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Viewing 1 to 30 of 191
2017-09-19
Journal Article
2017-01-2142
Brandon Mahoney, Jamie Marshall, Thomas Black, Dennis Moxley
It is well recognized that weight savings within an airframe can result in significant lifetime cost savings and increased flight range. The transition of aluminum alloys to lighter, composite materials is an increasingly prevalent strategy to reduce weight on aircraft. This paper describes the application of a lightweight carbon fiber composite technology to aviation, engine start lithium batteries. The transition of lithium battery chassis technology from metal to composite introduces technical challenges not found with traditional battery chassis. Modern lithium batteries contain more than energy cells; common internal components include switch mode battery chargers, health and safety monitoring electronics, and even environmental control circuitry such as heaters. Consequently, electromagnetic interference disruption potential created by the electronics must be addressed.
2017-08-01
Journal Article
2017-01-9682
Mohsen Rahmani, Kamran Behdinan
Abstract Widely used in automotive industry, lightweight metallic structures are a key contributor to fuel efficiency and reduced emissions of vehicles. Lightweight structures are traditionally designed through employing the material distribution techniques sequentially. This approach often leads to non-optimal designs due to constricting the design space in each step of the design procedure. The current study presents a novel Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) framework developed to address this issue. Topology, topography, and gauge optimization techniques are employed in the development of design modules and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is linked to the MDO framework to ensure efficient searching in large design spaces often encountered in automotive applications. The developed framework is then further tailored to the design of an automotive Cross-Car Beam (CCB) assembly.
2017-06-29
Journal Article
2017-01-9453
Tobias Hoernig
Abstract Within the scope of today’s product development in automotive engineering, the aim is to produce lighter and solid parts with higher capabilities. On the one hand lightweight materials such as aluminum or magnesium are used, but on the other hand, increased stresses on these components cause higher bolt forces in joining technology. Therefore screws with very high strength rise in importance. At the same time, users need reliable and effective design methods to develop new products at reasonable cost in short time. The bolted joints require a special structural design of the thread engagement in low-strength components. Hence an extension of existing dimensioning of the thread engagement for modern requirements is necessary. In the context of this contribution, this will be addressed in two ways: on one hand extreme situations (low strength nut components and high-strength fasteners) are considered.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1812
Steven Sorenson, Gordon Ebbitt, Scott Smith, Todd Remtema
Abstract In an effort to reduce mass, future automotive bodies will feature lower gage steel or lighter weight materials such as aluminum. An unfortunate side effect of lighter weight bodies is a reduction in sound transmission loss (TL). For barrier based systems, as the total system mass (including the sheet metal, decoupler, and barrier) goes down the transmission loss is reduced. If the reduced surface density from the sheet metal is added to the barrier, however, performance can be restored (though, of course, this eliminates the mass savings). In fact, if all of the saved mass from the sheet metal is added to the barrier, the TL performance may be improved over the original system. This is because the optimum performance for a barrier based system is achieved when the sheet metal and the barrier have equal surface densities. That is not the case for standard steel constructions where the surface density of the sheet metal is higher than the barrier.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1816
Mahsa Asgarisabet, Andrew Barnard
Abstract Carbon Nanotube (CNT) thin film speakers produce sound with the thermoacoustic effect. Alternating current passes through the low heat capacity CNT thin film changing the surface temperature rapidly. CNT thin film does not vibrate; instead it heats and cools the air adjacent to the film, creating sound pressure waves. These speakers are inexpensive, transparent, stretchable, flexible, magnet-free, and lightweight. Because of their novelty, developing a model and better understanding the performance of CNT speakers is useful in technology development in applications that require ultra-lightweight sub-systems. The automotive industry is a prime example of where these speakers can be enabling technology for innovative new component design. Developing a multi-physics (Electrical-Thermal-Acoustical) FEA model, for planar CNT speakers is studied in this paper. The temperature variation on the CNT thin film is obtained by applying alternating electrical current to the CNT film.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1467
Ashok Mache, Anindya Deb, Clifford Chou
Abstract There has been a keen interest in recent times on implementation of lightweight materials in vehicles to bring down the unladen weight of a vehicle for enhancing fuel efficiency. Fiber-reinforced composites comprise a class of such materials. As sustainability is also a preoccupation of current product development engineers including vehicle designers, bio-composites based on natural fibers are receiving a special attention. Keeping these motivations of lower effective density, environment friendliness and occupational safety in mind, woven jute fabric based composites have been recently studied as potential alternatives to glass fiber composites for structural applications in automobiles. In the past, mechanical characterization of jute-polyester composites were restricted to obtaining their stress-strain behaviors under quasi-static conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0506
Xueyuan Nie, Jimi Tjong
Abstract Ultra-high strength steel (UHSS) and magnesium (Mg) alloy have found their importance in response to automotive strategy of light weighting. UHSS to be metal-formed by hot stamping usually has a hot-dipped aluminum-silicon alloy layer on its surface to prevent the high temperature scaling during the hot stamping and corrosion during applications. In this paper, a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process was used to produce ceramic oxide coatings on aluminized UHSS and Mg with intention to further improve their corrosion resistances. A potentiodynamic polarization corrosion test was employed to evaluate general corrosion properties of the individual alloys. Galvanic corrosion of the aluminized UHSS and magnesium alloy coupling with and without PEO coatings was studied by a zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) test. It was found that the heating-cooling process simulating the hot stamping would reduce anti-corrosion properties of aluminized UHSS due to the outward iron diffusion.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0502
Mingde Ding, Jiancai Liu, Jianbo Su, Zhong Su, Bo Liu, Ligang Wang
Abstract Now weight reduction is increasingly needed in automotive industry to improve fuel efficiency and to reduce emission. Various lightweight technologies have been used to vehicles. Because of its heavy weight and complex shape, IP carrier tends to be integration and weight intensive. Therefore lightweight is necessary for IP carrier. This paper lists the fourth lightweight technologies used for IP carrier by now, which are Magnesium alloy part, Aluminum alloy part, Hybrid composite part, Composite material injection part. For magnesium alloy part and aluminum alloy part, they have been mass produced for some years. The hybrid composite part has been researched for some years. Recently, the injection composite part has been researched and some parts have been developed and tested. By outlining the design, manufacturing, weight reduction and cost of these lightweight technologies, this paper fully analyzed these used technologies.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1709
Zhigang Wei, Sarat Das, Ryan Barr, Greg Rohrs, Robert Rebandt, Xiao Wu, HongTae Kang
Abstract Recent stringent government regulations on emission control and fuel economy drive the vehicles and their associated components and systems to the direction of lighter weight. However, the achieved lightweight must not be obtained by sacrificing other important performance requirements such as manufacturability, strength, durability, reliability, safety, noise, vibration and harshness (NVH). Additionally, cost is always a dominating factor in the lightweight design of automotive products. Therefore, a successful lightweight design can only be accomplished by better understanding the performance requirements, the potentials and limitations of the designed products, and by balancing many conflicting design parameters. The combined knowledge-based design optimization procedures and, inevitably, some trial-and-error design iterations are the practical approaches that should be adopted in the lightweight design for the automotive applications.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0268
Venkatesh Babu, Richard Gerth
Abstract The aim of this analysis was to model the effect of adding stiffening ribs in structural aluminum components by friction stir processing (FSP) Nano material into the aluminum matrix. These stiffening ribs could dampen, redirect, or otherwise alter the transmission of energy waves created from automotive, ballistic, or blast shocks to improve noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) and structural integrity (reduced joint stress) response. Since the ribs are not created by geometry changes they can be space efficient and deflect blast / ballistic energy better than geometry ribbing, resulting in a lighter weight solution. The blast and ballistic performance of different FSP rib patterns in AL 5182 and AL 7075 were simulated and compared to the performance of an equivalent weight of RHA plate FSP helps to increase localized strength and stiffness of the base metal, while achieving light weighting of the base metal.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8138
Pranav Shinde, K Ravi, Nandhini Nehru, Sushant Pawar, Balaji Balakrishnan, Vinit Nair
Abstract Body in white (BIW) forms a major structure in any automobile. It is responsible for safety and structural rigidity of the vehicle. Also, this frame supports the power plant, auxiliary equipments and all body parts of the vehicle. When it comes to judging the performance of the vehicle, BIW is analyzed not only for its strength and shape but also the weight. Light weight BIW structures have grown rapidly in order to fulfill the requirements of the best vehicle performance in dynamic conditions. Since then lot of efforts have been put into computer-aided engineering (CAE), materials research, advanced manufacturing processes and joining methods. Each of them play a critical role in BIW functionality. Constructional designing, development of light materials with improved strength and special manufacturing practices for BIW are few research areas with scope of improvement. This paper attempts to review various factors studied for BIW weight reduction.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-2119
Gergis W. William, Samir N. Shoukry, Jacky C. Prucz, Mariana M. William
Abstract Air cargo containers are used to load freight on various types of aircrafts to expedite their handling. Fuel cost is the largest contributor to the total cost of ownership of an air cargo container. Therefore, a better fuel economy could be achieved by reducing the weight of such containers. This paper aims at developing innovative, lightweight design concepts for air cargo containers that would allow for weight reduction in the air cargo transportation industry. For this purpose, innovative design and assembly concepts of lightweight design configurations of air cargo containers have been developed through the applications of lightweight composites. A scaled model prototype of a typical air cargo container was built to assess the technical feasibility and economic viability of creating such a container from fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials. The paper is the authoritative source for the abstract.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1776
Alexander Rabofsky, Alexander Koeck, Martin Mittermaier
Abstract Lightweight vehicle design causes special demands for functional NVH design. The reduction of weight by reducing material thickness, enabled by new alloys, the combination of materials and new materials increases the sensitivity of a vehicle body to the vibrational and acoustical response of external forces like powertrain or road and wind excitation. To be able to fully raise lightweight potentials design has to be driven closer to functional boundaries, putting higher demands on the accuracy of the prediction by simulation. For a robust design a very broad view on several loadcases is needed to make sure that by optimization on one target no other target is violated. In this paper, optimization strategies for complex NVH load-cases should be investigated in detail. In reality, load-cases, excitations as well as boundary conditions are very often complex and complicated.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1791
Noé F. Melo, Claus Claeys, Elke Deckers, Bert Pluymers, Wim Desmet
Abstract The NVH performance of conventional panels and structures is mainly driven by their mass. Silence often requires heavy constructions, which conflicts with the emerging trend towards lightweight design. To face the challenging and often conflicting task of merging NVH and lightweight requirements, novel low mass and compact volume NVH solutions are required. Vibro-acoustic metamaterials with stopband behavior come to the fore as possible novel NVH solutions combining lightweight requirements with superior noise and vibration insulation, be it at least in some targeted and tunable frequency ranges, referred to as stopbands. Metamaterials are artificial materials or structures engineered from conventional materials to exhibit some targeted performance that clearly exceeds that of conventional materials. They consist typically of (often periodic) assemblies of unit cells of non-homogeneous material composition and/or topology.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0533
Harveer Singh Pali, Naveen Kumar, Kausambi Singh
Abstract In the present investigation AA6082/ SiC MMC composite is fabricated using electromagnetic stir casting technique. Silicon carbide (SiC) of 40 μm size is used as reinforcement and is varied by weight percentage as 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10% in alloy AA6082. The microstructure of the fabricated composite is studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) which shows even distribution of the reinforcement. The mechanical properties improve with SiCp till 7.5%, after that the properties decreases which may be due to presence of porosity during the composite manufacturing. A comparative study of mechanical properties such as tensile strength, hardness and toughness has been done between the composite and base aluminium alloy. After the comparative study it was found that the composite having AA6082/SiC-92.5%/7.5% is best suited. So, it is used for optimization of Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) process parameters using Taguchi’s design of experiment.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0532
Masaya Miura, Koichiro Hayashi, Kenichiro Yoshimoto, Natsuhiko Katahira
Abstract Weight reduction for a fuel cell vehicle (FCV) is important to contribute a long driving range. One approach to reduce vehicle weight involves using a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) which has a high specific strength and stiffness. However, a conventional thermoset CFRP requires a long chemical reaction time and it is not easy to introduce into mass production vehicles. In this study, a new compression-moldable thermoplastic CFRP material for mass production body structural parts was developed and applied to the stack frame of the Toyota Mirai.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1575
Federico Ballo, Roberto Frizzi, Gianpiero Mastinu, Donato Mastroberti, Giorgio Previati, Claudio Sorlini
Abstract In this paper the lightweight design and construction of road vehicle aluminum wheels is dealt with, referring particularly to safety. Dedicated experimental tests aimed at assessing the fatigue life behavior of aluminum alloy A356 - T6 have been performed. Cylindrical specimens have been extracted from three different locations in the wheel. Fully reversed strain-controlled and load-controlled fatigue tests have been performed and the stress/strain-life curves on the three areas of the wheel have been computed and compared. The constant amplitude rotary bending fatigue test of the wheel has been simulated by means of Finite Element method. The FE model has been validated by measuring the strain at several points of the wheel during the actual test. From the FE model, the stress tensor time history on the whole wheel over a loading cycle has been extracted.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0407
Da-Zhi Wang, Guang-Jun Cao, Chang Qi, Yong Sun, Shu Yang, Yu Du
Abstract The increasing demand for lightweight design of the whole vehicle has raised critical weight reduction targets for crash components such as front rails without deteriorating their crash performances. To this end the last few years have witnessed a huge growth in vehicle body structures featuring hybrid materials including steel and aluminum alloys. In this work, a type of tapered tailor-welded tube (TTWT) made of steel and aluminum alloy hybrid materials was proposed to maximize the specific energy absorption (SEA) and to minimize the peak crushing force (PCF) in an oblique crash scenario. The hybrid tube was found to be more robust than the single material tubes under oblique impacts using validated finite element (FE) models. Compared with the aluminum alloy tube and the steel tube, the hybrid tube can increase the SEA by 46.3% and 86.7%, respectively, under an impact angle of 30°.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0350
Andre Camboa, Bernardo Ribeiro, Miguel Vaz, Luis Pinheiro, Ricardo Malta
The development of an automotive hood for an electric vehicle based on a polymer-metal hybrid configuration is described in this paper. Here, special focus is given only to the engineering design and prototyping phases which are the initial stages of a much bigger project. A project that aims to evaluate the cost efficiency, weight penalty and structural integrity of adopting polydicyclopentadiene as an exterior body material in low production volume vehicles, among them the electric ones. For the engineering design and prototyping phases, three different reinforcement geometries were developed and six mechanical simulations were done through finite element analysis to aid best frame geometry selection and optimization. The entire hood was then prototyped containing the optimized geometry. The fabrication of the frame was made through metal stamping and the exterior panel through reaction injection moulding. Adhesive bonding was used for its assembly.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0353
Suleman Ahmad, Dimitry Sediako, Anthony Lombardi, C. (Ravi) Ravindran, Robert Mackay, Ahmed Nabawy
Abstract Aluminum alloys have been replacing ferrous alloys in automotive applications to reduce the weight of vehicles. The engine block is a striking example of weight reduction, and is made of Al-Si-Cu-Mg (319 type) alloys. The wear resistance in the engine block is enabled by cast iron liners, and these liners introduce tensile residual stress due to a thermo-mechanical mismatch. Typically, an artificial aging treatment effectively reduces residual stress. In this study, neutron diffraction was used to measure the residual stress profiles along the cylinder bridge of a T5 treated 319 aluminum alloy engine block. Results indicated high tensile residual stresses (200-300 MPa) in the hoop and axial orientation at depths of 50-60 mm below the head deck. The high residual stresses were likely due to a combination of minimal stress relief during artificial aging and stress development during post process cooling.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0396
Prasad S. Mehta, Jennifer Solis Ocampo, Andres Tovar, Prathamesh Chaudhari
Abstract Biologically inspired designs have become evident and proved to be innovative and efficacious throughout the history. This paper introduces a bio-inspired design of protective structures that is lightweight and provides outstanding crashworthiness indicators. In the proposed approach, the protective function of the vehicle structure is matched to the protective capabilities of natural structures such as the fruit peel (e.g., pomelo), abdominal armors (e.g., mantis shrimp), bones (e.g., ribcage and woodpecker skull), as well as other natural protective structures with analogous protective functions include skin and cartilage as well as hooves, antlers, and horns, which are tough, resilient, lightweight, and functionally adapted to withstand repetitive high-energy impact loads. This paper illustrates a methodology to integrate designs inspired by nature, Topology optimization, and conventional modeling tools.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1332
Fredrik Henriksson, Kerstin Johansen
Abstract In the automotive industry, mass reduction and lightweight design is a continuing trend that does not show signs of declining. When looking at where to reduce weight in a vehicle, the body is a preferential subsystem due to its large contribution to overall mass and the stability of body composition over a specific model range. The automotive industry of today moves toward a greater differentiation in materials that compose a car, which can be seen in the several different multi material vehicle bodies that have been introduced by manufacturers in recent years. But while mixing materials may contribute to a good compromise between weight reduction and vehicle cost, it also proposes a number of challenges that need to be addressed. Among other material factors, the different coefficients of thermal expansions might introduce new stresses during painting and curing.
2015-09-22
Technical Paper
2015-36-0219
Daniel Haber
Abstract Today, in order to optimize the resources usage and reduce the air pollution, the automobile industry is facing new challenges, with the necessity to improve engines fuel economy, enhance vehicles autonomy and reduce the CO2 emission. One of the solution, which is being much researched, is the car components weight reduction. There is a range of new materials that have been developed to attend the new weight standards. Together with lightweight these materials must also deliver acceptable mechanical properties, easy to manufacture and to assembly capability, good appearance, high durability, good cost-benefit relation and in some cases also acceptable impact energy absorption. This paper presents a review of some of the lightweight materials that are being applied in automobiles, like Carbon Fiber, Aluminum Alloy, Magnesium Alloy, Hybrid Material and Polymer Composites.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2596
Uli Burger, Ludovic Rochat
Abstract Lightweight structures are one key issue for all future mobility concepts. Carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) play an important role in these disciplines due to their outstanding mechanical performance regarding to their weight. Therefore, CRFP structures have been widely used since decades in aerospace industry resulting in improvements in payload, fuel consumption and range. The Airbus A350, Boeing B787 in civil airplane industry as well as military products like the NH90 transport helicopter are examples of this development towards “all composite”-aircrafts. A main difference of CFRP-structures towards metallic ones is the behaviour regarding damage tolerance and fatigue. For helicopter composite structures this issue is newly defined in §573 of the relevant certification specifications (CS and FAR).
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2343
Jian Pan, Yuksel Gur
Abstract OEMs are racing to develop lightweight vehicles as government regulations now mandate automakers to nearly double the average fuel economy of new cars and trucks by 2025. Lightweight materials such as aluminum, magnesium and carbon fiber composites are being used as structural members in vehicle body and suspension components. The reduction in weight in structural panels increases noise transmission into the passenger compartment. This poses a great challenge in vehicle sound package development since simply increasing weight in sound package components to reduce interior noise is no longer an option [1]. This paper discusses weight saving approaches to reduce noise level at the sources, noise transmission paths, and transmitted noise into the passenger compartment. Lightweight sound package materials are introduced to treat and reduce airborne noise transmission into multi-material lightweight body structure.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2344
Murteza T. Erman
Abstract In today's world, automotive manufacturers are required to decrease CO2 emissions and increase the fuel economy while assuring driver comfort and safety. To achieve desired acoustic performance targets, automotive manufacturers use various Noise-Vibration-Harshness (NVH) materials which they apply to the vehicle Body-In-White structures either in the body or paint shop. Beside the sound deadening coatings applied onto the underbody of vehicles, they have historically used either constrained or free-layer sheets. The majority of these damping pads/sheets, so called asphalt sheets, are applied onto the floor pan inside the vehicle. These pre-manufactured and vehicle specific die-cut sheets are typically highly metal-carbonate, sulfate or silicate filled asphalt systems with a high specific gravity. Depending on the size of vehicle, the amount of these sheets can reach application weights of 10∼20 kg/vehicle. This paper will document the technical path that Dr. H.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2345
Arnaud Duval, Valérie Marcel, Ludovic Dejaeger, Francis Lhuillier, Moussa Khalfallah
Abstract The Flaxpreg is a green and light very long flax fibers thermoset reinforced sandwich, which can be effectively used as multi-position trunk loadfloor or structural floor in the passenger compartment of a vehicle. The prepreg FlaxTapes of about 120 g/m2 constituting the skins of the sandwich, are unidirectionally aligned flax fibers tapes, with acrylic resin here, easily manipulable without requiring any spinning or weaving step and thus without any negative out of plane crimping of the almost continuous flax fibers. Thanks to their very low 1.45 kg/dm3 density combined with an adaptive 0°/90°/0° orientation of the FlaxTapes (for each skin) depending on the loading boundary conditions, the resulting excellent mechanical properties allow a - 35% weight reduction compared to petro-sourced Glass mat/PUR sandwich solutions (like the Baypreg).
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2239
Nicholas N. Kim, Seungkyu Lee, J Stuart Bolton, Sean Hollands, Taewook Yoo
Abstract Because of the increasing concern with vehicle weight, there is an interest in lightweight materials that can serve several functions at once. Here we consider the vibration damping performance provided by an “acoustical” material (i.e., a fibrous layer that would normally be used for airborne noise control). It has been previously established that the vibration of panel structures creates a non-propagating nearfield in the region close to the panel. In that region, there is an oscillatory, incompressible fluid flow parallel to the panel whose strength decays exponentially with distance from the panel. When a fibrous medium is placed close to the panel in the region where the oscillatory nearfield is significant, energy is dissipated by the viscous interaction of the flow and the fibers, and hence the panel vibration is damped. The degree of panel damping is then proportional to the energy removed from the nearfield by the viscous interaction with the fibrous medium.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0574
Donald E. Malen, Jason Hughes
Abstract Understanding the lightweighting potential of materials is important in making strategic decisions for material selection for a new vehicle program. Frequently benchmarking is done to support these decisions by selecting a reference vehicle which is believed to be mass efficient, then using the teardown mass data to set targets for the vehicle under design. In this work, rather then considering a single benchmark vehicle or a small set of vehicles, we looked at a large sample of vehicles over a range of sizes and segments (approximately 200 vehicles). Statistical methods were used to identify mass drivers for each subsystem. Mass drivers are the attributes of the vehicle and subsystem which determine subsystem mass. Understanding mass-drivers allows comparisons across vehicle size, segments, and materials. Next, we identified those vehicles which had subsystems which were much lighter than the average after adjusting for mass drivers.
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