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1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430138
C. G. PETERSON
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430147
KARL O. LARSON
THE handling of the three classes of cargo - unpackaged light pieces, unpackaged heavy units, and packaged goods in different shapes - requires, Mr. Larson says, greater simplification and standardization. Containers used for surface-shipped goods are generally too heavy for air cargo shipping, and lighter paper or fabric covers or containers are desirable. New materials for this purpose, he says, are being tested. Mr. Larson discusses the advantages of pallet loading with a lift truck. The pallet may be bolted to the floor, thus eliminating strain of lashing. Parking space requirements for a medium-sized cargo plane are about 150 ft square. A terminal of 10,000 sq ft to handle cargo from this size ship would require a 70-ft wide building one-story high, and 150-ft along one edge of the berth. These figures are based on 12 loadings per day. For each additional berth, the terminal must be extended accordingly. Alternate plan is the large central warehouse for receiving, storing, and transferring.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430150
FRANK D. KLEIN
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430044
Thomas Wolfe
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430016
R. J. Moore
ABSTRACT
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430020
E. N. Hatch
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430063
Milton H. Anderson
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430059
Julian S. Hatcher
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430109
Ellis W. Templin
1942-11-01
Magazine
1942-11-01
Standard
AS107
This standard provides a method for the application of surface finish control primarily to aircraft engine and propeller parts. Recommendations for a Surfaace Roughness Standard are contained in A.S.A. publication B46 and this SAE Aeronautical Standard contains a summary of information therin plus other information which has been compiled from current manufacturing practice.
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420009
Chas. R. Lund
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420006
H. Herbert Hughes
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420125
R. D. KELLY, W. W. DAVIES
⋆ ⋆ ⋆ IN the enormous increase in air-cargo transportation predicted for the near future, good schedule reliability is an absolute need. If schedule reliability is not maintained, it will be impossible to make close connections with other air carriers and time thus wasted would overcome many of the advantages of shipment by air. To attain such schedule reliability, cargo airplanes must be equipped with all the facilities needed for operation under adverse conditions, including anti-icing equipment and a full complement of radio and other necessary instruments. The purpose of this paper is to indicate probable design and performance trends and to outline some of the specific problems of carrying air cargo. The conclusions drawn are based upon an actual research study of cargo airplane performance and design criteria, and upon present airline cargo handling experience. These conclusions indicate that present methods and equipment are wholly inadequate for any great extension. Cargo airplanes, making frequent stops, provide a logical means for transportation of passengers for short distances, or to the major cities where they can be transferred to through flights.
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420124
M. G. BEARD
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420056
J. Parker Van Zandt
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410019
Lewis A. Schroyer
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410101
P. C. SANDRETTO
THIS paper shows that the growth of electrical demands on planes is due mainly to the problems encountered in operating the planes and, hence, electrical systems are the chief concern of the plane operators. Existing electrical systems are discussed from the standpoint of the operator, under the headings of “trouble,” “weight,” and “facilities.” A new system is described for the plane of the future, which is assumed to have a gross weight of about 100,000 lb, and a power demand of 30 kw. By means of variable-frequency systems a considerable weight saving is forecast.
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410130
R. L. McBRIEN
THE information given in this paper was obtained principally from trip icing logs and test flights conducted on a major transport system. A copy of a trip icing log is included to show the type of information obtained from normally scheduled flights. The different types of ice formed are explained and the general effect upon the performance on the airplane for each type of ice is stated. Airplane ice accumulations are divided into two major classes: (1) Those producing a loss of flight performance and (2) those which serve as an annoyance to the crew. The main portion of the paper deals with these two classes, explaining when, how, and why they are of importance. Numerous pictures are shown depicting the various conditions which were found to exist in scheduled airline operations and the shortcomings of the present anti-icing equipment is explained. Consideration is given to ice accumulations on the wings, empennage, propeller, pitot mast, radio loops, windshield, and so on. It is hoped that a dissemination of these actual airline operating conditions and experiences will result in further improvements to airline anti-icing equipment.
1940-06-13
Standard
AMS2640
This specification has been declared 'CANCELLED' by the Aerospace Materials Division SAE, as of April 1996. and has been superseded ASTM E 1444.
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400170
PAUL H. WILKINSON
A DEFINITE future exists for air-cooled, four-stroke aircraft diesel engines in the 400 to 600-hp class; the aircraft diesel is at least on a basis of parity with the gasoline aircraft engine in the 1000-hp water-cooled and liquid-cooled high-performance class and since the diesel can be conveniently fitted with a turbo-supercharger, there are definite advantages to be derived from the use of a two-stroke diesel of proved worth. These conclusions, made by Mr. Wilkinson, are based on comparative tables presented in this paper. The author, who last year visited diesel aircraft centers in France, Germany, England, and the United States, opens his paper by commenting on modern diesel-powered airplanes being flown in these countries. In reviewing the advantages of diesel aircraft engines, he groups them as: economic advantages such as reduced fire hazard, low fuel operating costs, and large payload and flight-range possibilities; and mechanical advantages, such as reliability and efficiency.
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400166
EROLD F. PIERCE
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400002
W. A. Taussig
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400007
J. P. Tretton
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400082
Errol J. Gay
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400072
R. W. Rummel
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400063
R. A. Miller, J. F. Martin
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