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1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530194
L. E. KASSEBAUM
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530180
H. W. LUETKEMEYER
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530281
W. GRIEVE
1953-01-01
Magazine
1952-12-01
Magazine
1952-11-01
Standard
AMS2640D
This specification has been declared 'CANCELLED' by the Aerospace Materials Division SAE, as of April 1996. and has been superseded ASTM E 1444.
1952-05-01
Magazine
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520033
Alfred C. Joy
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520263
P.W. Espenschade, R.C. Navarin, W.W. Van Ness
CONCERN about possible future military operations in arctic regions has led to the development of winterized hydraulic equipment which can be operated in subzero climates. In this paper the authors present a diagnosis of complex arctic operations together with a record of typical accomplishemnts to date. The ultimate objective is to have all powered equipment capable of starting and operating in temperatures down to -25 F. Primary technical problems center around the over-designing of all adjustable devices so that they can be handled by operators wearing heavy mittens. Under extreme cold conditions gloves cannot be removed for even an instant, nor can fingers be permitted to come into direct contact with cold metal.
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520158
HENRY M. HENION
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520179
H. R. SENNSTROM
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520185
LOUIS POLK
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520182
E. W. KETTERING, T. B. DILWORTH, J. M. NORRIS
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520235
Donald L. Putt
IN this paper Maj. -Gen. Putt presents the four major limitations today facing the United States Air Force. As mechanical limitations decrease, nature imposes ever new challenges; these natural barriers are paralleled by increased enemy interference, need for the development of new material, more efficient utilization of all resources, and the demand for automatic reliability which will compensate for the inadequacies of the human mind and body in combat flight operations. This factor of human frailty is cited as being responsible for explorations in the new and vast field of space medicine; also for the miniaturization of electronic equipment, leading to weight reduction and the resultant acceleration of development of pilotless aircraft. The writer stresses the dangers inherent in traditionalism, or the turning to the past at the expense of the dynamic future.
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520080
EDWARD A. DRIESSEN
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520111
WALTER E. STANGER, WELDON R. ORME
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520128
DAVID H. MIKKELSON
1952-01-01
Magazine
1951-09-01
Magazine
1951-06-01
Magazine
1951-04-01
Magazine
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510007
PHILIP H. EMRICH
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510001
ARTHUR S. BASSETTE
SUMMARY A short movie will be shown indicating the cars being tested for shake on the road and in the laboratory, and some of the equipment will be seen in operation. Next, eight slides will be shown and a detailed description will be made of each slide. The major context will be to show: 1. The functional arrangement of the equipment. 2. The method of interpreting the data for a single point under shake conditions. 3. The method of obtaining curves for multiple point studies. 4. The solution for a general problem.
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510036
T. J. CARMICHAEL, C. E. HALEY
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510071
WILLIAM C. ROGERS
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510134
KEITH BARR McCUTCHEON
The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private ones of the writer and are mot to be construed as official or reflecting the views of the Navy Department or the naval service at large.
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510128
COLONEL T. J. NOON
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510151
N. N. DAVIS, E. M. BEATTIE
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510153
HARRY N. TAYLOR
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510164
CHARLES W. WENDT

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