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1957-11-01
Standard
AS473
No scope available.
1957-11-01
Magazine
1957-06-01
Magazine
1957-05-01
Magazine
1957-02-01
Magazine
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570148
ROMIE A. TAYLOR
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570153
GEORGE S. SCHAIRER, HERBERT S. CLAYMAN
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570111
GEORGE R. MACKEY
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570064
G. R. WYNNE
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570215
G. H. MAXWELL
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570174
ALBERT D. EDWARDS
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570335
E. W. WRIGHT, J. R. COWLES
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570005
W.A. BLACK
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570140
ARTHUR J. MORROW
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570338
W. D. SPEIGHT, W. H. JONES
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570298
R. R. PETERSON
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570254
C. A. Hall, R. C. Beaubier, E. C. Marckwardt, R. L. Courtney
The results of a survey of spark plug fouling in 193 late-model passenger cars of four popular makes showed that approximately one-third of the spark plug sets were fouled sufficiently to cause at least a 20 percent decrease in vehicle performance. While the vehicle models and number of cars involved are limited and do not completely represent the car population nor types of service, the survey did provide a sample of the three main price classes of cars. The results indicate that a considerable amount of spark plug fouling exists in vehicles driven in city and city-suburban service. Recognition of spark plug fouling by car owners varied with car make. Dynamometer and road-test procedures have been devised for studying various factors affecting spark plug fouling. Careful control of test variables has produced acceptable correlation between these procedures.
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570304
J. J. MCDONALD
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570305
Hugh W. Larsen
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570147
HOWARD B. SIMKINS
1956-10-01
Magazine
1956-09-01
Magazine
1956-03-15
Standard
ARP476
This document describes guidelines and methods of performing the safety assessment for certification of civil aircraft. It is primarily associated with showing compliance with FAR/JAR 25.1309. The methods outlined here identify a systematic means, but not the only means, to show compliance. A subset of this material may be applicable to non-25.1309 equipment. The concept of Aircraft Level Safety Assessment is introduced and the tools to accomplish this task are outlined. The overall aircraft operating environment is considered. When aircraft derivatives or system changes are certified, the processes described herein are usually applicable only to the new designs or to existing designs that are affected by the changes. In the case of the implementation of existing designs in a new derivation, alternate means such as service experience may be used to show compliance.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560195
J. H. DOLAN
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560187
E. B. OGDEN
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560262
F. A. GROOSS
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560259
H. H. BIDWELL
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560107
G. W. HOSTETLER

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