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1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450040
Reagan C. Stunkel
ABSTRACT
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450043
C. H. Schildhauer
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450007
R. W. Rummel
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450097
C. M. Christenson
ABSTRACT
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450059
Walter T. Thorsen
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450071
E. J. McLaughlin
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450068
Otto E. Kirchner
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450079
R. J. Lusk
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450078
RAY G. HOLT
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450162
D. H. GREEN
ANALYSIS of engine cooling failures indicates the need for a special study of the automotive cooling system from the standpoint of design and construction, as well as of maintenance. Mr. Green carries out such a study here, discussing, in turn, the factors entering into each type of failure.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450123
Reagan C. Stunkel
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450185
REAGAN C. STUNKEL
THE dependability and regularity of airline service hinges, to a large extent, on the efficiency with which the job of maintaining the aircraft and their accessories in top-flight condition is accomplished. The maintenance of aircraft is now a precise and exacting science, extending from the creation of a design through the operation by the crew assigned to fly the plane - and, Mr. Stunkel shows, the maximum usefulness of any airline aircraft can't be attained unless the maintenance program is carefully tailored to fit the operations for which the aircraft is intended.
1944-09-01
Standard
AS161
This Aerospace Standard establishes an identification system and provides design and tolerance information in describing two series of image quality indicators currently used in radiography of aerospace components, especially in electronic component evaluation and radiographic film and paper classification. Individual image quality indicators (IQIs) are classified by use of this standard number, followed by appropriate codes. Synopsis of the classification system is: AS 1613-A-XX IQI, with six tungsten wires; and AS 1613-B-XX IQI, with six tungsten wires and six lead beads.
1944-08-01
Standard
AMS2640A
This specification has been declared 'CANCELLED' by the Aerospace Materials Division SAE, as of April 1996. and has been superseded ASTM E 1444.
1944-07-01
Magazine
1944-04-01
Magazine
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440211
R. S. SCHAIRER
FOR aircraft designed for cruising operation it is important that there be high propulsive efficiency at the engine speed for minimum specific fuel consumption for almost all cruising conditions. For a given airplane with a single-stage, two-speed engine supercharger there is ordinarily more than one combination of propeller diameter and gear ratio which give within 1% of maximum propulsive efficiency for all cruising conditions up to an altitude of 20,000 ft and up to maximum cruising speed. Of these combinations, that one is best which has the largest diameter and the lowest ratio of propeller speed to engine speed, because it gives the best take-off and climbing performance.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440043
George A. Bleyle
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440044
R. E. White
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440118
C. S. MacNeil
ABSTRACT
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440134
Jared B. Morse
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440132
Harry S. Pack
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440136
Herb Rawdon
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440092
W. A. Reichel
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440179
CARLOS WOOD
THIS paper deals primarily with the considerations affecting the airplane design, leaving discussion of operations to the operators. The big probable field for air cargo lies in the transportation of perishable and relatively high valued classes of goods. The structural design of floors, tie-down equipment, and the like, is shown to be basically dependent only on the maximum allowable cargo load and the maximum available cargo volume. Analysis shows that the actual operations of the cargo airplane determine the relative importance of speed of loading and weight. Speed is essential in short-range operation, but minimum weight is essential in long-range operation. In conclusion, the author suggests that reduction of rates can make air cargo a really big business, capable of affecting the prosperity of our country and the rest of the world.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440168
J. G. BORGER
IMPORTANCE of operational control of speeds through the use of constant power in air transport flights is emphasized by Mr. Borger in this paper.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440161
JAMES B. KENDRICK
MR. KENDRICK here shows ways in which improved engineering and better cooperation between engineering and operations personnel may serve to reduce the air cargo rates. This investigation of air cargo planes consists of the following general topics: 1. Some fundamentals of cargo plane design and economics, to permit an evaluation of the relative importance of various factors. 2. The engineering aspects of some of the problems of operation that must be considered by the maintenance and operations personnel. The first step toward providing good service at low cost will be accomplished automatically by the establishment of regular cargo service. The next step is to bring about greater cooperation between the operators and engineers, to inoculate the engineers with the importance of convenience in handling and maintenance.
1943-12-01
Magazine
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