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Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Se Jin Park, Seung Nam Min, Murali Subramaniyam, Heeran Lee, Dong Gyun Kim, Cheol Pyo Hong
Abstract Vibration is both a source of discomfort and a possible risk to human health. There have been numerous studies and knowledge exists regarding the vibrational behavior of vehicle seats on adult human occupants. Children are more and more becoming regular passengers in the vehicle. However, very little knowledge available regarding the vibrational behavior of child safety seats for children. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure the vibrations in three different baby car seats and to compare these to the vibrations at the interface between the driver and the automobile seat. The test was performed on the National road at the average speed of 70 km/h and acceleration levels were recorded for about 350 Sec (5.83 min). One male driver considered as an adult occupant and a dummy having a mass of 9 kg was representing one year old baby. Four accelerometers were used to measure the vibration. All measured accelerations were relative to the vertical direction. Vibration Analysis Toolset (VATS) was used for time domain analysis.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Scott Allen Ziolek
Abstract Seat comfort is an important factor in the development of a vehicle; however, comfort can be measured in many ways. Many aspects of the experimental design such as the duration of the drive test, the questions asked, and the make-up of the test subjects are known to influence comfort results. This paper provides the background methodology and results of a Seat comfort study aimed at assessing long-term driving seat comfort.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kathleen Ku, Michael Tschirhart
Abstract Displays that support complex graphics in driver information (DI) systems allow for the presentation of detailed visual data by employing a range of static (fixed image) and/or dynamic (moving image) design approaches. Such displays are gaining market share across a wide range of mainstream vehicles as the availability and cost of such technologies improves. Although a range of 2D, rendered 3D, and 3D imaging (or stereoscopic) information displays have been demonstrated throughout the automotive industry in recent years, there is limited empirical research examining consumer preference of the respective approaches or their influence on driving related tasks. The vehicle environment is known to be a demanding context for efficiently displaying information to the driver. Research in 3D [1, 2] reveals some of the factors that influence its acceptance and effective use, but there is limited research on the effects of 3D-related design elements when used in a driver-vehicle interface.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Nicolas F. Ponchaut, Francesco Colella, Ryan Spray, Quinn Horn
Abstract The emergence of Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) as a viable means of transportation has been coincident with the development of lithium-ion battery technology and electronics that have enabled the storage and use of large amounts of energy that were previously only possible with internal combustion engines. However, the safety aspects of using these large energy storage battery packs are a significant challenge to address. For example an unintentional sudden release of energy, such as through a thermal runaway event, is a common concern. Developing thermal management systems for upset conditions in battery packs requires a clear understanding of the heat generation mechanisms and kinetics associated with the failures of Li-ion batteries. Although every effort is made to avoid thermal runaway situations, there can still be upset and unforeseen instances where a cell or a pack would reach a sufficiently high temperature to initiate exothermic reaction(s) that often are initially slow to develop.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jugurtha Benouali, Christophe Petitjean, Isabelle Citti, Regis Beauvis, Laurent Delaforge
Abstract The development of Electrical and Hybrid cars led to the introduction of reversible heat pump systems in order to reduce the energy consumption and increase the car autonomy during the Zero Emission Mode. One of the most important components in the heat pump system, is the evaporator condenser that “pumps the heat” from the ambient air. Moreover, this heat exchanger has to work in both modes: A/C (condenser mode) and heat pump (evaporator mode). This paper will explain the main steps of the development of this heat exchanger: circuiting (refrigerant side) in order to improve the homogeneity and the performances fins (air side) in order to reduce icing impact. We will also present system tests results that illustrate the impact of those evolutions on loop performances (heating capacity and COP).
Collection
2014-04-01
This technical paper collection contains 23 papers covering the latest advancements in climate control.
Collection
2014-04-01
This technical paper collection focusses on state of the art simulation technologies for modeling thermal systems and their application in the development and optimization of vehicle thermal management and fuel economy. The papers included will range from empirical, 1D modeling methods to three dimensional CFD models as well as coupled methods.
Collection
2014-04-01
This technical paper collection focuses on current developments in the fields of vehicle fire science, statistics, risks, assessment and mitigation. Papers addressing vehicle design, live-fire tests and fire investigation issues applicable to traditional, electric and alternatively fueled vehicles are included.
Collection
2014-04-01
Proper thermal management can significantly contribute to overall system energy efficiency. This technical paper collection highlights the latest developments in thermal management energy efficiency.
Collection
2014-04-01
This technical paper collection features components used for thermal management. The papers address design, application and systems related topics.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mirko Schulze, Rashad Mustafa, Benjamin Tilch, Peter Eilts, Ferit Küçükay
Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are facing increased challenges of optimizing the energy flow through a vehicle system, to enhance both the fuel economy and emissions. Energy management of HEVs is a difficult task due to complexity of total system, considering the electrical, mechanical and thermal behavior. Innovative thermal management is one of the solutions for reaching these targets. In this paper, the potential of thermal management for a parallel HEV with a baseline control strategy under different driving cycles and ambient temperatures is presented. The focus of the investigations is on reducing fuel consumption and increasing comfort for passengers. In the first part of this paper, the developed HEV-model including the validation with measurements is presented. In the second part, the combined thermal management measures, for example the recuperation of exhaust-gas energy, engine compartment encapsulation and the effect on the target functions are discussed. Simulation results show potential of reduction fuel consumption together with increasing the comfort for the passenger cabin.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xueyu Zhang, Andrej Ivanco, Xinran Tao, John Wagner, Zoran Filipi
This paper investigates the impact of battery cooling ancillary losses on fuel economy, and optimal control strategy for a series hybrid electric truck with consideration of cooling losses. Battery thermal model and its refrigeration-based cooling system are integrated into vehicle model, and the parasitic power consumption from cooling auxiliaries is considered in power management problem. Two supervisory control strategies are compared. First, a rule-based control strategy is coupled with a thermal management strategy; it controls power system and cooling system separately. The second is optimal control strategy developed using Dynamic Programming; it optimizes power flow with consideration of both propulsion and cooling requirement. The result shows that battery cooling consumption could cause fuel economy loss as high as 5%. When dynamic programming coordinates control of the powertrain and the cooling system in an optimal way, the fuel consumption penalty due to cooling losses is reduced to 3.7%, and battery duty cycle becomes milder.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ludwig Brabetz, Mohamed Ayeb
For the prevention of technical risks and the optimum design of an electrical distribution system, considerable efforts have been made to implement thermal models of wires, bundles, and electromechanical components in order to improve thermal analysis. Unfortunately, in most cases, important input parameters such as the position of a wire within a bundle or the profiles of the currents are unknown. This leads to the use of worst-case scenarios, frequently providing unrealistic results and uneconomic over-dimensioning. The proposed approach is based on the thermal simulation of a large number of randomly-generated bundle configurations for given profiles of currents. Thus one gets a temperature distribution, allowing a much more precise analysis compared to a simple worst-case calculation. By applying the same method to various current profiles, one gets temperature distributions for each wire as a function of a normalized total bundle current. The finding is that statistics allow a very good thermal assessment despite unknown bundle configurations and current profiles.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jason Lisseman, Lisa Diwischek, Stefanie Essers, David Andrews
The last years have seen an increasing amount of innovations in the functionality of car electronics (e.g. advanced driver assistant systems (ADAS) and in-vehicle infotainment systems (IVIS)). These electrical systems are not reserved for premium cars anymore, but additionally reach mid-size, compact, and subcompact cars. The growing number of functionalities in these cars entails increasing amount of interfaces, which may confuse, overload, or annoy the driver. Accompanying this, there is a trend towards the integration of capacitive touchscreens as user interfaces. These touchscreens were implemented first in consumer electronics and had a substantial impact on the way in which users interact with technology. This in turn has led to an increased user driven demand for the technology to be implemented in other domains, even in safety-critical ones like the automotive area. Capacitive touchscreens have certain drawbacks in their distraction potential and their usability, leading to safety-critical situations and negative user feedback.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Scott Peck, Aditya Velivelli, Wilko Jansen
Integration of advanced battery systems into the next generation of hybrid and electric vehicles will require significant design, analysis, and test efforts. One major design issue is the thermal management of the battery pack. Analysis tools are being developed that can assist in the development of battery pack thermal design and system integration. However, the breadth of thermal design issues that must be addressed requires that there are a variety of analysis tools to address them efficiently and effectively. A set of battery modeling tools has been implemented in the thermal modeling software code PowerTHERM. These tools are coupled thermal-electric models of battery behavior during current charge and discharge. In this paper we describe the three models in terms of the physics they capture, and their input data requirements. We discuss where the capabilities and limitations of each model best align with the different issues needed to be addressed by analysis. Model outputs are compared with measured data for various analysis scenarios, including simulation of constant current charge/discharge, and response to charge/discharge profiles derived from a standard drive cycle, for both single cell and multi-cell pack configurations.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Lijun Zhang, Hongzheng Cheng, Kun Diao, Cheng Ruan
To accurately and efficiently predict the temperature fields inside a lithium-ion battery is key technology for the enhancement of battery thermal management and the improvement of battery performances. The dimensional analysis method is applied to derive similarity criterions and the similarity coefficients of battery interior temperature fields, based on the governing partial differential equations describing the three dimensional transient temperature field. To verify the correctness of similarity criterions and the similarity coefficients, 3D finite element models of battery temperature field are established with a prototype and scale model, on the assumption that the battery cell has single-layer structure and multi-layers structure separately. The simulation results show that the similarity criterions and the similarity coefficients are correct. The calculation efficiency is checked to be much more efficient compared with FEM model based on the original cell structure in aspect of amount of resources occupied.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael Kolich, Daniel Dooge, Mark Doroudian, Efim Litovsky, Richard Ng, Jacob Kleiman
Thermophysical properties of materials used in the design of automotive interiors are needed for computer simulation of climate conditions inside the vehicle. These properties are required for assessment of the vehicle occupants' thermal sensation as they come in contact with the vehicle interior components, such as steering wheels, arm rests, instruments panel and seats. This paper presents the results of an investigation into the thermophysical properties of materials which are required for solving the non-linear Fourier equations with any boundary conditions and taking into account materials' specific heat, volume density, thermal conductivity, and thermal optical properties (spectral and total emissivity and absorptivity). The model and results of the computer simulation will be published in a separate paper. The tested materials included foam, leather/foam laminated materials, and a few plastic laminated materials, which were used in the construction of various automotive interior parts.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Dinesh Pahuja, Arpit Kapila, Sanjay Haldar, Sandeep Raina
Interiors of past vehicles were created to satisfy specific functions with appearance being a secondary consideration, but in the present & future market with ever increasing vehicle luxury, decoration of vehicle has become a prime focus in automobile industry along with the safety & economy. Automotive interiors have evolved over the years from a collection of trims covering bare sheet metal panels to add quality & richness of interior cabin, ultimately delivering greater value to customers. One such area in interiors is Side door trims serving the dual purpose of functionality and creating a pleasing environment too. The aesthetic appeal to the Side door trim is added usually through a Door trim insert having a decorative skin pasted on to the plastic base. And the selection of pasting technique for pasting decorative film on to the plastic base insert is a challenge for an automotive interior designer. The objective of this paper will be to review technologies available for manufacturing Door trim inserts with decorative skins, and discuss a direction toward selecting an appropriate pasting technique with cost effectiveness.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Seishiro Murata, Hiroyuki Ito, Steven Sopher
Flexible polyurethane (PU) foam has been widely used for seat cushions in automotive passenger vehicles due to the excellent cushioning performance and the ability to shape mold. Originally introduced in the late 1950's, it has been used for more than 50 years. However, there is a limitation using polyurethane foam with efforts to reduce the weight and address ever increasing risks to environment. This paper provides information about a new automotive seat concept which does not use polyurethane foam at all. Expanded polyolefin foam is used for this application to replace polyurethane foam and achieve comparable cushioning performance. Other features of the material include 100% recyclability, and no VOC's. By replacing polyurethane foam with expanded thermoplastic foam, hazardous outgassing is eliminated during the seat cushion production, thus improving workplace environmental health and safety.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Namwook Kim, Aymeric Rousseau, Daeheung Lee, Henning Lohse-Busch
Abstract This paper introduces control strategy analysis and performance degradation for the 2010 Toyota Prius under different thermal conditions. The goal was to understand, in as much detail as possible, the impact of thermal conditions on component and vehicle performances by analyzing a number of test data obtained under different thermal conditions in the Advanced Powertrain Research Facility (APRF) at Argonne National Laboratory. A previous study analyzed the control behavior and performance under a normal ambient temperature; thus the first step in this study was to focus on the impact when the ambient temperature is cold or hot. Based on the analyzed results, thermal component models were developed in which the vehicle controller in the simulation was designed to mimic the control behavior when temperatures of the components are cold or hot. Further, the performance degradation of the components was applied to the mathematical models based on analysis of the test data. All the thermal component models were integrated into a vehicle system with the redesigned supervisory controller, and the vehicle model was validated with the test data.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mengjia Cao, Idan Kovent, Jerry Ku
Abstract Hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) is one of the most highly pursued technologies for improving energy efficiency while reducing harmful emissions. Thermal modeling and control play an ever increasing role with HEV design and development for achieving the objective of improving efficiency, and as a result of additional thermal loading from electric powertrain components such as electric motor, motor controller and battery pack. Furthermore, the inherent dual powertrains require the design and analysis of not only the optimal operating temperatures but also control and energy management strategies to optimize the dynamic interactions among various components. This paper presents a complete development process and simulation results for an efficient modeling approach with integrated control strategy for the thermal management of plug-in HEV in parallel-through-the road (PTTR) architecture using a flexible-fuel engine running E85 and a battery pack as the energy storage system (ESS). While the main motivation for the work is to deliver a design for the Department of Energy's EcoCAR2 Plugging in to the Future Competition, yet the framework and methodologies should be useful for any typical hybrid powertrain thermal and control development.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Dimitrios Angelos Mitakos, Christopher Blomberg, Yuri M. Wright, Peter Obrecht, Bruno Schneider, Konstantinos Boulouchos
Abstract The heat release of the low temperature reactions (LTR or cool-flame) under Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion has been quantified for five candidate fuels in an optically accessible Rapid Compression Expansion Machine (RCEM). Two technical fuels (Naphthas) and three primary reference fuels (PRF), (n-heptane, PRF25 and PRF50) were examined. The Cetane Numbers (CN) of the fuels range from 35 to 56. Variation of the operating parameters has been performed, in regard to initial charge temperature of 383, 408, and 433K, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate of 0%, 25%, and 50%, and equivalence ratio of 0.29, 0.38, 0.4, 0.53, 0.57, and 0.8. Pressure indication measurements, OH-chemiluminescence imaging, and passive spectroscopy were simultaneously implemented. In our previous work, an empirical, three-stage, Arrhenius-type ignition delay model, parameterized on shock tube data, was found to be applicable also in a transient, engine-relevant environment. The pressure rise due to cool-flame heat release, which is crucial for the induction of main ignition, was included in the experimental pressure traces that have been used.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ravi Kiran Cheni, Chetan Prakash Jain, Revathy Muthiah, Srikanth Gomatam
Abstract Automotive OEMs quest for vehicle body light weighting, increase in Fuel efficiency along with significant cut in the emissions pose significant challenges. Apart from the effect on vehicle handling, the reduction of vehicle weight also results in additional general requirements for acoustic measures as it is an important aspect that contributes to the comfort and the sound quality image of the vehicle, thus posing a unique challenge to body designers and NVH experts. Due to these conflicting objectives, accurate identification along with knowledge of the transfer paths of vibrations and noise in the vehicle is needed to facilitate measures for booming noise dampening and vehicle structure vibration amplitude. This paper focuses on the application of a unique design and development of vehicle body structure anti-vibration dynamic damper (DD), unique in its aspect in controlling booming noise generated at a specific RPM range. Design methodology follows the concept of Mass-damper system on vehicle body or engine structure where panel with multi-degree of freedom vibrating at medium level frequency is transferred to damper which is vibrating at same resonant frequency in 180° opposite phase.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tomoya Ishii, Tomohiro Sudo, Masanori Morikawa, Daisuke Nagahata
Abstract General analysis methods which are known as Transfer Path Analysis and Air borne Source Quantification have been extended to estimate forces of an air conditioner's parts and also clarify the path from air conditioner system. These results show noise transfer path to be improved. Originally, the existing methods are known to require considerable amount of time for the cause of complicated measurement to get analysis results. In the work of this paper, required measurement is simplified, and time reduction of 50% is achieved without critical decrease in analysis accuracy.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Rupesh Sonu Kakade, Prashant Mer
Abstract A human thermal comfort, which has been a subject of extensive research, is a principal objective of the climate control systems. Applying the results of research studies to practical problems requires quantitative information of the thermal environment parameters, such as the solar radiation. A photovoltaic-cell based sensor is commonly used in the automotive climate control systems for the measurement of solar radiation information. The erroneous information from the sensors can cause thermal discomfort. The erroneous measurement from sensors can be due to physical or environmental parameters. Shading of a solar sensor due to opaque vehicle body elements is one such environmental parameter that is known to give incorrect measurement. Analytical method that uses fundamental geometric principles is proposed to determine whether sensor is shaded, for a known location of the sun and for a given geometry of the vehicle passenger compartment. A corrective action to measured data when sensor is shaded that ensures thermal comfort is also presented.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mingyu Wang, Debashis Ghosh, Edward Wolfe, Kuo-huey Chen, Jeffrey Bozeman
Abstract Traditional vehicle air conditioning systems are designed to cool the entire cabin to provide passenger comfort. Localized cooling, on the other hand, focuses on keeping the passenger comfortable by creating a micro climate around the passenger. Such a system also easily adapts to the number of passengers in the car and enables zonal control. The net impact of the localized cooling is that equivalent comfort can be achieved at reduced HVAC energy consumption rate. The present paper reports on a vehicle implementation of localized cooling using Thermoelectric Devices and the resulting energy saving.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mickael Cormerais, Thierry Marimbordes, Stephane Warnery, David Chalet, Haitham Mezher, Laurent Roussel
Abstract The future environmental constraints [e.g. WLTC +RDE, CAFE, Euro 6.2, 7] for the pollutant emissions lead to new challenges for the internal combustion engine. One of the solutions to decrease the fuel consumption, the CO2 and pollutant emissions whilst keeping the same driving and thermal comforts is the engine's thermal management, in particular during the warm-up phase. Furthermore, the traditional cooling system is not designed to work at the new engine transient thermal conditions at a non-optimal temperature in terms of fuel economy and exhaust emission. This paper describes a new technology for engine cooling systems that is able to control the coolant flow and temperature in relation to the engine conditions such as load and rotational speed. With a no flow in crankcase cooling strategy and a high engine temperature regulation, the Active Cooling Thermomanagement Valve succeeds in decreasing the fuel consumption without deteriorating engine's performance. To validate this concept, endurance tests were performed to verify the wear and durability.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Hai Wu, Wen Chen, Meng-Feng Li, Xinlei Wang
Abstract A hot and cold water mixing process with a steam condenser and a chilled water heat exchanger is set up for an engine EGR fouling test. The test rig has water recycled in the loop of a pump, heat exchangers, a three-way mixing valve, and a test EGR unit. The target unit temperature is controlled by a heating, cooling and mixing process with individual valves regulating the flow-rate of saturated steam, chilled water and mixing ratio. The challenges in control design are the dead-time, interaction, nonlinearity and multivariable characteristics of heat exchangers, plus the flow recycle in the system. A systems method is applied to extract a simple linear model for control design. The method avoids the nonlinearity and interaction among different temperatures at inlet, outlet and flow-rate. The test data proves the effectiveness of systems analysis and modeling methodology. As a result, the first-order linear model facilitates the controller design. The simulation studies with internal recycle processes produced promising results.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tau Tyan, Jeff Vinton, Eric Beckhold, Xiangtong Zhang, Jeffrey Rupp, Nand Kochhar, Saeed Barbat
The objective of this paper focused on the modeling of an adaptive energy absorbing steering column which is the first phase of a study to develop a modeling methodology for an advanced steering wheel and column assembly. Early steering column designs often consisted of a simple long steel rod connecting the steering wheel to the steering gear box. In frontal collisions, a single-piece design steering column would often be displaced toward the driver as a result of front-end crush. Over time, engineers recognized the need to reduce the chance that a steering column would be displaced toward the driver in a frontal crash. As a result, collapsible, detachable, and other energy absorbing steering columns emerged as safer steering column designs. The safety-enhanced construction of the steering columns, whether collapsible, detachable, or other types, absorb rather than transfer frontal impact energy. Recently, more advanced steering column designs with adaptive features, mechanically or pyrotechnically activated, have been introduced for different crash conditions, including different crash severity, occupant mass/size, seat position and seatbelt usage.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Alaa El-Sharkawy, Asif Salahuddin, Brian Komarisky
In this paper a design methodology for automotive heat exchangers has been applied which brings robustness into the design process and helps to optimize the design goals: as to maintain an optimal coolant temperature and to limit the vehicle underhood air temperature within a tolerable limit. The most influential design factors for the heat exchangers which affect the goals have been identified with that process. The paper summarizes the optimization steps necessary to meet the optimal functional goals for the vehicle as mentioned above. Taguchi's [1] Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) methods have been employed to conduct this analysis in a robust way.
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