Display:

Results

Viewing 7201 to 7230 of 7257
Technical Paper
1925-01-01
J E MILLS
Successful operation of a general service-station depends upon the application of several business fundamentals. The service division of a car sales organization can be made to produce a fair profit by following proper methods, but the importance of the service division as a possible asset or liability has only recently begun to be recognized by the more progressive sales companies; surprisingly few service-station operators or managers have attempted to study the condition and to correct faults and increase the efficiency of their shops, while fewer still have any definite control-records for their guidance. Too many organizations try to conduct their service divisions with little or no attempt to follow the business principles that are observed by the foremost corporations in many lines of industry, with the inevitable result that the monthly balance sheets of the service-stations vary from a heavy loss to a fortunate profit. The author regards 8 per cent as a fair profit, realizing that the main source of profit of a distributer or dealer is the sale of new vehicles and that, as good service helps to increase such sales, any income from the service division, above its expenses and in excess of a fair profit, should be used to develop better service or to reduce certain costs of service to the car-owners.
Technical Paper
1925-01-01
J E WHITBECK
The personnel and the ground facilities that have produced such excellent results in the Air Mail Service are discussed apart from the flying equipment and its operation in the air. An airway is on the ground and the performance and safety of the pilots are dependent upon the ground facilities provided and the efficiency of the ground personnel. Pilots perform a highly important part in the operation of airlines and no matter how good the flying equipment may be, the desired results cannot be obtained without thoroughly trained and capable pilots. When selecting new pilots, the Air Mail Service looks for men who handle an airplane in a businesslike way and who are able, without taking unnecessary risks, to fly the ship without letting the ship fly them. Desired qualifications are that an applicant should have had 400 hr. in the air, of which 200 hr. shall have been behind a Liberty engine or one of equal size; have learned to fly before he was 25 years of age; have a knowledge of navigation; be able to fly a given course cross-country; and be in good physical condition and especially have good eyesight.
Technical Paper
1925-01-01
A R KELSO
Machine-repair analysis and a criticism of present-day equipment, with analytical tables based on data collected from a 5 months' study, are followed by conclusions relative to the reliability of present-day equipment. Eight types of common machine-tools are considered and the maintenance advantage of one over the other is deduced from the consolidated tables based on monthly reports. A comparison of each class of machine-tools with the others is made, as well as a summary of the weaknesses of each class from the frequency of repairs of the elementary parts. The attention of the builders is drawn to the conditions that the shop encounters with their equipment. A maintenance budget-system is described that has been installed in one plant to give the men a comparative idea of particular equipment that is running in excess of the budget time. It also serves in lieu of an inspection of the conditions of the equipment and is an indication of the time when overhauling is advisable. The analysis shows that a few makes of machine predominate in each group which can serve profitably as a basis for standardization.
Technical Paper
1923-01-01
OTIS C FUNDERBURK
Technical Paper
1923-01-01
DON T HASTINGS
The author states that the word “service” has been and still is the most abused word in the automobile language and enumerates some of the causes of poor service. Good service is then considered as constituting a sales asset. The new attitude toward service is described and the progress of the building-up of a combined flat-rate and piece-work system is outlined. The flat-rate and the piece-work features are analyzed, inclusive of the methods applied to each and comments upon the results obtained. Records form an all-important part, and these are kept on special forms that are illustrated; the method of their utilization is given in detail. The duties of the different members of the service personnel are specified, and it is shown how the different factors are made to combine and produce service that satisfies the car-owner.
Technical Paper
1923-01-01
O T KREUSSER
To furnish each year better, prompter and less costly service compels the development of field service-branches that operate on a sound business basis such that all the capital involved is applied toward operating all of the floor-space to its maximum capacity, turning-over the stock with the maximum frequency, justifying the existence of the tool equipment and having the right men all pull together. Data are necessary in the conduct of any business on an efficient basis, and the field experience provides a definite channel to bring to the designing and the production organizations the information that is most valuable in making an improved product. Two tendencies of the industry are toward automobiles that become lower in overall costs per mile of transportation and vehicles that function with less trouble, delay and inconvenience. The author discusses the subject at length under headings of maintenance troubles, field information, recording and charting of service data and cooperation between the factory and the service-men.
Viewing 7201 to 7230 of 7257

Filter

  • Article
    167
  • Book
    37
  • Collection
    13
  • Magazine
    249
  • Technical Paper
    4629
  • Subscription
    1
  • Standard
    2161