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Technical Paper
1942-01-01
J. Parker Van Zandt
Technical Paper
1942-01-01
R. D. KELLY, W. W. DAVIES
⋆ ⋆ ⋆ IN the enormous increase in air-cargo transportation predicted for the near future, good schedule reliability is an absolute need. If schedule reliability is not maintained, it will be impossible to make close connections with other air carriers and time thus wasted would overcome many of the advantages of shipment by air. To attain such schedule reliability, cargo airplanes must be equipped with all the facilities needed for operation under adverse conditions, including anti-icing equipment and a full complement of radio and other necessary instruments. The purpose of this paper is to indicate probable design and performance trends and to outline some of the specific problems of carrying air cargo. The conclusions drawn are based upon an actual research study of cargo airplane performance and design criteria, and upon present airline cargo handling experience. These conclusions indicate that present methods and equipment are wholly inadequate for any great extension. Cargo airplanes, making frequent stops, provide a logical means for transportation of passengers for short distances, or to the major cities where they can be transferred to through flights.
Technical Paper
1942-01-01
M. G. BEARD
Technical Paper
1941-01-01
Lewis A. Schroyer
Technical Paper
1941-01-01
R. L. McBRIEN
THE information given in this paper was obtained principally from trip icing logs and test flights conducted on a major transport system. A copy of a trip icing log is included to show the type of information obtained from normally scheduled flights. The different types of ice formed are explained and the general effect upon the performance on the airplane for each type of ice is stated. Airplane ice accumulations are divided into two major classes: (1) Those producing a loss of flight performance and (2) those which serve as an annoyance to the crew. The main portion of the paper deals with these two classes, explaining when, how, and why they are of importance. Numerous pictures are shown depicting the various conditions which were found to exist in scheduled airline operations and the shortcomings of the present anti-icing equipment is explained. Consideration is given to ice accumulations on the wings, empennage, propeller, pitot mast, radio loops, windshield, and so on. It is hoped that a dissemination of these actual airline operating conditions and experiences will result in further improvements to airline anti-icing equipment.
Technical Paper
1941-01-01
P. C. SANDRETTO
THIS paper shows that the growth of electrical demands on planes is due mainly to the problems encountered in operating the planes and, hence, electrical systems are the chief concern of the plane operators. Existing electrical systems are discussed from the standpoint of the operator, under the headings of “trouble,” “weight,” and “facilities.” A new system is described for the plane of the future, which is assumed to have a gross weight of about 100,000 lb, and a power demand of 30 kw. By means of variable-frequency systems a considerable weight saving is forecast.
Standard
1940-06-13
This specification has been declared 'CANCELLED' by the Aerospace Materials Division SAE, as of April 1996. and has been superseded ASTM E 1444.
Technical Paper
1940-01-01
R. A. Miller, J. F. Martin
Technical Paper
1940-01-01
Errol J. Gay
Technical Paper
1940-01-01
R. W. Rummel
Technical Paper
1940-01-01
PAUL H. WILKINSON
A DEFINITE future exists for air-cooled, four-stroke aircraft diesel engines in the 400 to 600-hp class; the aircraft diesel is at least on a basis of parity with the gasoline aircraft engine in the 1000-hp water-cooled and liquid-cooled high-performance class and since the diesel can be conveniently fitted with a turbo-supercharger, there are definite advantages to be derived from the use of a two-stroke diesel of proved worth. These conclusions, made by Mr. Wilkinson, are based on comparative tables presented in this paper. The author, who last year visited diesel aircraft centers in France, Germany, England, and the United States, opens his paper by commenting on modern diesel-powered airplanes being flown in these countries. In reviewing the advantages of diesel aircraft engines, he groups them as: economic advantages such as reduced fire hazard, low fuel operating costs, and large payload and flight-range possibilities; and mechanical advantages, such as reliability and efficiency.
Technical Paper
1940-01-01
EROLD F. PIERCE
Technical Paper
1940-01-01
J. P. Tretton
Technical Paper
1939-01-01
W. G. Lundquist
HOW the airlines can obtain laboratory-precision power control by means of a torque meter, is explained by Mr. Lundquist. He tells how the device provides an accurate method for controlling both brake horsepower and fuel-air ratio. The simplicity of the method is stressed, and its limitations under various operating conditions are brought out. In this paper the author presents an impartial discussion of the principal phases of the general problem to assist airline operators in evaluating the possible benefits that they individually might achieve by the use of torque meters. He points out that the long-range operator is the only one who probably will realize any appreciable improvement in operating efficiency by the use of the torque meter, and even he must survey carefully his present operations to ascertain whether or not he already is operating so near to maximum efficiency that the application of the torque meter will not produce any benefits. The torque meter will add from 10 to 50 lb to an engine, including the indicating equipment, the author reveals.
Technical Paper
1939-01-01
R. E. Johnson, W. G. Lundquist
VIBRATION characteristics and considerations of simplicity, rather than those of operating efficiency, have dictated present methods of aircraft operation, the authors contend. The bmep parameter proposed in their paper, they explain, is based upon cruising operation at or near maximum efficiency of the engine-airplane-propeller combination. They stress the importance of cruising-flight control by pointing out that cruising flight embodies 95 to 99% of all commercial flying. The authors show how the parameter is related fundamentally to the operating efficiency of the engine as defined by fuel consumption and, therefore, to the overall efficiency of the airplane-engine-propeller combination. The parameter is discussed further as related to the engine alone; as tempered by considerations of airplane and propeller efficiency; as applied to the physical problem of controlling cruising power; and as limited by engine and airplane design.
Technical Paper
1939-01-01
ROBERT E. ROWLEY
Technical Paper
1939-01-01
Walter E. Getschman
Magazine
1938-10-01
Magazine
1938-07-01
Magazine
1938-04-01
Magazine
1938-03-01
Magazine
1938-02-01
Technical Paper
1938-01-01
R. G. Horridge
Technical Paper
1938-01-01
F. K. Glynn
Technical Paper
1938-01-01
R. M. Critchfield
MR. CRITCHFIELD attacks the problem of securing automotive electrical equipment that will operate satisfactorily at the lowest original as well as upkeep cost. Integral parts of the electrical supply system, the ignition system and the cranking system are discussed with notes on maintenance of each. Particular attention is given to the various items which affect the sizes and types of equipment necessary. Mr. Critchfield points out that misapplications from both the capacity and operation standpoints are often the source of the most serious maintenance problems, and he gives specific examples to illustrate. In the tables accompanying the paper the author presents application charts to serve as a rough guide in considering the purchase of new equipment.
Magazine
1937-12-01
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