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2015-12-31
WIP Standard
J670
The vehicle dynamics terminology presented herein pertains to passenger cars and light trucks with two axles and to those vehicles pulling single-axle trailers. The terminology presents symbols and definitions covering the following subjects: axis systems, vehicle bodies, suspension and steering systems, brakes, tires and wheels, operating states and modes, control and disturbance inputs, vehicle responses, and vehicle characterizing descriptors. The scope does not include terms relating to the human perception of vehicle response.
CURRENT
2014-10-28
Standard
J383_201410
This SAE Recommended Practice specifies design recommendations for the location of seat belt assembly anchorages which will promote proper transfer of occupant restraint forces on the strongest parts of the human anatomy to the vehicle or seat structure. Test procedures are specified in SAE J384.
CURRENT
2012-10-05
Standard
J1574/1_201210
The parameters measured according to this SAE Recommended Practice will generally be used in simulating directional control performance in the linear range. (The “linear range” is the steady-state lateral acceleration below which steering wheel angle can generally be considered to be linearly related to lateral acceleration.) But they may be used for certain other simulations (such as primary ride motions), vehicle and suspension characterization and comparison, suspension development and optimization, and processing of road test data. This document is intended to apply to passenger cars, light trucks, and on-highway recreational and commercial vehicles, both non-articulated and articulated. Measurement techniques are intended to apply to these vehicles, with alterations primarily in the scale of facilities required.
CURRENT
2012-05-11
Standard
J1460/1_201205
This series of reports provides response characteristics of the head, face, neck, shoulder, thorax, lumbar spine, abdomen, pelvis, and lower extremities. In each report, the descriptions of human impact response are based on data judged by the subcommittee to provide the most appropriate information for the development of human surrogates.
CURRENT
2011-03-22
Standard
J128_201103
This SAE Information Report discusses the significant factors which measure the effectiveness of the total occupant restraint system in commonly encountered collision configurations. The total system includes the components which affect occupant injury by influencing the manner in which the collision energy management is accomplished. In addition to the elements that contribute to impact attenuation, consideration must be given to factors that encourage maximum use, such as comfort, reliability, appearance, and convenience. Hence, system evaluation necessarily involves consideration of the complete vehicle.
CURRENT
2011-02-21
Standard
J1980_201102
An airbag generates a considerable amount of kinetic energy during its inflation process. As a result substantial forces can be developed between the deploying airbag and the out-of-position occupant. Accident data and laboratory test results have indicated a potential for head, neck, chest, abdominal, and leg injuries from these forces. This suggests that mitigating such forces should be considered in the design of airbag restraint systems. This document outlines a comprehensive set of test guidelines that can be used for investigating the interactions that occur between the deploying airbag and the occupant who is near the module at the time of deployment. Static and dynamic tests to investigate driver and passenger systems are given. Static tests may be used to sort designs on a comparative basis. Designs that make it through the static sorting procedure may be subjected to the appropriate dynamic tests.
CURRENT
2011-02-21
Standard
J1460/2_201102
This series of reports provides response characteristics of the head, face, neck, shoulder, thorax, lumbar spine, abdomen, pelvis, and lower extremities. In each report, the descriptions of human impact response are based on data judged by the subcommittee to provide the most appropriate information for the development of human surrogates.
CURRENT
2011-02-21
Standard
J2114_201102
This SAE Recommended Practice describes the test procedure for conducting a rollover test using a dolly fixture designed to laterally trip a vehicle into a roll. Its purpose is to establish a recommended test procedure which will standardize the procedure between different test facilities. A description of the test procedure, test instrumentation, photographic/video coverage, and the rollover fixture is included.
HISTORICAL
2008-06-17
Standard
J1980_200806
An airbag generates a considerable amount of kinetic energy during its inflation process. As a result substantial forces can be developed between the deploying airbag and the out-of-position occupant. Accident data and laboratory test results have indicated a potential for head, neck, chest, abdominal, and leg injuries from these forces. This suggests that mitigating such forces should be considered in the design of airbag restraint systems. This document outlines a comprehensive set of test guidelines that can be used for investigating the interactions that occur between the deploying airbag and the occupant who is near the module at the time of deployment. Static and dynamic tests to investigate driver and passenger systems are given. Static tests may be used to sort designs on a comparative basis. Designs that make it through the static sorting procedure may be subjected to the appropriate dynamic tests.
HISTORICAL
2008-06-17
Standard
J1460/2_200806
This series of reports provides response characteristics of the head, face, neck, shoulder, thorax, lumbar spine, abdomen, pelvis, and lower extremities. In each report, the decriptions of human impact respnse are based on data judged by the subcommittee to provide the most appropriate information for the development of human surrogates. This is one of a series of reports which define human mechanical impact response characteristics for specific body regions. These reports update SAE J1460 which is intended for use by anthropomorphic test dummy designers and analytical modelers who need qualitative definitions of human mechnical impact behavior.These reports do not discuss criteria for assessing human impact injury potential, which are the subject of SAE J885. Each document in the series covers material specific to a body region and will be independently updated when new response data become available.
CURRENT
2008-01-24
Standard
J670_200801
The vehicle dynamics terminology presented herein pertains to passenger cars and light trucks with two axles and to those vehicles pulling single-axle trailers. The terminology presents symbols and definitions covering the following subjects: axis systems, vehicle bodies, suspension and steering systems, brakes, tires and wheels, operating states and modes, control and disturbance inputs, vehicle responses, and vehicle characterizing descriptors. The scope does not include terms relating to the human perception of vehicle response.
HISTORICAL
2005-05-09
Standard
J1574/1_200505
The parameters measured according to this SAE Recommended Practice will generally be used in simulating directional control performance in the linear range. (The "linear range" is the steady-state lateral acceleration below which steering wheel angle can generally be considered to be linearly related to lateral acceleration.) But they may be used for certain other simulations (such as primary ride motions), vehicle and suspension characterization and comparison, suspension development and optimization, and processing of road test data. This document is intended to apply to passenger cars, light trucks, and on-highway recreational and commercial vehicles, both non-articulated and articulated. Measurement techniques are intended to apply to these vehicles, with alterations primarily in the scale of facilities required.
HISTORICAL
2000-11-28
Standard
J1460/1_200011
This series of reports provides response characteristics of the head, face, neck, shoulder, thorax, lumbar spine, abdomen, pelvis, and lower extremities. In each report, the descriptions of human impact response are based on data judged by the subcommittee to provide the most appropriate information for the development of human surrogates.
HISTORICAL
1999-10-01
Standard
J2114_199910
This SAE Recommended Practice describes the test procedure for conducting a rollover test using a dolly fixture designed to laterally trip a vehicle into a roll. Its purpose is to establish a recommended test procedure which will standardize the procedure between different test facilities. A description of the test procedure, test instrumentation, photographic/video coverage, and the rollover fixture is included.
HISTORICAL
1994-11-01
Standard
J128_199411
The purpose of this SAE Information Report is to further the development of passenger car and light-duty truck restraint systems. This report should aid that goal by: (a) describing standardizing restraint system testing methods so that results from various test laboratories can be compared; (b) serving as a guide in the design and development of restraint systems and in the preparation of detailed procedures for testing and evaluating specific types of restraint systems; and (c) providing an orientation for research in human tolerance to impact and for the development of improved human simulators. The evaluation procedures discussed are presented as an information report.
HISTORICAL
1976-07-01
Standard
J670E_197607
The vehicle dynamics terminology presented herein pertains to passenger cars and light trucks with two axles and to those vehicles pulling single-axle trailers. The terminology presents symbols and definitions covering the following subjects: axis systems, vehicle bodies, suspension and steering systems, brakes, tires and wheels, operating states and modes, control and disturbance inputs, vehicle responses, and vehicle characterizing descriptors. The scope does not include terms relating to the human perception of vehicle response.
HISTORICAL
1974-07-01
Standard
J670D_197407
The vehicle dynamics terminology presented herein pertains to passenger cars and light trucks with two axles and to those vehicles pulling single-axle trailers. The terminology presents symbols and definitions covering the following subjects: axis systems, vehicle bodies, suspension and steering systems, brakes, tires and wheels, operating states and modes, control and disturbance inputs, vehicle responses, and vehicle characterizing descriptors. The scope does not include terms relating to the human perception of vehicle response.
HISTORICAL
1972-03-01
Standard
J670C_197203
The vehicle dynamics terminology presented herein pertains to passenger cars and light trucks with two axles and to those vehicles pulling single-axle trailers. The terminology presents symbols and definitions covering the following subjects: axis systems, vehicle bodies, suspension and steering systems, brakes, tires and wheels, operating states and modes, control and disturbance inputs, vehicle responses, and vehicle characterizing descriptors. The scope does not include terms relating to the human perception of vehicle response.
HISTORICAL
1970-05-01
Standard
J670B_197005
The vehicle dynamics terminology presented herein pertains to passenger cars and light trucks with two axles and to those vehicles pulling single-axle trailers. The terminology presents symbols and definitions covering the following subjects: axis systems, vehicle bodies, suspension and steering systems, brakes, tires and wheels, operating states and modes, control and disturbance inputs, vehicle responses, and vehicle characterizing descriptors. The scope does not include terms relating to the human perception of vehicle response.
HISTORICAL
1969-12-01
Standard
J128_196912
This SAE Information Report discusses the signifcant factors which measure the effectiveness of the total occupant restraint system in commonly encountered collision configurations. The total system includes the components which affect occupant injury by influencing the manner in which the collision energy management is accomplished. In addition to the elements that contribute to impact attenuation, consideration must be given to factors that encourage maximum use, such as comfort, reliability, appearance, and convenience. Hence, system evaluation necessarily involves consideration of the complete vehicle.
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