industry under the aegis of SAE's HM-1 technical committee to author a document that hopes to give working engineers and program managers clear guidance on all the elements of IVHM that they need to consider before designing a system. This proposed recommended practice (ARP6883 [1]) will describe all the steps of requirements generation and management as it applies to IVHM systems, and demonstrate these with a “real-world” example related to designing a landing gear system. The team hopes that this paper and presentation will help start a dialog with the larger aerospace community and that the feedback can be used to improve the ARP and subsequently the practice of IVHM from a systems engineering point-of-view.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2332
Lucas Campos Puttini
This paper discusses the correlation of IVHM (Integrated Vehicle Health Management) as an emerging aerospace discipline and the Big Data paradigm widely discussed in the Information Technology industry. The 4-V model is discussed to qualify a Big Data problem in terms of the volume, variety, velocity and veracity of the data involved. Big Data management allows, for example, correlations to be found to “spot business trends, determine quality of research, prevent diseases, combat crime, and determine real-time roadway traffic conditions”. Examining these two fields side by side is necessary and desirable because innovation is very likely to occur when and where different but correlated domains interface. This paper compares the most significant technical components required for Big Data Analytics and IVHM to work. Most aerospace players have recognized the strategic value of IVHM, but only a few have been able to establish coordinated action plans that allow them to offer advanced services in line with the possibilities envisioned.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2331
Jianhua Ge, Brian Lefevre, Michael Roemer, Rodney Martin
This paper presents a novel health monitoring and fault adaptive control architecture for an unmanned hexrotor helicopter. The technologies developed to achieve the described level of robust fault contingency management include; 1.) A Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) routine for maximizing the “built-in” fault tolerance that the closed loop flight control system affords, 2.) A two-stage Kalman filter scheme for real-time identification of faults that are masked by control system compensation, and 3.) A reconfigurable control allocation method which compensates for large degradations of the six main motor/rotor assemblies. The fault adaptive control system presented herein has strong robustness against small faults without the need for controller reconfiguration, and strong tolerance of large faults through adaptive accommodation of the fault source and severity. By taking advantage of the inherent fault-tolerant nature of typical closed loop control systems, the technology described in this paper avoids the difficulties associated with typical fault detection and isolation (FDI) techniques that have poor performance when targeting incipient faults.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2315
Raphael Van Der Vorst, Jean Louis Magerman, Bruno Bernay, Swen Vandenberk, Alex Carrella
Wing Anti-Icing Systems (WAIS) are integral part of a wing design. Their presence ensures safety in all-weather conditions. In standard designs, the WAIS are fitted in the slat internal structure and runs throughout its span in between the ribs. Given its critical function, such a system has to pass qualification test. The test specification is dictated by international standards. In the case discussed in this article, the standard adopted is the RTCA DO-160G “Environmental Conditions and Test Procedures for Airborne Equipment”. In particular, the work presented here concerns with the Vibration environmental test. The standard prescribes a number of dynamic tests to be carried out on the AIS: random, shock and sine excitation tests have to be performed in order to study their effect on the parts composing the Anti-Icing System. The standard prescribes vibration levels at the attachment locations of the AIS to the wings' ribs. However, one issue specific to the anti-icing system is its dimension.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2145
Jonathan L. Geisheimer, David Kwapisz, Thomas Holst, Michael Hafner
Blade tip clearance is a key design parameter for gas turbine designers. This parameter is often measured during engine testing and development phases as part of design validation but has yet to be utilized during normal engine fleet operation. Although blade tip clearance measurements are often mentioned for fleet operation in the context of active clearance control, the use of blade tip clearance measurements can provide an additional benefit for engine health monitoring. This paper explores the use of blade tip clearance sensors for engine condition monitoring of hot section blades. Blade tip clearance, especially in the first stage turbine, has an impact on exhaust gas temperature. The use of tip clearance measurements can provide supplementary information to traditional EGT measurements by providing a direct measurement of wear on the blade tips. In addition, blade creep and cracking can be measured and tracked if the sensors are able to provide clearance values of individual blades.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2183
Joao Pedro Pinheiro Malere, Luis Gustavo dos Santos
1 The current pressure across the entire aerospace industry to reduce operating costs and increase efficiency has arguably never been greater. Thus the need to improve parameters such as availability and reliability, and increase the tools and services associated with more efficient aircraft operations and sustainment is now paramount. Moreover, these improvements are seen by many as important factors that define the differentiation and competitiveness of not only current but also future aircraft fleets. The paper will focus on some of the opportunities for OEMs that arise from implementing Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) systems on their platforms and the challenges associated with evaluating the costs and benefits of their implementation and operation.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2219
Peter Foote
The first cross-industry guidelines for the implementation of structural health monitoring for aerospace applications have been created as a SAE International Aerospace Recommended Practices document: SAE ARP 6461 ‘Guidelines for Implementation of Structural Health Monitoring on Fixed Wing Aircraft’ [1]. These guidelines have brought together manufacturers, operators / users, systems integrators, regulators, technology providers and researchers to produce information on the integration of SHM into aircraft maintenance procedures, generic requirements and advice on validation, verification and airworthiness. The take-up of SHM in the aerospace industry has been slow, in part due to the lack of accepted industry practices surrounding not just the technology itself (sensors and sensor systems) but also the associated issues arising from the introduction of new methods into aircraft maintenance. The SHM community responded by forming an Industry Steering Committee on the topic which then became a Technical Group within the SAE International standards organization (G-11 SHM).
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2201
Joshua Benhabib
Manufacturing operations introduce unreliability into hardware that is not ordinarily accounted for by reliability design engineering efforts. Inspections and test procedures normally interwoven into fabrication processes are imperfect, and allow defects to escape which later result in field failures. Therefore, if the reliability that is designed and developed into an equipment/system is to be achieved, efforts must be applied during production to insure that reliability is built into the hardware. There are various ways to improve the reliability of a product. These include: Simplification Stress reduction/strength enhancement Design Improvement Using higher quality components Environmental Stress Screening before shipment Process Improvements, etc. This paper concentrates on ‘Manufacturing Process Improvement’ effort through the use of design of experiments, (DOE). Hence, improved levels of reliability can be achieved. Most applications optimize the mean value of a response variable.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2301
Yao Wang, Shon Grabbe
When the demand for either a region of airspace or an airport approaches or exceeds the available capacity, miles-in-trail (MIT) restrictions are the most frequently issued traffic management initiatives (TMIs) that are used to mitigate these imbalances. Miles-in-trail operations require aircraft in a traffic stream to meet a specific inter-aircraft separation in exchange for maintaining a safe and orderly flow within the stream. This stream of aircraft can be departing an airport, over a common fix, through a sector, on a specific route or arriving at an airport. This study begins by providing a high-level overview of the distribution and causes of arrival MIT restrictions for the top ten airports in the United States. This is followed by an in-depth analysis of the frequency, duration and cause of MIT restrictions impacting the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL) from 2009 through 2011. Then, machine-learning methods for predicting (1) situations in which MIT restrictions for ATL arrivals are implemented under low demand scenarios, and (2) days in which a large number of MIT restrictions are required to properly manage and control ATL arrivals are presented.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2220
M. Reza Mofakhami, Jerome Pinsonnault
In civil aviation the main driver for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is to provide maintenance and ownership benefits. The maintenance benefits are defined in terms of improving maintenance planning, increasing inspection intervals and reducing inspection cost. The ownership benefits can be measured in residual value and life extension. In this paper different aspects of SHM implementation are discussed for fatigue monitoring and fatigue damage sensing with a consideration of minimizing challenges for SHM implementation. First, the current Fatigue Monitoring implementation scenarios for the most representative agile military aircraft are reviewed. In the following some aircraft utilization results obtained from analyzing different airlines are presented. The obtained results show a better possibility of categorizing fleet of an airline in comparison with agile military aircraft. Based on these results a concept for fatigue monitoring of a civil aircraft is proposed that can be implemented with a minimum certification challenges.
2013-09-10
Standard
AS1875A
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) presents all appropriate boss dimensions from .125 inch to 2.0 inch tube sizes.
2013-09-05
WIP Standard
AIR9968B
This SAE AIR provides a description of a reference method for viscosity tests of thickened (AMS 1428) anti-icing fluids.
2013-09-05
Book
Ian K. Jennions
The third volume in the Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) series focuses on the technology that actually supports the implementation of IVHM in real-life situations. Edited by Ian K. Jennions, Director of the IVHM Center at Cranfield University, UK, this book was written collaboratively by twenty-seven authors from industry, academia and governmental research agencies. Topics include: -Sensors, instrumentation and signal processing -Fault detection and diagnostics -Prognostics and metrics -Architecture -Data Management -Vehicle level reasoning systems -System's design -Applications and disruptive technologies Integrated Vehicle Heath Management: The Technology follows two bestsellers, also published by SAE International, which cover the fundamentals aspects of this new body of knowledge (Integrated Vehicle Health Management: Perspectives on an Emerging Field), and the business justification needed so that investments in the technology make sense (Integrated Vehicle Health Management: Business Case Theory and Practice).
2013-09-04
WIP Standard
AMS1384B
This specification covers an inhibited phosphoric acid in the form of a liquid concentrate or a water soluble powder for dilution with water. Primarily for derusting of aircraft turbine engine ferrous components and removal of heat scale and other contamination from the surface of nickel alloys by immersion at room temperature. Should not be used on steel parts having hardness of 40 HRC or over.
2013-09-04
WIP Standard
AMS1378B
This specification covers a carbon soil and paint remover compound in the form of a liquid. Primarily for removal of carbonaceous soils and paint from aircraft turbine engine parts by immersing the parts in liquid at room temperature.
2013-09-04
WIP Standard
AMS1380B
This specification covers a strongly alkaline scale conditioner in the form of a liquid or a water-soluble powder. This product has been used typically in conditioning heat scale formed on aircraft turbine engine high-temperature alloy part by immersion in a solution of the compound at elevated temperature, but usage is not limited to such applications. These compounds are unsuitable for cleaning aluminum parts.
2013-09-04
WIP Standard
AMS1383B
This specification covers an alkaline permanganate oxide conditioner in the form of a water-soluble powder or a liquid for dilution with water. This product has been used typically for conditioning of oxidation products on aircraft turbine engine components fabricated from steels, nickel alloys, and cobalt alloys by immersion in a solution of the cleaner at elevated temperature, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2013-09-03
Standard
AIR4989A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) developed by a broad cross section of personnel from the aviation industry and government agencies is offered to provide state-of-the-art information for the use of individuals and organizations designing new or upgraded turboshaft engine test facilities.
2013-08-29
Standard
ARP4874A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides guidelines for the format and content of documents defining the interface between electronic propulsion control systems and aircraft systems. The scope includes civilian aircraft powered by turbofan, turboprop, and turboshaft engines equipped with electronic engine controls.
2013-08-23
WIP Standard
ARP1621C
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines minimum requirements for an aircraft transport ULD to transport horses properly and safely by air, to protect the horse(s) from injuries, and to protect the aircraft from corrosion created by waste spill. The ULD is designed to accommodate one horse or several.
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